National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ionizing radiation ir

  1. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  2. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  3. Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing

  4. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oommen, Deepu Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  5. Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing radiation via genetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing radiation via genetic adaptation of DNA repair Prev Next Title: Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing ...

  6. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  7. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The very reactive superoxide anion O[sub 2] is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20[sub 2][sup [minus

  8. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  9. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  10. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  11. Method and apparatus to monitor a beam of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn, Brandon W.; Chichester, David L.; Watson, Scott M.; Johnson, James T.; Kinlaw, Mathew T.

    2015-06-02

    Methods and apparatus to capture images of fluorescence generated by ionizing radiation and determine a position of a beam of ionizing radiation generating the fluorescence from the captured images. In one embodiment, the fluorescence is the result of ionization and recombination of nitrogen in air.

  12. Dwarf Galaxies with Ionizing Radiation Feedback II: Spatially...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Star Formation Relation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dwarf Galaxies with Ionizing Radiation Feedback II: Spatially-resolved Star Formation Relation Authors: Kim, ...

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jrgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  14. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the ...

  15. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  16. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our

  17. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  19. Organic materials and devices for detecting ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2007-03-06

    A .pi.-conjugated organic material for detecting ionizing radiation, and particularly for detecting low energy fission neutrons. The .pi.-conjugated materials comprise a class of organic materials whose members are intrinsic semiconducting materials. Included in this class are .pi.-conjugated polymers, polyaromatic hydrocarbon molecules, and quinolates. Because of their high resistivities (.gtoreq.10.sup.9 ohmcm), these .pi.-conjugated organic materials exhibit very low leakage currents. A device for detecting and measuring ionizing radiation can be made by applying an electric field to a layer of the .pi.-conjugated polymer material to measure electron/hole pair formation. A layer of the .pi.-conjugated polymer material can be made by conventional polymer fabrication methods and can be cast into sheets capable of covering large areas. These sheets of polymer radiation detector material can be deposited between flexible electrodes and rolled up to form a radiation detector occupying a small volume but having a large surface area. The semiconducting polymer material can be easily fabricated in layers about 10 .mu.m to 100 .mu.m thick. These thin polymer layers and their associated electrodes can be stacked to form unique multi-layer detector arrangements that occupy small volume.

  20. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  1. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karl, Jr., Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  2. DWARF GALAXIES WITH IONIZING RADIATION FEEDBACK. I. ESCAPE OF IONIZING PHOTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-10-01

    We describe a new method for simulating ionizing radiation and supernova feedback in the analogs of low-redshift galactic disks. In this method, which we call star-forming molecular cloud (SFMC) particles, we use a ray-tracing technique to solve the radiative transfer equation for ultraviolet photons emitted by thousands of distinct particles on the fly. Joined with high numerical resolution of 3.8 pc, the realistic description of stellar feedback helps to self-regulate star formation. This new feedback scheme also enables us to study the escape of ionizing photons from star-forming clumps and from a galaxy, and to examine the evolving environment of star-forming gas clumps. By simulating a galactic disk in a halo of 2.3 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}, we find that the average escape fraction from all radiating sources on the spiral arms (excluding the central 2.5 kpc) fluctuates between 0.08% and 5.9% during a ?20 Myr period with a mean value of 1.1%. The flux of escaped photons from these sources is not strongly beamed, but manifests a large opening angle of more than 60 from the galactic pole. Further, we investigate the escape fraction per SFMC particle, f{sub esc}(i), and how it evolves as the particle ages. We discover that the average escape fraction f{sub esc} is dominated by a small number of SFMC particles with high f{sub esc}(i). On average, the escape fraction from an SFMC particle rises from 0.27% at its birth to 2.1% at the end of a particle lifetime, 6 Myr. This is because SFMC particles drift away from the dense gas clumps in which they were born, and because the gas around the star-forming clumps is dispersed by ionizing radiation and supernova feedback. The framework established in this study brings deeper insight into the physics of photon escape fraction from an individual star-forming clump and from a galactic disk.

  3. Modeling of ionizing radiation effects in short-channel MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.L.; Blue, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on short-channel MOSFETs is modeled using a charge-sheet approach. The primary effect of ionizing radiation is the introduction of oxide trapped charge (OTC) and interface trapped charge (ITC). Using a two-dimensional charge-sheet model, transistors with channel lengths between 4.65 ..mu..m and 0.27 ..mu..m were studied. A range of net OTC and ITC values of + 4.0 X 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -2/ corresponding to a dose of approximately 10/sup 6/ rad (SiO/sub 2/) was used to study total dose effects. ITC and OTC cause significant effects in each region of operation. In the subthreshold region, the sensitivity of drain current to these charges is exponential. A more realistic model must include the energy distribution of the ITC charge as well as two-dimensional charge sharing effects. In the triode region, the effects of ITC and OTC are indistinguishable from two-dimensional charge sharing effects.

  4. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jinghui; Mulligan, Padhraic; Cao, Lei R.; Brillson, Leonard

    2015-09-15

    With the largest band gap energy of all commercial semiconductors, GaN has found wide application in the making of optoelectronic devices. It has also been used for photodetection such as solar blind imaging as well as ultraviolet and even X-ray detection. Unsurprisingly, the appreciable advantages of GaN over Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), SiC, amorphous SiC (a-SiC), and GaAs, particularly for its radiation hardness, have drawn prompt attention from the physics, astronomy, and nuclear science and engineering communities alike, where semiconductors have traditionally been used for nuclear particle detection. Several investigations have established the usefulness of GaN for alpha detection, suggesting that when properly doped or coated with neutron sensitive materials, GaN could be turned into a neutron detection device. Work in this area is still early in its development, but GaN-based devices have already been shown to detect alpha particles, ultraviolet light, X-rays, electrons, and neutrons. Furthermore, the nuclear reaction presented by {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C and various other threshold reactions indicates that GaN is intrinsically sensitive to neutrons. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art development of GaN detectors for detecting directly and indirectly ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is given to GaN's radiation hardness under high-radiation fields.

  5. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F.; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  6. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; et al

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initiallymore » improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.« less

  7. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  8. Ionizing radiation post-curing of objects produced by stereolithography and other methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howell, David H.; Eberle, Claude C.; Janke, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    An object comprised of a curable material and formed by stereolithography or another three-dimensional prototyping method, in which the object has undergone initial curing, is subjected to post-curing by ionizing radiation, such as an electron beam having a predetermined beam output energy, which is applied in a predetermined dosage and at a predetermined dose rate. The post-cured object exhibits a property profile which is superior to that which existed prior to the ionizing radiation post-curing.

  9. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Mickel, Patrick R.; Hanson, Donald J.; McDonald, Joseph K.; Hughart, David Russell; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  10. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  11. Non-Targeted Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Risk Assessment and the Radiation Dose Response Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2009-11-01

    Radiation risks at low doses remain a hotly debated topic. Recent experimental advances in our understanding of effects occurring in the progeny of irradiated cells, and/or the non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated cells, i.e., non-targeted effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, have influenced this debate. The goal of this document is to summarize the current status of this debate and speculate on the potential impact of non-targeted effects on radiation risk assessment and the radiation dose response profile.

  12. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  13. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  14. Detailed Investigations of Interactions between Ionizing Radiation and Neutral Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, Allen L

    2014-03-31

    We are investigating phenomena that stem from the many body dynamics associated with ionization of an atom or molecule by photon or charged particle. Our program is funded through the Department of Energy EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership Award in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We are using variations on the well established COLTRIMS technique to measure ions and electrons ejected during these interactions. Photoionization measurements take place at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL as part of the ALS-COLTRIMS collaboration with the groups of Reinhard Dörner at Frankfurt and Ali Belkacem at LBNL. Additional experiments on charged particle impact are conducted locally at Auburn University where we are studying the dissociative molecular dynamics following interactions with either ions or electrons over a velocity range of 1 to 12 atomic units.

  15. Effect of focal geometry on radiation from atomic ionization in an ultrastrong and ultrafast laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Walker, Barry C.

    2007-08-15

    We use a tunneling-Monte Carlo model to calculate the dynamics and emitted Larmor radiation from electrons ionized in an ultrashort and ultrastrong pulsed laser focus over the intensity range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. We find the spatial variation of a laser field affects the radiation and can no longer be neglected at laser intensities leading to relativistic effects. We identify three regimes for the interaction as a function of the ratio of the single cycle quiver amplitude of the photoelectron to the laser focus waist. Adopting a one-dimensional or plane wave approximation when the laser driven excursion of the photoelectron exceeds the focus waist overestimates the total radiated energy by as much as an order of magnitude. Despite this, the spectral amplitude of the highest-energy photons from ionization in a laser focus is comparable to the plane wave case for excursions up to the beam waist since the laser focus imparts an extra boost of speed for electrons exiting the focus. Full spatial and temporal integration that includes the ionization of charge states before the peak of the pulse do not differ significantly from results that include only the radiation from ionization of the charge state at the peak of the laser field.

  16. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  17. Apparatus and method for the simultaneous detection of neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane W.

    2000-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising: a sensor for the detection of gamma radiation, the sensor defining a sensing head; the sensor further defining an output end in communication with the sensing head; and an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head; wherein the neutron-sensitive material, subsequent to the capture of the neutron, fissions into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the first excited state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV which can in turn be detected by the sensing head; and wherein the sensing head can also detect the ionizing electromagnetic radiation from an incident radiation field without significant interference from the neutron-sensitive material. A method for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising the steps of: providing a gamma ray sensitive detector comprising a sensing head and an output end; conforming an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head of the detector; capturing neutrons by the sensing head causing the neutron-sensitive material to fission into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV; sensing gamma rays entering the detector through the neutron-sensitive material; and producing an output through a readout device coupled to the output end; wherein the detector provides an output which is proportional to the energy of the absorbed ionizing electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Low dose ionizing radiation detection using conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, E.A.B.; Borin, J.F.; Nicolucci, P.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Netto, T. Ghilardi; Bianchi, R.F.

    2005-03-28

    In this work, the effect of gamma radiation on the optical properties of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{sup '}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) is studied. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with different doses from 0 Gy to 152 Gy using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source. For thin films, significant changes in the UV-visible spectra were only observed at high doses (>1 kGy). In solution, shifts in absorption peaks are observed at low doses (<10 Gy), linearly dependent on dose. The shifts are explained by conjugation reduction, and possible causes are discussed. Our results indicate that MEH-PPV solution can be used as a dosimeter adequate for medical applications.

  19. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey, May 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingleton, K.L.; Cate, J.L.; Trent, M.G.; Robison, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands in the atoll and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Although the external dose rates from beta and gamma radiation have been previously determined by aerial survey and a variety of ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external beta dose rates that result from the /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), the external beta dose rates can be measured. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data.

  1. The iQID Camera An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    Abstract We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  2. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier andmore » then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.« less

  3. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  5. RUNAWAY STARS AND THE ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conroy, Charlie; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-08-20

    Approximately 30% of all massive stars in the Galaxy are runaways with velocities exceeding 30 km s{sup -1}. Their high speeds allow them to travel {approx}0.1-1 kpc away from their birthplace before they explode at the end of their several Myr lifetimes. At high redshift, when galaxies were much smaller than in the local universe, runaways could venture far from the dense inner regions of their host galaxies. From these large radii, and therefore low column densities, much of their ionizing radiation is able to escape into the intergalactic medium. Runaways may therefore significantly enhance the overall escape fraction of ionizing radiation, f{sub esc}, from small galaxies at high redshift. We present simple models of the high-redshift runaway population and its impact on f{sub esc} as a function of halo mass, size, and redshift. We find that the inclusion of runaways enhances f{sub esc} by factors of Almost-Equal-To 1.1-8, depending on halo mass, galaxy geometry, and the mechanism of runaway production, implying that runaways may contribute 50%-90% of the total ionizing radiation escaping from high-redshift galaxies. Runaways may therefore play an important role in reionizing the universe.

  6. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Truong, T. A.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Limoli, C. L.; Turner, N. D.; Halloran, B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss.more » Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.« less

  7. Bystander effects of ionizing radiation can be modulated by signaling amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poon, R.C.C.; Agnihotri, N.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2007-10-15

    Actual risk and risk management of exposure to ionizing radiation are among the most controversial areas in environmental health protection. Recent developments in radiobiology especially characterization of bystander effects have called into question established dogmas and are thought to cast doubt on the scientific basis of the risk assessment framework, leading to uncertainty for regulators and concern among affected populations. In this paper we test the hypothesis that small signaling molecules widely used throughout the animal kingdom for signaling stress or environmental change, such as 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), L-DOPA, glycine or nicotine are involved in bystander signaling processes following ionizing radiation exposure. We report data which suggest that nano to micromolar concentrations of these agents can modulate bystander-induced cell death. Depletion of 5-HT present in tissue culture medium, occurred following irradiation of cells. This suggested that 5-HT might be bound by membrane receptors after irradiation. Expression of 5-HT type 3 receptors which are Ca{sup 2+} ion channels was confirmed in the cells using immunocytochemistry and receptor expression could be increased using radiation or 5-HT exposure. Zofran and Kitryl, inhibitors of 5-HT type 3 receptors, and reserpine a generic serotonin antagonist block the bystander effect induced by radiation or by serotonin. The results may be important for the mechanistic understanding of how low doses of radiation interact with cells to produce biological effects.

  8. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  9. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  10. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  11. Epidemiologic Study of One Million American Workers and Military Veterans Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boice, John D.

    2015-02-27

    A pilot study was completed demonstrating the feasibility of conducting an epidemiologic study assessing cancer and other disease mortality among nearly one million US veterans and workers exposed to ionizing radiation, a population 10 times larger than atomic bomb survivor study with high statistical power to evaluate low dose rate effects. Among the groups enumerated and/or studied were: (1) 194,000 Department of Energy Uranium Workers; (2) 6,700 Rocketdyne Radiation Workers; (3) 7,000 Mound Radiation Workers; (4) 156,000 DOE Plutonium Workers; (5) 212,000 Nuclear Power Plant Workers; (6) 130,000 Industrial Radiography Workers; (7) 1.7 million Medical Workers and (8) 135,000 Atomic Veterans.

  12. On the effect of bias on the behavior of MOS structures subjected to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using a quantitative model [6], the analysis of published data on the effect of the gate bias on the behavior of MOS structure subjected to ionizing radiation is performed. It is shown that, along with hydrogen-containing traps, there are hydrogen-free hole traps in samples with a low content of hydrogen; traps of both types are distributed inhomogeneously over the thickness of the gate insulator. In addition to ionized hydrogen, neutral hydrogen is involved in the formation of surface states and provides the main contribution to this process at negative gate bias. A decrease in the shift of the threshold voltage in the case of high fields is caused by an increase in the drift component of the hole drain to the electrodes.

  13. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed aftermore » LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.« less

  14. Genetic background modulates lncRNA-coordinated tissue response to low dose ionizing radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian -Hua

    2015-02-04

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressedmoreafter LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.less

  15. Low-Dose, Ionizing Radiation and Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Microarchitecture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Kumar, Akhilesh; Tran, Luan H.; Wang, Angela; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis can profoundly affect the aged as a consequence of progressive bone loss; high-dose ionizing radiation can cause similar changes, although less is known about lower doses (≤100 cGy). We hypothesized that exposure to relatively low doses of gamma radiation accelerates structural changes characteristic of skeletal aging. Mice (C57BL/6J-10 wk old, male) were irradiated (total body; 0-sham, 1, 10 or 100 cGy 137 Cs) and tissues harvested on the day of irradiation, 1 or 4 months later. Microcomputed tomography was used to quantify microarchitecture of high turnover, cancellous bone. Irradiation at 100 cGy caused transient microarchitectural changes over one month that were only evidentmore » at longer times in controls (4 months). Ex vivo bone cell differentiation from the marrow was unaffected by gamma radiation. In conclusion, acute ionizing gamma irradiation at 100 cGy (but not at 1 cGy or 10 cGy) exacerbated microarchitectural changes normally found during progressive, postpubertal aging prior to the onset of age-related osteoporosis.« less

  16. Low doses ionizing radiation enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Low doses ionizing irradiation would enhance the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation induced morphologic changes in breast cancer cells. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation led to upregulation of mesenchymal markers and down-regulation of epithelial markers. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation increased migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process cellular morphologic and molecular alterations facilitate cell invasion. We hypothesized that low dose ionizing irradiation (LDIR) enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. The effects of LDIR on cellular morphology and the EMT markers of MCF-7 breast cancer cells were analyzed by western blot/RT-PCR and migration/invasion was examined using the transwell assay. We found that LDIR led to the phenotypic changes of EMT in MCF-7 cells and down-regulation of epithelial differentiation markers and transcriptional induction of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, the radiated cells demonstrated enhanced migration/invasion MCF-7 cells compared with non-radiated cells. In summary, LDIR promotes the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings may ultimately provide a new targeted approach for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of radiation in breast cancer.

  17. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  18. Modeling of transient ionizing radiation effects in bipolar devices at high dose-rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FJELDLY,T.A.; DENG,Y.; SHUR,M.S.; HJALMARSON,HAROLD P.; MUYSHONDT,ARNOLDO

    2000-04-25

    To optimally design circuits for operation at high intensities of ionizing radiation, and to accurately predict their a behavior under radiation, precise device models are needed that include both stationary and dynamic effects of such radiation. Depending on the type and intensity of the ionizing radiation, different degradation mechanisms, such as photoelectric effect, total dose effect, or single even upset might be dominant. In this paper, the authors consider the photoelectric effect associated with the generation of electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor. The effects of low radiation intensity on p-II diodes and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) were described by low-injection theory in the classical paper by Wirth and Rogers. However, in BJTs compatible with modem integrated circuit technology, high-resistivity regions are often used to enhance device performance, either as a substrate or as an epitaxial layer such as the low-doped n-type collector region of the device. Using low-injection theory, the transient response of epitaxial BJTs was discussed by Florian et al., who mainly concentrated on the effects of the Hi-Lo (high doping - low doping) epilayer/substrate junction of the collector, and on geometrical effects of realistic devices. For devices with highly resistive regions, the assumption of low-level injection is often inappropriate, even at moderate radiation intensities, and a more complete theory for high-injection levels was needed. In the dynamic photocurrent model by Enlow and Alexander. p-n junctions exposed to high-intensity radiation were considered. In their work, the variation of the minority carrier lifetime with excess carrier density, and the effects of the ohmic electric field in the quasi-neutral (q-n) regions were included in a simplified manner. Later, Wunsch and Axness presented a more comprehensive model for the transient radiation response of p-n and p-i-n diode geometries. A stationary model for high-level injection in p

  19. Review of Department of Energy research on human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Department of Energy research program on the human health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation consists of 16 projects conducted under the sponsorship of the Human Health and Assessments Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. Each of these projects was reviewed by the Committee with the project's principal investigators and associated scientific personnel and with the DOE staff and the associate directors of the national laboratories where appropriate. The principal objectives of this research program include the determination of the risks from exposure to external radiation and from internally deposited radionuclides and the use of this information in the development of standards to protect the health of nuclear workers at DOE and related facilities and of the population at large. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 4501000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

  1. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Kross, Brian J.; Zorn, Carl J.; Majewski, Lukasz A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray.RTM. (RGX.RTM.) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging.

  2. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, S.; Kross, B.J.; Zorn, C.J.; Majewski, L.A.

    1996-10-22

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray{trademark} (RGX{trademark}) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging. 5 figs.

  3. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  4. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore » affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  5. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Balter, Stephen; Rauch, Phillip; Wagner, Louis K.

    2014-01-15

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic.

  6. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  7. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

  8. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  9. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  10. Measurement of the radiative cooling rates for high-ionization species of krypton using an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radtke, R.; Biedermann, C.; Fuchs, T.; Fussmann, G.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2000-02-01

    We describe a measurement of the radiative cooling rate for krypton made at the Berlin electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT was tuned to a charge-state distribution approaching the ionization balance of a plasma at a temperature of about 5 keV. To determine the cooling rate, we made use of EBIT's capabilities to sample a wide range of electron-beam energies and distinguish between different radiation channels. We have measured the x-ray emission from bremsstrahlung, radiative recombination, dielectronic recombination, and line radiation following electron-impact excitation. The dominant contribution to the cooling rate is made by the n=3-2, n=4-2,... x rays of the L-shell spectra of krypton, which produce more than 75% of the total radiation loss. A difference with theoretical calculations is noted for the measured total cooling rate. The predicted values are lower by a factor of 1.5-2, depending on the theoretical model. For our measurement of the cooling rate, we estimate an uncertainty interval of 22-30 %. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low-Dose, Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-11-03

    month after irradiation (IR). At four months post-IR, these animals were comparable to sham-treated controls with regards to the abovementioned structural parameters. Irradation at 1 or 10 cGy did not result in any significant changes in bone structural parameters. (3) Irradiation of 16-wk old male mice with high doses of 56Fe or proton (50 or 200cGy), but not at low doses (5 or 10cGy), showed a similar loss of cancellous BV/TV and trabecular number at five weeks post-IR. (4) Age-related bone loss overtook acute radiation-induced decrements in bone structure within four months post-IR with 100 cGy gamma and 12 months post-IR with 200 cGy iron. Transgenic mice globally overexpressing human catalase gene in mitochondria did not exhibit cancellous bone loss as assessed at four month post-IR with 10 cGy proton, 50 cGy iron, or in combination. (5) The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for loss of bone with radiation are mediated primarily through increased osteoclastogenesis. Our data provide evidence that there are increases in gene expression of TNF alpha and MCP1 in the bone marrow cells 24 hours post-IR and of osteoclastogenic differentiation factor RANKL by day 3. These cytokines in the marrow may stimulate mature osteoclasts or drive osteoclastogenesis from precursors. (6) Osteoblastogenesis from marrow progenitors evaluated ex vivo decreased following whole body 56Fe irradiation at a dose threshold between 20 and 50 cGy whereas osteoclastogenesis ex vivo increased with doses as low as 10cGy two days post-IR of mice. However, the latter finding was not observed in more than a single experiment. (7) Gamma irradiation of cells in vitro requires relatively high doses (200cGy) to disturb normal osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis as evidenced by decrements in mineralized nodule formation, osteoclast counts, and expression of osteoblast related genes such as runx2, col1a1. (8) We also investigated the effect of antioxidants on osteoblastogenesis following

  12. The increase in animal mortality risk following exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is not linear quadratic with dose

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2015-12-09

    The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS). As a result, it was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limitedmore » number of animal studies.« less

  13. The increase in animal mortality risk following exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is not linear quadratic with dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2015-12-09

    The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS). As a result, it was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limited number of animal studies.

  14. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Li Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li

    2014-03-15

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  15. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 3-phosphate dehydro- genase (Gapdh, assay ID: Mm99999915g1). tte reactions were ... A. Space Radiation Risks for Astronauts on Multiple International Space Station Missions. ...

  16. ON THE DETECTION OF IONIZING RADIATION ARISING FROM STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT z {approx} 3-4: LOOKING FOR ANALOGS OF 'STELLAR RE-IONIZERS'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanzella, Eros; Cristiani, Stefano; Nonino, Mario; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grazian, Andrea; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; Pentericci, Laura; Galametz, Audrey; Dickinson, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Newman, Jeffrey; Siana, Brian D.

    2012-05-20

    We use the spatially resolved, multi-band photometry in the GOODS South field acquired by the CANDELS project to constrain the nature of candidate Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters at redshift z {approx} 3.7 identified using ultradeep imaging below the Lyman limit (1{sigma} limit of Almost-Equal-To 30 AB in a 2'' diameter aperture). In 19 candidates out of a sample of 20 with flux detected at >3{sigma} level, the light centroid of the candidate LyC emission is offset from that of the Lyman break galaxy (LBG) by up to 1.''5. We fit the spectral energy distribution of the LyC candidates to spectral population synthesis models to measure photometric redshifts and the stellar population parameters. We also discuss the differences in the UV colors between the LBG and the LyC candidates, and how to estimate the escape fraction of ionizing radiation (f{sub esc}) in cases, like in most of our galaxies, where the LyC emission is spatially offset from the host galaxy. In all but one case we conclude that the candidate LyC emission is most likely due to lower redshift interlopers. Based on these findings, we argue that the majority of similar measurements reported in the literature need further investigation before it can be firmly concluded that LyC emission is detected. Our only surviving LyC candidate is an LBG at z = 3.795, which shows the bluest (B - V) color among LBGs at similar redshift, a stellar mass of M {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, weak interstellar absorption lines, and a flat UV spectral slope with no Ly{alpha} in emission. We estimate its f{sub esc} to be in the range 25%-100%, depending on the dust and intergalactic attenuation.

  17. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  18. Precise method of compensating radiation-induced errors in a hot-cathode-ionization gauge with correcting electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeki, Hiroshi Magome, Tamotsu

    2014-10-06

    To compensate pressure-measurement errors caused by a synchrotron radiation environment, a precise method using a hot-cathode-ionization-gauge head with correcting electrode, was developed and tested in a simulation experiment with excess electrons in the SPring-8 storage ring. This precise method to improve the measurement accuracy, can correctly reduce the pressure-measurement errors caused by electrons originating from the external environment, and originating from the primary gauge filament influenced by spatial conditions of the installed vacuum-gauge head. As the result of the simulation experiment to confirm the performance reducing the errors caused by the external environment, the pressure-measurement error using this method was approximately less than several percent in the pressure range from 10{sup ?5} Pa to 10{sup ?8} Pa. After the experiment, to confirm the performance reducing the error caused by spatial conditions, an additional experiment was carried out using a sleeve and showed that the improved function was available.

  19. Ionization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  20. Ionization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  1. Ionizing radiation from hydrogen recombination strongly suppresses the lithium scattering signature in the CMB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2005-10-15

    It has been suggested that secondary CMB anisotropies generated by neutral lithium could open a new observational window into the universe around the redshift z{approx}400, and permit a determination of the primordial lithium abundance. The effect is due to resonant scattering in the allowed Li i doublet (2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}), so its observability depends on the formation history of neutral lithium. Here we show that the ultraviolet photons produced during hydrogen recombination are sufficient to keep lithium in the Li ii ionization stage in the relevant redshift range and suppress the neutral fraction by {approx}3 orders of magnitude from previous calculations, making the lithium signature unobservable.

  2. Ionizing radiation induced leakage current on ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpa, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Montera, F.; Ghibaudo, G.; Pananakakis, G.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1997-12-01

    MOS capacitors with a 4.4 nm thick gate oxide have been exposed to {gamma} radiation from a Co{sup 60} source. As a result, the authors have measured a stable leakage current at fields lower than those required for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) is similar to the usual Stress Induced Leakage Currents (SILC) observed after electrical stresses of MOS devices. They have verified that these two currents share the same dependence on the oxide field, and the RILC contribution can be normalized to an equivalent injected charge for Constant Current Stresses. They have also considered the dependence of the RILC from the cumulative radiation dose, and from the applied bias during irradiation, suggesting a correlation between RILC and the distribution of trapped holes and neutral levels in the oxide layer.

  3. Coherent scattering of monochromatic RF radiation by ionization electrons of an extensive air shower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filonenko, A. D.

    2013-10-15

    The possibility of detecting extensive air showers by recording and analyzing the radio pulse produced by the reradiation of a wave moving toward the cascade disk is considered. The coherent amplification of the scattered radiation in the direction of motion of the shower is shown to be due to a relativistic effect. An example of a real facility and its peculiarities are discussed.

  4. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  5. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Johnson, Michael D.; Fornace, Albert J.; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC ; Datta, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  7. The inhibitory effect of ionizing radiation on Fc and C3 receptors on mouse and human leukocytes, and the protective potential of human albumin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, M.A.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Gamminio, E.; Liera, C.; Nieto, P.; Weiss-Steider, B. )

    1990-08-01

    The effect that ionizing radiation has in vitro on Fc and C3 receptors was evaluated at various doses and measured by means of erythrocytes coated with antibody (EA) and erythrocytes coated with antibody and complement (EAC) rosettes on human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and on mouse bone marrow cells (BMC) and PBL. We found that the number of cells with either EA and EAC rosettes decreased as the radiation doses increased, and that they were almost absent when the highest doses were employed. We obtained evidence that albumin is a natural source of radio-protection for Fc and C3 receptors, and we showed that by increasing the amount of this molecule we could completely protect receptors for EA and EAC in vitro. Finally, the possible therapeutic value of the administration of human albumin to patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed.

  8. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  9. The effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex trademark HPQ, a new macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin, and on four conventional polystyrene anion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    This study compares the effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex{trademark} HPQ, a recently available macroporous copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine/divinylbenzene, and on four conventional strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. The polystyrene resins investigated included one gel type, Dowex{trademark} 1 {times} 4, and three macroporous resins: Dow{trademark} MSA-1, Amberlite{trademark} IRA-900, and Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK. Each resin, in 7 M nitric acid, was subjected to seven different levels of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation ranging from 100 to 1000 megarads. Irradiated resins were measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, chloride and Pu(IV) exchange capacities, and thermal stability. In separate experiments, each resin was subjected to approximately 340 megarads of in situ alpha particles from sorbed plutonium. Resin damage from alpha particles was less than half that caused by gamma rays, which may be a consequence of different production rates of radiolytic nitrite and nitro radicals in the two systems. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin provided the greatest radiation stability, whereas Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK was the least stable of the resins tested. Thermogravimetric analyses of dry, nitrate-form resin revealed that dry Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin offered the best thermal stability for absorbed gamma doses to 370 megarads, but the worst thermal stability after exposures of 550 megarads or more. 25 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Combination Effect of Regulatory T-Cell Depletion and Ionizing Radiation in Mouse Models of Lung and Colon Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Cheol-Hun; Bae, Jae-Ho; Shin, Dong-Yeok; Lee, Hong-Rae; Jo, Wol-Soon; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CTX) and anti-CD25 antibody to prevent activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used LD-CTX and anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody as a means to inhibit Tregs and improve the therapeutic effect of radiation in a mouse model of lung and colon cancer. Mice were irradiated on the tumor mass of the right leg and treated with LD-CTX and anti-CD25 antibody once per week for 3 weeks. Results: Combined treatment of LD-CTX or anti-CD25 antibody with radiation significantly decreased Tregs in the spleen and tumor compared with control and irradiation only in both lung and colon cancer. Combinatorial treatments resulted in a significant increase in the effector T cells, longer survival rate, and suppressed irradiated and distal nonirradiated tumor growth. Specifically, the combinatorial treatment of LD-CTX with radiation resulted in outstanding regression of local and distant tumors in colon cancer, and almost all mice in this group survived until the end of the study. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Treg depletion strategies may enhance radiation-mediated antitumor immunity and further improve outcomes after radiation therapy.

  11. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  12. On the possibility of the generation of high harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV upon interaction of intense mid-IR radiation with neutral gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelina, A S; Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2014-05-30

    Based on the analytical quantum-mechanical description in the framework of the modified strong-field approximation, we have investigated high harmonic generation of mid-IR laser radiation in neutral gases taking into account the depletion of bound atomic levels of the working medium and the electron magnetic drift in a high-intensity laser field. The possibility is shown to generate high-order harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV under irradiation of helium atoms by intense femtosecond laser pulses with a centre wavelength of 8 – 10.6 μm. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  13. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragn-Martnez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gmez-Muoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm 10 cm and 5.4 cm 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  14. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  16. Welding arc gap ionization device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweikhardt, George M.

    1976-01-01

    An alpha emitting isotope is positioned near the tip of a TIG welding electrode so that the alpha radiation can provide an ionized path between the electrode and the workpiece.

  17. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  18. Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Protection and Safety Training (3 hrs) Instructors: John Seaman and Neil Miller ... with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. ...

  19. The carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for subnuclear assembly of RAD51 after treatment with cisplatin but not ionizing radiation in human breast and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Chenyi; Huang Peng; Liu Jinsong . E-mail: jliu@mdanderson.org

    2005-10-28

    BRCA1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability through its involvement in DNA repair. Although it is known that BRCA1 and RAD51 form distinct DNA repair subnuclear complexes, or foci, following environmental insults to the DNA, the role of BRCA1 in this process remains to be characterized. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the role of BRCA1 in the formation of RAD51 foci following treatment with cisplatin and ionizing radiation. We found that although a functional BRCA1 is required for the subnuclear assembly of BRCA1 foci following treatment with either ionizing radiation or cisplatin, a functional BRCA1 is required for RAD51 foci to form following treatment with cisplatin but not with ionizing radiation. Similar results were obtained in SKOV-3 cells when the level of BRCA1 expression was knocked down by stable expression of a retrovirus-mediated small-interfering RNA against BRCA1. We also found that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 contains uncharacterized phosphorylation sites that are responsive to cisplatin. The functional BRCA1 is also required for breast and ovarian cancer cells to mount resistance to cisplatin. These results suggest that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for the cisplatin-induced recruitment of RAD51 to the DNA-damage site, which may contribute to cisplatin resistance.

  20. Hf-irJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hf-irJ jnj,4 States Governmen Department of Energy Inemorandum DOTE: DAY o 1S5a . 7 EPY TO F . O 0 NE-24 SUJEC': Authorization for Remedial Action of Residential Vicinity ...

  1. Hand and shoe monitor using air ionization probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fergus, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    A hand and shoe radiation monitor is provided which includes a probe support body defining a plurality of cells, within each cell there being an ionization probe. The support body provides structural strength for protecting the ionization probes from force applied to the support body during a radiation monitoring event. There is also provided a fast response time amplifier circuit for the output from the ionization probes.

  2. Incorporating Radiation Effects into Edge Plasma Transport Models...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiation can significantly affect the ionization and energy balance in these plasmas. ... Subject: 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; DIMENSIONS; ENERGY BALANCE; HYDROGEN; IONIZATION; ...

  3. 10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

  4. Total ionizing dose effect of γ-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ∼5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy γ-ray exposure.

  5. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  6. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  7. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr.; Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  8. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-05-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  9. I\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t&

  10. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium at the EMS 2009 Annual Meeting - September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; von Borstel, Robert C.; Brenner, David; Redpath, J. Leslie; Erickson, Barbra E.; Brooks, Antone L.

    2009-11-12

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects.

  11. Poly [1,1'-bis(ethynyl)-4,4'-biphenyl(bis-tributylphosphine)Pt(II)] solutions used as low dose ionizing radiation dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronze-Uhle, E. S.; Graeff, C. F. O.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Fernandes, D. M.; Fratoddi, I.; Russo, M. V.

    2013-06-17

    In this work, the effect of gamma radiation on the optical properties of polymetallayne poly[1,1'-bis(ethynyl)-4,4'-biphenyl(bis-tributylphosphine)Pt(II)] (Pt-DEBP) in chloroform solution is studied. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with doses from 0.01 Gy to 1 Gy using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source. A new band at 420 nm is observed in the emission spectra, in superposition to the emission maximum at 398 nm, linearly dependent on dose. We propose to use the ratio of the emission amplitude bands as the dosimetric parameter. This method proved to be robust, accurate, and can be used as a dosimeter in medical applications.

  12. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  13. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  14. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  15. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  16. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  17. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  18. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE ...

  20. ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online August 15-19, 2016 Fee: 275 ... information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses. ...

  1. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Chou, W.

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  2. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : GOES7IR GOES-7: infrared, channels 7, 10, 12

  3. AS-2, a novel inhibitor of p53-dependent apoptosis, prevents apoptotic mitochondrial dysfunction in a transcription-independent manner and protects mice from a lethal dose of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, Akinori; Ariyasu, Shinya; Wang, Bing; Asanuma, Tetsuo; Onoda, Takayoshi; Sawa, Akiko; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ippei; Togami, Shotaro; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Inaba, Toshiya; Aoki, Shin

    2014-08-08

    mice that had been exposed to a lethal dose of ionizing radiation. Our findings indicate that some types of bidentate 8HQ chelators could serve as radioprotectors with no substantial toxicity in vivo.

  4. Attosecond control of dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, W.; Kelkensberg, F.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Dowek, D.; Lucchini, M.; Calegari, F.; De Giovannini, U.; Rubio, A.; Lucchese, R. R.; Kono, H.; Lepine, F.

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} can be controlled by the relative delay between an attosecond pulse train (APT) and a copropagating infrared (IR) field. Our experiments reveal a dependence of both the branching ratios between a range of electronic states and the fragment angular distributions on the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) to IR time delay. The observations go beyond adiabatic propagation of dissociative wave packets on IR-induced quasistatic potential energy curves and are understood in terms of an IR-induced coupling between electronic states in the molecular ion.

  5. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  6. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  7. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-30

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  8. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  9. IR-2003- | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IR-2003- (20.04 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy ...

  10. Detailed and simplified nonequilibrium helium ionization in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2014-03-20

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is set mostly by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified three-level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling nonequilibrium helium ionization in three-dimensional numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show nonequilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis for interpretating observations.

  11. Characterization of the role of Fhit in maintenance of genomic integrity following low dose radiation, in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ya Wang

    2010-05-31

    The major goal of this study is to determine the effects of the Fhit pathway on low dose ({le} 0.1 Gy) ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genetic instability. Reduction of Fhit protein expression is observed in most solid tumors particularly in those tumors resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. Therefore, characterization of the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in preventing low dose IR-induced genetic instability will provide useful parameters for evaluating the low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. We pursued 3 specific aims to study our hypothesis that the Fhit-dependent pathways maintain genomic integrity through adjusting checkpoint response and repair genes expression following low dose IR. Aim 1: Determine whether Fhit interaction with RPA is necessary for Fhit to affect the cellular response to low dose IR. We combined the approaches of in vitro (GST pull-down and site-directed mutagenesis) and in vivo (observing the co-localization and immunoprecipitation of Fhit and RPA in Fhit knock out mouse cells transfected with mutant Fhit which has lost ability to interact with RPA in vitro). Aim 2: Determine the role of genes whose expression is affected by Fhit in low dose irradiated cells. We analyzed the distinct signature of gene expression in low dose irradiated Fhit-/- cells compared with Fhit+/+ cells by combining microarray, gene transfection and siRNA approaches. Aim 3: Determine the role of Fhit in genetic susceptibility to low dose IR in vivo. We compared the gene mutation frequency and the fragile site stability in the cells isolated from the Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice at 1.5 years following low dose IR. These results determine the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in maintaining genomic integrity in vitro and in vivo, which provide a basis for choosing surrogate markers in the Fhit-dependent pathway to evaluate low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  12. Characterization of the role of Fhit in maintenance of genomic integrity following low dose radiation, in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ya

    2010-05-14

    The major goal of this study is to determine the effects of the Fhit pathway on low dose (< 0.1 Gy) ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genetic instability. Reduction of Fhit protein expression is observed in most solid tumors particularly in those tumors resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. Therefore, characterization of the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in preventing low dose IR-induced genetic instability will provide useful parameters for evaluating the low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. We pursued 3 specific aims to study our hypothesis that the Fhit-dependent pathways maintain genomic integrity through adjusting checkpoint response and repair genes expression following low dose IR. Aim 1: Determine whether Fhit interaction with RPA is necessary for Fhit to affect the cellular response to low dose IR. We combined the approaches of in vitro (GST pull-down and site-directed mutagenesis) and in vivo (observing the co-localization and immunoprecipitation of Fhit and RPA in Fhit knock out mouse cells transfected with mutant Fhit which has lost ability to interact with RPA in vitro). Aim 2: Determine the role of genes whose expression is affected by Fhit in low dose irradiated cells. We analyzed the distinct signature of gene expression in low dose irradiated Fhit-/- cells compared with Fhit+/+ cells by combining microarray, gene transfection and siRNA approaches. Aim 3: Determine the role of Fhit in genetic susceptibility to low dose IR in vivo. We compared the gene mutation frequency and the fragile site stability in the cells isolated from the Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice at 1.5 years following low dose IR. These results determine the role of the Fhit-dependent pathway in maintaining genomic integrity in vitro and in vivo, which provide a basis for choosing surrogate markers in the Fhit-dependent pathway to evaluate low dose IR-induced risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  13. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.P.

    1990-10-11

    J. P. Young attended the Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and presented an invited oral presentation on research he and coworkers had carried out in applying diode lasers to resonance ionization mass spectrometry. A summary of the conference is given along with an assessment of some of the presentations that the author found of interest. Young also visited Professor Marassi at the University of Camerino to present a seminar and discuss mutual interests in a new molten salt research project of the author. Some of the studies at Camerino are described. Ideas concerning the author's research that came from private discussions are also presented here.

  14. Alkali ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrizo, John (Monroeville, PA); Bauerle, James E. (Plum Borough, PA); Witkowski, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  15. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  16. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  17. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  18. Semiconductor radiation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  19. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  20. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hae-June; Kwon, Hee-Chung; Chung, Hee-Yong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  1. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  2. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76% IRS Parking Facility Lighting ...

  3. Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband

  4. Ionization photophysics and spectroscopy of cyanoacetylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, Sydney; Champion, Norbert; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Fray, Nicolas; Gaie-Levrel, François; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Schwell, Martin

    2014-05-07

    Photoionization of cyanoacetylene was studied using synchrotron radiation over the non-dissociative ionization excitation range 11–15.6 eV, with photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. The absolute ionization cross-section and spectroscopic aspects of the parent ion were recorded. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyanoacetylene was measured as 11.573 ± 0.010 eV. A detailed analysis of photoelectron spectra of HC{sub 3}N involves new aspects and new assignments of the vibrational components to excitation of the A{sup 2}Σ{sup +} and B{sup 2}Π states of the cation. Some of the structured autoionization features observed in the 11.94 to 15.5 eV region of the total ion yield (TIY) spectrum were assigned to two Rydberg series converging to the B{sup 2}Π state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +}. A number of the measured TIY features are suggested to be vibrational components of Rydberg series converging to the C{sup 2}Σ{sup +} state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +} at ≈17.6 eV and others to valence shell transitions of cyanoacetylene in the 11.6–15 eV region. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the cation electronic state geometries, vibrational frequencies and energies, as well as of the C–H dissociation potential energy profiles of the ground and electronic excited states of the ion, are compared with experimental observations. Ionization quantum yields are evaluated and discussed and the problem of adequate calibration of photoionization cross-sections is raised.

  5. Filamentation of IR and UV femtosecond pulses upon focusing in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dergachev, A A; Ionin, Andrei A; Kandidov, V P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shlenov, Svyatoslav A

    2013-01-31

    The filamentation of IR and UV laser pulses has been studied numerically and experimentally for different initial beam focusing geometries, and linear electron density profiles along the plasma channel of filaments have been obtained. The results demonstrate that changes in laser beam focusing have a stronger effect on filament and plasma channel parameters for UV radiation than for IR radiation. Focusing causes individual high fluence regions produced by refocusing to merge to form a continuous extended filament with a continuous plasma channel. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. Infrared (IR) photon-sensitive spectromicroscopy in a cryogenic environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2016-06-14

    A system designed to suppress thermal radiation background and to allow IR single-photon sensitive spectromicroscopy of small samples by using both absorption, reflection, and emission/luminescence measurements. The system in one embodiment includes: a light source; a plurality of cold mirrors configured to direct light along a beam path; a cold or warm sample holder in the beam path; windows of sample holder (or whole sample holder) are transparent in a spectral region of interest, so they do not emit thermal radiation in the same spectral region of interest; a cold monochromator or other cold spectral device configured to direct a selected fraction of light onto a cold detector; a system of cold apertures and shields positioned along the beam path to prevent unwanted thermal radiation from arriving at the cold monochromator and/or the detector; a plurality of optical, IR and microwave filters positioned along the beam path and configured to adjust a spectral composition of light incident upon the sample under investigation and/or on the detector; a refrigerator configured to maintain the detector at a temperature below 1.0K; and an enclosure configured to: thermally insulate the light source, the plurality of mirrors, the sample holder, the cold monochromator and the refrigerator.

  7. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  8. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markey, John K. (New Haven, CT)

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  9. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  10. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  11. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  12. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  13. Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on

  14. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  15. Final Report of project entitled "A metabolomics and mouse models approach to study inflammatory and immune responses to radiation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, Albert J.; Li, Henghong

    2013-12-02

    The three-year project entitled ?A Metabolomics and Mouse Models Approach to Study Inflammatory and Immune Responses to Radiation? was initiated in September 2009. The overall objectives of this project were to investigate the acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell lymphocyte function and physiology, as well the contributions of these cells to radiation-induced inflammatory responses. Inflammation after ionizing radiation (IR), even at low doses, may impact a variety of disease processes, including infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other potentially inflammatory disorders. There were three overall specific aims: 1. To investigate acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell subsets and function; 2. A genetic approach with mouse models to investigate p38 MAPK pathways that are involved in radiation-induced inflammatory signaling; 3. To investigate the effect of radiation quality on the inflammatory response. We have completed the work proposed in these aims. Below are our major accomplishments: ? Our data show that T cells from low dose irradiated animals have lower proliferation potency and cytokine production upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This effect was observed as early as 4 hours after radiation, and lasted up to two weeks. ? Using our ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with highly sensitive time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF) metabolomics method, we demonstrated the global changes of metabolites in T cells upon TCR stimulation in a time-dependent pattern. ? We found that the TCR activation induced metabolome changes are remarkably altered in a dose-dependent manner after radiation. At a dose of 0.5 Gy and above, IR mitigated TCR activation induced metabolome changes while at the dose of as low as 0.1Gy IR had a mild stimulatory effect on some of the metabolome changes. ? We revealed the mechanism for how radiation affects T cell activation by showing that the energy

  16. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ir8 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : GOES7IR8 GOES-7: infrared, channel 8

  17. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  18. Magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leake, James E.; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic reconnection in partially ionized plasmas is a ubiquitous phenomenon spanning the range from laboratory to intergalactic scales, yet it remains poorly understood and relatively little studied. Here, we present results from a self-consistent multi-fluid simulation of magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma with a particular focus on the parameter regime of the solar chromosphere. The numerical model includes collisional transport, interaction and reactions between the species, and optically thin radiative losses. This model improves upon our previous work in Leake et al.[“Multi-fluid simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma,” Astrophys. J. 760, 109 (2012)] by considering realistic chromospheric transport coefficients, and by solving a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for finite ion-inertia and electron-neutral drag. We find that during the two dimensional reconnection of a Harris current sheet with an initial width larger than the neutral-ion collisional coupling scale, the current sheet thins until its width becomes less than this coupling scale, and the neutral and ion fluids decouple upstream from the reconnection site. During this process of decoupling, we observe reconnection faster than the single-fluid Sweet-Parker prediction, with recombination and plasma outflow both playing a role in determining the reconnection rate. As the current sheet thins further and elongates, it becomes unstable to the secondary tearing instability, and plasmoids are seen. The reconnection rate, outflows, and plasmoids observed in this simulation provide evidence that magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere could be responsible for jet-like transient phenomena such as spicules and chromospheric jets.

  19. An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern

  20. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) Feb 22 - Mar 14, 2007 Dave Turner, Eli Mlawer RHUBC Breakout Session ARM Science Team Meeting Monterey, California 27 March 2007 Not a Lot of Time Between IOP and STM! RHUBC Motivation * Radiative cooling due to water vapor in mid- to-upper trop contribute significantly to the dynamical processes and radiative balance the regulate Earth's climate * ~40% of the OLR comes from far-IR (wavelengths > 15 µm) * Far-IR has not been well studied because: -

  1. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Hyer, Ronald C.; Shapiro, Stanley J.

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  2. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  3. Life-span effects of ionizing radiation in the beagle dog: A summary account of four decades of research funded by the US Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, the US Atomic Energy Commission made a far- reaching commitment to the support of life-span radiation-effects studies in a relatively long-lived animal, the beagle dog. Something in the range of 200 million dollars has already been spent on a group of closely related experiments, many of which are only now coming to fruition. Responsible fiscal management of these studies, directed toward securing an optimum return from past investments, and toward creative planning of future directions, requires a comprehensive view of this total effort. This report is designed to provide that comprehensive view. This is primarily intended as a research management document. Evaluation and interpretation are tasks for those directly involved in conducting these experiments. The limited objective of the present document is to describe what has been done, to give some of the background for why it was done, to describe results already realized and applications that have been made of these results -- all in a manner designed to display the total effort rather than piecemeal details. While proposing no specific answers to the questions ''Where do we go from here.''it is hoped that the document will provide a basis for approaching that question in an informed manner. The maintenance of a continuity of scientific understanding and direction in these experiments, which often continue beyond the initiating investigators' working life, is no small part of the problem involved in conducting these experiments.

  4. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  5. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, ...

  6. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E.

    1989-01-01

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  7. Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION (329.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A -

  8. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  9. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  10. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  11. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  12. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  13. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  14. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  15. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subpart A - General Provisions | Department of Energy PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

  16. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION (127.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL

  17. Measurements of High-Intensity Laser Induced Ionizing Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  18. Dwarf Galaxies with Ionizing Radiation Feedback II: Spatially...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Astrophys. ; Goldbaum, Nathan J. ; UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. ; Abel, Tom ; KIPAC, Menlo Park Publication Date: 2013-10-21 OSTI Identifier: 1097423 Report Number(s): ...

  19. Measurements of High-Intensity Laser Induced Ionizing Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  20. Review of using gallium nitride for ionizing radiation detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, ...

  1. Alpha Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments

  2. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bands Campaign (RHUBC) D. Turner and E. Mlawer RHUBC Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting 13 March, 2008 Norfolk, Virginia Motivation * Radiative heating/cooling in the mid-troposphere modulate the vertical motions of the atmosphere - This heating/cooling occurs primarily in water vapor absorption bands that are opaque at the surface * Approximately 40% of the OLR comes from the far-IR * Until recently, the observational tools were not available to evaluate the accuracy of the far-IR

  3. RADIATION DETECTING AND TELEMETERING SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, H.K.

    1959-12-15

    A system is presented for measuring ionizing radiation at several remote stations and transmitting the measured information by radio to a central station. At each remote station a signal proportioned to the counting rate is applied across an electrical condenser made of ferroelectric material. The voltage across the condenser will vary as a function of the incident radiation and the capacitance of the condenser will vary accordingly. This change in capacitance is used to change the frequency of a crystalcontrolled oscillator. The output of the oscillator is coupled to an antenna for transmitting a signal proportional to the incident radiation.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  5. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  6. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Glish, Gary L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  7. Audible radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

  8. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  9. Identification of a Previously Unobserved Dissociative Ionization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identification of a Previously Unobserved Dissociative Ionization Pathway in Time-Resolved Photospectroscopy of the Deuterium Molecule Not Available Temp HTML Storage 2: Cao, Wei; ...

  10. Atmospheric Ionization Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia National Labs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Ionization Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia National Labs. ...

  11. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  12. Theory of multiphoton and tunnel ionization in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagulov, D. S.; Kotelnikov, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    The imaginary-time method [6, 7] is used to calculate the multiphoton and tunnel ionization probabilities for atoms in a laser radiation field part of which is converted into the second harmonic. We assume that the first harmonic has a linear or elliptical polarization and the second harmonic is polarized linearly, with its polarization vector making an arbitrary angle with that of the first harmonic. The mean momentum of the photoelectrons knocked out from atoms is shown to depend on the phase shift between the first and second harmonics and their mutual polarization and to be identically equal to zero for a monochromatic field. An important difference between the case of elliptical polarization and the case of linear polarization of both harmonics is the absence of conditions under which the conditions for dominance of one of the two generation mechanisms considered here can be identified during the generation of terahertz radiation from the region of optical breakdown in a gas.

  13. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  14. Los Alamos Science: Number 23, 1995. Radiation protection and the human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1995-12-31

    There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the ionizing radiation that surrounds and penetrates us all. Dispel a few of these by taking a leisurely tour of radiation and its properties, of the natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation, and of the way doses are calculated. By damaging DNA and inducing genetic mutations, ionizing radiation can potentially initiate a cell on the road to cancer. The authors review what is currently known about regulation of cellular reproduction, DNA damage and repair, cellular defense mechanisms, and the specific cancer-causing genes that are susceptible to ionizing radiation. A rapid survey of the data on radiation effects in humans shows that high radiation doses increase the risk of cancer, whereas the effects of low doses are very difficult to detect. The hypothetical risks at low doses, which are estimated from the atomic-bomb survivors, are compared to the low-dose data so that the reader can assess the present level of uncertainty. As part of the openness initiative, ten individuals who have worked with plutonium during various periods in the Laboratory`s history were asked to share their experiences including their accidental intakes. The history and prognosis of people who have had plutonium exposures is discussed by the Laboratory`s leading epidemiologist.

  15. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Carini, Gabriella

    2009-05-12

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  16. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  17. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  18. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  19. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; Whangbo, Myung -Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  20. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular ...

  1. Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET You are accessing a document from the ...

  2. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  3. AREA RADIATION MONITOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

    1962-06-12

    S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

  4. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang; Hegland, Joel E.; Jones, Scott C.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  5. RADIATION DOSIMETER AND DOSIMETRIC METHODS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taplin, G.V.

    1958-10-28

    The determination of ionizing radiation by means of single fluid phase chemical dosimeters of the colorimetric type is presented. A single fluid composition is used consisting of a chlorinated hydrocarbon, an acidimetric dye, a normalizer and water. Suitable chlorinated hydrocarbons are carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, trichlorethane, ethylene dichioride and tetracbloroethylene. Suitable acidimetric indicator dyes are phenol red, bromcresol purple, and creosol red. Suitable normallzers are resorcinol, geraniol, meta cresol, alpha -tocopberol, and alpha -naphthol.

  6. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  7. Ionization of Rb Rydberg atoms in the attractive nsnp dipole-dipole potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunwook; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-11-15

    We have observed the ionization of a cold gas of Rb Rydberg atoms which occurs when nsns van der Waals pairs of ns atoms of n{approx_equal} 40 on a weakly repulsive potential are transferred to an attractive dipole-dipole nsnp potential by a microwave transition. Comparing the measurements to a simple model shows that the initial 300-{mu}K thermal velocity of the atoms plays an important role. Excitation to a repulsive dipole-dipole potential does not lead to more ionization on a 15-{mu}s time scale than leaving the atoms in the weakly repulsive nsns state. This observation is slightly surprising since a radiative transition must occur to allow ionization in the latter case. Finally, by power broadening of the microwave transition, to allow transitions from the initial nsns state to the nsnp state over a broad range of internuclear spacings, it is possible to accelerate markedly the evolution to a plasma.

  8. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  9. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  10. IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm

  11. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, J.M.

    1990-10-11

    The Fifth International Symposium in Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and Its Applications was attended. The Joint Research Centre of the European Communities at Ispra, Italy was also visited. The traveler presented an invited talk, chaired a meeting session and gave an impromptu presentation on how current laser technology limits the development of commercial instrumentation based upon Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. The conference was truely international with scientists from 19 countries and less than 1/4 from the US. The meeting also provided a health mixture of experimentalists and theoreticians. Technical developments reported included the use of electric field ionization from laser prepared Rydberg states as a way to reduce background signals and commercial development of an optical parametric oscillator for replacing pulsed dye laser. A speaker from the Soviet Union suggested their willingness to market hardware they have developed based upon the resonance ionization technique.

  12. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Farzana Aktar; Hossain, Mohammad Abul; Uchida, Koji; Tamura, Takahiro; Sugawa, Kosuke; Mochida, Tomoaki; Otsuki, Joe; Mohiuddin, Tariq; Boby, Monny Akter; Alam, Mohammad Sahabul

    2015-10-15

    This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) adorned graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR) radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW{sup −1}. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  13. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  14. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  15. Photodetectors with passive thermal radiation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Dodson, Brian W.

    2001-10-02

    A new class of photodetectors which include means for passive shielding against undesired thermal radiation is disclosed. Such devices can substitute in applications currently requiring cooled optical sensors, such as IR detection and imaging. This description is included for purposes of searching, and is not intended to limit or otherwise influence the interpretation of the present invention.

  16. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the Optics, ...

  17. Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; George, Easo P.; Bloom, Everett E.

    2006-01-03

    An alloy composition includes, in atomic percent: about 1 to about 10% of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf, balance Ir.

  18. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray transient ...

  19. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES ...

  20. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films Prev Next Title: Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline...

  1. Radiation Counters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jr, J A

    1950-01-31

    Geiger-Mueller and proportional counters operating at low potentials (about 125-300 v) obtained by utilizing certain ratios of diameters of the electrodes and particular mixtures of noble gases as the ionizing medium are covered in this application.

  2. Beta Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells ...

  3. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  4. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  5. IR keeps coal miners safe and reduces downtime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, L.G.

    2009-01-15

    Infrared (IR) cameras can inspect the direct current trolley system that powers mantrips and locomotives that transport men and supplies to an underground mine. If trolley insulators become shorted or electrically leaky they can heat the roof and cause a fire or cave-in. The article explains how IR inspection works and describes typical problems that can be identified by thermograms. 8 figs.

  6. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  7. NaIrO3A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  8. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  9. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  10. Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site NNSA's Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site (REAC/TS) is on-call 24 hours a day, to provide medical REACTS logo care or consultative assistance involving the exposure to ionizing radiation or radiological contamination. REAC/TS, located in Methodist Medical Center of Oak Ridge in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was established in 1976 and has assisted in more than 2,400 calls for assistance

  11. Memory in Nonlinear Ionization of Transparent Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajeev, P. P.; Simova, E.; Hnatovsky, C.; Taylor, R. S.; Rayner, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Gertsvolf, M.; Bhardwaj, V. R.

    2006-12-22

    We demonstrate a shot-to-shot reduction in the threshold laser intensity for ionization of bulk glasses illuminated by intense femtosecond pulses. For SiO{sub 2} the threshold change serves as positive feedback reenforcing the process that produced it. This constitutes a memory in nonlinear ionization of the material. The threshold change saturates with the number of pulses incident at a given spot. Irrespective of the pulse energy, the magnitude of the saturated threshold change is constant ({approx}20%). However, the number of shots required to reach saturation does depend on the pulse energy. Recognition of a memory in ionization is vital to understand multishot optical or electrical breakdown phenomena in dielectrics.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of zirconium atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R.H.; Dropinski, S.C.; Worden, E.F. Jr.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

    1992-05-01

    We have examined the stepwise-resonant three-photon-ionization spectrum of neutral zirconium atoms using three separately-tunable pulsed visible dye lasers. Lifetimes of even-parity levels (measured with delayed-photoionization technique) range from 10 to 100 nsec. Direct ionization cross sections appear to be less than 10{sup {minus}17} cm{sup 2}; newly-detected autoionizing levels give peak ionization cross sections (inferred from saturation fluences) up to 10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup 2}. Members of Rydberg series converging to the 315 and 1323 cm{sup {minus}1} levels of Zr{sup +} were identified. ``Clumps`` of autoionizing levels are thought to be due to Rydberg-valence mixing.

  13. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  15. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  16. Ionized cluster beam technology for material science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takagi, Toshinori

    1997-06-20

    The most suitable kinetic energy range of ionized materials in film formation and epitaxial growth is from a few eV to a few hundreds eV, especially, less than about 100eV, when ions are used as a host. The main roles of ions in film formation are the effects due to their kinetic energy and the electronic charge effects which involve the effect to active film formation and the effect acceleration of chemical reactions. Therefore, it is important to develope the technology to transport large volume of a flux of ionized particles with an extremely low incident energy without any troubles due to the space charge effects and charge up problems on the surface. This is the exact motivation for us to have been developing the Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) technology since 1972. By ICB technology materials (actually wide varieties of materials such as metal, semiconductor, magnetic material, insulator, organic material, etc.) are vaporized and ejected through a small hole nozzle into a high vacuum, where the vaporized material condenses into clusters with loosely coupled atoms with the sizes about from 100 to a few 1000 atoms (mainly 100-2000 atoms) by supercondensation phenomena due to the adiabatic expansion in this evaporation process through a small hole nozzle. In the ICB technology an atom in each cluster is ionized by irradiated by electron shower, and the ionized clusters are accelerated by electric field onto a substrate. The ionized clusters with neutral clusters impinged onto a substrate are spreaded separately into atoms migrating over the substrate, so that the surface migration energy of the impinged atoms, that is, surface diffusion energy are controlled by an incident energy of a cluster. In this report the theoretical and also experimental results of ICB technology are summarized.

  17. (Basic radiation protection criteria). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ney, W.R.

    1982-12-03

    Progress in the following areas directly related to nuclear waste management is summarized: (1) a radiation protection system based on risk per rad of dose; (2) assessment of the accumulation and biological significance of industrial waste discharges and estimation of concentrations present in the environment; (3) assessment of exposure resulting from nuclear power; (4) internal emitter standards; (5) human radiation exposure experience; (6) the identification of national needs related to the estimation of exposure of the public from ionizing radiation; and (7) acceptable risk for management of radioactive waste. (ACR)

  18. Effect of L1{sub 2} ordering in antiferromagnetic Ir-Mn epitaxial layer on exchange bias of FePd films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. C.; Duh, J. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsiao, S. N. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Liu, S. H.; Su, S. H.; Chiu, K. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lin, Y. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Lee, H. Y.; Sung, C. K.

    2015-05-07

    Two series of samples of single-layer IrMn and IrMn/FePd bilayer films, deposited on a single-crystal MgO substrate at different IrMn deposition temperatures (T{sub s} = 300–700 °C), were investigated using magnetron sputtering. L1{sub 2} ordering was revealed for the 30 nm-thick IrMn epitaxial (001) films with T{sub s} ≥ 400 °C, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD results also provide evidence of the epitaxial growth of the IrMn films on MgO substrate. Increasing T{sub s} from 400 to 700 °C monotonically increases the ordering parameter of L1{sub 2} phases from 0.17 to 0.81. An in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) of 22 Oe is obtained in a 10 nm-thick FePd film that is deposited on the disordered IrMn films. As the L1{sub 2} ordering of the IrMn layers increases, the H{sub eb} gradually decreases to 0 Oe, meaning that the exchange bias behavior vanishes. The increased surface roughness, revealed by atomic force microscopy, of the epitaxial IrMn layers with increasing T{sub s} cannot be the main cause of the decrease in H{sub eb} due to the compensated surface spins regardless of the disordered and ordered (001) IrMn layers. The change of antiferromagnetic structure from the A1 to the L1{sub 2} phase was correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  19. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  20. Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of powerful 2Jy and 3CRR radio galaxies. II. AGN power indicators and unification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicken, D.; Tadhunter, C.; Morganti, R.; Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Magagnoli, M.; Kharb, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Hardcastle, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Singh, V.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Rose, M.; Spoon, H.; Inskip, K. J.; Holt, J.

    2014-06-20

    It remains uncertain which continuum and emission line diagnostics best indicate the bolometric powers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially given the attenuation caused by the circumnuclear material and the possible contamination by components related to star formation. Here we use mid-IR spectra along with multiwavelength data to investigate the merit of various diagnostics of AGN radiative power, including the mid-IR [Ne III] ?25.89 ?m and [O IV] ?25.89 ?m fine-structure lines, the optical [O III] ?5007 forbidden line, and mid-IR 24 ?m, 5 GHz radio, and X-ray continuum emission, for complete samples of 46 2Jy radio galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.7) and 17 3CRR FRII radio galaxies (z < 0.1). We find that the mid-IR [O IV] line is the most reliable indicator of AGN power for powerful radio-loud AGNs. By assuming that the [O IV] is emitted isotropically, and comparing the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities of the broad- and narrow-line AGNs in our samples at fixed [O IV] luminosity, we show that the [O III] and 24 ?m emission are both mildly attenuated in the narrow-line compared to the broad-line objects by a factor of ?2. However, despite this attenuation, the [O III] and 24 ?m luminosities are better AGN power indicators for our sample than either the 5 GHz radio or the X-ray continuum luminosities. We also detect the mid-IR 9.7 ?m silicate feature in the spectra of many objects but not ubiquitously: at least 40% of the sample shows no clear evidence for these features. We conclude that, for the majority of powerful radio galaxies, the mid-IR lines are powered by AGN photoionization.

  1. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, J.M.; Mori, W.B.; Lai, C.H.; Katsouleas, T.C.

    1998-07-14

    Method and apparatus ar disclosed for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing. 4 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, John M.; Mori, Warren B.; Lai, Chih-Hsiang; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing.

  3. WARPED IONIZED HYDROGEN IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cersosimo, J. C.; Figueroa, N. Santiago; Velez, S. Figueroa; Soto, C. Lozada; Mader, S.; Azcarate, D.

    2009-07-01

    We report observations of the H166{alpha} ({nu} = 1424.734 MHz) radio recombination line (RRL) emission from the Galactic plane in the longitude range l = 267 deg. - 302 deg. and latitude range b = -3.{sup 0}0 to +1.{sup 0}5. The line emission observed describes the Carina arm in the Galactic azimuth range from {theta} = 260 deg. to 190 deg. The structure is located at negative latitudes with respect to the formal Galactic plane. The observations are combined with RRL data from the first Galactic quadrant. Both quadrants show the signature of the warp for the ionized gas, but an asymmetry of the distribution is noted. In the fourth quadrant, the gas is located between Galactic radii R {approx} 7 and 10 kpc, and the amplitude of the warp is seen from the midplane to z {approx} -150 pc. In the first quadrant, the gas is found between R {approx} 8 and 13-16 kpc, and flares to z {approx} +350 pc. We confirm the warp of the ionized gas near the solar circle. The distribution of the ionized gas is compared with the maximum intensity H I emission (0.30 < n{sub HI} < 0.45 cm{sup -3}) at intervals of the Galactic ring. The ionized material is correlated with the H I maximum intensity in both quadrants, and both components show the same tilted behavior with respect to the mid-Galactic plane.

  4. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szoeke, A.

    1986-03-01

    A non-perturbative approach to the theory of multiphoton ionization is reviewed. Adiabatic Floquet theory is its first approximation. It explains qualitatively the energy and angular distribution of photoelectrons. In many-electron atoms it predicts collective and inner shell excitation. 14 refs.

  5. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  6. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  7. IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Treasury and the IRS published new guidance today allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs) for Tribes that have projects that are in the final stages of going to the market to receive financing.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send...

  9. New IRS Rules for Small and Medium Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) will host a webinar on how certification is being used to meet the new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements for small and medium wind turbines...

  10. DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

  11. Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data ... Wet chemical compositional data and NIR spectra exist for the following types of biomass ...

  12. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. ... In these cases, the thermographer must rely on an IR microscope for close-up work with a ...

  13. A study of electron recombination using highly ionizing particles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7) Eliminate lightly ionizing ptcls by requiring T calo > 0.5 T range Collection Induction Time ADC Select Highly Ionizing Particles Wire time time ANT 2013 Baller 13 Particle...

  14. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Over ...

  15. EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM OF SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II) ...

  16. Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Precipitator | Department of Energy Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator Energy Efficient Clothes Dryer with IR Heating and Electrostatic Precipitator This project seeks to demonstrate a ventless residential dryer with an energy factor greater than 4.04.<br /> Photo credit: GE Global Research This project seeks to demonstrate a ventless residential dryer with an energy factor greater than 4.04. Photo credit: GE Global Research Project team members left to right

  17. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Harder, D.; Willborn, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within 0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of 2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The ?-values of the

  18. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Kimbrough, Joseph R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO.sub.2 insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron's generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO.sub.2 layer.

  19. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1996-11-19

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

  20. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  1. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  2. Quantum Theory for Cold Avalanche Ionization in Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H. X.; Zu, X. T.; Xiang, X.; Sun, K.

    2010-09-10

    A theory of photon-assisted impact ionization in solids is presented. Our theory makes a quantum description of the new impact ionization--cold avalanche ionization recently reported by P. P. Rajeev, M. Gertsvolf, P. B. Corkum, and D. M. Rayner [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 083001 (2009)]. The present theory agrees with the experiments and can be reduced to the traditional impact ionization expression in the absence of a laser.

  3. Benchmark Measurements of the Ionization Balance of Non-LTE Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Hansen, S B; Fournier, K B; Foord, M E; Froula, D H; Mackinnon, A J; May, M J; Schneider, M B; Young, B F

    2007-04-20

    The authors present a series of benchmark measurements of the ionization balance of well characterized gold plasmas with and without external radiation fields at electron densities near 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and various electron temperatures spanning the range 0.8 to 2.4 keV. They have analyzed time- and space-resolved M-shell gold emission spectra using a sophisticated collisional-radiative model with hybrid level structure, finding average ion changes ranging from 42 to 50. At the lower temperatures, the spectra exhibit significant sensitivity to external radiation fields and include emission features from complex N-shell ions not previously studied at these densities. The measured spectra and inferred provide a stringent test for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) models of complex high-Z ions.

  4. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  5. Compact modeling of total ionizing dose and aging effects in MOS technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Barnaby, Hugh J.; King, Michael Patrick

    2015-06-18

    This paper presents a physics-based compact modeling approach that incorporates the impact of total ionizing dose (TID) and stress-induced defects into simulations of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices and integrated circuits (ICs). This approach utilizes calculations of surface potential (?s) to capture the charge contribution from oxide trapped charge and interface traps and to describe their impact on MOS electrostatics and device operating characteristics as a function of ionizing radiation exposure and aging effects. The modeling approach is demonstrated for bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOS device. The formulation is verified using TCAD simulations and through the comparison of model calculations and experimental I-V characteristics from irradiated devices. The presented approach is suitable for modeling TID and aging effects in advanced MOS devices and ICs.

  6. Compact modeling of total ionizing dose and aging effects in MOS technologies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Barnaby, Hugh J.; King, Michael Patrick

    2015-06-18

    This paper presents a physics-based compact modeling approach that incorporates the impact of total ionizing dose (TID) and stress-induced defects into simulations of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices and integrated circuits (ICs). This approach utilizes calculations of surface potential (ψs) to capture the charge contribution from oxide trapped charge and interface traps and to describe their impact on MOS electrostatics and device operating characteristics as a function of ionizing radiation exposure and aging effects. The modeling approach is demonstrated for bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOS device. The formulation is verified using TCAD simulations and through the comparison of model calculations and experimentalmore » I-V characteristics from irradiated devices. The presented approach is suitable for modeling TID and aging effects in advanced MOS devices and ICs.« less

  7. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, O. Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  8. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  9. On the potential of mid-IR lasers for generating high harmonics with subnanometer wavelengths in gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2013-03-31

    The influence of the magnetic field of a laser pulse and the depletion of bound levels of working-medium atoms on the generation of high harmonics of mid-IR laser radiation in gases is investigated using numerical quantum-mechanical calculations. The maximum attainable spectral widths of high harmonics are estimated for model atoms with different ionisation potentials taking into account the aforementioned limiting effects. It is shown (within a two-dimensional model) that high harmonics with wavelengths to several angstroms can be generated by irradiating helium atoms with high-power femtosecond pulses of a laser [5] with a centre wavelength of 3.9 {mu}m. The possibility of observing experimentally relativistic effects using modern desktop mid-IR laser sources is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. Radiation sensitive devices and systems for detection of radioactive materials and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, Dale K

    2014-12-02

    Radiation sensitive devices include a substrate comprising a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to resonate responsive to non-ionizing incident radiation. Systems for detecting radiation from a special nuclear material include a radiation sensitive device and a sensor located remotely from the radiation sensitive device and configured to measure an output signal from the radiation sensitive device. In such systems, the radiation sensitive device includes a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements positioned on the radiation sensitive material. Methods for detecting a presence of a special nuclear material include positioning a radiation sensitive device in a location where special nuclear materials are to be detected and remotely interrogating the radiation sensitive device with a sensor.

  11. Evaluation and Control of Radiation Dose to the Embryo/Fetus Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-29

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a program to control fetal exposure to ionizing radiation and evaluate the resultant dose that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835.

  12. Measuring Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Measurement Activity: How Much Is Present? The size or weight of a container or shipment does not indicate how much radioactivity is in it. The amount of radioactivity in a quantity of material can be determined by noting how many curies of the material are present. This information should be found on labels and/or shipping

  13. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Home MSDS Search MSDS Help Safety Training and Tests Contact Links LSU Campus Safety Glossary Radiation Safety Manual Radiation Safety Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! **Please allow two weeks for your badge to be processed.** Regulations and Hierarchy The CAMD Safety Officer reports to two separate individuals regarding safety. These are the Radiation Safety Officer for the University, and the Campus Safety Officer in all other matters. Thus safety

  14. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemoreof 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.less

  15. Laser-Induced Ionization Efficiency Enhancement On A Filament For Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegfried, M.

    2015-10-14

    The evaluation of trace Uranium and Plutonium isotope ratios for nanogram to femtogram material quantities is a vital tool for nuclear counter-proliferation and safeguard activities. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) is generally accepted as the state of the art technology for highly accurate and ultra-trace measurements of these actinide ratios. However, the very low TIMS ionization yield (typically less than 1%) leaves much room for improvement. Enhanced ionization of Nd and Sm from a TIMS filament was demonstrated using wavelength resonance with a nanosecond (pulse width) laser operating at 10 Hz when light was directed toward the filament.1 For this study, femtosecond and picosecond laser capabilities were to be employed to study the dissociation and ionization mechanisms of actinides/lanthanides and measure the enhanced ionization of the metal of interest. Since the underlying chemistry of the actinide/lanthanide carbides produced and dissociated on a TIMS filament is not well understood, the experimental parameters affecting the photodissociation and photoionization with one and two laser beams were to be investigated.

  16. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  17. A NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST PROTOTYPE FOR z {approx} 7 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES: SPITZER-IRS AND X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 031203

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michalowski, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Covino, S.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 {mu}m of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy-in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios-suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z {approx} 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 A break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of

  18. Ionization-induced annealing of pre-existing defects in silicon carbide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-12

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to find innovative ways to remove preexisting damage and heal fabrication defects or environmentally induced defects in materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a fascinating wide-band gap semiconductor for high-temperature, high-power, high-frequency applications. Its high corrosion and radiation resistance makes it a key refractory/structural material with great potential for extremely harsh radiation environments. Here we show that the energy transferred to the electron system of SiC by energetic ions via inelastic ionization processes results in a highly localized thermal spike that can effectively heal preexisting defects and restore the structural order. This work revealsmore » an innovative self-healing process using highly ionizing ions, and it describes a critical aspect to be considered in modeling SiC performance as either a functional or a structural material for device applications or high-radiation environments.« less

  19. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  20. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mc Fee, Matthew C.; Kirkham, Tim J.; Johnson, Tippi H.

    1994-01-01

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  1. A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Acquatic and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Biota - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements CURRENT DOE-STD-1153-2002, A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Acquatic and Terrestrial Biota by Diane Johnson This technical standard provides methods, models, and guidance within a graded approach that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors may use to evaluate doses of ionizing radiation to populations of aquatic animals, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial animals from DOE activities for the

  2. Sequential circuit design for radiation hardened multiple voltage integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Lawrence T.; McIver, III, John K.

    2009-11-24

    The present invention includes a radiation hardened sequential circuit, such as a bistable circuit, flip-flop or other suitable design that presents substantial immunity to ionizing radiation while simultaneously maintaining a low operating voltage. In one embodiment, the circuit includes a plurality of logic elements that operate on relatively low voltage, and a master and slave latches each having storage elements that operate on a relatively high voltage.

  3. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, Michael N.

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  4. Definition of Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of ...

  5. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, T.A.

    1993-12-01

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  6. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, M.G.

    1990-10-05

    The field of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy grew out of work done in the Photophysics Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As one of the original developers of this field the traveler has continued to attend this meeting on a regular basis. The traveler was originally asked to present an invited talk and to present part of a short course offered to graduate students attending the conference. Subsequently, the traveler was also asked to chair a session and to be a judge of the students papers entered in a contest for a $1000 first prize.

  7. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Eichner, Fred N.; Durham, James S.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light.

  8. To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... In addition to the floor area and fixtures in the shop where the extrusion was accomplished, the offices, rest rooms, and clothes change areas were surveyed and no contamination ...

  9. Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility James Preciado October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES October 2012 James

  10. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  11. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  12. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  13. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation technique as two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers. This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processesablation and ionization

  14. Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas Eriksen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas Eriksen, Kristoffer A. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgan,...

  15. Ionized channel generation of an intense-relativistic electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Charles A.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Shope, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    A foilless intense relativistic electron beam generator uses an ionized cnel to guide electrons from a cathode passed an anode to a remote location.

  16. Pulsed Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometers - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion-limited resolution. In addition, the radioactive ion sources used in many IMSs present potential safety and hazardous waste disposal issues. Other ionization sources...

  17. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  18. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  19. Escape fraction of ionizing photons during reionization: Effects due to supernova feedback and runaway ob stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue

    2014-06-20

    The fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons escaping from galaxies into the intergalactic medium is a critical ingredient in the theory of reionization. We use two zoomed-in, high-resolution (4 pc), cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the impact of two physical mechanisms (supernova, SN, feedback, and runaway OB stars) on the escape fraction (f {sub esc}) at the epoch of reionization (z ? 7). We implement a new, physically motivated SN feedback model that can approximate the Sedov solutions at all (from the free expansion to snowplow) stages. We find that there is a significant time delay of about ten million years between the peak of star formation and that of escape fraction, due to the time required for the build-up and subsequent destruction of the star-forming cloud by SN feedback. Consequently, the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction for dwarf galaxies in halos of mass 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?} is found to be ?f{sub esc}??11%, although instantaneous values of f {sub esc} > 20% are common when star formation is strongly modulated by the SN explosions. We find that the inclusion of runaway OB stars increases the mean escape fraction by 22% to ?f{sub esc}??14%. As SNe resulting from runaway OB stars tend to occur in less dense environments, the feedback effect is enhanced and star formation is further suppressed in halos with M{sub vir}?10{sup 9} M{sub ?} in the simulation with runaway OB stars compared with the model without them. While both our models produce enough ionizing photons to maintain a fully ionized universe at z ? 7 as observed, a still higher amount of ionizing photons at z ? 9 appears necessary to accommodate the high observed electron optical depth inferred from cosmic microwave background observations.

  20. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  1. Spectroscopy of triply and quadruply ionized states of mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttula, M.; Huttula, S.-M.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Andric, L.; Eland, J. H. D.

    2011-03-15

    Multielectron coincidence spectroscopy has been used to study multiple ionization of atomic mercury. The binding energies of triply and quadruply ionized states of Hg have been determined from three- and fourfold electron coincidences. Relativistic ab initio theory has been used to calculate the state energies and predict the experimental findings.

  2. 10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart A - General Provisions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191. Source: 58 FR 65485, Dec. 14, 1993, unless otherwise noted. Subpart A-General Provisions § 835.1 Scope. (a) General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. (b) Exclusion. The requirements in this part do not apply to: 1. Activities that are regulated through a license by

  3. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC`s history structure, and operations; CIRRPC`s most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies.

  4. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  5. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  6. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Christopher Curtis; David Douglas; H. Dylla; L. Dillon-townes; Richard Evans; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; John Heckman; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Tommy Hiatt; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; George Neil; Joseph Preble; Harvey Rutt; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; David W. Waldman; Richard Walker; Neil Wilson; Byung Yunn; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab[1]. The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 {micro}sec pulses at 2Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 {micro}m). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 psec FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.

  7. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  8. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  9. Radiation chemistry in the reprocessing and recycling of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with solvent extraction solutions results in the ionization, excitation, and decay to neutral radicals of mainly diluent molecules. These produced reactive species diffuse into the bulk solution to react with solvent extraction ligands. Ligand reactions often result in deleterious effects such as loss in ligand concentration or the production of decomposition products that may also be complexing agents. This often interferes with desired separations. The common radiolysis reactions and their potential effects on solvent extraction are reviewed here.

  10. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  11. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  12. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of ...

  13. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of ...

  14. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures We present a ...

  15. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: ...

  16. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-19

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  17. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Resonance enhanced multiphoton and single-photon ionization of molecules and molecular fragments. Final report, May 1993--April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoy, V.

    1998-09-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes pulsed laser radiation to prepare a molecule in an excited state via absorption of one or more photons and to subsequently ionize that level before it decays. A remarkable feature of REMPI is that the very narrow bandwidth of laser radiation makes it possible to select a specific rotational level in the initial (ground) state and to prepare the excited state of interest in a single rotational level. Thus, by suitable choice of the excitation step, it is possible to selectively ionize a species that may be present. The key objective of the effort is to carry out quantitative studies of REMPI of molecules and molecular fragments, as well as of single-photon ionization of these species by coherent VUV radiation, in order to provide a robust description of significant spectral features of interest in related experiments and needed insight into the underlying dynamics of these spectra. A major focus of the effort is joint theoretical and experimental studies of these ion rotational distributions which are being widely studied by the zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) technique. This technique, which is based on the detection of photoelectrons resulting from pulsed-field ionization of very high Rydberg states lying just below an ion threshold, makes it possible to obtain cation distributions with subwavenumber resolution. The unprecedented resolution of this ZEKE technique is opening up entirely new vistas in studies of photoionization dynamics, ion spectroscopy, and state-selected ion-molecule reactions. Emerging applications built on the ultra-high resolution of this technique include its use for accurate determination of thermochemically important ionization energies, for characterization of ion rovibrational level structure of large organic molecules, of elemental clusters, and of weakly bound molecular complexes, for probing reactive fragments, and for pump-probe photoelectron studies of wavepacket dynamics. This

  19. System and method of infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in polyacrylamide gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haglund, Jr., Richard F.; Ermer, David R.; Baltz-Knorr, Michelle Lee

    2004-11-30

    A system and method for desorption and ionization of analytes in an ablation medium. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of preparing a sample having analytes in a medium including at least one component, freezing the sample at a sufficiently low temperature so that at least part of the sample has a phase transition, and irradiating the frozen sample with short-pulse radiation to cause medium ablation and desorption and ionization of the analytes. The method further includes the steps of selecting a resonant vibrational mode of at least one component of the medium and selecting an energy source tuned to emit radiation substantially at the wavelength of the selected resonant vibrational mode. The medium is an electrophoresis medium having polyacrylamide. In one embodiment, the energy source is a laser, where the laser can be a free electron laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. Alternatively, the laser can be a solid state laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. The laser can emit light at various ranges of wavelength.

  20. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  1. How to Detect Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How to Detect Radiation Radiation cannot be detected by human senses. A variety of instruments are available for detecting and measuring radiation. Examples of radiation survey meters: photos of survey meters alphacounter1.JPG (28857 bytes) This probe is used for the detection of alpha radiation. The most common type of

  2. radiation.p65

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that ...

  3. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  4. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  5. IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

    2008-09-02

    A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

  6. Multiple ionization of Ar by F{sup -} impact: Projectile-electron-loss and direct-ionization collision channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sant'Anna, M. M.; Zappa, F.; Santos, A. C. F.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Wolff, W.; Barros, A. L. F. de; Castro Faria, N. V. de

    2006-08-15

    We have measured single- and multiple-target ionization cross sections for the F{sup -}+Ar collision system. Measurements of the final target and projectile charge states were performed in coincidence, separating the collision channels for single-, double-, and triple-projectile-electron loss and for direct ionization. The studied velocity region extends from v=0.46 to v=1.45 atomic units. Results are compared with existing H{sup -}+Ar data as well as with Ar multiple ionization by protons, electrons, and antiprotons. For the direct-ionization channel, ratios for multiple-to-single target ionization are similar to those found for H{sup +}+Ar collisions. For this channel multiple ionization is well described by independent single-ionization events by a frozen projectile. For the projectile-electron-loss collision channels, on the other hand, the correlation between projectile electrons and target electrons plays an important role. Our data show that the average final charge state of the target, , increases steeply with the final charge state of the projectile, while an independent-particle model (neglecting two-center electron-electron correlation) only accounts for small variations of .

  7. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  8. MULTI-TUBE POWER LEADS TOWER FOR BEPCII IR MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JIA,L.X.; ZHANG,X.B.; WANG,L.; WANG,T.H.; YAO,Z.L.

    2004-05-11

    A power lead tower containing the multi-tube power leads is designed and under fabrication for the superconducting IR quadrupole magnets in the Beijing Electron Position Collider Upgrade (BEPCII). The lead tower consists of six pairs of gas-cooled leads for seven superconducting coils at various operating currents. The power lead is designed in a modular fashion, which can be easily applied to suit different operating current. The end copper block of the tube lead has a large cold mass that provide a large time constant in case of cooling flow interruption. A novel cryogenic electrical isolator is used for the leads.

  9. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  10. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasenko, V. F. Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ∼500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF{sub 6} is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (∼30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ∼10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  11. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itl, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-21

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the CC{sub ?} bond and the presence of the CNH{sub 2}{sup +} fragment.

  12. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johson, Rolland Paul; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  13. Perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, Kentaro Sekerak, Michael J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2014-12-15

    A perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations, which cause low frequency oscillations of the discharge plasma, in Hall effect thrusters is presented including the electron energy equation in addition to heavy-species transport. Excitation and stabilization of such oscillations, often called the breathing mode, are discussed in terms of the growth rate obtained from the linear perturbation equations of the discharge plasma. The instability induced from the ionization occurs only when the perturbation in the electron energy is included while the neutral atom flow contributes to the damping of the oscillation. Effects of the electron energy loss mechanisms such as wall heat loss, inelastic collisions, and convective heat flux are discussed. It is shown that the ionization oscillations can be damped when the electron transport is reduced and the electron temperature increases so that the energy loss to the wall stabilizes the ionization instability.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts Hirohito Ogasawara, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Dennis Nordlund, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Anders Nilsson, Stanford Synchrotron ...

  15. Types of Radiation Exposure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation ...

  16. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universit de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  17. Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fe Atomic Data for Non-equilibrium Ionization Plasmas No abstract prepared. Authors: Eriksen, Kristoffer A. [1] ; Fontes, Christopher J. [1] ; Colgan, James P. [1] ; Zhang, Honglin [1] ; Hungerford, Aimee L. [1] ; Fryer, Christopher L. [1] ; Hughes, John P. [2] ; Smith, Randall K. [3] ; Badenes, Carles [4] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Rutgers

  18. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research

  19. Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iancso, Georgeta Iliescu, Elena Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-16

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  20. Paths and ionization losses of proton energy in different substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilovskiy, I.M.; Karpov, I.I.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Prokoshkin, Yu.D.

    1986-02-14

    Ionization energy losses of charged particles in a substance are described by the well-known Bethe-Bloch formula. However, the magnitudes of the ionization potentials in region of low proton energies (E < 100 MeV) for heavy elements prove to be considerably larger than those at high energies. Thus, studies of ionization losses in the region of high energies are the main source of the experimental information necessary for the correction of the Bethe-Bloch formula and determination of magnitudes of ionization potentials I. The purpose of this work was to measure the magnitudes of ionization losses dE/ds, paths R and ionization potentials I at a proton energy of E 670 MeV. The measurements were taken by the relative method for different substances of x, and the magnitudes of q sub x=(dE/ds) sub x/(dE/ds) sub Al and px=R sub x/R sub Al were found. Quantities qx and px weakly depend on the energy E where at E=200-600 MeV, a=(2-4).10-2 for different substances. The proton energy was determined with an accuracy of 2 MeV.

  1. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  2. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  3. AN UNBIASED SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD R CrA IRS7B IN THE 345 GHz WINDOW WITH ASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Jorgensen, Jes K.

    2012-02-01

    We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332-364 GHz region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 0 or Class 0/I transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary observations in the 450 GHz band. In total, 16 molecular species are identified in the 332-364 GHz region. Strong emission lines of CN and CCH are observed, whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules, which are characteristics of hot corino and warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) source, respectively, are not detected. The rotation temperature of CH{sub 3}OH is evaluated to be 31 K, which is significantly lower than that reported for the prototypical hot corino IRAS 16293-2422 ({approx}85 K). The deuterium fractionation ratios for CCH and H{sub 2}CO are obtained to be 0.038 and 0.050, respectively, which are much lower than those in the hot corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC and hot corino chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions of low-mass Class 0 sources, R CrA IRS7B would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey demonstrates further chemical diversity in low-mass star-forming regions.

  4. Absorption of solar radiation in broken clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.; Zhuravleva, T.B.

    1996-04-01

    It is recognized now that the plane-parallel model unsatisfactorily describes the transfer of radiation through broken clouds and that, consequently, the radiation codes of general circulation models (GCMs) must be refined. However, before any refinement in a GCM code is made, it is necessary to investigate the dependence of radiative characteristics on the effects caused by the random geometry of cloud fields. Such studies for mean fluxes of downwelling and upwelling solar radiation in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range were performed by Zuev et al. In this work, we investigate the mean spectral and integrated absorption of solar radiation by broken clouds (in what follows, the term {open_quotes}mean{close_quotes} will be implied but not used, for convenience). To evaluate the potential effect of stochastic geometry, we will compare the absorption by cumulus (0.5 {le} {gamma} {le} 2) to that by equivalent stratus ({gamma} <<1) clouds; here {gamma} = H/D, H is the cloud layer thickness and D the characteristic horizontal cloud size. The equivalent stratus clouds differ from cumulus only in the aspect ratio {gamma}, all the other parameters coinciding.

  5. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, Daniel S.; Jones, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  6. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-02-29

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. As a result, the epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystallinemore » Ir nanocrystals.« less

  8. ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online April 24-28, 2017 August 14-18, 2017 Fee: $275 Maximum enrollment: 28 30 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 4½-day course includes more advanced information for medical practitioners. This program is academically more rigorous than the REM course and is primarily for Physicians, Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Nurses desiring an advanced level of information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing

  9. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Durham, J.S.

    1992-08-04

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light. 5 figs.

  10. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Eichner, Fred N.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material to a cryogenic temperature. The thermoluminescent material is then optically stimulated by exposure to ultraviolet light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light.

  11. Atomic veterans and their families: Responses to radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.C.; Ellis, P.; Greenberg, S. )

    1990-07-01

    In-depth interviews with seven atomic veterans and their families indicated powerful psychological effects on all family members from exposure to low-level ionizing radiation. Four themes emerged: the invalidation of their experiences by government and other authority figures; family concerns about genetic effects on future generations; family members' desire to protect each other from fears of physical consequences; and desire to leave a record of their experiences to help prevent future suffering.

  12. A UV to mid-IR study of AGN selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Sun Mi; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stern, Daniel; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Moustakas, John

    2014-07-20

    We classify the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 431,038 sources in the 9 deg{sup 2} Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). There are up to 17 bands of data available per source, including ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (NDWFS), near-IR (NEWFIRM), and mid-infrared (IRAC and MIPS) data, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for ∼20,000 objects, primarily from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. We fit galaxy, active galactic nucleus (AGN), stellar, and brown dwarf templates to the observed SEDs, which yield spectral classes for the Galactic sources and photometric redshifts and galaxy/AGN luminosities for the extragalactic sources. The photometric redshift precision of the galaxy and AGN samples are σ/(1 + z) = 0.040 and σ/(1 + z) = 0.169, respectively, with the worst 5% outliers excluded. On the basis of the χ{sub ν}{sup 2} of the SED fit for each SED model, we are able to distinguish between Galactic and extragalactic sources for sources brighter than I = 23.5 mag. We compare the SED fits for a galaxy-only model and a galaxy-AGN model. Using known X-ray and spectroscopic AGN samples, we confirm that SED fitting can be successfully used as a method to identify large populations of AGNs, including spatially resolved AGNs with significant contributions from the host galaxy and objects with the emission line ratios of 'composite' spectra. We also use our results to compare with the X-ray, mid-IR, optical color, and emission line ratio selection techniques. For an F-ratio threshold of F > 10, we find 16,266 AGN candidates brighter than I = 23.5 mag and a surface density of ∼1900 AGN deg{sup –2}.

  13. Issues in Low Dose Radiation Biology: The Controversy Continues. A Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Bair, William J.

    2013-05-01

    Both natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation contribute to human exposure and consequently pose a risk to human health. Much of this is unavoidable, e.g., natural background radiation, and as the use of radiation in modern medicine and industry increases so does the potential health risk. This perspective reflects the authors view of current issues in low dose radiation biology research, highlights some of the controversies therein, and suggests areas of future research to address these issues. The views expressed here are the authors own and do not represent any institution, organization or funding body.

  14. Phthalocyanine adsorption to graphene on Ir(111): Evidence for decoupling from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endlich, M. Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.; Rosa, A. L. da; Frauenheim, T.; Wehling, T. O.

    2014-11-14

    Phthalocyanine molecules have been adsorbed to Ir(111) and to graphene on Ir(111). From a comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual molecules adsorbed to the different surfaces alone it is difficult to discern potential differences in the molecular adsorption geometry. In contrast, vibrational spectroscopy using inelastic electron scattering unequivocally hints at strong molecule deformations on Ir(111) and at a planar adsorption geometry on graphene. The spectroscopic evidence for the different adsorption configurations is supported by density functional calculations.

  15. RADIATION COUNTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

  16. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W.; Hegland, Joel E.; Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  17. Method and apparatus for the measurement of signals from radiation sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-18

    The preferred embodiments of the present invention include a device for measuring an ionizing event in a radiation sensor. The device can include a charge amplifier and a timing shaper. The charge amplifier receives a cathode signal and is configured to output an amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is operatively connected to the charge amplifier to receive the amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is configured to generate a first pulse in response to a beginning of the ionizing event and a second pulse in response to an end of the ionizing event. The first and second pulses are associated with a depth of interaction of the ionizing event and are generated in response to a slope of the amplified cathode signal changing.

  18. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four ...

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate Y2Ir2O7 Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  20. On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On Loops in Inflation II: IR Effects in Single Clock Inflation Authors: Senatore, Leonardo ; Stanford U., ITP KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Zaldarriaga, Matias ; Princeton, Inst. ...

  1. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  2. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  3. Inner-shell and double ionization potentials of aminophenol isomers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryzhevoi, N. V.; Santra, R.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of single and double core ionization potentials of the aminophenol molecule is reported. The role of relaxation, correlation, relativistic, and basis set effects in these potentials is clarified. Special attention is paid to the isomer dependence of the single and double core ionization potentials. Some of them are also compared with the respective values of the phenol and aniline molecules. It is shown that the core level single ionization potentials of the para-, meta-, and ortho-aminophenol molecules differ only slightly from each other, rendering these structural isomers challenging to distinguish for conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast, the energy needed to remove two core electrons from different atoms depends noticeably on the mutual arrangement and even on the relative orientations of the hydroxyl and amine groups. Together with the electrostatic repulsion between the two core holes, relaxation effects accompanying double core ionization play a crucial role here. The pronounced sensitivity of the double ionization potentials, therefore, enables a spectroscopic characterization of the electronic structure of aminophenol isomers by means of x-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  5. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazovi?, S.; Maleti?, D.; Pua?, N.; Malovi?, G.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj.; Leskovac, A.; Filipovi?, J.; Joksi?, G.

    2014-09-22

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2?Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  6. The iQID Camera An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    less Authors: Miller, Brian W. ; Gregory, Stephanie J. ; Fuller, Erin S. ; Barrett, Harrison H. ; Barber, Bradford H. ; Furenlid, Lars R. Publication Date: 2014-06-11 OSTI...

  7. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States) Univ. of California, ... Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322 Publisher: ...

  8. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  9. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.

    1997-09-30

    A ``blink`` technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements. 18 figs.

  10. System level latchup mitigation for single event and transient radiation effects on electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Joseph Robert; Colella, Nicholas John

    1997-01-01

    A "blink" technique, analogous to a person blinking at a flash of bright light, is provided for mitigating the effects of single event current latchup and prompt pulse destructive radiation on a micro-electronic circuit. The system includes event detection circuitry, power dump logic circuitry, and energy limiting measures with autonomous recovery. The event detection circuitry includes ionizing radiation pulse detection means for detecting a pulse of ionizing radiation and for providing at an output terminal thereof a detection signal indicative of the detection of a pulse of ionizing radiation. The current sensing circuitry is coupled to the power bus for determining an occurrence of excess current through the power bus caused by ionizing radiation or by ion-induced destructive latchup of a semiconductor device. The power dump circuitry includes power dump logic circuitry having a first input terminal connected to the output terminal of the ionizing radiation pulse detection circuitry and having a second input terminal connected to the output terminal of the current sensing circuitry. The power dump logic circuitry provides an output signal to the input terminal of the circuitry for opening the power bus and the circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential to remove power from the power bus. The energy limiting circuitry with autonomous recovery includes circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential. The circuitry for opening the power bus and circuitry for shorting the power bus to a ground potential includes a series FET and a shunt FET. The invention provides for self-contained sensing for latchup, first removal of power to protect latched components, and autonomous recovery to enable transparent operation of other system elements.

  11. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  12. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  13. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isselhardt, B H

    2011-09-06

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  14. A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Acquatic and Terrestrial Biota

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-08-14

    This technical standard provides methods, models, and guidance within a graded approach that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors may use to evaluate doses of ionizing radiation to populations of aquatic animals, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial animals from DOE activities for the purpose of demonstrating protection relative to Dose Rate Guidelines.

  15. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, A.L.

    1991-06-30

    In 1990--91 CIRRPC`s program included efforts to improve interagency coordination on ionizing radiation risk assessments, a review of the reported health risks to humans from exposure to extremely low- frequency electric and magnetic fields (ELF/EMF), and increased coordination with national and international organizations such as NCRP and ICRP.

  16. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

    2011-10-31

    Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sheep Cortical Bone Using Synchrotron Radiation Transmission X-ray Microscopy", PLoS ONE ... Garry R. Brock, Cornell University Joy C. Andrews, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation ...

  18. Radiation Effects Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Reasearch Facility Geomechanics and ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Radiation Effects Sciences Home...

  19. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76%

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over $122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years.

  20. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  1. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search ... Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is ...

  2. Numerical modeling of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Yu, L.L.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2013-03-01

    Methods for the calculation of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes used for modeling laserplasma interactions are compared and validated against theoretical predictions. Improved accuracy is obtained by using the direct current form for the ionization rate. Multi level ionization in a single time step and energy conservation have been considered during the ionization process. The effects of grid resolution and number of macro-particles per cell are examined. Implementation of the ionization algorithm in two different particle-in-cell codes is compared for the case of ionization-based electron injection in a laserplasma accelerator.

  3. The development of in-situ calibration method for divertor IR thermography in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, M.; Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Takeyama, S.; Itami, K.

    2014-08-21

    For the development of the calibration method of the emissivity in IR light on the divertor plate in ITER divertor IR thermography system, the laboratory experiments have been performed by using IR instruments. The calibration of the IR camera was performed by the plane black body in the temperature of 100–600 degC. The radiances of the tungsten heated by 280 degC were measured by the IR camera without filter (2.5–5.1 μm) and with filter (2.95 μm, 4.67 μm). The preliminary data of the scattered light of the laser of 3.34 μm that injected into the tungsten were acquired.

  4. Ionization monitor with improved ultra-high megohm resistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burgess, Edward T.

    1988-11-05

    An ionization monitor measures extremely small currents using a resistor containing a beta emitter to generate ion-pairs which are collected as current when the device is used as a feedback resistor in an electrometer circuit. By varying the amount of beta emitter, the resistance of the resistor may be varied.

  5. Ionization Thresholds of Small Carbon Clusters: Tunable VUVExperiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Ahmed,Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer III, Henry F.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2007-07-31

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in amolecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuumultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUVradiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source(ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra atvarious ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances ofthe neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species isC3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra arerecorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionizationthresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transferbracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for differentcluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clustersfor n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) levelwith cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations areapplied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic andvertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measuredionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomericstructures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. Themeasurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because ofunquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidencefor the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 speciesand the presence of cyclic C10.

  6. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen; Natarajan, Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  7. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  8. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  9. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  10. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  11. Wireless radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  12. Hand-held, mechanically cooled, radiation detection system for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, Morgan Thomas; Eckels, Joel Del

    2010-06-08

    In one embodiment, a radiation detection system is provided including a radiation detector and a first enclosure encapsulating the radiation detector, the first enclosure including a low-emissivity infra-red (IR) reflective coating used to thermally isolate the radiation detector. Additionally, a second enclosure encapsulating the first enclosure is included, the first enclosure being suspension mounted to the second enclosure. Further, a cooler capable of cooling the radiation detector is included. Still yet, a first cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure is included for coupling the cooler and the first enclosure. Furthermore, a second cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure and capable of coupling the first enclosure to a cooler separate from the radiation detection system is included. Other embodiments are also presented.

  13. NGC 7538 IRS 1 - Subarcsecond resolution recombination line and (N-15)H3 maser observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaume, R.A.; Johnston, K.J.; Nguyen, H.A.; Wilson, T.L.; Dickel, H.R. Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1991-08-01

    The present imaging of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-associated (N-15)H3 (J, K) = (3, 3) maser emission with 0.2-arcsec resolution shows the strongest such masers, which may be amplifying the strong double-lobe radio continuum core of the IRS 1 H II region, to be concentrated in two regions separated by about 0.2 arcsec. Observations of several hydrogen recombination line transitions indicate that the velocity of the IRS H II region is similar to that of the ambient molecular cloud. 23 refs.

  14. Complexity reduction of collisional-radiative kinetics for atomic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Hai P.; Karagozian, Ann R.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-15

    Thermal non-equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional-radiative kinetics. This level of detail is required for an accurate prediction of the plasma. However, the resultant system of equations can be prohibitively large, making multi-dimensional and unsteady simulations of non-equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we present a scheme for model reduction of the collisional-radiative kinetics, by combining energy levels into groups and deriving the corresponding macroscopic rates for all transitions. Although level-grouping is a standard approach to this type of problem, we provide here a mechanism for achieving higher-order accuracy by accounting for the level distribution within a group. The accuracy and benefits of the scheme are demonstrated for the generic case of atomic hydrogen by comparison with the complete solution of the master rate equations and other methods.

  15. Radiation Safety Poster | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Poster Radiation Safety Poster Radiation Safety Poster

  16. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  17. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolutemore » total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.« less

  18. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.

  19. Ionization of ethane, butane, and octane in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Mitchell, Rob; Ekanayake, N.; Watts, A. M.; White, S. L.; Sauer, Rob; Howard, L. E.; Videtto, M.; Mancuso, C.; Wells, S. J.; Stanev, T.; Wen, B. L.; Decamp, M. F.; Walker, B. C.

    2010-10-15

    Strong-field photoionization of ethane, butane, and octane are reported at intensities from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. The molecular fragment ions, C{sup +} and C{sup 2+}, are created in an intensity window from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and have intensity-dependent yields similar to the molecular fragments C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup +} and C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup 2+}. In the case of C{sup +}, the yield is independent of the molecular parent chain length. The ionization of more tightly bound valence electrons in carbon (C{sup 3+} and C{sup 4+}) has at least two contributing mechanisms, one influenced by the parent molecule size and one resulting from the tunneling ionization of the carbon ion.

  20. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  1. Ionization-Induced Electron Trapping inUltrarelativistic Plasma Wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oz, E.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Barnes, C.D.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Auerbach, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; /UCLA

    2007-04-06

    The onset of trapping of electrons born inside a highly relativistic, 3D beam-driven plasma wake is investigated. Trapping occurs in the transition regions of a Li plasma confined by He gas. Li plasma electrons support the wake, and higher ionization potential He atoms are ionized as the beam is focused by Li ions and can be trapped. As the wake amplitude is increased, the onset of trapping is observed. Some electrons gain up to 7.6 GeV in a 30.5 cm plasma. The experimentally inferred trapping threshold is at a wake amplitude of 36 GV/m, in good agreement with an analytical model and PIC simulations.

  2. AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cartmell, T.R.; Gifford, J.F.

    1959-08-01

    An ionization chamber used for measuring the radioactivity of dust present in atmospheric air is described. More particularly. the patent describes a device comprising two concentric open ended, electrically connected cylinders between which is disposed a wire electrcde. A heating source is disposed inside of the cylinder to circulate air through the space between the two cylinders by convective flow. A high voltage electric field between the wire electrcde of the electrically connected cylinder will cause ionization of the air as it passes therethrough.

  3. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I.

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  4. Measurements of radiation effects on a 4 Mb PSRAM memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonalez, Odair Lelis; Pereira Junior, Evaldo Carlos Fonseca; Vaz, Rafael Galhardo; Pereira, Marlon Antonio; Wirth, Gilson Incio; Both, Thiago Hanna

    2014-11-11

    The results of a static test of total ionizing dose (TID) effects on an ISSI 4Mb PSRAM memory are reported in this work. The irradiation was performed at the IEAvs Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation with 1.17 and 1.32 MeV gamma-rays from a {sup 60}Co source at a dose rate of 2.5 krad/h up to an accumulated dose of 215.7 krad. The TID threshold for bit flip found in this experiment was 52.5 krad. From a sampling of 4096 memory addresses it was estimated a bit flip rate of approximately 50% at an accumulated dose of 215.7 krad.

  5. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, Andr

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  6. NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface ...

  7. Collisional-Radiative Modeling for Radiation Hydrodynamics (Book...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: Modern Methods in Collisional-Radiative Modelling of Plasmas, Collisional-Radiative Modeling for Radiation Hydrodynamics, Springer International Publishing, unknown, ...

  8. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  9. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  10. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  11. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  12. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  13. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  14. Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Selective Ionization in Nanoclusters Affects Subsequent Fragmentation Print Understanding charge-transfer processes at the atomic level of nanoscale systems is of the utmost importance for designing nanodevices based on quantum-dot structures, nanotubes, or two-dimensional graphene sheets. Researchers from Western Michigan University, Berkeley Lab, and other international research facilities investigated charge-transfer processes and subsequent ion fragmentation dynamics in nanoclusters

  15. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal ...

  16. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    evolution in Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 This content will become publicly available on November 23, 2016 Prev Next Title: Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in ...

  17. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  18. Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wishart, J.F.; Takahaski, K.

    2010-12-01

    As our understanding of ionic liquids and their tunable properties has grown, it is possible to see many opportunities for ionic liquids to contribute to the sustainable use of energy. The potential safety and environmental benefits of ionic liquids, as compared to conventional solvents, have attracted interest in their use as processing media for the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is still a relatively unexplored topic although there has been a significant increase in the number of researchers in the field recently. This article provides a brief introduction to ionic liquids and their interesting properties, and recent advances in the radiation chemistry and photochemistry of ionic liquids. In this article, we will mainly focus on excess electron dynamics and radical reaction dynamics. Because solvation dynamics processes in ionic liquids are much slower than in molecular solvents, one of the distinguishing characteristics is that pre-solvated electrons play an important role in ionic liquid radiolysis. It will be also shown that the reaction dynamics of radical ions is significantly different from that observed in molecular solvents because of the Coulombic screening effects and electrostatic interactions in ionic liquids.

  19. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  20. Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Effects in Embedded...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects on Components and Systems: 2013 Conference held September 23-27, 2013 in Oxford, United Kindom.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the Radiation...

  1. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison to Reference Methods | Department of Energy Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_lake.pdf (837.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx

  2. RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Orlando

    2010-07-23

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  3. New insulating antiferromagnetic quaternary iridates MLa10Ir4O24 (M=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Qingbiao; Han, Fei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Han, Tian -Heng; Li, Hao; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, oxides of Ir4+ have received renewed attention in the condensed matter physics community, as it has been reported that certain iridates have a strongly spin-orbital coupled (SOC) electronic state, Jeff = ½, that defines the electronic and magnetic properties. The canonical example is the Ruddlesden-Popper compound Sr2IrO4, which has been suggested as a potential route to a new class of high temperature superconductor due to the formal analogy between Jeff = ½ and the S = ½ state of the cuprate superconductors. The quest for other iridium oxides that present tests of the underlying SOC physics is underway. Inmore » this spirit, here we report the synthesis and physical properties of two new quaternary tetravalent iridates, MLa10Ir4O24 (M = Sr, Ba). The crystal structure of both compounds features isolated IrO6 octahedra in which the electronic configuration of Ir is d5. As a result, both compounds order antiferromagnetically despite the lack of obvious superexchange pathways, and resistivity measurement shows that SrLa10Ir4O24 is an insulator.« less

  4. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M.; Fu, Hai; Wardlow, J.; Amber, S.; Baker, A. J.; Baes, M.; Bock, J.; Bourne, N.; Dye, S.; Bussmann, R. S.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 ?m bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (?17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 ?m magnification factor (?{sub 880}) is ?1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (?{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ?2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  5. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation is a natural part of our everyday environment. Cosmic rays showering the Earth ... and radon gas seeping up from the soil are only two examples of natural radiation. ...

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan -

  7. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  8. Planar Hall effect in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X. Zou, L. K.

    2014-12-29

    The planar Hall effect of IrMn on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG = Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was measured in the magnetic field rotating in the film plane. The magnetic field angular dependence of planar Hall resistance (PHR) was observed in YIG/IrMn bilayer at different temperatures, while the Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn film shows constant PHR for different magnetic field angles at both 10 K and 300 K. This provides evidence that IrMn has interfacial spins which can be led by ferrimagnetic layer in YIG/IrMn structure. A hysteresis can be observed in PHR-magnetic field angle loop of YIG/IrMn film at 10 K, indicative of the irreversible switching of IrMn interfacial spins at low temperature.

  9. A LOW ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS OF L > L* LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z = 3.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutsia, K.; Grazian, A.; Giallongo, E.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Castellano, M.; Fiore, F.; Gallozzi, S.; Testa, V.; Paris, D.; Santini, P.; Zamorani, G.; Mignoli, M.; Vanzella, E.; Lilly, S. J.

    2011-07-20

    We present an upper limit for the relative escape fraction (f{sup rel}{sub esc}) of ionizing radiation at z {approx} 3.3 using a sample of 11 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) with deep imaging in the U band obtained with the Large Binocular Camera, mounted on the prime focus of the Large Binocular Telescope. We selected 11 LBGs with secure redshifts in the range 3.27 < z < 3.35, from three independent fields. We stacked the images of our sources in the R and U bands, which correspond to an effective rest-frame wavelength of 1500 A and 900 A, respectively, obtaining a limit in the U band image of {>=}30.7 mag (AB) at 1{sigma}. We derive a 1{sigma} upper limit of f{sup rel}{sub esc} {approx} 5%, which is one of the lowest values found in the literature so far at z {approx} 3.3. Assuming that the upper limit for the escape fraction that we derived from our sample holds for all galaxies at this redshift, the hydrogen ionization rate that we obtain ({Gamma}{sub -12} < 0.3 s{sup -1}) is not enough to keep the intergalactic medium ionized and a substantial contribution to the UV background by faint active galactic nuclei is required. Since our sample is clearly still limited in size, larger z {approx} 3 LBG samples at similar or even greater depths are necessary to confirm these results on a more firm statistical basis.

  10. THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC DIFFUSION FOR EXAFLAG Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH ...

  11. THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC DIFFUSION FOR EXAFLAG Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH...

  12. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Satoshi; Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Jing; Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.

  13. A VUV photoionization measurement and ab-initio calculation of the ionization energy of gas phase SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2008-12-05

    In this work we report on the detection and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of gas phase SiO2 generated in situ via laser ablation of silicon in a CO2 molecular beam. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for SiO and SiO2 and ionization energy estimates are revealed from such measurements. A state-to-state ionizationenergy of 12.60 (+-0.05) eV is recorded by fitting two prominent peaks in the PIE curve for the following process: 1SUM O-Si-O --> 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the photoionization process and allow for identification of the symmetric stretch of 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+ which is observed in the PIE spectrum to be 0.11 eV (890 cm-1) above the ground state of the cation and agrees with the 892 cm-1 symmetric stretch frequency calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level.

  14. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  15. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  16. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1961-12-26

    A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

  17. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; et al

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams inmore » the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.« less

  18. The Ultraviolet Surprise. Efficient Soft X-Ray High Harmonic Generation in Multiply-Ionized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popmintchev, Dimitar; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Mancuso, Christopher; Perez-Hernandez, Jose A.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Hankla, Amelia; Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.; Gaffney, Jim A.; Foord, Mark; Libby, Stephen B.; Jaron-Becker, Agnieskzka; Becker, Andreas; Plaja, Luis; Muranane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2015-12-04

    High-harmonic generation is a universal response of matter to strong femtosecond laser fields, coherently upconverting light to much shorter wavelengths. Optimizing the conversion of laser light into soft x-rays typically demands a trade-off between two competing factors. Reduced quantum diffusion of the radiating electron wave function results in emission from each species which is highest when a short-wavelength ultraviolet driving laser is used. But, phase matching—the constructive addition of x-ray waves from a large number of atoms—favors longer-wavelength mid-infrared lasers. We identified a regime of high-harmonic generation driven by 40-cycle ultraviolet lasers in waveguides that can generate bright beams in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum, up to photon energies of 280 electron volts. Surprisingly, the high ultraviolet refractive indices of both neutral atoms and ions enabled effective phase matching, even in a multiply ionized plasma. We observed harmonics with very narrow linewidths, while calculations show that the x-rays emerge as nearly time-bandwidth–limited pulse trains of ~100 attoseconds.

  19. Flare heating and ionization of the low solar chromosphere. II. Observations of five solar flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, T.R.; Canfield, R.C.; Saba, J.L.R. Hawaii Univ., Honolulu Lockheed Research Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA )

    1990-12-01

    Two neutral Mg spectral lines formed in the temperature-minimum region and the low chromosphere, at 4571 and 5173 A, are used to quantify the changes in the atmospheric structure as a function of time during five solar flares. Eight proposed flare heating and ionization mechanisms and predictions of the effects of each on the temperature minimum region are discussed. Two Mg spectral observations made at the National Solar Observatory (Sacramento Peak), along with observations of hard and soft X-rays from the SMM and GOES satellites, are compared to the predictions of the eight proposed mechanisms. The initial effects in all five flares are consistent with backwarming by enhanced Balmer- and Paschen-continuum radiation originating in the upper chromosphere. Extended heating observed in two of the flares is most likely due to UV irradiation. In all cases heating by the dissipation of nonreversed electric currents, collisions with an electron or proton beam, irradiation by soft X-rays, and dissipation of Alfven waves are eliminated. 61 refs.

  20. CIRRPC: Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination. Eighth annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, A.L.

    1992-12-01

    CIRRPC`s eighth year was marked by the completion of several CIRRPC projects, including: An independent study on the possible health effects of extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields; a report evaluating the uncertainties identified in a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and their impact on the report`s application to Federal risk assessment; an analysis of the use of two reports on radiation risk assessment from NAS and the United Nations; and an update of Part 11 of ORAU`s radiation protection fact sheets, a compilation of major US radiation protection standards and guides. CIRRPC also sponsored a workshop on internal dosimetry and provided financial support to the 1991 Health Physics Society Summer School on the biological basis of radiation protection practice. The program highlights are briefly described in this report.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  2. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco

  3. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. I. Theoretical model applied to the interpretation of experimental results on H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carniato, S. Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; itnik, M.; Bu?ar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-07

    We present in detail a theoretical model that provides absolute cross sections for simultaneous core-ionization core-excitation (K{sup ?2}V ) and compare its predictions with experimental results obtained on the water molecule after photoionization by synchrotron radiation. Two resonances of different symmetries are assigned in the main K{sup ?2}V peak and comparable contributions from monopolar (direct shake-up) and dipolar (conjugate shake-up) core-valence excitations are identified. The main peak is observed with a much greater width than the total experimental resolution. This broadening is the signature of nuclear dynamics.

  4. Guiding and Ionization Blueshift in Ablative Capillary Waveguide Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuffey, Chris; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl; Levin, Michael; Zigler, Arie

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in plasmas has been demonstrated with gradients which are orders of magnitude greater than the limit on conventional Radio Frequency accelerators. However, the acceleration length is limited by two factors, the dephasing length and the Rayleigh range of the laser pulse. Dephasing length is the distance in which electrons overtake the laser pulse and can be increased by decreasing plasma density. Alternatively the interaction length can be extended by orders of magnitude by using ablative wall discharge capillary targets, in which a plasma is preformed with a transverse density profile capable of guiding the focused laser. We have demonstrated guiding of high intensity laser pulses from the HERCULES laser over 3 cm for powers up to 35 TW. The quality of the laser spot can be retained and the intensity remains high even at the exit of the capillary. The transmitted laser spectrum shows blueshifting due to field ionization by the laser pulse. This ionization might enhance electron injection at low electron density for LWFA GeV accelerators. The field ionization affects carbon atoms and ions from the ablated capillary, which are not present in hydrogen-filled capillaries. This creates an additional challenge to guiding compared to hydrogen-filled capillaries. However, the setup and materials are easier to come by. The use of these capillary targets may also be of interest to other high intensity laser-plasma interactions requiring long interaction lengths such as high harmonic generation from gases and plasmas, or x-ray lasing in underdense plasmas.

  5. Experimental Station 7-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Beam line 7-3 is a wiggler side-station dedicated for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EXAFS measurements on dilute biological systems. BL7-3 is equipped with a 30-element Ge solid-state detector in addition to ionization chambers and Lytle/PIPS detectors. A dedicated LHe cryostat allows for routine low temperature measurements. The unfocused beam on BL7-3 is ideal for samples especially susceptible to radiation damage, such as high-valent intermediates and other oxidized species. Status Open

  6. Search for Linear Polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1978-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (3 deg K blackbody) radiation. These ground-based measurements are made at 9 mm wavelength. We find no evidence for linear polarization, and set an upper limit for a polarized component of 0.8 m deg K with a 95% confidence level. This implies that the present rate of expansion of the Universe is isotropic to one part in 10{sup 6}, assuming no re-ionization of the primordial plasma after recombination

  7. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  8. Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2011-09-15

    Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H{sup +} and H{sup -} ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H{sup -} ions.

  9. Structure factors for tunneling ionization rates of diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Morishita, Toru

    2015-05-15

    Within the leading-order, single-active-electron, and frozen-nuclei approximation of the weak-field asymptotic theory, the rate of tunneling ionization of a molecule in an external static uniform electric field is determined by the structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital. We present the results of systematic calculations of structure factors for 40 homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules by the Hartree–Fock method using a numerical grid-based approach implemented in the program X2DHF.

  10. Runaway electrons in a fully and partially ionized nonideal plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Turekhanova, K.M.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports on a study of electron runaway for a nonideal plasma in an external electric field. Based on pseudopotential models of nonideal fully and partially ionized plasmas, the friction force was derived as a function of electron velocities. Dependences of the electron free path on plasma density and nonideality parameters were obtained. The impact of the relative number of runaway electrons on their velocity and temperature was considered for classical and semiclassical models of a nonideal plasma. It has been shown that for the defined intervals of the coupled plasma parameter, the difference between the relative numbers of runaway electron values is essential for various plasma models.

  11. Photo-ionization and residual electron effects in guided streamers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.; Lu, X. Liu, D.; Yang, Y.; Pan, Y.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-10-15

    Complementary experiments and numerical modeling reveal the important role of photo-ionization in the guided streamer propagation in helium-air gas mixtures. It is shown that the minimum electron concentration ?10{sup 8?}cm{sup ?3} is required for the regular, repeated propagation of the plasma bullets, while the streamers propagate in the stochastic mode below this threshold. The stochastic-to-regular mode transition is related to the higher background electron density in front of the propagating streamers. These findings help improving control of guided streamer propagation in applications from health care to nanotechnology and improve understanding of generic pre-breakdown phenomena.

  12. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  13. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0'= 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPamore » from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  14. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0' = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64more » GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  15. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  16. Novel detection methods for radiation-induced electron-hole pairs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Derzon, Mark Steven; Martinez, Marino John

    2010-09-01

    Most common ionizing radiation detectors typically rely on one of two general methods: collection of charge generated by the radiation, or collection of light produced by recombination of excited species. Substantial efforts have been made to improve the performance of materials used in these types of detectors, e.g. to raise the operating temperature, to improve the energy resolution, timing or tracking ability. However, regardless of the material used, all these detectors are limited in performance by statistical variation in the collection efficiency, for charge or photons. We examine three alternative schemes for detecting ionizing radiation that do not rely on traditional direct collection of the carriers or photons produced by the radiation. The first method detects refractive index changes in a resonator structure. The second looks at alternative means to sense the chemical changes caused by radiation on a scintillator-type material. The final method examines the possibilities of sensing the perturbation caused by radiation on the transmission of a RF transmission line structure. Aspects of the feasibility of each approach are examined and recommendations made for further work.

  17. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (?200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ?2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a 1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 22cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 11cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this technology

  18. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  19. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  20. Collision dynamics of proton with formaldehyde: Fragmentation and ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Gao, Cong-Zhang; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 ; Calvayrac, Florent; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875; Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000

    2014-03-28

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of the ions, we study the ionization and fragmentation of formaldehyde in collision with a proton. Four different impact energies: 35 eV, 85 eV, 135 eV, and 300 eV are chosen in order to study the energy effect in the low energy region, and ten different incident orientations at 85 eV are considered for investigating the steric effect. Fragmentation ratios, single, double, and total electron ionization cross sections are calculated. For large impact parameters, these results are close to zero irrespective of the incident orientations due to a weak projectile-target interaction. For small impact parameters, the results strongly depend on the collision energy and orientation. We also give the kinetic energy releases and scattering angles of protons, as well as the cross section of different ion fragments and the corresponding reaction channels.

  1. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California; ERC, Incorporated, Edwards Air Force Base; Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University; Koh, Christine J.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Harmon, Christopher W.; Strasser, Daniel; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2011-07-19

    Isolated ion pairs of a conventional ionic liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2N?]), and a reactive hypergolic ionic liquid, 1-Butyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Dicyanamide ([Bmim+][Dca?]), are generated by vaporizing ionic liquid submicron aerosol particles for the first time; the vaporized species are investigated by dissociative ionization with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light, exhibiting clear intact cations, Emim+ and Bmim+, presumably originating from intact ion pairs. Mass spectra of ion pair vapor from an effusive source of the hypergolic ionic liquid show substantial reactive decomposition due to the internal energy of the molecules emanating from the source. Photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion pairs of [Emim+][Tf2N?]ionic liquid vapor are compared for an aerosol source and an effusive source, revealing changes in the appearance energy due to the amount of internal energy in the ion pairs. The aerosol source has a shift to higher threshold energy (~;;0.3 eV), attributed to reduced internal energy of the isolated ion pairs. The method of ionic liquid submicron aerosol particle vaporization, for reactive ionic liquids such as hypergolic species, is a convenient, thermally ?cooler? source of isolated intact ion pairs in the gas phase compared to effusive sources.

  2. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California; ERC, Incorporated, Edwards Air Force Base; Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Koh, Christine J.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Harmon, Christopher W.; Strasser, Daniel; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Chambreau, Steven D.; L.Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam; Leone, Stephen R.

    2012-03-16

    Isolated ion pairs of a conventional ionic liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2N?]), and a reactive hypergolic ionic liquid, 1- Butyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Dicyanamide ([Bmim+][Dca?]), are generated by vaporizing ionic liquid submicron aerosol particles for the first time; the vaporized species are investigated by dissociative ionization with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light, exhibiting clear intact cations, Emim+ and Bmim+, presumably originating from intact ion pairs. Mass spectra of ion pair vapor from an effusive source of the hypergolic ionic liquid show substantial reactive decomposition due to the internal energy of the molecules emanating from the source. Photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion pairs of [Emim+][Tf2N?] ionic liquid vapor are compared for an aerosol source and an effusive source, revealing changes in the appearance energy due to the amount of internal energy in the ion pairs. The aerosol source has a shift to higher threshold energy (~;;0.3 eV), attributed to reduced internal energy of the isolated ion pairs. The method of ionic liquid submicron aerosol particle vaporization, for reactive ionic liquids such as hypergolic species, is a convenient, thermally ?cooler? source of isolated intact ion pairs in the gas phase compared to effusive sources.

  3. Vortexlike excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yongkang; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report a systematic study of temperature- and field-dependent charge (ρ) and entropy (S) transport in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5. Its large positive thermopower Sxx is typical of Ce-based Kondo lattice systems, and strong electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing the Nernst signal Sxy. By separating the off-diagonal Peltier coefficient αxy from Sxy, we find that αxy becomes positive and greatly enhanced at temperatures well above the bulk Tc. Compared with the nonmagnetic analog LaIrIn5, these results suggest vortexlike excitations in a precursor state to unconventional superconductivity in CeIrIn5. This study sheds light on the similarity ofmore » heavy-fermion and cuprate superconductors and on the possibility of states not characterized by the amplitude of an order parameter.« less

  4. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  5. Determination of partial (n,xngamma) cross-sections in 193-Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talou, P; Chadwick, M B; Nelson, R; Fotiades, N; Devlin, M; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Becker, J A

    2003-10-15

    The {sup 193}Ir(n,n'){sup 193m}Ir cross section for the production of the 80-keV isomer in {sup 193}Ir is evaluated using a combination of experimental data and nuclear reaction modeling, from threshold to about 20 MeV. Four discrete {gamma} lines feeding the isomer were recently observed with the GEANIE {gamma}-ray detector at LANSCE. Theoretical calculations of the nuclear reaction mechanisms in play are then carried out to evaluate the contributions not accounted for in the experimental setup (direct population; fraction of {gamma}-lines not observed in the experiment; etc). Experiment and modeling are then combined to provide a total cross section for the production of the Iridium isomer. We finally compare our result with activation measurement data available for a few energy points.

  6. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  7. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Jinchen; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Cao, Gang

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from thatmore » of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.« less

  8. Highly Lipophilic, Mono-ionizable Calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from Nuclear Wastes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Highly Lipophilic, Mono-ionizable Calix4arene-benzocrown-6 Extractants for Removal of Radiocesium from Nuclear ...

  9. Resonance overlap structure in the microwave ionization of the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrelly, D.; Uzer, T.

    1988-12-01

    The microwave ionization of the hydrogen atom involves most of the open issues concerning classical and quantum chaos. Much recent research has considered quasi-one-dimensional extended states for which ionization thresholds have been estimated using a classical picture in which ionization proceeds through the overlap of an infinity of nonlinear resonances. Using a canonical transformation to Deprit's ''Lissajous elements'' which makes the two-dimensional nature of the problem explicit, an accurate and improved ionization threshold, compared to previous resonance overlap criteria, is obtained through the overlap of only two nonlinear resonances in the one-dimensional limit.

  10. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2012-10-30

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  11. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2014-08-19

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  12. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  13. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2011-11-29

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  14. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  15. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2011-06-21

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  16. ORISE Video: What is the difference between radiation exposure and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation contamination?

  17. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRLUO functions include: sponsoring and presenting the Annual Farrel W. Lytle Award to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based ...

  19. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  20. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Now the Synchrotron Medical Imaging Team, a group of Canadian, US, and European scientists (including scientists from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource) are using ...

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work demonstrates that synchrotron radiation-based spectroscopies provide invaluable, atom-specific tools to determine the electronic properties of different dopant and defect ...

  3. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  4. Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the CH activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the CH bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and

  5. Handling collision debris in quad- and dipole-first LHC IR options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Detailed MARS15 Monte Carlo energy deposition calculations are performed for two main designs of the LHC interaction regions (IR) capable to achieve a luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}: a traditional quadrupole-first scheme and the one with a dual-bore inner triplet with separation dipoles placed in front of the quadrupoles. It is shown that with the appropriate design of the Nb3Sn magnets, IR layout and a number of protective measures implemented, both schemes are feasible for the LHC luminosity upgrade up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  6. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Mulera, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    A wire chamber radiation detector (11) has spaced apart parallel electrodes (16) and grids (17, 18, 19) defining an ignition region (21) in which charged particles (12) or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges (93) and defining an adjacent memory region (22) in which sustained glow discharges (94) are initiated by the primary discharges (93). Conductors (29, 32) of the grids (18, 19) at each side of the memory section (22) extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles (12) were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors (29) of one grid (18) while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors (36) of the other grid (19) through glow discharges (94). One of the grids (19) bounding the memory region (22) is defined by an array of conductive elements (32) each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor (36) through a separate resistance (37). The wire chamber (11) avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles (12) have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  7. BRCA1 Mutation: A Predictive Marker for Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Charlene; Zhang, Junran

    2015-10-01

    DNA repair, in particular, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is essential for the survival of both normal and cancer cells. An elaborate repair mechanism has been developed in cells to efficiently repair the damaged DNA. The pathways predominately involved in DSB repair are homologous recombination and classic nonhomologous end-joining, although the alternative NHEJ pathway, a third DSB repair pathway, could also be important in certain contexts. The protein of BRCA1 encoded by the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 regulates all DSB repair pathways. Given that DSBs represent the most biologically significant lesions induced by ionizing radiation and that impaired DSB repair leads to radiation sensitivity, it has been expected that cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations should benefit from radiation therapy. However, the clinical data have been conflicting and inconclusive. We provide an overview about the current status of the data regarding BRCA1 deficiency and radiation therapy sensitivity in both experimental models and clinical investigations. In addition, we discuss a strategy to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, the pharmacologic drugs being investigated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  8. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. p-07_frazee.pdf (499.08 KB) More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Vehicle

  9. Radiative cooling of C{sub 7}{sup ?}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najafian, K.; Pettersson, M. S.; Hansen, K.; Dynefors, B.; Shiromaru, H.; Matsumoto, J.; Tanuma, H.; Furukawa, T.; Azuma, T.

    2014-03-14

    The spontaneous and photo-induced neutralization of C{sub 7}{sup ?} produced in a laser ablation source was measured in an electrostatic storage ring. The measurements provide three independent determinations of the radiative cooling of the ions, based on the short time spontaneous decay and on the integrated amplitude and the shape of the photo-induced neutralization signal. The amplitude of the photo-induced signal was measured between 0.5 ms and 35 ms and found to depend on photon wavelength and ion storage time. All three signals can be reproduced with identical thermal IR radiative cooling rates with oscillator strengths equal to theoretical predictions. In addition, the measurements provide the excitation energy distribution.

  10. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  11. Determination of Radiation Energy Response for Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TLD-100: Determination of Organ Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deda, Antoneta; Telhaj, Ervis

    2009-04-19

    TLD-100 (thermoluminescent dosimeter) cards (chips) were calibrated using X-rays with energies of 25-250 kV produced by a Cs-137 source. The energy responses of lithium fluoride crystals for different energies of X-rays were studied. QA/QC was then performed in the Albanian Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory. Based on the QA/QC results, the chips were used to study the doses to different organs in diagnostic radiology. Organ dose was evaluated after calculation of e dose in air (Kair), using an ionizing chamber.

  12. Radiation damage in diagnostic window materials for the TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primak, W.

    1981-07-01

    The general problem of evaluating diagnostic window materials for the TFTR at the tank wall location is described. Specific evaluations are presented for several materials: vitreous silica, crystal quartz, sapphire, zinc selenide, and several fluorides: lithium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and calcium fluoride; and seal glasses are discussed. The effects of the neutrons will be minimal. The major problems arise from the high flux of ionizing radiation, mainly the soft x rays which are absorbed near the surface of the materials. Additionally, this large energy deposition causes a significant thermal pulse with attendant thermal stresses. It is thus desirable to protect the windows with cover slips where this is feasible or to reduce the incident radiation by mounting the windows on long pipes. A more detailed summary is given at the end of this report.

  13. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search low ionization-threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban

    2014-01-01

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and in-directly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise. In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in phonon

  14. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W. A.; Newell, W. R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Langley, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focused to {approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} has been investigated by the three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. In a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three-dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, cannot. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multielectronic processes.

  15. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  16. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  17. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  18. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  19. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  20. Underwater radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W.; McKnight, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.