Sample records for ion trap mass

  1. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  2. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  3. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  4. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  5. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  6. Dipole Excitation With A Paul Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Chutjian, A. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are presented for the use of an auxiliary radiofrequency (rf) excitation voltage in combination with a high purity, high voltage rf generator to perform dipole excitation within a high precision Paul ion trap. These results show the effects of the excitation frequency over a continuous frequency range on the resultant mass spectra from the Paul trap with particular emphasis on ion ejection times, ion signal intensity, and peak shapes. Ion ejection times are found to decrease continuously with variations in dipole frequency about several resonant values and show remarkable symmetries. Signal intensities vary in a complex fashion with numerous resonant features and are driven to zero at specific frequency values. Observed intensity variations depict dipole excitations that target ions of all masses as well as individual masses. Substantial increases in mass resolution are obtained with resolving powers for nitrogen increasing from 114 to 325.

  7. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  8. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  9. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  10. Ion Funnel Trap Interface for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed and characterized. The ion trap was incorporated through the use of added terminal electrodynamic ion funnel electrodes enabling control over the axial dc gradient in...

  11. A comb-sampling method for enhanced mass analysis in linear electrostatic ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Kelly, O.; Calvert, C. R.; Duffy, M. J.; King, R. B.; Belshaw, L.; Graham, L.; Alexander, J. D.; Williams, I. D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bryan, W. A. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Turcu, I. C. E.; Cacho, C. M.; Springate, E. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper an algorithm for extracting spectral information from signals containing a series of narrow periodic impulses is presented. Such signals can typically be acquired by pickup detectors from the image-charge of ion bunches oscillating in a linear electrostatic ion trap, where frequency analysis provides a scheme for high-resolution mass spectrometry. To provide an improved technique for such frequency analysis, we introduce the CHIMERA algorithm (Comb-sampling for High-resolution IMpulse-train frequency ExtRAaction). This algorithm utilizes a comb function to generate frequency coefficients, rather than using sinusoids via a Fourier transform, since the comb provides a superior match to the data. This new technique is developed theoretically, applied to synthetic data, and then used to perform high resolution mass spectrometry on real data from an ion trap. If the ions are generated at a localized point in time and space, and the data is simultaneously acquired with multiple pickup rings, the method is shown to be a significant improvement on Fourier analysis. The mass spectra generated typically have an order of magnitude higher resolution compared with that obtained from fundamental Fourier frequencies, and are absent of large contributions from harmonic frequency components.

  12. Buffer-gas cooling of ions in a multipole radio frequency trap beyond the critical mass ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weckesser, P; López-Carrera, H; Weidemüller, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass ratio of the buffer gas atom to the ion is below a critical value. We show how this limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps and a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is derived for arbitrary buffer gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the analytical form of the ion's energy distribution are found. Final ion temperatures down to the millikelvin regime can be achieved even for heavy buffer gases by actively controlling the size of the buffer gas or the trap voltage (forced sympathetic cooling).

  13. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

  14. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  15. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangan, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM); Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  16. Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

  17. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  18. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Alexander, Michael L. (Richland, WA); Follansbee, James C. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  19. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  20. Tachyon Physics with Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tony E; Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been predicted that particles with imaginary mass, called tachyons, would be able to travel faster than the speed of light. So far, there has not been any experimental evidence for tachyons in either natural or engineered systems. Here, we propose how to experimentally simulate Dirac tachyons with trapped ions. Quantum measurement on a Dirac particle simulated by a trapped ion causes it to have an imaginary mass so that it may travel faster than the effective speed of light. We show that a Dirac tachyon must have spinor-motion entanglement in order to be superluminal. We also show that it exhibits significantly more Klein tunneling than a normal Dirac particle. We provide numerical simulations with realistic ion systems and show that our scheme is feasible with current technology.

  1. Surface trap for ytterbium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jonathan A. (Jonathan Alan)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted an experiment to load a shallow planar ion trap from a cold atom source of Ytterbium using photoionization. The surface trap consisted of a three-rod radio frequency Paul trap fabricated using standard printed ...

  2. Ion Trap in a Semiconductor Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stick; W. K. Hensinger; S. Olmschenk; M. J. Madsen; K. Schwab; C. Monroe

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ion. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometer scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with 'chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks, and most notably, large scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometer-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool, and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) heterostructure.

  3. Ideal Multipole Ion Traps from Planar Ring Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Clark

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present designs for multipole ion traps based on a set of planar, annular, concentric electrodes which require only rf potentials to confine ions. We illustrate the desirable properties of the traps by considering a few simple cases of confined ions. We predict that mm-scale surface traps may have trap depths as high as tens of electron volts, or micromotion amplitudes in a 2-D ion crystal as low as tens of nanometers, when parameters of a magnitude common in the field are chosen. Several example traps are studied, and the scaling of those properties with voltage, frequency, and trap scale, for small numbers of ions, is derived. In addition, ions with very high charge-to-mass ratios may be confined in the trap, and species of very different charge-to-mass ratios may be simultaneously confined. Applications of these traps include quantum information science, frequency metrology, and cold ion-atom collisions.

  4. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  5. Fiber optic integration in planar ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Elizabeth Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic ion traps are are excellent tools in atomic physics for studying single ions. Accurate measurement of the ion's electronic state in these ion traps is required by both atomic clocks and quantum computation. Quantum ...

  6. Human Plasma Proteome Analysis by Multidimensional Chromatography Prefractionation and Linear Ion Trap Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    to facilitate human plasma proteome research. Keywords: proteomics · human plasma · mass spectrometry · two the past decades of plasma proteome research works based on 2-DE:2,14-20 the highest quantity of identified

  7. Automatic Identification of Proteins with a MALDI-Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    the sample with relatively high energy- density laser pulsessthe practical result is that is often, automatic identification of proteins. A mass spectrometry-based method can satisfy this need if it (1) produces high-quality MS and MS/MS data; (2) has femtomole sensitivity; (3) is fast, i.e., collects spectra

  8. Trapped-ion Lissajous trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Rossetti; G. D. de Moraes Neto; J. Carlos Egues; M. H. Y. Moussa

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a protocol for generating Lissajous curves with a trapped ion by engineering Rashba- and the Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit interactions in a Paul trap. The unique anisotropic Rashba $\\alpha_{x}$, $\\alpha_{y}$ and Dresselhaus $\\beta_{x}$, $\\beta_{y}$ couplings afforded by our setup also enables us to obtain an "unusual" Zitterbewegung, i.e., the semiconductor analog of the relativistic trembling motion of electrons, with cycloidal trajectories in the absence of magnetic fields. We have also introduced bounded SO interactions, confined to an upper-bound vibrational subspace of the Fock states, as an additional mechanism to manipulate the Lissajous motion of the trapped ion. Finally, we accounted for dissipative effects on the vibrational degrees of freedom of the ion and find that the Lissajous trajectories are still robust and well defined for realistic parameters.

  9. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro, E-mail: okada-k@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-0021 (Japan); Tanuma, Hajime [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar{sup q+} (q = 5?7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar{sup q+} (q = 5?7) under a constant number density of H{sub 2} and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar{sup q+}(q = 5, 6)-H{sub 2} collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula.

  10. Theory and application of planar ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Christopher Elliott

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate a new geometry of Paul trap with electrodes in a plane. These planar ion traps are compatible with modern silicon microfabrication, and can be scaled up to large arrays with multiple trapping ...

  11. Cryogenic Ion Trapping Systems with Surface-Electrode Traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Antohi; D. Schuster; G. M. Akselrod; J. Labaziewicz; Y. Ge; Z. Lin; W. S. Bakr; I. L. Chuang

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two simple cryogenic RF ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 hours. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 minutes.

  12. Cooling Techniques for Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Segal; Christof Wunderlich

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter gives an introduction to, and an overview of, methods for cooling trapped ions. The main addressees are researchers entering the field. It is not intended as a comprehensive survey and historical account of the extensive literature on this topic. We present the physical ideas behind several cooling schemes, outline their mathematical description, and point to relevant literature useful for a more in-depth study of this topic.

  13. Laser cooling of trapped ions Jurgen Eschner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    of the art is reported, and several new cooling techniques are outlined. The principles of ion trapping by elucidating several milestone experiments. In addition, a number of special cooling techniques pertainingLaser cooling of trapped ions Ju¨rgen Eschner Institut fu¨ r Experimentalphysik, Universita

  14. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; ,

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  15. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

  16. Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Schlawin; Manuel Gessner; Shaul Mukamel; Andreas Buchleitner

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity which require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in [M. Gessner et al. New J. Phys. 16 092001 (2014)], we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems and discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods in combination with distinct features of ultra-cold matter systems allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and can therefore reliably probe systems where, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  17. A quantum information processor with trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Philipp

    Quantum computers hold the promise to solve certain problems exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. Trapped atomic ions are among the physical systems in which building such a computing device seems viable. ...

  18. Controlling fast transport of cold trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Walther; Frank Ziesel; Thomas Ruster; Sam T. Dawkins; Konstantin Ott; Max Hettrich; Kilian Singer; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Ulrich Poschinger

    2012-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We realize fast transport of ions in a segmented micro-structured Paul trap. The ion is shuttled over a distance of more than 10^4 times its groundstate wavefunction size during only 5 motional cycles of the trap (280 micro meter in 3.6 micro seconds). Starting from a ground-state-cooled ion, we find an optimized transport such that the energy increase is as low as 0.10 $\\pm$ 0.01 motional quanta. In addition, we demonstrate that quantum information stored in a spin-motion entangled state is preserved throughout the transport. Shuttling operations are concatenated, as a proof-of-principle for the shuttling-based architecture to scalable ion trap quantum computing.

  19. Rapid and sensitive gas chromatography ion-trap mass spectrometry method for the determination of tobacco specific N-nitrosamines in secondhand smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLEIMAN, Mohamad; MADDALENA, Randy L.; GUNDEL, Lara A.; DESTAILLATS, Hugo

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) are some of the most potent carcinogens in tobacco and cigarette smoke. Accurate quantification of these chemicals is needed to help assess public health risks. We developed and validated a specific and sensitive method to measure four TSNAs in both the gas- and particle-phase of secondhand smoke (SHS) using gas chromatography and ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry,. A smoking machine in an 18-m3 room-sized chamber generated relevant concentrations of SHS that were actively sampled on Teflon coated fiber glass (TCFG) filters, and passively sampled on cellulose substrates. A simple solid-liquid extraction protocol using methanol as solvent was successfully applied to both filters with high recoveries ranging from 85 to 115percent. Tandem MS parameters were optimized to obtain the best sensitivity in terms of signal to-noise ratio (S/N) for the target compounds. For each TSNA, the major fragmentation pathways as well as ion structures were elucidated and compared with previously published data. The method showed excellent performances with a linear dynamic range between 2 and 1000 ng mL-1, low detection limits (S/N> 3) of 30-300 pg.ml-1 and precision with experimental errors below 10percent for all compounds. Moreover, no interfering peaks were observed indicating a high selectivity of MS/MS without the need for a sample clean up step. The sampling and analysis method provides a sensitive and accurate tool to detect and quantify traces of TSNA in SHS polluted indoor environments.

  20. Feedback cooling of a single trapped ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Bushev; Daniel Rotter; Alex Wilson; Francois Dubin; Christoph Becher; Juergen Eschner; Rainer Blatt; Viktor Steixner; Peter Rabl; Peter Zoller

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a real-time measurement of the motion of a single ion in a Paul trap, we demonstrate its electro-mechanical cooling below the Doppler limit by homodyne feedback control (cold damping). The feedback cooling results are well described by a model based on a quantum mechanical Master Equation.

  1. Simulating a quantum magnet with trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    systems we need a quantum leap in computer simulations. We cannot translate quantum behaviour arising from dynamics, we need a `quantum leap' in simulation efficiency. As proposed in ref. 1, a universal quantumLETTERS Simulating a quantum magnet with trapped ions A. FRIEDENAUER*, H. SCHMITZ*, J. T. GLUECKERT

  2. Quantum Stochastic Heating of a Trapped Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Horvath; R. Fisher; M. J. Collett; H. J. Carmichael

    2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonant heating of a harmonically trapped ion by a standing-wave light field is described as a quantum stochastic process combining a coherent Schroedinger evolution with Bohr-Einstein quantum jumps. Quantum and semi-quantum treatments are compared.

  3. Towards a cryogenic planar ion trap for Sr-88

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakr, Waseem (Waseem S.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes experiments with ion traps constructed with electrodes in a single two-dimensional plane, and ion traps operated in a cryogenic environment at 77K and 4K temperatures. These two technologies address ...

  4. Parallel ion strings in linear multipole traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu Marciante; Caroline Champenois; J. Pedregosa-Gutierrez; Annette Calisti; Martina Knoop

    2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional radio-frequency (rf) potentials applied to linear multipole traps create extra field nodes in the radial plane which allow one to confine single ions, or strings of ions, in totally rf field-free regions. The number of nodes depends on the order of the applied multipole potentials and their relative distance can be easily tuned by the amplitude variation of the applied voltages. Simulations using molecular dynamics show that strings of ions can be laser cooled down to the Doppler limit in all directions of space. Once cooled, organized systems can be moved with very limited heating, even if the cooling process is turned off.

  5. In-Vacuum Active Electronics for Microfabricated Ion Traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas D. Guise; Spencer D. Fallek; Harley Hayden; C-S Pai; Curtis Volin; K. R. Brown; J. True Merrill; Alexa W. Harter; Jason M. Amini; Lisa M. Lust; Kelly Muldoon; Doug Carlson; Jerry Budach

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of microfabricated ion traps for the quantum information community has allowed research groups to build traps that incorporate an unprecedented number of trapping zones. However, as device complexity has grown, the number of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) channels needed to control these devices has grown as well, with some of the largest trap assemblies now requiring nearly one hundred DAC channels. Providing electrical connections for these channels into a vacuum chamber can be bulky and difficult to scale beyond the current numbers of trap electrodes. This paper reports on the development and testing of an in-vacuum DAC system that uses only 9 vacuum feedthrough connections to control a 78-electrode microfabricated ion trap. The system is characterized by trapping single and multiple $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions. The measured axial mode stability, ion heating rates, and transport fidelities for a trapped ion are comparable to systems with external(air-side) commercial DACs.

  6. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas D. Guise; Spencer D. Fallek; Kelly E. Stevens; K. R. Brown; Curtis Volin; Alexa W. Harter; Jason M. Amini; Robert E. Higashi; Son Thai Lu; Helen M. Chanhvongsak; Thi A. Nguyen; Matthew S. Marcus; Thomas R. Ohnstein; Daniel W. Youngner

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ions in a second BGA trap.

  7. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

  8. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Smith, W. W. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Narducci, F. A. [Naval Air Systems Command, EO Sensors Division, Bldg 2187, Suite 3190 Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)] [Naval Air Systems Command, EO Sensors Division, Bldg 2187, Suite 3190 Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  9. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Lindenfelser; B. Keitch; D. Kienzler; D. Bykov; P. Uebel; M. A. Schmidt; P. St. J. Russell; J. P. Home

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787(24) quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 um and 10 um.

  10. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenfelser, F; Kienzler, D; Bykov, D; Uebel, P; Schmidt, M A; Russell, P St J; Home, J P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787(24) quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 um and 10 um.

  11. Surface-electrode ion trap with integrated light source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tony Hyun

    An atomic ion is trapped at the tip of a single-mode optical fiber in a cryogenic (8 K) surface-electrode ion trap. The fiber serves as an integrated source of laser light, which drives the quadrupolequbit transition of ...

  12. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R. D., E-mail: rdgraham@uw.edu; Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B., E-mail: blinov@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195-1560 (United States); Chen, S.-P. [University of Washington, Department of Electrical Engineering, 185 Stevens Way, Paul Allen Center - Room AE100R, Campus Box 352500, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  13. Stability and dynamics of ion rings in linear multipole traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Cartarius; Cecilia Cormick; Giovanna Morigi

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapped singly-charged ions can crystallize as a result of laser cooling. The emerging structure depends on the number of particles and on the geometry of the trapping potential. In linear multipole radiofrequency traps, the geometry of the radial potential can lead to the formation of single-ring structures. We analyse the conditions and stability of single rings as a function of the number of poles. For larger numbers of ions the rings form tubes in which the arrangement of the ions corresponds to a triangular lattice folded onto a cylinder. The stability of these tubular structures is numerically studied for different lattice constants and their normal mode spectrum is determined.

  14. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, R J; Leibfried, D; Wesenberg, J H; Bollinger, J J; Amini, J M; Blakestad, R B; Britton, J; Home, J P; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Ozeri, R; Shiga, N; Wineland, D J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 microns above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300 plus or minus 30 per second for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

  15. Quantum gates, sensors, and systems with trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum information science promises a host of new and useful applications in communication, simulation, and computational algorithms. Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading physical systems with potential to implement ...

  16. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Leibrandt; Robert J. Clark; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Paul Antohi; Waseem Bakr; Kenneth R. Brown; Isaac L. Chuang

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Additionally, laser ablation is used to load traps with a trap depth (40 meV) below where electron impact ionization loading is typically successful ($\\gtrsim$ 500 meV).

  17. Ion Crystals Produced by Laser and Sympathetic Cooling in a Linear RF Ion Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed investigation of ion crystals produced by laser and sympathetic cooling in a linear RF trap has been conducted. The laser cooling methods were examined and applied to the trapped ^24Mg^(positive) ions. The crystals produced by the laser...

  18. Ion Crystals Produced by Laser and Sympathetic Cooling in a Linear RF Ion Trap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed investigation of ion crystals produced by laser and sympathetic cooling in a linear RF trap has been conducted. The laser cooling methods were examined and applied to the trapped ^24Mg^(positive) ions. The crystals produced by the laser...

  19. Tritium--helium-3 mass difference using the Penning trap mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyck, R.S. Jr.; Farnham, D.L.; Schwinberg, P.B. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic masses of both [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He have been measured with a Penning trap mass spectrometer that utilizes a frequency-shift detector to observe ion cyclotron resonances. Present resolution exceeds 1 part in 10[sup 9] and is limited only by the stability of the magnetic field. The leading systematic shift (at [approx lt]1 part in 10[sup 10]) is due to the residual quadratic [bold B] field dependence. The atomic masses have been combined to yield [Delta][ital Mc][sup 2]([sup 3]H[minus][sup 3]He)=18 590.1(1.7) eV. The excellent agreement with recent results from [beta] spectrometers lends strong support for new limits on the neutrino's rest mass.

  20. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  1. Scalable Digital Hardware for a Trapped Ion Quantum Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mount, Emily; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for trapping and cooling the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  2. Future works The Ion trap -Laser cooling technique has the ad-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensinger, Winfried

    Future works The Ion trap - Laser cooling technique has the ad- vantages to easily manipulate apparatus for trace isotope analysis. Guidance of the ion beams to the trap Laser cooling of ions with this apparatus Realization of trapping ions from ICP-MS Optimization of the experimental system for detecting

  3. Ion trapping in the emitter sheath in thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundgren, L.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of ion trapping in the emitter sheath in ignited thermionic converters is studied. The ion trapping prevents the emitter-sheath barrier from being higher than approximately 0.1 eV, when the current decreases in the converter. This gives a condition for the constriction of the arc. I-V curves are calculated for an ignited thermionic converter with a hydrodynamic plasma theory that takes into account the effect of Coulomb scattering and volume recombination, but assumes that the electron temperature is constant in the plasma.

  4. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniilidis, N.

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 ?m. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates ...

  5. Improving Ion Mobility Measurement Sensitivity by Utilizing Helium in an Ion Funnel-Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases no significant effects upon performance are expected for IMS of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap.

  6. Advanced quadrupole ion trap instrumentation for low level vehicle emissions measurements. CRADA final report for number ORNL93-0238

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Goeringer, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dearth, M.A. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Environmental Research Consortium

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amenable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of sensitivity, specificity, speed, and flexibility with respect to the technical requirements of the top 15 analyzer.

  7. Quantum energy teleportation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hotta, Masahiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy-transfer channel without heat generation.

  8. Quantum Energy Teleportation with Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed much higher than the speed of the phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with the phonon fluctuation in the ground state during short time and is projectively measured in order to get information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is announced to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge yet when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ion at the right edge by using the announced information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the ex...

  9. Quantum Energy Teleportation with Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Hotta

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time, and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction, and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy transfer channel without heat generation.

  10. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ettenauer; M. C. Simon; A. T. Gallant; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; V. V. Simon; M. Brodeur; A. Chaudhuri; E. Mané; C. Andreoiu; G. Audi; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; P. Delheij; G. Gwinner; A. Lapierre; D. Lunney; M. R. Pearson; R. Ringle; J. Ullrich; J. Dilling

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly-charged ions (HCI), using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly-charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb-isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q = 8 - 12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly-charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivalled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {\\beta} emitter 74Rb (T1/2 = 65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved QEC-value are presented.

  11. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedran Dunjko; Nicolai Friis; Hans J. Briegel

    2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization. In particular, classical random walks were substituted by Szegedy-type quantum walks, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose how such classical and quantum agents can be implemented in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are `upgraded' to their quantum counterparts by nested coherent controlization, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  12. Photon trap for neutralization of negative ions beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, S S; Ivanov, A A; Kotelnikov, I A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For effectively neutralization of the powerful negative ions beams of hydrogen and deuterium the photon target is considered in long time. The attractiveness of the traditional approach (Fabry-Perot resonators) to their creation is limited to a number of stringent technical requirements and large economic costs. In this paper we propose a new concept of non-resonant photon trap (storage) for creation more technologically simple optical neutralizers.

  13. Nuclear spin qubits in a trapped-ion quantum computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Feng; Y. Y. Xu; F. Zhou; D. Suter

    2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical systems must fulfill a number of conditions to qualify as useful quantum bits (qubits) for quantum information processing, including ease of manipulation, long decoherence times, and high fidelity readout operations. Since these conditions are hard to satisfy with a single system, it may be necessary to combine different degrees of freedom. Here we discuss a possible system, based on electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom in trapped ions. The nuclear spin yields long decoherence times, while the electronic spin, in a magnetic field gradient, provides efficient manipulation, and the optical transitions of the ions assure a selective and efficient initialization and readout.

  14. Laser Stabilization for Quantum Computing with Trapped Barium ions Corey Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    system used to trap and cool Ba+ ions used for quantum computation research. The lasers, at 650 and 985 perform ex- periments, including trapping ions themselves. A trap works using both a laser cooling system in the cooling system is important to its success. A proposed method to stabilize lasers is to use an external

  15. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education, 200433 Shanghai (China); Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup ?10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup ?4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  16. Design of superconducting transmission line integrated surface-electrode ion-traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, David Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricated superconducting surface electrode ion traps with integrated microwave coplanar waveguides using direct-write optical lithography and a niobium on sapphire process. We then tested these traps in a closed cycle ...

  17. Precise determination of micromotion for trapped-ion optical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, J; Burgermeister, T; Mehlstäubler, T E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As relative systematic frequency uncertainties in trapped-ion spectroscopy are approaching the low 10^{-18} range, motional frequency shifts account for a considerable fraction of the uncertainty budget. Micromotion, a driven motion fundamentally connected to the principle of the Paul trap, is a particular concern in these systems. In this article, we experimentally investigate at this level three common methods for minimizing and determining the micromotion amplitude. We develop a generalized model for a quantitative application of the photon-correlation technique, which is applicable in the commonly encountered regime where the transition linewidth is comparable to the rf drive frequency. We show that a fractional frequency uncertainty due to the 2nd-order Doppler shift below 1 x 10^{-20} can be achieved. The quantitative evaluation is verified in an interleaved measurement with the conceptually simpler resolved sideband method. If not performed deep within the Lamb-Dicke regime, a temperature-dependent off...

  18. Integrated Fiber-Mirror Ion Trap for Strong Ion-Cavity Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgit Brandstätter; Andrew McClung; Klemens Schüppert; Bernardo Casabone; Konstantin Friebe; Andreas Stute; Piet O. Schmidt; Christian Deutsch; Jakob Reichel; Rainer Blatt; Tracy E. Northup

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to $12$ for FFPCs longer than $200 \\mu$m in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate distortions of the potential due to the fibers. Home-built fiber feedthroughs connect the FFPC to external optics, and an integrated nanopositioning system affords the possibility of retracting or realigning the cavity without breaking vacuum.

  19. A simple method for characterization of the magnetic field in an ion trap using Be+ ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianwei Shen; Andrii Borodin; Stephan Schiller

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a simple method for the determination of the magnetic field in an ion trap using laser-cooled Be+ ions. The method is not based on magnetic resonance and thus does not require delivering radiofrequency (RF) radiation to the trap. Instead, stimulated Raman spectroscopy is used, and only an easily generated optical sideband of the laser cooling wave is required. The d.c. magnetic vector, averaged over the Be+ ion ensemble, is determined. Furthermore, the field strength can be minimized and an upper limit for the field gradient can be determined. The resolution of the method is 0.04 G at present. The relevance for precision rovibrational spectroscopy of molecular hydrogen ions is briefly discussed.

  20. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-xi Liu; L. F. Wei; J. R. Johansson; J. S. Tsai; Franco Nori

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the "vibrational" mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a SQUID). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings/decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way.

  1. Measuring molecular electric dipoles using trapped atomic ions and ultrafast laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordi Mur-Petit; Juan José García-Ripoll

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a hybrid quantum system composed of an ion and an electric dipole. We show how a trapped ion can be used to measure the small electric field generated by a classical dipole. We discuss the application of this scheme to measure the electric dipole moment of cold polar molecules, whose internal state can be controlled with ultrafast laser pulses, by trapping them in the vicinity of a trapped ion.

  2. Wavelength-Scale Imaging of Trapped Ions using a Phase Fresnel lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jechow; E. W. Streed; B. G. Norton; M. J. Petrasiunas; D. Kielpinski

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated phase Fresnel lens was used to image ytterbium ions trapped in a radio frequency Paul trap. The ions were laser cooled close to the Doppler limit on the 369.5 nm transition, reducing the ion motion so that each ion formed a near point source. By detecting the ion fluorescence on the same transition, near diffraction limited imaging with spot sizes of below 440 nm (FWHM) was achieved. This is the first demonstration of imaging trapped ions with a resolution on the order of the transition wavelength.

  3. Shelving and Probe Efficiency in Trapped Ion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schacht, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized probe sequence typical of trapped ion experiments using shelving is studied. Detection efficiency is analyzed for finite shelved state lifetimes and using multi-modal count distributions. Multi-modal distributions are more appropriate for measurements that use a small number of ions than the simple Poisson counting statistics usually considered and have a larger variance that may be significant in determining uncertainties and in making weighted fits. Optimal probe times and the resulting state detection efficiency and sensitivity are determined for arbitrary cooling rates, initial states and shelved state lifetimes, in terms of a probe coherence time {\\tau}p. A universal optimal probe time of tp ~ 0.43{\\tau}p is shown to give an almost optimal probe sensitivity for most systems.

  4. Probing Entanglement in Adiabatic Quantum Optimization with Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Hauke; Lars Bonnes; Markus Heyl; Wolfgang Lechner

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Adiabatic quantum optimization has been proposed as a route to solve NP-complete problems, with a possible quantum speedup compared to classical algorithms. However, the precise role of quantum effects, such as entanglement, in these optimization protocols is still unclear. We propose a setup of cold trapped ions that allows one to quantitatively characterize, in a controlled experiment, the interplay of entanglement, decoherence, and non-adiabaticity in adiabatic quantum optimization. We show that, in this way, a broad class of NP-complete problems becomes accessible for quantum simulations, including the knapsack problem, number partitioning, and instances of the max-cut problem. Moreover, a general theoretical study reveals correlations of the success probability with entanglement at the end of the protocol. From exact numerical simulations for small systems and linear ramps, however, we find no substantial correlations with the entanglement during the optimization. For the final state, we derive analytically a universal upper bound for the success probability as a function of entanglement, which can be measured in experiment. The proposed trapped-ion setups and the presented study of entanglement address pertinent questions of adiabatic quantum optimization, which may be of general interest across experimental platforms.

  5. Offline trapping of $^{221}$Fr in a magneto-optical trap from implantation of an $^{225}$Ac ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; R. Collister; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; H. Heggen; J. Lassen; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson; S. Raeder; A. Teigelhöfer

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new technique to prepare an offline source of francium for trapping in a magneto-optical trap. Implanting a radioactive beam of $^{225}$Ac, $t_{1/2} = 9.920(3)$ days, in a foil, allows use of the decay products, i.e.$^{221}$Fr, $t_{1/2} = 288.0(4)$ s. $^{221}$Fr is ejected from the foil by the $\\alpha$ decay of $^{225}$Ac. This technique is compatible with the online accumulation of a laser-cooled atomic francium sample for a series of planned parity non-conservation measurements at TRIUMF. We obtain a 34% release efficiency for $^{221}$Fr from the recoil source based on particle detector measurements. We find that laser cooling operation with the source is $8^{+10}_{-5}$ times less efficient than from a mass-separated ion beam of $^{221}$Fr in the current geometry. While the flux of this source is two to three orders of magnitude lower than typical francium beams from ISOL facilities, the source provides a longer-term supply of francium for offline studies.

  6. The ReA electron-beam ion trap charge breeder for reacceleration of rare isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Nash, S.; Rencsok, R.; Tobos, L.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Wittmer, W.; Wu, X.; Bollen, G.; Leitner, D.; Syphers, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 South Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Collaboration: ReA Team

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ReA is a post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. ReA is designed to reaccelerate rare isotopes to energies of a few MeV/u following production by projectile fragmentation and thermalization in a gas cell. The facility consists of four main components: an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder, an achromatic charge-over-mass (Q/A) separator, a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder was specifically designed to efficiently capture continuous beams of singly charged ions injected at low energy (<60 keV), charge breed in less than 50 ms, and extract highly charged ions to the Q/A separator for charge-state selection and reacceleration through the accelerator structures. The use of highly charged ions to reach high beam energies is a key aspect that makes ReA a compact and cost-efficient post-accelerator. The EBIT is characterized by a high-current electron gun, a long multi-electrode trap structure and a dual magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density necessary for fast charge breeding of short-lived isotopes as well as the high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents an overview and the status of the ReA EBIT, which has extracted for reacceleration tests stable {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ion beams produced from injected gas and more recently {sup 39}K{sup 16+} beams by injecting stable {sup 39,41}K{sup +} ions from an external ion source.

  7. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Daniilidis; S. Narayanan; S. A. Möller; R. Clark; T. E. Lee; P. J. Leek; A. Wallraff; St. Schulz; F. Schmidt-Kaler; H. Häffner

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with trapping height of approximately 240 micron. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

  8. Title of dissertation: ULTRAFAST CONTROL OF SPIN AND MOTION IN TRAPPED IONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Christopher

    , I report here on the first experiments using ultrafast laser pulses to control the internalABSTRACT Title of dissertation: ULTRAFAST CONTROL OF SPIN AND MOTION IN TRAPPED IONS Jonathan and external states of a single trapped ion. I begin with experiments in ultrafast spin control, showing how

  9. Heating of trapped ions from the quantum ground state Q. A. Turchette,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Cass

    Heating of trapped ions from the quantum ground state Q. A. Turchette,*, D. Kielpinski, B. E. King. Monroe, and D. J. Wineland Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology heating of laser-cooled 9 Be ions held in radio-frequency Paul traps. We have measured heating rates

  10. Efficient Photoionization-Loading of Trapped Cadmium Ions with Ultrafast Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Deslauriers; M. Acton; B. B. Blinov; K. -A. Brickman; P. C. Haljan; W. K. Hensinger; D. Hucul; S. Katnik; R. N. Kohn, Jr.; P. J. Lee; M. J. Madsen; P. Maunz; S. Olmschenk; D. L. Moehring; D. Stick; J. Sterk; M. Yeo; K. C. Younge; C. Monroe

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic cadmium ions are loaded into radiofrequency ion traps by photoionization of atoms in a cadmium vapor with ultrafast laser pulses. The photoionization is driven through an intermediate atomic resonance with a frequency-quadrupled mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser that produces pulses of either 100 fsec or 1 psec duration at a central wavelength of 229 nm. The large bandwidth of the pulses photoionizes all velocity classes of the Cd vapor, resulting in high loading efficiencies compared to previous ion trap loading techniques. Measured loading rates are compared with a simple theoretical model, and we conclude that this technique can potentially ionize every atom traversing the laser beam within the trapping volume. This may allow the operation of ion traps with lower levels of background pressures and less trap electrode surface contamination. The technique and laser system reported here should be applicable to loading most laser-cooled ion species.

  11. Ion-neutral sympathetic cooling in a hybrid linear rf Paul and magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, D S; Wells, J E; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long range polarization forces between ions and neutral atoms result in large elastic scattering cross sections, e.g., 10^6 a.u. for Na+ on Na or Ca+ on Na at cold and ultracold temperatures. This suggests that a hybrid ion-neutral trap should offer a general means for significant sympathetic cooling of atomic or molecular ions. We present SIMION 7.0 simulation results concerning the advantages and limitations of sympathetic cooling within a hybrid trap apparatus, consisting of a linear rf Paul trap concentric with a Na magneto-optical trap (MOT). This paper explores the impact of various heating mechanisms on the hybrid system and how parameters related to the MOT, Paul trap, number of ions, and ion species affect the efficiency of the sympathetic cooling.

  12. Ion-neutral sympathetic cooling in a hybrid linear rf Paul and magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Goodman; I. Sivarajah; J. E. Wells; F. A. Narducci; W. W. Smith

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Long range polarization forces between ions and neutral atoms result in large elastic scattering cross sections, e.g., 10^6 a.u. for Na+ on Na or Ca+ on Na at cold and ultracold temperatures. This suggests that a hybrid ion-neutral trap should offer a general means for significant sympathetic cooling of atomic or molecular ions. We present SIMION 7.0 simulation results concerning the advantages and limitations of sympathetic cooling within a hybrid trap apparatus, consisting of a linear rf Paul trap concentric with a Na magneto-optical trap (MOT). This paper explores the impact of various heating mechanisms on the hybrid system and how parameters related to the MOT, Paul trap, number of ions, and ion species affect the efficiency of the sympathetic cooling.

  13. Local Detection of Quantum Correlations with a Single Trapped Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gessner; M. Ramm; T. Pruttivarasin; A. Buchleitner; H. -P. Breuer; H. Haeffner

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics, quantum correlations are at the heart of quantum information science. Detection of correlations usually requires access to all the correlated subsystems. However, in many realistic scenarios this is not feasible since only some of the subsystems can be controlled and measured. Such cases can be treated as open quantum systems interacting with an inaccessible environment. Initial system-environment correlations play a fundamental role for the dynamics of open quantum systems. Following a recent proposal, we exploit the impact of the correlations on the open-system dynamics to detect system-environment quantum correlations without accessing the environment. We use two degrees of freedom of a trapped ion to model an open system and its environment. The present method does not require any assumptions about the environment, the interaction or the initial state and therefore provides a versatile tool for the study of quantum systems.

  14. Theory of phonon dynamics in an ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, T; Sengupta, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a theory to address the non-equilibrium dynamics of phonons in a one-dimensional trapped ion system. We elaborate our earlier results obtained in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 111}, 170406 (2013) to chart out the mechanism of dynamics-induced cooling and entanglement generation between phonons in these systems when subjected to a linear ramp protocol inducing site-specific tuning of on-site interactions between the phonons. We further extend these studies to non-linear ramps and periodic drive protocols and identify the optimal ramp protocol for minimal cooling and entanglement generation time. We qualitatively address the effect of noise arising out of fluctuation of the intensity of the laser used to generate entanglement and provide a detailed discussion of a realistic experimental setup which may serve as a test bed for our theory.

  15. Mass measurements near the $r$-process path using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Van Schelt; D. Lascar; G. Savard; J. A. Clark; S. Caldwell; A. Chaudhuri; J. Fallis; J. P. Greene; A. F. Levand; G. Li; K. S. Sharma; M. G. Sternberg; T. Sun; B. J. Zabransky

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of 40 neutron-rich nuclides from Z = 51 to 64 were measured at an average precision of $\\delta m/m= 10^{-7}$ using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. The measurements, of fission fragments from a $^{252}$Cf spontaneous fission source in a helium gas catcher, approach the predicted path of the astrophysical $r$ process. Where overlap exists, this data set is largely consistent with previous measurements from Penning traps, storage rings, and reaction energetics, but large systematic deviations are apparent in $\\beta$-endpoint measurements. Differences in mass excess from the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation of up to 400 keV are seen, as well as systematic disagreement with various mass models.

  16. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  17. Radial transport of energetic ions in the presence of trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Wang, W.; Ethier, S.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of transport of hot ions is studied in the presence of microturbulence generated by the trapped electron mode in a Tokamak using massively parallel, first principle based global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation, and with the help of a passive tracer method. Passing and trapped hot ions are observed to exhibit inverse and inverse square scaling with energy, while those with isotropic pitch distribution are found to exhibit inverse dependence on energy. For all types of hot ions, namely, isotropic, passing, and trapped, the radial transport appears to be subdiffusive for the parameters considered.

  18. Trapped Ion Quantum Error Correcting Protocols Using Only Global Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph F. Goodwin; Benjamin J. Brown; Graham Stutter; Howard Dale; Richard C. Thompson; Terry Rudolph

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum error-correcting codes are many-body entangled states that are prepared and measured using complex sequences of entangling operations. Each element of such an entangling sequence introduces noise to delicate quantum information during the encoding or reading out of the code. It is important therefore to find efficient entangling protocols to avoid the loss of information. Here we propose an experiment that uses only global entangling operations to encode an arbitrary logical qubit to either the five-qubit repetition code or the five-qubit code, with a six-ion Coulomb crystal architecture in a Penning trap. We show that the use of global operations enables us to prepare and read out these codes using only six and ten global entangling pulses, respectively. The proposed experiment also allows the acquisition of syndrome information during readout. We provide a noise analysis for the presented protocols, estimating that we can achieve a six-fold improvement in coherence time with noise as high as $\\sim 1\\%$ on each entangling operation.

  19. Extending Penning trap mass measurements with SHIPTRAP to the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany and Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Duellmann, Ch. E. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eibach, M. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eliseev, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Hessberger, F. P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ramirez, E. Minaya [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Nesterenko, D. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides provides accurate mass values and absolute binding energies. Such mass measurements are sensitive indicators of the nuclear structure evolution far away from stability. Recently, direct mass measurements have been extended to the heavy elements nobelium (Z=102) and lawrencium (Z=103) with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The results probe nuclear shell effects at N=152. New developments will pave the way to access even heavier nuclides.

  20. An optical-fiber interface to a trapped-ion quantum computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tony Hyun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapped-ion quantum computer is an atom-based implementation of a quantum computer that has successfully demonstrated numerous quantum algorithms and the potential for scalability. Fundamental to its operation is the ...

  1. On the application of radio frequency voltages to ion traps via helical resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Siverns; L. R. Simkins; S. Weidt; W. K. Hensinger

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions confined using a Paul trap require a stable, high voltage and low noise radio frequency (RF) potential. We present a guide for the design and construction of a helical coil resonator for a desired frequency that maximises the quality factor for a set of experimental constraints. We provide an in-depth analysis of the system formed from a shielded helical coil and an ion trap by treating the system as a lumped element model. This allows us to predict the resonant frequency and quality factor in terms of the physical parameters of the resonator and the properties of the ion trap. We also compare theoretical predictions with experimental data for different resonators, and predict the voltage applied to the ion trap as a function of the Q-factor, input power and the properties of the resonant circuit.

  2. Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerme, Philip J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

  3. Insensitivity of the rate of ion motional heating to trap-electrode material over a large temperature range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaverini, John

    We present measurements of trapped-ion motional-state heating rates in niobium and gold surface-electrode ion traps over a range of trap-electrode temperatures from approximately 4 K to room temperature (295 K) in a single ...

  4. Optimal control of entangling operations for trapped-ion quantum computing V. Nebendahl,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    . In the quantum circuit model, information is encoded in quantum bits qu- bits and manipulated by applying unitary to a vibrational mode of the ions' motion in the trap. To achieve a gate on either a specific ion or a pair of ions that it interacts only with a single ion at a time 6 . Then, a CNOT gate or an equivalent entangling gate between

  5. Ultracold molecules for the masses: evaporative cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Deborah

    cooling, until now none of these techniques have been applicable to molecules. In this thesis, two majorUltracold molecules for the masses: evaporative cooling and magneto-optical trapping by B. K. Stuhl for the masses: evaporative cooling and magneto-optical trapping written by B. K. Stuhl has been approved

  6. Transport of ions in a segmented linear Paul trap in printed-circuit-board technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Huber; T. Deuschle; W. Schnitzler; R. Reichle; K. Singer; F. Schmidt-Kaler

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the construction and operation of a segmented linear Paul trap, fabricated in printed-circuit-board technology with an electrode segment width of 500 microns. We prove the applicability of this technology to reliable ion trapping and report the observation of Doppler cooled ion crystals of Ca-40 with this kind of traps. Measured trap frequencies agree with numerical simulations at the level of a few percent from which we infer a high fabrication accuracy of the segmented trap. To demonstrate its usefulness and versatility for trapped ion experiments we study the fast transport of a single ion. Our experimental results show a success rate of 99.0(1)% for a transport distance of 2x2mm in a round-trip time of T=20us, which corresponds to 4 axial oscillations only. We theoretically and experimentally investigate the excitation of oscillations caused by fast ion transports with error-function voltage ramps: For a slightly slower transport (a round-trip shuttle within T=30us) we observe non-adiabatic motional excitation of 0.89(15)meV.

  7. Authentic samples were analyzed on low and high resolution, ion-trap and linear collision cell mass spectrometers. A clustering algorithm used an adjusted dot product as a measure of spectral similarity to create

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    speed (e.g. metabolite identifications in Standard Reference Materials studies); · The quality, size,183 precursor ions, 121,591 spectra of positive and negative ions at different collision energies. Building is an effective method for chemical identification because of its reliable searching results and fast searching

  8. ablation ion trap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geometry that generates a two dimensional lattice of point Paul traps. C. E. Pearson; D. R. Leibrandt; W. S. Bakr; W. J. Mallard; K. R. Brown; I. L. Chuang 2005-11-02 15...

  9. advanced ion trap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geometry that generates a two dimensional lattice of point Paul traps. C. E. Pearson; D. R. Leibrandt; W. S. Bakr; W. J. Mallard; K. R. Brown; I. L. Chuang 2005-11-02 17 Cold...

  10. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  11. Loading of a surface electrode ion trap from a remote, pre-cooled source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sage, Jeremy M; Chiaverini, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate for the first time the loading of ions into a surface electrode trap (SET) from a remote, laser-cooled source of neutral atoms. We first cool and load $\\sim$ $10^6$ neutral $^{88}$Sr atoms into a magneto-optical trap (MOT) from an oven that has no line-of-sight with the SET. The cold atoms are then pushed with a resonant laser into the trap region where they are subsequently photoionized and trapped in an SET operated at a cryogenic temperature of 4.6 K. We present studies of the loading process and show that our technique achieves ion loading into a shallow (15 meV depth) trap at rates as high as 125 ions/s while drastically reducing the amount of deposition of metal on the trap surface as compared with direct loading from a hot vapor. Furthermore, we note that due to multiple stages of isotopic filtering in our loading process, this technique has enhanced isotopic selectivity over other loading methods. Rapid loading from a clean, isotopically pure, and pre-cooled source will potentially enab...

  12. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?°C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  13. Initial commissioning results with the NSCL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Leitner, D.; Ottarson, J.; Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ReA reaccelerator is being added to the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) fragmentation facility in order to provide exotic rare-isotope beams, not available at the Isotope Separation On-Line facilities, in the several-MeV/u energy range. The first stage of the NSCL reaccelerator complex, consisting of an EBIT charge breeder, a room-temperature radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and superconducting linear accelerator modules, has been completed and is being put into operation. Commissioning of the EBIT has started by extracting charge-bred residual gas ions, ions created from a Ne gas jet directed across the EBIT's electron beam and ions captured from an external test ion source. Charge-bred ions from the Ne gas jet have been extracted as a pulse and accelerated through the RFQ and the two cryomodules.

  14. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  15. Laser cooling of two trapped ions: Sideband cooling beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit G. Morigi,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    of ultracold atoms, have provided renewed interest and applications for laser cooling techniques 1- onstrated to be a successful technique for cooling single ions to the ground state of a harmonic trap 9Laser cooling of two trapped ions: Sideband cooling beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit G. Morigi,1 J

  16. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  17. Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Püschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (˜1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

  18. Electron shakeoff following the $\\Beta$+ decay of trapped 35Ar+ ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couratin, C; Fabre, B; Pons, B; Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Ban, G; Breitenfeldt, M; Delahaye, P; Durand, D; Méry, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Porobic, T; Quéméner, G; Rodriguez, D; Severijns, N; Thomas, J C; Van Gorp, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron shakeoff of $^{35}$Cl atoms resulting from the $\\beta$$^+$ decay of $^{35}$Ar$^+$ ions has been investigated using a Paul trap coupled to a recoil-ion spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of the recoiling daughter nuclei is compared to theoretical calculations accounting for shakeoff and Auger processes. The calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and enable to identify the ionization reaction routes leading to the formation of all charge states.

  19. Novel endothermic and exothermic ion-molecule reactions as observed in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bricker, Donald Lee

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the electric field strength in. v/m and t ~ 2rB/E (6) B is the magnetic field strength in tesla. 6 The standard FTICR trap cell developed by McIver is a one 7 region cell consisting of six flat plates arranged in a rectangular geometry. A positive... q is the charge on the KE = q r B /2m (7) 2 2 2 ion, r is the radius of the trap cell in meters, B is the magnetic field strength in tesla and m is the mass of the ion in kilograms. therefore an ion of m/z 100 in a 1. 9 tesla magnetic field...

  20. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F. [Koc University, Rumelifeneriyolu, Sariyer, Istanbul TR-34450 (Turkey); LASIM, Universite de Lyon and CNRS UMR 5579, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, FR-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  1. An ion ring in a linear multipole trap for optical frequency metrology C. Champenois, # M. Marciante, J. PedregosaGutierrez, M. Houssin, and M. Knoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    An ion ring in a linear multipole trap for optical frequency metrology C. Champenois, # M­Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184­8795, Japan (Dated: May 31, 2010) A ring crystal of ions trapped in a linear multipole multipole traps where the electric field amplitude is almost null in the center part of the trap [13]. Large

  2. Error Compensation of Single-Qubit Gates in a Surface Electrode Ion Trap Using Composite Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily Mount; Chingiz Kabytayev; Stephen Crain; Robin Harper; So-Young Baek; Geert Vrijsen; Steven Flammia; Kenneth R. Brown; Peter Maunz; Jungsang Kim

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapped atomic ion qubits feature desirable properties for use in a quantum computer such as long coherence times (Langer et al., 2005), high qubit measurement fidelity (Noek et al., 2013), and universal logic gates (Home et al., 2009). The quality of quantum logic gate operations on trapped ion qubits has been limited by the stability of the control fields at the ion location used to implement the gate operations. For this reason, the logic gates utilizing microwave fields (Brown et al., 2011; Shappert et al., 2013; Harty et al., 2014) have shown gate fidelities several orders of magnitude better than those using laser fields (Knill et al., 2008; Benhelm et al., 2008; Ballance et al., 2014). Here, we demonstrate low-error single-qubit gates performed using stimulated Raman transitions on an ion qubit trapped in a microfabricated chip trap. Gate errors are measured using a randomized benchmarking protocol (Knill et al., 2008; Wallman et al., 2014; Magesan et al., 2012), where amplitude error in the control beam is compensated using various pulse sequence techniques (Wimperis, 1994; Low et al., 2014). Using B2 compensation (Wimperis, 1994), we demonstrate single qubit gates with an average error per randomized Clifford group gate of $3.6(3)\\times10^{-4}$. We also show that compact palindromic pulse compensation sequences (PD$n$) (Low et al., 2014) compensate for amplitude errors as designed.

  3. Architecture for a large-scale ion-trap quantum computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    individually experimentally demonstrated. The quantum CCD To build up a large-scale quantum computer, we have demonstrated in this system, there exist theoretical and technical obstacles to scaling up the approachArchitecture for a large-scale ion-trap quantum computer D. Kielpinski*, C. Monroe & D. J. Wineland

  4. Ion transport in macroscopic RF linear traps Jofre Pedregosa-Gutierrez,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ´er^ome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France (Dated: July 18, 2014) Abstract Efficient transport of cold atomsIon transport in macroscopic RF linear traps Jofre Pedregosa-Gutierrez, Caroline Champenois, Marius information processing to frequency metrology. Different transport schemes have been developed, which allow

  5. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  6. Effects of emitter sheath ion reflection and trapped ions on thermionic converter performance using an isothermal electron model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Main, G.L.; Lam, S.H.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper couples exact collisionless sheath calculations to an isothermal electron model of a thermionic converter. The emitter sheath structure takes into account reflected ions, trapped ions, and surface emission ions. It is shown that lessening the net loss of ions at the emitter in the ignited mode by these phenomena degrades performance. In addition, it is shown that when the emitter returns too many of the ions, the arc is extinguished because there is insufficient resistive heating to maintain the necessary plasma electron temperature for ionization. These results suggest that the ignited mode cannot be improved much. However, nonignited modes in which the electron temperature remains low, such as the pulsed mode, do not suffer from this adverse behavior.

  7. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  8. Quantum feedback cooling of a single trapped ion in front of a mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Steixner; P. Rabl; P. Zoller

    2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a theory of quantum feedback cooling of a single ion trapped in front of a mirror. By monitoring the motional sidebands of the light emitted into the mirror mode we infer the position of the ion, and act back with an appropriate force to cool the ion. We derive a feedback master equation along the lines of the quantum feedback theory developed by Wiseman and Milburn, which provides us with cooling times and final temperatures as a function of feedback gain and various system parameters.

  9. Cryogenic surface electrode ion traps with integrated superconducting microwave resonators for polar molecular ion spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antohi, Paul Bogdan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapped cold molecules open the possibility of studying ultracold chemistry and astrophysical processes in laboratory settings. Their rich internal structure also makes them suitable for quantum information manipulation ...

  10. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to...

  11. EBIT - Electronic Beam Ion Trap: N Divison experimental physics annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-faceted research effort of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N-Division of the Physics and Space Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continues to contribute significant results to the physical sciences from studies with low energy very highly charged heavy ions. The EBIT program attracts a number of collaborators from the US and abroad for the different projects. The collaborations are partly carried out through participating graduate students demonstrating the excellent educational capabilities at the LLNL EBIT facilities. Moreover, participants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are engaged in the EBIT project. This report describes EBIT work for 1995 in atomic structure measurements and radiative transition probabilities, spectral diagnostics for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, ion/surface interaction studies, electron-ion interactions studies, retrap and ion collisions, and instrumental development.

  12. Laser Cooling of Trapped Ions. W. M. ITANO,J. C. BERGQUIST,J. J. BOLLINGERand D. J. WINELAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques, because the ions can be held for long peri- ods in a well-controlled environment. CoolingLaser Cooling of Trapped Ions. W. M. ITANO,J. C. BERGQUIST,J. J. BOLLINGERand D. J. WINELAND Time ordered structures of ions, can be observed only at low temperatures. We use the term cooling*to mean

  13. Influence of monolayer contamination on electric-field-noise heating in ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Safavi-Naini; E. Kim; P. F. Weck; P. Rabl; H. R. Sadeghpour

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field noise is a hinderance to the assembly of large scale quantum computers based on entangled trapped ions. Apart from ubiquitous technical noise sources, experimental studies of trapped ion heating have revealed additional limiting contributions to this noise, originating from atomic processes on the electrode surfaces. In a recent work [A. Safavi-Naini et al., Phys. Rev. A 84, 023412 (2011)] we described a microscopic model for this excess electric field noise, which points a way towards a more systematic understanding of surface adsorbates as progenitors of electric field jitter noise. Here, we address the impact of surface monolayer contamination on adsorbate induced noise processes. By using exact numerical calculations for H and N atomic monolayers on an Au(111) surface representing opposite extremes of physisorption and chemisorption, we show that an additional monolayer can significantly affect the noise power spectrum and either enhance or suppress the resulting heating rates.

  14. Simulating the Haldane Phase in Trapped Ion Spins Using Optical Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Cohen; P. Richerme; Z. -X. Gong; C. Monroe; A. Retzker

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to experimentally explore the Haldane phase in spin-one XXZ antiferromagnetic chains using trapped ions. We show how to adiabatically prepare the ground states of the Haldane phase, demonstrate their robustness against sources of experimental noise, and propose ways to detect the Haldane ground states based on their excitation gap and exponentially decaying correlations, nonvanishing nonlocal string order, and doubly-degenerate entanglement spectrum.

  15. Measurement of isotope ratio of Ca{sup +} ions in a linear Paul Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Minamino, K.; Nagamoto, D.; Hasegawa, S. [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of isotope ratios of Calcium is very useful in many fields. So we demonstrated the measurement of isotope ratios of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}(abundance 96.4%) to {sup 44}Ca{sup +}(2.09%) ions in a linear Paul trap with several laser lights tuning to the isotope shifts. And we found that the experimental parameters had large influences on the measurement of the isotope ratios.

  16. Alfvén ion-cyclotron instability in an axisymmetric trap with oblique injection of fast atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsidulko, Yu. A.; Chernoshtanov, I. S., E-mail: cherivn@ngs.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditions for the onset of Alfvén ion-cyclotron instability and the spatial structure of unstable modes in an axisymmetric mirror trap with oblique injection of fast atoms are studied. It is shown that the main contribution to instability comes from the inverse population of ions in the velocity space domain into which atoms are injected. Using the distribution function of fast ions obtained by approximately solving the Fokker-Planck equation, the instability threshold in terms of ?{sub ?} is determined in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation as a function of the geometric parameters and the parameters of injection and target plasma. It is demonstrated that the stability threshold increases substantially when the radius of the hot plasma decreases to a size comparable with the Larmor radius of fast ions. It is shown that the perturbed fields near the axis and at the plasma periphery can rotate in opposite directions, which is important for the interpretation of experimental data.

  17. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  18. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)! Seminar 4 (UN)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Â?umer, Slobodan

    for compositional analysis of solid surfaces and thin films. When a surface is bombarded by high energy beam! ! Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)! Seminar 4 (UN)! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Author: Nina Kovacic! ___________________________________________________________________________! ABSTRACT! ! Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an analytical experimental technique, used

  19. Extraction of highly charged ions from the electron beam ion trap at LBNL for applications in surface analysis and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Ion Trap at LBNL for Applications in Surfacetransferred from LLNL to LBNL, and is now operating with+ . The research program at LBNL is focused on the following

  20. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Coherent Diabatic Ion Transport and Separation in a Multi-Zone Trap Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowler, R; Lin, Y; Tan, T R; Hanneke, D; Jost, J D; Home, J P; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the motional dynamics of single and multiple ions during transport between and separation into spatially distinct locations in a multi-zone linear Paul trap. A single 9Be+ ion in a 2 MHz harmonic well located in one zone was laser-cooled to near its ground state of motion and transported 370 micrometers by moving the well to another zone. This was accomplished in 8 microseconds, corresponding to 16 periods of oscillation. Starting from a state with n=0.1 quanta, during transport the ion was excited to a displaced coherent state with n=1.6 quanta but on completion was returned close to its motional ground state with n=0.2. Similar results were achieved for the transport of two ions. We also separated chains of up to 9 ions from one potential well to two distinct potential wells. With two ions this was accomplished in 55 microseconds, with final excitations of about 2 quanta for each ion. Fast coherent transport and separation can significantly reduce the time overhead in certain architectures fo...

  2. The Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) coupled to a gas cell catcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sonoda; T. E. Cocolios; J. Gentens; M. Huyse; O. Ivanov; Yu. Kudryavtsev; D. Pauwels; P. Van den Bergh; P. Van Duppen

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The proof of principle of the Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) coupled to a gas cell catcher system has been demonstrated at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL). The experiments were carried out by using the modified gas cell-based laser ion source and the SextuPole Ion Guide (SPIG). Element selective resonance laser ionization of neutral atoms was taking place inside the cold jet expanding out of the gas cell catcher. The laser path was oriented in longitudinal as well as transverse geometries with respect to the atoms flow. The enhancement of beam purity and the feasibility for in-source laser spectroscopy were investigated in off-line and on-line conditions.

  3. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallraff, Andreas

    and recombination of ion crystals [3, 4]. To overcome the difficulties of assembling three-dimensional (3D) trap information processing was proposed in which segmented trap electrodes allow splitting, shuttling

  4. Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry T. Schenkel,1 A high vacuum (10^8 torr). In posi- tive polarity, HCI can be decelerated to an impact energy of $1 ke in the interaction of slow (u highly charged ions (e.g., Au69+ ) with solid surfaces increases secondary

  5. Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blümel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

  6. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  7. Ion-trap measurements of electric-field noise near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brownnutt; M. Kumph; P. Rabl; R. Blatt

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric-field noise near surfaces is a common problem in diverse areas of physics, and a limiting factor for many precision measurements. There are multiple mechanisms by which such noise is generated, many of which are poorly understood. Laser-cooled, trapped ions provide one of the most sensitive systems to probe electric-field noise at MHz frequencies and over a distance range 30 - 3000 $\\mu$m from the surface. Over recent years numerous experiments have reported spectral densities of electric-field noise inferred from ion heating-rate measurements and several different theoretical explanations for the observed noise characteristics have been proposed. This paper provides an extensive summary and critical review of electric-field noise measurements in ion traps, and compares these experimental findings with known and conjectured mechanisms for the origin of this noise. This reveals that the presence of multiple noise sources, as well as the different scalings added by geometrical considerations, complicate the interpretation of these results. It is thus the purpose of this review to assess which conclusions can be reasonably drawn from the existing data, and which important questions are still open. In so doing it provides a framework for future investigations of surface-noise processes.

  8. Shell Structure, Melting and Dynamics of Ion Clusters Confined in an Octupolar Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvo, F. [LASIM, Universite Claude Bernard and CNRS, Bat. A. Kastler, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, F69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Yurtsever, E. [Koc University, Rumelifeneriyolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450 (Turkey)

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The stable structures of clusters of identical ions trapped in an isotropic octupolar trap are investigated using global optimization methods. These clusters form well defined shells of ions that are approximately solutions of the Thomson problem. In particular, magic numbers are found to correlate with highly symmetric configurations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, finite temperature properties are also investigated. Melting proceeds from the core, and takes place through a very progressive loss of the shell structure. The hollow shape is eventually lost at very high temperatures, where the ions essentially feel the confinement but not the Coulomb repulsion. The vibrational density of states shows marked differences with the harmonic case, but also with bulk Wigner crystals. The variations of the maximal Lyapunov exponent obtained from additional molecular dynamics trajectories reveals that the dynamics becomes increasingly chaotic as the temperature increases. With the decreasing influence of the Coulomb interaction, a more regular behavior is found at very high temperatures but, contrary to the quadrupolar case, still highly chaotic.

  9. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia, E-mail: ciurea@infim.ro; Lazanu, Sorina, E-mail: ciurea@infim.ro [National Institute for Materials Physics, 105bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  10. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  11. Simplified implementation of the quantum Fourier transform with Ising-type Hamiltonians: Example with ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetoslav S. Ivanov; Michael Johanning; Christof Wunderlich

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simplified mathematical construction of the quantum Fourier transform which is suited for systems described by Ising-type Hamiltonians. By contrast to the standard scheme, which prescribes concatenated sequences of control phase gates, our implementation is based on one-qubit gates and a free evolution process. We show a realization of our method with homogeneous microwave driven ion traps in a magnetic field with gradient. In this setup our implementation presents a series of microwave $\\pi$ or $\\pi/2$ pulses applied at certain times.

  12. Toward Plasma Proteome Profiling with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Toward Plasma Proteome Profiling with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Stephen J. Valentine, Manolo D) analysis of a plasma digest sample where abundant proteins have not been removed. Protein database searches- for comparative plasma profiling studies. Keywords: ion mobility spectrometry · proteome profiling

  13. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Brown, G. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr{sup 34+} and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th{sup 87+} and U{sup 89+}, which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti{sup 20+} through CO{sup 25+}. A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT.

  14. Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Moehring; B. B. Blinov; D. W. Gidley; R. N. Kohn Jr.; M. J. Madsen; T. D. Sanderson; R. S. Vallery; C. Monroe

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report precision measurements of the excited state lifetime of the $5p$ $^2P_{1/2}$ and $5p$ $^2P_{3/2}$ levels of a single trapped Cd$^+$ ion. The ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser and the distribution of arrival times of spontaneously emitted photons is recorded. The resulting lifetimes are 3.148 $\\pm$ 0.011 ns and 2.647 $\\pm$ 0.010 ns for $^2P_{1/2}$ and $^2P_{3/2}$ respectively. With a total uncertainty of under 0.4%, these are among the most precise measurements of any atomic state lifetimes to date.

  15. On-line Excited-State Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Short-Lived Ra$^+$ Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. O. Versolato; G. S. Giri; L. W. Wansbeek; J. E. van den Berg; D. J. van der Hoek; K. Jungmann; W. L. Kruithof; C. J. G. Onderwater; B. K. Sahoo; B. Santra; P. D. Shidling; R. G. E. Timmermans; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As an important step towards an atomic parity violation experiment in one single trapped Ra$^+$ ion, laser spectroscopy experiments were performed with on-line produced short-lived $^{212,213,214}$Ra$^+$ ions. The isotope shift of the $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$\\,-\\,$7\\,^2$P$_{1/2}$ and $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$\\,-\\,$7\\,^2$P$_{3/2}$ transitions and the hyperfine structure constant of the $7\\,^2$S$_{1/2}$ and $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$ states in $^{213}$Ra$^+$ were measured. These values provide a benchmark for the required atomic theory. A lower limit of $232(4)$ ms for the lifetime of the metastable $6\\,^2$D$_{5/2}$ state was measured by optical shelving.

  16. Ion Sources and Mass Analyzers in Protein Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    . Get molecules into the gas phase & ionize them. 2. Give the ions a defined energy or velocity. 3 of analyzers may not always be adequate to distinguish individual peaks. In this case, average masses are used/z are lost. The mass range is scanned as the voltages are swept from min to max, but at constant DC/RF ratio

  17. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  18. Nanoscale interfacial structure for Novel Opto-electronic and Ion-trapping Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulin-Avila, Erick

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEM pictures of Aluminum alloy trap A,B. ) trap details C. )including Graphene, Aluminum alloys, Copper, Gold andwe use an specific aluminum alloy, which annealed increases

  19. Quantum computer using a trapped-ion spin molecule and microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mc Hugh, D.; Twamley, J. [Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, County Kildare (Ireland)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a design for a quantum-information processor where qubits are encoded into hyperfine states of ions held in a linear array of individually tailored linear microtraps and sitting in a spatially varying magnetic field. The magnetic field gradient introduces spatially dependent qubit transition frequencies and a type of spin-spin interaction between qubits. Single- and multiqubit manipulation is achieved via resonant microwave pulses as in liquid-NMR quantum computation while the qubit readout and reset is achieved through trapped-ion fluorescence shelving techniques. By adjusting the microtrap configurations we can tailor, in hardware, the qubit resonance frequencies and coupling strengths. We show that the system possesses a sideband transition structure which does not scale with the size of the processor, allowing scalable frequency discrimination between qubits. By using large magnetic field gradients, one can reset individual qubits in the ion chain via frequency selective optical pulses to implement quantum-error correction, thus avoiding the need for many tightly focused laser beams.

  20. Supporting Kibble-Zurek Mechanism in Quantum Ising Model through a Trapped Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin-Ming Cui; Yun-Feng Huang; Zhao Wang; Dong-Yang Cao; Jian Wang; Wei-Min Lv; Yong Lu; Le Luo; Adolfo del Campo; Yong-Jian Han; Chuan-Feng Li; Guang-Can Guo

    2015-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in quantum simulation has fostered the research on far-from-equilibrium dynamics. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism is the paradigmatic framework to account for the non adiabatic critical dynamics of a system driven across a phase transition in a finite time. Its study in the quantum regime is hindered by the requisite of ground state cooling. We report the experimental quantum simulation of critical dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model by a set of non-equilibrium processes in the pseudo-momentum space, that can be probed with high accuracy using a single trapped ion. Our results support the validity of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in the quantum regime and advance the quantum simulation of critical systems far-away from equilibrium.

  1. Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Weidt; J. Randall; S. C. Webster; E. D. Standing; A. Rodriguez; A. E. Webb; B. Lekitsch; W. K. Hensinger

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation. This is a powerful tool for the implementation of quantum operations, where long-wavelength radiation instead of lasers is used for motional quantum state engineering. We measure a mean phonon number of $\\overline{n} = 0.13(4)$ after sideband cooling, corresponding to a ground-state occupation probability of 88(7)\\%. After preparing in the vibrational Fock state $\\left|n=0\\right\\rangle$, we implement sideband Rabi oscillations which last for more than 10 ms, demonstrating the long coherence time of our system. We also use the ability to ground-state cool to accurately measure the motional heating rate and report a reduction by almost two orders of magnitude compared to our previously measured result, which we attribute to carefully eliminating sources of electrical noise in the system.

  2. Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidt, S; Webster, S C; Standing, E D; Rodriguez, A; Webb, A E; Lekitsch, B; Hensinger, W K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation. This is a powerful tool for the implementation of quantum operations, where long-wavelength radiation instead of lasers is used for motional quantum state engineering. We measure a mean phonon number of $\\overline{n} = 0.13(4)$ after sideband cooling, corresponding to a ground-state occupation probability of 88(7)\\%. After preparing in the vibrational Fock state $\\left|n=0\\right\\rangle$, we implement sideband Rabi oscillations which last for more than 10 ms, demonstrating the long coherence time of our system. We also use the ability to ground-state cool to accurately measure the motional heating rate and report a reduction by almost two orders of magnitude compared to our previously measured result, which we attribute to carefully eliminating sources of electrical noise in the system.

  3. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  4. Trapped ytterbium ions for scalable quantum Ion Quantum Technology Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensinger, Winfried

    performed accurate measurements of 2S1/2 2P1/2 and 2D3/2 3D[3/2]1/2 transitions for Yb+ isotopes. Motional to retain and control atoms during shuttling operations inside ion trap arrays. Vacuum system Vacuum chamber

  5. Two-photon laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions via the 402 nm resonance line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera-Sancho, O A; Zimmermann, K; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Glowacki, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of 232Th+ ions in a radiofrequency ion trap are reported. As the first excitation step, the strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the 6d^2 7s J=3/2 ground state to the 6d7s7p J=5/2 state at 24874 cm^{-1} is driven by radiation from an extended cavity diode laser. Spontaneous decay of the intermediate state populates a number of low-lying metastable states, thus limiting the excited state population and fluorescence signal obtainable with continuous laser excitation. We study the collisional quenching efficiency of helium, argon, and nitrogen buffer gases, and the effect of repumping laser excitation from the three lowest-lying metastable levels. The experimental results are compared with a four-level rate equation model, that allows us to deduce quenching rates for these buffer gases. Using laser radiation at 399 nm for the second step, we demonstrate two-photon excitation to the state at 49960 cm^{-1}, among the highest-lying classified levels of Th+. Thi...

  6. Magnetically induced electron shelving in a trapped Ca{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crick, D. R.; Donnellan, S.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic states are perturbed by externally applied magnetic fields (Zeeman effect). As well as the usual Zeeman splittings, the magnetic field leads to mixing of states with different values of the J quantum number. We report on the direct experimental measurement of this effect using the electron shelving technique (employed to great effect in single-ion spectroscopy and quantum-information processing). Specifically we observe shelving to the metastable (3p{sup 6}3d) {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion, via spontaneous decay on the strongly forbidden 4p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2{r_reversible}}3d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} transition. The rate of this transition is shown to scale as the square of the magnetic-field strength. The scaling and magnitude of the effect is compared to the result derived from first-order perturbation theory. For applications in quantum-information processing the J-mixing effect causes a degradation of readout fidelity. We show that this degradation is at a tolerable level for Ca{sup +} and is much less problematic for other trapped ionic species.

  7. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  8. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  10. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); Feldman, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  11. A Double Ion Trap for Large Coulomb Crystals Caroline Champenois, Jofre Pedregosa-Gutierrez, Mathieu Marciante,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : 37.10.Ty; 52.25.Kn;52.27.Jt MULTIPOLE TRAPS Thirty years after Wolfgang Paul's introduction of the 3D, the multipole trap is combined in line with a quadrupole trap, using a shuttling protocol between both parts

  12. Dark-state suppression and optimization of laser cooling and fluorescence in a trapped alkaline-earth-metal single ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lindvall; M. Merimaa; I. Tittonen; A. A. Madej

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and destabilization of dark states in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion caused by the cooling and repumping laser fields required for Doppler cooling and fluorescence detection of the ion. By numerically solving the time-dependent density matrix equations for the eight-level system consisting of the sublevels of the 5s 2S1/2, 5p 2P1/2, and 4d 2D3/2 states, we analyze the different types of dark states and how to prevent them in order to maximize the scattering rate, which is crucial for both the cooling and the detection of the ion. The influence of the laser linewidths and ion motion on the scattering rate and the dark resonances is studied. The calculations are then compared with experimental results obtained with an endcap ion trap system located at the National Research Council of Canada and found to be in good agreement. The results are applicable also to other alkaline earth ions and isotopes without hyperfine structure.

  13. Mass Spectrometer: Time of Flight Secondary Ion (ToF SIMS) -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 1997 Mass Spectrometer: Time of Flight Secondary Ion (ToF SIMS) - 1997 The Physical Electronics Instruments (PHI) Model T2100 time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer...

  14. Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) The 6-Tesla High-Field Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), is a unique...

  15. Molecular primary probe for secondary ion mass spectrometry of organics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of development of a fast, highly focused neutral molecular primary beam probe for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), the question as to the relative efficiency of a molecule versus an atom for producing secondary ions of organic molecules was raised. Theoretical and experimental studies have indicated sputtering efficiency should increase as more energy is deposited near the surface. This would seem to be especially true when trying to sputter large organic molecules that must be desorbed from the surface with minimum molecular heating to remain intact. The kinetic energy of an SF6 molecule is distributed among 7 atoms and the SF6 molecule is large (geometrically) compared to an atom. Thus although at equivalent accelerating voltages an SF6/sup /minus// molecular ion (146 u) and a Cs atomic ion (133 u) deposit nearly the same amount of energy, the spatial distribution of this energy on surface will be quite different. The SF6 molecule will deposit more energy near the surface. To determine if this results in more efficient sputtering of molecules residing on the surface we have compared the SF6 molecular beam with a Cs atomic ion beam under organic static SIMS conditions. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  16. 1 -, 2 -, and 3 D -ion structures in traps of different geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensinger, Winfried

    septembre 2010 1 / 22 #12;bg=white Motivation Dynamics of large ion clouds · ion numbers from a few structures 20 septembre 2010 2 / 22 #12;bg=white Motivation Dynamics of large ion clouds · ion numbers from structures 20 septembre 2010 5 / 22 #12;bg=white Cooling dynamics of an ion cloud in a linear quadrupole Vlin

  17. Development and Application of an Electrospray Ionization Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometer Using an RF Ion Funnel and Periodic-focusing Ion Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Junho

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Through experimental measurements and ion trajectory calculations from well known model peptides and proteins having multiple charge states, a correlation factor ? which links the results from the two different...

  18. Continuous time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous time-of-flight mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating an electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the electric field. A source of continuous ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between arrival of a secondary electron out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a first predetermined location and arrival of a sample ion out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a second predetermined location.

  19. Loading and characterization of a printed-circuit-board atomic ion trap Kenneth R. Brown, Robert J. Clark, Jaroslaw Labaziewicz, Philip Richerme, David R. Leibrandt, and Isaac L. Chuang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerme, Phil

    -dimensional 3D lay- ered planar traps 6­8 and the ability to integrate control electronics below the electrode of new trap geometries and ion shuttling techniques. In this Brief Report, we demonstrate the loading

  20. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  1. argonne positive ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002-06-19 16 Position-sensitive ion detection in precision Penning trap mass spectrometry Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A commercial, position-sensitive ion detector...

  2. Simulation of lean NOx trap performance with microkinetic chemistry and without mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Rich; Daw, C. Stuart (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, TN); Pihl, Josh A. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, TN); Chakravarthy, V. Kalyana (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, TN)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, barium oxide (NO{sub x} storage), and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used in conjunction with a transient plug flow reactor code to simulate not only conventional storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a steady state code. The results show that NO{sub x} storage is not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all of the gas phase species involved. It is found that, with a few minor exceptions, all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with these purely kinetic simulations, i.e., without including mass-transfer limitations. In addition to accounting for normal cycling behavior, the final mechanism should provide a starting point for the description of further LNT phenomena such as desulfation and the role of alternative reductants.

  3. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and separations. The system couples a high-resolution ion mobility (IM) drift cell to the front end of a mass spectrometer (MS) allowing for chemical separation prior to isotope distribution analyses. This will yield isotope ratio measurement capabilities with minimal sample preparation.

  4. Sideband cooling an ion to the quantum ground state in a Penning trap with very low heating rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Goodwin; G. Stutter; R. C. Thompson; D. M. Segal

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the laser cooling of a single $^{40}\\text{Ca}^+$ ion in a Penning trap to the motional ground state in one dimension. Cooling is performed in the strong binding limit on the 729-nm electric quadrupole $S_{1/2}\\leftrightarrow D_{5/2}$ transition, broadened by a quench laser coupling the $D_{5/2}$ and $P_{3/2}$ levels. We find the final phonon number to be $\\bar{n}=0.014\\pm0.009$. We measure the heating rate of the trap to be very low with $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=2.5\\pm 0.3\\textrm{s}^{-1}$ and a scaled spectral noise density of $\\omega S_{E}(\\omega)\\sim1.6^{-8}\\textrm{V}^2\\textrm{m}^{-2}\\textrm{Hz}^{-1}\\textrm{s}^{-1}$, which is consistent with the large ion-electrode distance. We perform Rabi oscillations on the sideband-cooled ion and observe a coherence time of $0.7\\pm 0.1\\textrm{ms}$, noting that the practical performance is currently limited by the intensity noise of the probe laser.

  5. Spectra of In-like Tungsten, $W^{25+}$, from the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, W; Shi, Z; Fei, Z; R,; Zhao,; Brage, T; Huldt, S; Hutton, R; Zou, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three visible lines of M1 transitions from In-like W were recorded using the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap. The experimental wavelengths were measured as 493.84 $\\pm$ 0.15, 226.97 $\\pm$ 0.13 and 587.63 $\\pm$ 0.23 nm (vacuum wavelengths). These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained using large-scale Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory, in the form of the Flexible Atomic Code, and some explorations with the Muliconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock code GRASP2K.

  6. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  7. Simulation of the elementary evolution operator with the motional states of an ion in an anharmonic trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludovic Santos; Yves Justum; Nathalie Vaeck; M. Desouter-Lecomte

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent proposal of L. Wang and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 064301 (2012), we theoretically illustrate the possibility of using the motional states of a $Cd^+$ ion trapped in a slightly anharmonic potential to simulate the single-particle time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. The simulated wave packet is discretized on a spatial grid and the grid points are mapped on the ion motional states which define the qubit network. The localization probability at each grid point is obtained from the population in the corresponding motional state. The quantum gate is the elementary evolution operator corresponding to the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation of the simulated system. The corresponding matrix can be estimated by any numerical algorithm. The radio-frequency field able to drive this unitary transformation among the qubit states of the ion is obtained by multi-target optimal control theory. The ion is assumed to be cooled in the ground motional state and the preliminary step consists in initializing the qubits with the amplitudes of the initial simulated wave packet. The time evolution of the localization probability at the grids points is then obtained by successive applications of the gate and reading out the motional state population. The gate field is always identical for a given simulated potential, only the field preparing the initial wave packet has to be optimized for different simulations. We check the stability of the simulation against decoherence due to fluctuating electric fields in the trap electrodes by applying dissipative Lindblad dynamics.

  8. Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goeringer, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

  9. The effect of a radial electric field on ripple-trapped ions observed by neutral particle fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT Energy, Euratom-TEKES Association, P.O. Box 1604, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)] [VTT Energy, Euratom-TEKES Association, P.O. Box 1604, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Herrmann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik--EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik--EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kurki-Suonio, T. [Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Euratom-TEKES Association, FIN-02150 Espoo (Finland)] [Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Euratom-TEKES Association, FIN-02150 Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a radial electric field on nonthermal ripple-trapped ions is investigated using toroidal Monte Carlo simulations for edge tokamak plasmas. The increase in the neutral particle flux from the ions trapped in local magnetic wells observed by the charge exchange (CX) detector at a low confinement to high confinement transition at ASDEX (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment). Upgrade tokamak [{ital Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, Lisbon (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, Switzerland, 1993), Vol. 17C, Part I, p. 267] is reproduced in the simulations by turning on a radial electric field near the plasma periphery. The poloidal and toroidal angles at which the CX detector signal is most sensitive to the radial electric field are determined. A fast response time of the signal in the range of 50{endash}100 {mu}s to the appearance of the electric field can be found in the simulations with a relatively large half-width of the negative electric field region. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. A study of the formation of cluster ions from metal acetates using plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez Silvagnoli, Winston Reinaldo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel application of desorption/ionization methods of mass spectrometry, e. g. plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS), is the analysis of both the composition and structure of solid materials in one experiment. Cluster ions emitted from...

  11. Investigation on Gas-phase Structures of Biomolecules Using Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Lei

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    IM-MS is a 2-D technique which provides separations based on ion shape (ion-neutral collision cross-section, ?) and mass (m/z ratio). Ion structures can be deduced from the measured collision cross-section (?meas) by calculating the collision cross...

  12. Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch, weighs 3.8 lb, and uses a 10.6 eV photoionization source. Analytes are identified both by their elution time from the column and by the characteristic response in the FAIMS spectrum. Analysis times required to obtain results for most analytes examined are less than three minutes. A fieldable mass spectrometer system is also being developed that includes sampling, ionization, mass selection and detection, vacuum technology, and analytical methodology with remote data transmission. Multiple methods for mass selection are being explored, including both Penning and Paul type ion traps as well as a quadrupole system to determine which is best suited for a portable mass spectrometer. Several ionization sources and ion counting methods will also be evaluated to establish their effectiveness with each system. The intended result of this project is a handheld mass spectrometer system capable of field deployment for the detection and identification of a wide range of gas-phase CBE species.

  13. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton, J. P. Home, W. M have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi

  14. Dynamical Localization in the Paul Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. El Ghafar; P. Torma; V. Savichev; E. Mayr; A. Zeiler; W. P. Schleich

    1996-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that quantum localization occurs in the center-of-mass motion of an ion stored in a Paul trap and interacting with a standing laser field. The present experimental state of the art makes the observation of this phenomenon feasible.

  15. An ion ring in a linear multipole trap for optical frequency metrology C. Champenois,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and cooling possibilities are discussed through an analytical model and molecular dynamics simulations is proposed. The systematic shifts for the electric quadrupole transition of calcium ions are evaluated) electric fields in the quadrupole configuration. This ultimate control, possible only with a single

  16. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-75 Sediment Trap Study in the Green Bay Mass Balance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Mass and Organic Carbon Fluxes, Resuspension, and Particle Settling Velocities Brian J. Eadie Gerald L ................................................................................................. 23 4.5 Flux Profiles and Estimates of Sediment Resuspension

  18. Measurements of the intercombination and forbidden lines from helium-like ions in Tokamaks and Electron Beam Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; von Goeler, S; Stodiek, W; Beiersdorfer, P; Rice, J E; Ince-Cushman, A

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the results from tokamak experiments for the line ratios x/w, y/w, and z/w from helium-like ions with Z in the range from 14 to 28. With exception of the DITE experiments, where these line ratios were found to be in agreement with theoretical predictions, all other tokamak experiments yielded values that were significantly larger than predicted. The reasons for these discrepancies are not yet understood. It is possible that radial profile effects were not properly taken into account in the majority of the tokamak experiments. The paper also gives a short historical review of the X-ray diagnostic developments and also presents very recent data from a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which records spatially resolved spectra with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the plasma. These new data can be Abel inverted, so that it will be possible to determine line ratios at each radial position in the plasma. Effects of radial profiles, which may have affected the chord-integrated measurements of the past, will thus be eliminated in the future.

  19. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer Andreas Rohrbacher and Robert E. Continettia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    /ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins myoglobin and lysozyme , created by matrix assisted laser,7 and matrix assisted desorption and ionization MALDI 8­11 have become avail- able to allow the mass the samples with a robot- driven capillary,15 a scanning ion beam,16 or spatial resolu- tion was achieved

  20. Permanent magnet electron beam ion source/trap systems with bakeable magnets for improved operation conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M., E-mail: mike.schmidt@dreebit.com [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, G.; Kentsch, U.; Ritter, E. [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic system of a Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS) generating the necessary magnetic field with a new type of permanent magnet made of high energy density NdFeB-type material operable at temperatures above 100?°C has been investigated and tested. The employment of such kind of magnets provides simplified operation without the time-consuming installation and de-installation procedures of the magnets for the necessary baking of the ion source after commissioning and maintenance work. Furthermore, with the use of a new magnetization technique the geometrical filling factor of the magnetic Dresden EBIS design could be increased to a filling factor of 100% leading to an axial magnetic field strength of approximately 0.5 T exceeding the old design by 20%. Simulations using the finite element method software Field Precision and their results compared with measurements are presented as well. It could be shown that several baking cycles at temperatures higher than 100?°C did not change the magnetic properties of the setup.

  1. Effect of trapped electron on the dust ion acoustic waves in dusty plasma using time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazari-Golshan, A. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourazar, S. S. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries (TFMKdV) equation is solved to study the nonlinear propagation of small but finite amplitude dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons. The plasma is composed of a cold ion fluid, stationary dust grains, and hot electrons obeying a trapped electron distribution. The TFMKdV equation is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods and then solved by the Laplace Adomian decomposition method. Our results show that the amplitude of the DIA solitary waves increases with the increase of time fractional order ?, the wave velocity v{sub 0}, and the population of the background free electrons ?. However, it is vice-versa for the deviation from isothermality parameter b, which is in agreement with the result obtained previously.

  2. Charge-to-mass-ratio-dependent ion heating during magnetic reconnection in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Craig, D. [Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States)] [Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature evolution during magnetic reconnection has been spectroscopically measured for various ion species in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Measurements are made predominantly in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. It is found that the increase in parallel ion temperature during magnetic reconnection events increases with the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. This trend can be understood if the heating mechanism is anisotropic, favoring heating in the perpendicular degree of freedom, with collisional relaxation of multiple ion species. The charge-to-mass ratio trend for the parallel temperature derives from collisional isotropization. This result emphasizes that collisional isotropization and energy transfer must be carefully modeled when analyzing ion heating measurements and comparing to theoretical predictions.

  3. Micro mass spectrometer on a chip.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, Dolores Y.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Fleming, James Grant

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, electrical characterization and testing analysis of a microfabricated a cylindrical ion trap ({mu}CIT) array is presented. Several versions of microfabricated cylindrical ion traps were designed and fabricated. The final design of the individual trap array element consisted of two end cap electrodes, one ring electrode, and a detector plate, fabricated in seven tungsten metal layers by molding tungsten around silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) features. Each layer of tungsten is then polished back in damascene fashion. The SiO{sub 2} was removed using a standard release processes to realize a free-hung structure. Five different sized traps were fabricated with inner radii of 1, 1.5, 2, 5 and 10 {micro}m and heights ranging from 3-24 {micro}m. Simulations examined the effects of ion and neutral temperature, the pressure and nature of cooling gas, ion mass, trap voltage and frequency, space-charge, fabrication defects, and other parameters on the ability of micrometer-sized traps to store ions. The electrical characteristics of the ion trap arrays were determined. The capacitance was 2-500 pF for the various sized traps and arrays. The resistance was in the order of 1-2 {Omega}. The inductance of the arrays was calculated to be 10-1500 pH, depending on the trap and array sizes. The ion traps' field emission characteristics were assessed. It was determined that the traps could be operated up to 125 V while maintaining field emission currents below 1 x 10{sup -15} A. The testing focused on using the 5-{micro}m CITs to trap toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}). Ion ejection from the traps was induced by termination of the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode and current measured on the collector electrode suggested trapping of ions in 1-10% of the traps. Improvements to the to the design of the traps were defined to minimize voltage drop to the substrate, thereby increasing trapping voltage applied to the ring electrode, and to allow for electron injection into, ion ejection from, and optical access to the trapping region.

  4. Combining Capillary Electrochromatography with Ion Trap Accumulation and Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, David C

    metre, an average chromatographic efficiency of 95,000 was obtained with a test mixture that consisted of acenaphthene, biphenyl, fluorene, naphthalene and phenanthrene. Furthermore, using the leak inlet, naphthalene was detected as a 100 nM solution...

  5. Spectroscopy at the high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The following progress report presents some of the x-ray measurements performed during the last year on the Livermore SuperEBIT facility. The measurements include: direct observation of the spontaneous emission of the hyperfine transition in ground state hydrogenlike holmium, {sup 165}Ho{sup 66{plus}}; measurements of the n {equals} 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies in neonlike thorium, Th{sup 80{plus}}, through lithiumlike thorium, Th{sup 87{plus}}, testing the predictions of quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions up to the 0.4{percent} level; measurements of the isotope shift of the n= 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies between lithiumlike through carbonize uranium, {sup 233}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}} and {sup 238}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}}, inferring the variation of the mean- square nuclear charge radius; and high-resolution measurements of the K{alpha} radiation of heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52 {plus}}, using a transmission-type crystal spectrometer, resolving for the first time the ls2p{sup 3}P{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and ls2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transitions individually. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Surface-electrode point Paul trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tony Hyun; Herskind, Peter F.; Chuang, Isaac L. [Center for Ultracold Atoms, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Jungsang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model as well as experimental results for a surface electrode radiofrequency Paul trap that has a circular electrode geometry well suited for trapping single ions and two-dimensional planar ion crystals. The trap design is compatible with microfabrication and offers a simple method by which the height of the trapped ions above the surface may be changed in situ. We demonstrate trapping of single {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ions over an ion height range of 200-1000 {mu}m for several hours under Doppler laser cooling and use these to characterize the trap, finding good agreement with our model.

  7. Anal. Chem. 1981, 53, 1241-1244 1241 Comparison of Mass Spectra Obtained with Low-Energy Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    and High-Energy Californium-252 Fission Fragment Bombardment Werner Ens and K. G. Standing Physics mass spectrometry (1,2)and low-energy ion bombardment mass spectrometry (3-5). In these techniquesAnal. Chem. 1981, 53, 1241-1244 1241 Comparison of Mass Spectra Obtained with Low-Energy Ion

  8. In situ UPb dating of micro-baddeleyite by secondary ion mass spectrometry Axel K. Schmitt a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ U­Pb dating of micro-baddeleyite by secondary ion mass spectrometry Axel K. Schmitt a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in situ analysis of ng-mass crystals that cannot be efficiently conventional mineral separation methods are not optimized for recovery of such small grains, techniques

  9. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  10. More than mass proportional heating of heavy ions by supercritical collisionless shocks in the solar corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new model for explaining the observations of more than mass proportional heating of heavy ions in the polar solar corona. We point out that a large number of small scale intermittent shock waves can be present in the solar corona. The energization mechanism is, essentially, the ion reflection off supercritical quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks in the corona and the subsequent acceleration by the motional electric field ${\\bf E} = - (1/c) {\\bf V} \\times {\\bf B}$. The acceleration due to ${\\bf E}$ is perpendicular to the magnetic field, in agreement with observations, and is more than mass proportional with respect to protons, because the heavy ion orbit is mostly upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock foot. The observed temperature ratios between O$^{5+}$ ions and protons in the polar corona, and between $\\alpha$ particles and protons in the solar wind are easily recovered.

  11. Characterization of surface and layered films with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................... 84 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is well recognized a sensitive surface analysis method [1]. It utilizes energetic charged particles (primary ions) to probe surfaces. Impacts from the high energy, high... surprisingly, the most efficient projectiles for this purpose are those depositing a high density of energy. Desorption with keV and MeV Projectiles SIMS operates in two different modes: dynamic SIMS and static SIMS. The major difference between these modes...

  12. An rf-carpet electrospray ion source to provide isobaric mass calibrants for trans-uranium elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Naimi; S. Nakamura; Y. Ito; H. Mita; K. Okada; A. Ozawa; P. Schury; T. Sonoda; A. Takamine; M. Wada; H. Wollnik

    2012-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    For trans-uranium elements, stable atomic isobars do not exist. In order to provide isobaric reference ions for the mass measurement of trans-uranium elements, an electrospray ion source (ESI) was combined with an rf-carpet to collect molecular ions efficiently. The rf-carpet allows for simplification of the pumping system to transport ions from the ESI to a precision mass analyzer. Molecular ions appropriate for isobaric references of trans-uranium elements were extracted from the rf-carpet and analyzed by a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph (MRTOF-MS) with a resolving power of $\\rm{R_m} \\gtrsim100,000$.

  13. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  14. Focusing of intense and divergent ion beams in a magnetic mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianlin, Ke; Changgeng, Zhou; Rui, Qiu; Yonghong, Hu [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, 621900 Mianyang (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic mass analyzer is used to determine the beam composition of a vacuum arc ion source. In the analyzer, we used the concentric multi-ring electrodes to focus the intense and divergent ion beams. We describe the principle, design, and the test results of the focusing device. The diameter of the beam profile is less than 20 mm when the accelerating voltage is 30 kV and the focusing voltage is about 2.0 kV. The focusing device has been successfully used in the magnetic mass analyzer to separate Ti{sup +}, Ti{sup 2+}, and Ti{sup 3+}.

  15. Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Jody C.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic (325-80 K) ion mobility-mass spectrometer was designed and constructed in order to improve the analytical figures-of-merit for the chemical analysis of small mass analytes using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. ...

  16. Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses D. L. Moehring,* B. B. Blinov, D. W. Gidley, R. N. Kohn, Jr., M. J. Madsen, T. D. Sanderson, R. S. Vallery, and C. Monroe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses D. L. Moehring and ultrafast laser technologies, the ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser excited state lifetime of order nanoseconds by an ultrafast laser pulse duration of order picoseconds

  17. Method for Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols Using Ion Chromatography Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    spectrometry (ESI-MS).17-19 ESI has the advantage of being compatible with polar mobile phases, and softMethod for Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols Using Ion Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Lacey C. Brent,* Jessica L. Reiner, Russell R. Dickerson, and Lane C. Sander

  18. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  19. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 ?M, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ? 2.5 ?M, ? 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion trapping. • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis.

  20. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  1. VOLUME 60, NUMBER 6 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 8 FEBRUARY 1988 Computer Simulation of Ion Clouds in a Penning Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    VOLUME 60, NUMBER 6 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 8 FEBRUARY 1988 Computer Simulation of Ion Clouds, because of the relatively small size of the ion cloud, results differ considerably from previous studies to con6ne the ion cloud, and this 6eld makes a straight- forward simulation difficult by introducing

  2. Development of a cold cathode ion source for a mass spectrometer type vacuum leak detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Harold Albert

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 7 cm., discharge voltage of about 2000 volts, discharge current of 10 ma., and a magnetic field strength of approximately 2200 Oersteds. As a leak detector it had a differential sensitivity of one part of helium in 10,000 parts of air ? about... for this ion souree as for the first type tested# Be? cause of the simpler construction and fewer components reauired, it appears that this type of source would have some valuable possibili? ties as a mass spectrometer ion source for the leak detector...

  3. High Resolution Studies of the Origins of Polyatomic Ions in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Wisnewski Ferguson

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Traditionally, the plasma is sampled via a sampler cone. A supersonic jet develops behind the sampler, and this region is pumped down to a pressure of approximately one Torr. A skimmer cone is located inside this zone of silence to transmit ions into the mass spectrometer. The position of the sampler and skimmer cones relative to the initial radiation and normal analytical zones of the plasma is key to optimizing the useful analytical signal [1]. The ICP both atomizes and ionizes the sample. Polyatomic ions form through ion-molecule interactions either in the ICP or during ion extraction [l]. Common polyatomic ions that inhibit analysis include metal oxides (MO{sup +}), adducts with argon, the gas most commonly used to make up the plasma, and hydride species. While high resolution devices can separate many analytes from common interferences, this is done at great cost in ion transmission efficiency--a loss of 99% when using high versus low resolution on the same instrument [2]. Simple quadrupole devices, which make up the bulk of ICP-MS instruments in existence, do not present this option. Therefore, if the source of polyatomic interferences can be determined and then manipulated, this could potentially improve the figures of merit on all ICP-MS devices, not just the high resolution devices often utilized to study polyatomic interferences.

  4. Heating of Heavy Ions by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) Driven Collisionless Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Korreck; T. H. Zurbuchen; S. T. Lepri; J. M . Raines

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock heating and particle acceleration processes are some of the most fundamental physical phenomena of plasma physics with countless applications in laboratory physics, space physics, and astrophysics. This study is motivated by previous observations of non-thermal heating of heavy ions in astrophysical shocks (Korreck et al. 2004). Here, we focus on shocks driven by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) which heat the solar wind and accelerate particles. This study focuses specifically on the heating of heavy ions caused by these shocks. Previous studies have focused only on the two dynamically dominant species, H+ and He2+ . This study utilizes thermal properties measured by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft to examine heavy ion heating. This instrument provides data for many heavy ions not previously available for detailed study, such as Oxygen (O6+, O7+), Carbon (C5+, C6+), and Iron (Fe10+). The ion heating is found to depend critically on the upstream plasma

  5. Facilities: NHMFL 14.5 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: A Pseudoatomic Model of the COPII Cage Obtained from Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Facilities: NHMFL 14.5 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation ultrahigh-resolution 14.5 tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The Mag

  6. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by?8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at?8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  7. Can the "Darmstadt oscillations" be treated as two closely spaced mass-eigenstates of the H-like mother ions ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Faber; A. N. Ivanov; P. Kienle; E. L. Kryshen; M. Pitschmann; N. I. Troitskaya

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the proposal that the "Darmstadt oscillations" of the orbital K-shell electron capture decay (EC) rate of the H-like heavy ions are caused by quantum beats of two coherently excited, closely spaced mass-eigenstates of decaying H-like heavy ions. We show that such a mechanism to explain the time modulation of the EC-decay rates of the H-like heavy ions leads to the time modulation of the beta^+ decay rate of these ions with the same period. Such a time-dependence of the beta^+ decay rate of the H-like heavy ions contradicts the experimental data of GSI.

  8. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} using a single trapped ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letchumanan, V.; Wilson, M.A.; Gill, P.; Sinclair, A.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural lifetime of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} has been measured using a single laser-cooled, trapped ion. The ion was prepared in the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state by laser excitation of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} quadrupole transition at 674 nm. The decay time was measured by using Dehmelt's electron shelving method to monitor the ion's electronic state. Two separate investigations were conducted under slightly different experimental conditions. 160 000 decay times from the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state were observed in total, and two different methods for determining the statistical value of the measured lifetime have been compared. Systematic effects have also been estimated, and including these effects yields a value of {tau}=390.8(1.6) ms (1{sigma} uncertainty) for the natural lifetime.

  9. Application of coincidence ion mass spectrometry for chemical and structural analysis at the sub-micron scale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderas, Sara

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces can be probed with a variant of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) where the bombardment is with a sequence of single keV projectiles, each resolved in time and space, coupled with the separate record of the ...

  10. Application of coincidence ion mass spectrometry for chemical and structural analysis at the sub-micron scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderas, Sara

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces can be probed with a variant of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) where the bombardment is with a sequence of single keV projectiles, each resolved in time and space, coupled with the separate record of the secondary ions (SIs) ejected...

  11. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reden, K. F. von; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Beaupre, S. R. [Geology and Geophysics Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C x C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO{sub 2} samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 {mu}l/min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 {mu}A of negative {sup 12}C current after the C x C, leading to about 400 {sup 14}C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  12. Kinetic Electron and Ion Instability of the Lunar Wake Simulated at Physical Mass Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; Zhou, Chuteng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar wind wake behind the moon is studied with 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using a physical ion to electron mass ratio (unlike prior investigations); the simulations also apply more generally to supersonic flow of dense magnetized plasma past non-magnetic objects. A hybrid electrostatic Boltzmann electron treatment is first used to investigate the ion stability in the absence of kinetic electron effects, showing that the ions are two-stream unstable for downstream wake distances (in lunar radii) greater than about three times the solar wind Mach number. Simulations with PIC electrons are then used to show that kinetic electron effects can lead to disruption of the ion streams at least three times closer to the moon than in the hybrid simulations. This disruption occurs as the result of a novel wake phenomenon: the non-linear growth of electron holes spawned from a narrow dimple in the electron velocity distribution. Most of the holes arising from the dimple are small and quickly l...

  13. Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Wright; Carolyn Auchter; Chen-Kuan Chou; Richard D. Graham; Thomas W. Noel; Tomasz Sakrejda; Zichao Zhou; Boris B. Blinov

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

  14. A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low energy ions using a multi-pixel photon counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilman, Edward S.; Gardiner, Sara H.; Vallance, Claire [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Nomerotski, Andrei [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Turchetta, Renato [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Brouard, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of ion detector for mass spectrometry and general detection of low energy ions is presented. The detector consists of a scintillator optically coupled to a single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) array. A prototype sensor has been constructed from a LYSO (Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce)) scintillator crystal coupled to a commercial SPAD array detector. As proof of concept, the detector is used to record the time-of-flight mass spectra of butanone and carbon disulphide, and the dependence of detection sensitivity on the ion kinetic energy is characterised.

  15. Towards secondary ion mass spectrometry on the helium ion microscope: An experimental and simulation based feasibility study with He{sup +} and Ne{sup +} bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtz, T.; Vanhove, N.; Pillatsch, L.; Dowsett, D. [Department of Science and Analysis of Materials (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Sijbrandij, S.; Notte, J. [Carl Zeiss NTS LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of the high-brightness He{sup +}/Ne{sup +} atomic level ion source with secondary ion mass spectrometry detection capabilities opens up the prospect of obtaining chemical information with high lateral resolution and high sensitivity on the Zeiss ORION helium ion microscope. The analytical performance in terms of sputtering yield, useful yield, and detection limit is studied and subsequently optimized by oxygen and cesium flooding. Detection limits down to 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -5} can be obtained for silicon using Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}, respectively. A simulation based study reveals furthermore that a lateral resolution <10 nm can be obtained.

  16. Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry, Jacqueline M. Jarvis, Amy M. McKenna, Roger N and aqueous phases. Here, each phase is characterized by negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier

  17. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, 94 (1989) 63-85 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam -Printed in The Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    in the understanding of the formation of mass spectra, among them the unexpectedly high kinetic energy of the laserInternational Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, 94 (1989) 63-85 Elsevier Science, cloud extensions, ion yields, relative sensitivity factors and ion kinetic energy distributions, i

  18. Method for calibrating a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Tolmachev, Aleksey

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the calibration of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer wherein the frequency spectrum of a sample has been measured and the frequency (f) and intensity (I) of at least three species having known mass to charge (m/z) ratios and one specie having an unknown (m/z) ratio have been identified. The method uses the known (m/z) ratios, frequencies, and intensities at least three species to calculate coefficients A, B, and C, wherein the mass to charge ratio of a least one of the three species (m/z).sub.i is equal to ##EQU1## wherein f.sub.i is the detected frequency of the specie, G(I.sub.i) is a predetermined function of the intensity of the species, and Q is a predetermined exponent. Using the calculated values for A, B, and C, the mass to charge ratio of the unknown specie (m/z).sub.ii is calculated as the sum of ##EQU2## wherein f.sub.ii is the measured frequency of the unknown specie, and (I.sub.ii) is the measured intensity of the unknown specie.

  19. Emergence and Frustration of Magnetic Order with Variable-Range Interactions in a Trapped Ion Quantum Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Islam; C. Senko; W. C. Campbell; S. Korenblit; J. Smith; A. Lee; E. E. Edwards; C. -C. J. Wang; J. K. Freericks; C. Monroe

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Frustration, or the competition between interacting components of a network, is often responsible for the complexity of many body systems, from social and neural networks to protein folding and magnetism. In quantum magnetic systems, frustration arises naturally from competing spin-spin interactions given by the geometry of the spin lattice or by the presence of long-range antiferromagnetic couplings. Frustrated magnetism is a hallmark of poorly understood systems such as quantum spin liquids, spin glasses and spin ices, whose ground states are massively degenerate and can carry high degrees of quantum entanglement. The controlled study of frustrated magnetism in materials is hampered by short dynamical time scales and the presence of impurities, while numerical modeling is generally intractable when dealing with dynamics beyond N~30 particles. Alternatively, a quantum simulator can be exploited to directly engineer prescribed frustrated interactions between controlled quantum systems, and several small-scale experiments have moved in this direction. In this article, we perform a quantum simulation of a long-range antiferromagnetic quantum Ising model with a transverse field, on a crystal of up to N = 16 trapped Yb+ atoms. We directly control the amount of frustration by continuously tuning the range of interaction and directly measure spin correlation functions and their dynamics through spatially-resolved spin detection. We find a pronounced dependence of the magnetic order on the amount of frustration, and extract signatures of quantum coherence in the resulting phases.

  20. Effect of ion mass and charge state on transport of vacuum ARC plasmas through a biased magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Kwon, Sik-Chol; Anders, Andre

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of ion mass and charge state on plasma transport through a 90{sup o}-curved magnetic filter is experimentally investigated using a pulsed cathodic arc source. Graphite, copper, and tungsten were selected as test materials. The filter was a bent copper coil biased via the voltage drop across a low-ohm, ''self-bias'' resistor. Ion transport is accomplished via a guiding electric field, whose potential forms a ''trough'' shaped by the magnetic guiding field of the filter coil. Evaluation was done by measuring the filtered ion current and determination of the particle system coefficient, which can be defined as the ratio of filter ion current, divided by the mean ion charge state, to the arc current. It was found that the ion current and particle system coefficient decreased as the mass-to-charge ratio of ions increased. This result can be qualitatively interpreted by a very simply model of ion transport that is based on compensation of the centrifugal force by the electric force associated with the guiding potential trough.

  1. Multielement ultratrace analysis of molybdenum with high performance secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virag, A.; Friedbacher, G.; Grasserbauer, M.; Ortner, H.M.; Wilhartitz, P.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam melting has been used to obtain ultrapure refractory metals that are gaining importance in metal oxide semiconductor--very large scale integration (MOS--VLSI) processing technology, fusion reactor technology, or as superconducting materials. Although the technology of electron beam melting is well established in the field of production of very clean refractory metals, little is known about the limitations of the method because the impurity level of the final products is frequently below the detection power of common methods for trace analysis. Characterization of these materials can be accomplished primarily by in situ methods like neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometric methods (glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)). A suitable method for quantitative multielement ultratrace bulk analysis of molybdenum with SIMS has been developed. Detection limits of the analyzed elements from 10/sup -7/ g/g down to 10/sup -12/ g/g have been found. Additional information about the distribution of the trace elements has been accumulated.

  2. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 25 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 17 DECEMBER 2001 Ion-Trap Quantum Logic Using Long-Wavelength Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderlich, Christof

    radiation in the radiofrequency or microwave regime. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.257904 PACS numbers: 03 Logic Using Long-Wavelength Radiation Florian Mintert1 and Christof Wunderlich2,* 1 I. Institut für radiation; the atom with mass m is trapped in a harmonic potential characterized by angular frequency vl

  3. Investigations into the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Sally M.

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an elemental analytical instrument capable of determining nearly all elements in the periodic table at limits of detection in the parts per quadrillion and with a linear analytical range over 8-10 orders of magnitude. Three concentric quartz tubes make up the plasma torch. Argon gas is spiraled through the outer tube and generates the plasma powered by a looped load coil operating at 27.1 or 40.6 MHz. The argon flow of the middle channel is used to keep the plasma above the innermost tube through which solid or aqueous sample is carried in a third argon stream. A sample is progressively desolvated, atomized and ionized. The torch is operated at atmospheric pressure. To reach the reduced pressures of mass spectrometers, ions are extracted through a series of two, approximately one millimeter wide, circular apertures set in water cooled metal cones. The space between the cones is evacuated to approximately one torr. The space behind the second cone is pumped down to, or near to, the pressure needed for the mass spectrometer (MS). The first cone, called the sampler, is placed directly in the plasma plume and its position is adjusted to the point where atomic ions are most abundant. The hot plasma gas expands through the sampler orifice and in this expansion is placed the second cone, called the skimmer. After the skimmer traditional MS designs are employed, i.e. quadrupoles, magnetic sectors, time-of-flight. ICP-MS is the leading trace element analysis technique. One of its weaknesses are polyatomic ions. This dissertation has added to the fundamental understanding of some of these polyatomic ions, their origins and behavior. Although mainly continuing the work of others, certain novel approaches have been introduced here. Chapter 2 includes the first reported efforts to include high temperature corrections to the partition functions of the polyatomic ions in ICP-MS. This and other objections to preceeding papers in this area were addressed. Errors in the measured T{sub gas} values were found for given errors in the experimental and spectroscopic values. The ionization energy of the neutral polyatomic ion was included in calculations to prove the validity of ignoring more complicated equilibria. Work was begun on the question of agreement between kinetics of the plasma and interface and the increase and depletion seen in certain polyatomic ions. This dissertation was also the first to report day to day ranges for T{sub gas} values and to use a statistical test to compare different operating conditions. This will help guide comparisons of previous and future work. Chapter 4 was the first attempt to include the excited electronic state 2 in the partition function of ArO{sup +} as well as the first to address the different dissociation products of the ground and first electronic levels of ArO{sup +}. Chapter 5 reports an interesting source of memory in ICP-MS that could affect mathematical corrections for polyatomic ions. For future work on these topics I suggest the following experiments and investigations. Clearly not an extensive list, they are instead the first topics curiosity brings to mind. (1) Measurement of T{sub gas} values when using the flow injection technique of Appendix B. It was believed that there was a fundamental difference in the plasma when the auto-sampler was used versus a continuous injection. Is this reflected in T{sub gas} values? (2) The work of Chapter 3 can be expanded and supplemented with more trials, new cone materials (i.e. copper, stainless steel) and more cone geometries. Some of this equipment is already present in the laboratory, others could be purchased or made. (3) T{sub gas} values from Chapter 3 could be correlated with instrument pressures during the experiment. Pressures after the skimmer cone were recorded for many days but have yet to be collated with the measured T{sub gas} values. (4) The work in Chapter 5 could be expanded to include more metals. Does the curious correlation between measured T{sub gas} and element boili

  4. Validating mass spectrometry measurements of nuclear materials via a non-contact volume analysis method of ion sputter craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry, optical profilometry and a statistically-driven algorithm was used to develop a non-contact volume analysis method to validate the useful yields of nuclear materials. The volume analysis methodology was applied to ion sputter craters created in silicon and uranium substrates sputtered by 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ions. Sputter yield measurements were determined from the volume calculations and were shown to be comparable to Monte Carlo calculations and previously reported experimental observations. Additionally, the volume calculations were used to determine the useful yields of Si+, SiO+ and SiO2+ ions from the silicon substrate and U+, UO+ and UO2+ ions from the uranium substrate under 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ion bombardment. This work represents the first steps toward validating the interlaboratory and cross-platform performance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of nuclear materials.

  5. and Ion Processes ELSEVIER International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and lon Processes 167/168 (1997) 637-647

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    /168 (1997) 637-647 Microsolvation of the ammonium ion in argon: infrared spectra of NH --Arn complexes (n Received 25 November 1996; accepted 2 June 1997 Abstract Infrared spectra of mass selected NH~-Ar, (n = 1 of the tetrahedral monomer. © 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. © 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Ab initio studies

  6. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Thompson

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  7. Ion funnel with extended mass range and reduced conductance limit aperture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion funnel design is disclosed that decreases the axial RF (parasite) fields at the ion funnel exit. This is achieved by addition of one or more compensation electrodes after the conductance limit electrode. Various RF voltage profiles may be applied to the various electrodes minimizing the parasite axial potential wells. The smallest RF aperture that serves as the conductance limiting electrode is further reduced over standard designs. Overall, the ion funnel improves transmission ranges of both low m/z and high m/z ions, reducing RF activation of ions and decreasing the gas load to subsequent differential pumping stages.

  8. Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Holly Ann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine...

  9. Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Holly Ann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine...

  10. Broadband laser cooling of trapped atoms with ultrafast pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Blinov; R. N. Kohn Jr.; M. J. Madsen; P. Maunz; D. L. Moehring; C. Monroe

    2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate broadband laser cooling of atomic ions in an rf trap using ultrafast pulses from a modelocked laser. The temperature of a single ion is measured by observing the size of a time-averaged image of the ion in the known harmonic trap potential. While the lowest observed temperature was only about 1 K, this method efficiently cools very hot atoms and can sufficiently localize trapped atoms to produce near diffraction-limited atomic images.

  11. Secondary ion emission from “super-efficient” events: prospects for surface mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickman, Richard Dale

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is recorded from a single event. Large increases (one to two orders of magnitude) in co-emitted ion yields were observed with increasing projectile energy and complexity. Correlation coefficients were calculated for the co-emission of two Ph ions...

  12. Intermediate mass fragment emission in heavy-ion collisions: Energy and system mass dependence O. Bjarki,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    . The number of IMFs emitted at the peak also increased with the system mass. Percolation calculations showed, the system can develop from evaporation to multifragmentation to vaporization, signifying the liquid-gas of the liquid-gas phase tran- sition and critical phenomena of nuclear matter have been carried out 9

  13. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  14. Detection of photon bursts from single 200 eV Mg ions: Progress in photon burst mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, W.M. Jr.; LaBelle, R.D.; Keller, R.A.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern atom counting methods, based on advances in laser and accelerator technology, provide a valuable complement to traditional decay counting methods for radioisotope dating and tracer work. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TAMS) has already had a large impact on /sup 14/C dating and is beginning to provide new opportunities with /sup 10/Be and several other isotopes. We report here on progress in the development of a laser-based technique, Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry, which is potentially capable of analyzing many of the elements which are forbidden in TAMS because they do not form negative ions. We are especially interested in the noble gases, which have a variety of potential scientific and environmental applications.

  15. Broadband laser cooling of trapped atoms with ultrafast pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    Broadband laser cooling of trapped atoms with ultrafast pulses B. B. Blinov,* R. N. Kohn, Jr., M. J ions in an rf trap using ultrafast pulses from a mode-locked laser. The temperature of a single ion On the other hand, an ultrafast laser whose pulse is a few picoseconds long will naturally have a bandwidth

  16. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along...

  17. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Anil K.; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel J.; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese RW; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are not due to any contamination from solvents and chemicals used for mobile and stationary phases or from the laboratory atmospheric environment. Instead these ions are clusters of trifluoroacetic acid formed in association with acetonitrile, water and iron from the stainless steel union used to connect the column with the electrospray tip and to apply high voltage; the molecular formulae are Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)9(CF3COOH)5 and Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)6 (CF3COOH)5.

  18. Principal ComponentAnalysisof Optical EmissionSpectroscopy and MassSpectrometry:Applicationto Reactive Ion Etch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    of process parameters (i.e., pressure, RF power, and gas mixture) on the optical emission and mass spectra.g., chamber pressure, RF power, and gas flow, while others are internal to the condition of the chamber, e

  19. Glycoprotein profiling by electrospray mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hui; Desaire, Heather; Butnev, V. Y.; Bousfield, George R.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and protease by ultrafiltration 5 using Amicon (Millipore, Bedford, MA) Centricon P-10 centrifugal ultrafiltration cartridges [18]. The filtrate was evaporated to dryness in a Savant (Thermo-Savant, Holbrook, NY) SpeedVac. It was applied to a 150 mg Altech... and neutral loss scan, collision energy was set between 20 V and 40 V. Spectra were recorded between m/z 1000 and m/z 2000, unless specified. Ion trap mass spectrometry Electrospray mass spectra were recorded on a Thermo Finnigan LCQ Advantage mass...

  20. Cooling and Heating of the Quantum Motion of Trapped Cd+ Louis Deslauriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Christopher

    ABSTRACT Cooling and Heating of the Quantum Motion of Trapped Cd+ Ions by Louis Deslauriers Chair information processor has seen tremendous progress in many fields of physics. In the last decade, trapped ions for entanglement generation limiting the fidelity of quantum logic gates. Effective ground state cooling of trapped

  1. Ion mass spectrometry investigations of the discharge during reactive high power pulsed and direct current magnetron sputtering of carbon in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, S.; Greczynski, G.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Div., Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 (Sweden); Czigany, Zs. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33. H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate discharges formed during high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a graphite target in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2} ambient. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were recorded in time-averaged and time-resolved mode for Ar{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, and C{sub x}N{sub y}{sup +} ions. An increase of N{sub 2} in the sputter gas (keeping the deposition pressure, pulse width, pulse frequency, and pulse energy constant) results for the HiPIMS discharge in a significant increase in C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and CN{sup +} ion energies. Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and C{sub 2}N{sup +} ion energies, in turn, did not considerably vary with the changes in working gas composition. The HiPIMS process showed higher ion energies and fluxes, particularly for C{sup +} ions, compared to DCMS. The time evolution of the plasma species was analyzed for HiPIMS and revealed the sequential arrival of working gas ions, ions ejected from the target, and later during the pulse-on time molecular ions, in particular CN{sup +} and C{sub 2}N{sup +}. The formation of fullerene-like structured CN{sub x} thin films for both modes of magnetron sputtering is explained by ion mass-spectrometry results and demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy as well as diffraction.

  2. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  3. The Radial Loss of Ions Trapped in the Thermal Barrier Potential and the Design of Divertor Magnetic Field in GAMMA10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katanuma, I. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Ito, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Saimaru, H. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Sasagawa, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Pastukhov, V.P. [I.V.Kuruchatov Atomic Energy Institute (Russian Federation); Ishii, K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Tatematsu, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Saito, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Islam, Md.K. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Cho, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion radial loss exists in the presence of a non-axisymmetric electrostatic potential in the end-mirror cells of GAMMA10, which leads to a formation of the thermal barrier potential. The non-axisymmetric electrostatic potential can also exist in the central cell. A design for divertor magnetic field of GAMMA10 is performed, the purpose of which is first to reduce an ion radial transport in the central cell by making electrostatic potential circular and second to assure the macroscopic plasma stability of GAMMA10 without help of non-axisymmetric anchor cells which enhances a neoclassical radial transport.

  4. Mass spectrometry analysis of Arabidopsis histone H3 reveals distinct combinations of post-translational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steve

    , Donald F. Hunt3 and Steven E. Jacobsen1, * Life Science Core Curriculum and 1 Molecular, Cell to electrospray ionization on a hybrid linear ion trap- Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LTQ/FTMS). We find and the histone octamer can be altered, influencing the sliding or movement of nucleosomes and thereby affecting

  5. Energy and Atomic Mass Dependence of Nuclear Stopping Power in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Interacting Gluon Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. J. Liu; W. Q. Chao; G. Wilk

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte-Carlo simulation of energy deposition process in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on a new realization of the Interacting-Gluon-Model (IGM) for high energy $N-N$ collisions. In particular we show results for proton spectra from collisions of $E_{lab}=200 \\ GeV/N$ $^{32}$S beam incident on $^{32}$S target and analyze the energy and mass dependence of nuclear stopping power predicted by our model. Theoretical predictions for proton rapidity distributions of both $^{208}$Pb + $^{208}$Pb collisions at $E_{lab}=160 \\ GeV/N$ CERN SPS and $^{197}$Au + $^{197}$Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 \\ GeV$ BNL RHIC are given.

  6. In situ measurements of Krypton in Xenon gas with a quadrupole mass spectrometer following a cold-trap at a temporarily reduced pumping speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethan Brown; Stephan Rosendahl; Christian Huhmann; Christian Weinheimer; Hans Kettling

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for measuring trace amounts of krypton in xenon using a cold trap with a residual gas analyzer has been developed, which achieves an increased sensitivity by temporarily reducing the pumping speed while expending a minimal amount of xenon. By partially closing a custom built butterfly valve between the measurement chamber and the turbomolecular pump, a sensitivity of 40 ppt has been reached. This method has been tested on an ultra-pure gas sample from Air Liquide with an unknown intrinsic krypton concentration, yielding a krypton concentration of $330 \\pm 200$ ppt.

  7. Loading a planar RF Paul Trap from a cold Yb? source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Brendan John

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we demonstrate a functioning planar radio frequency, three-rod Paul Trap, loaded with Yb+ ions that have been photoionized from a source of neutral atoms, which were cooled in a magneto-optical trap. Planar ...

  8. Evidence of microscopic effects in fragment mass distribution in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Ghosh; S. Pal; K. S. Gold; P. Bhattacharya

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Our measurements of variances ($\\sigma_{m}^2$) in mass distributions of fission fragments from fusion-fission reactions of light projectiles (C, O and F) on deformed thorium targets exhibit a sharp anomalous increase with energy near the Coulomb barrier, in contrast to the smooth variation of $\\sigma_{m}^2$ for the spherical bismuth target. This departure from expectation based on a statistical description is explained in terms of microscopic effects arising from the orientational dependence in the case of deformed thorium targets.

  9. Entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of compound nucleus formation time in light heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanto de Toledo, A. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear-Laboratorio, Pelletron, Caixa Postal 66318-05389-970 Sao Paulo, (Brasil)] [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear-Laboratorio, Pelletron, Caixa Postal 66318-05389-970 Sao Paulo, (Brasil); Carlson, B.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aerospacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, (Brasil)] [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aerospacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, (Brasil); Beck, C. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Universite Louis Pasteur, Boite Postale 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)] [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Universite Louis Pasteur, Boite Postale 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the compound nucleus formation time in light heavy-ion reactions has been investigated within the framework of semiclassical dissipative collision models. The model calculations have been applied successfully to the formation of the {sup 38}Ar compound nucleus as populated via the {sup 9}Be+{sup 29}Si, {sup 11}B+{sup 27}Al, {sup 12}C+{sup 26}Mg, and {sup 19}F+{sup 19}F entrance channels. The shape evolution of several other light composite systems appears to be consistent with the so-called {open_quote}{open_quote}Fusion Inhibition Factor{close_quote}{close_quote} which has been observed experimentally. As found previously in more massive systems for the fusion-evaporation process, the entrance-channel mass-asymmetry degree of freedom appears to determine the competition between the different mechanisms as well as the time scales involved. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Gas-phase and Solution-phase Peptide Conformations Studied by Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liuxi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates ions on the basis of ion-neutral collision cross-sections (CCS, [omega]), which are determined by the geometry or conformation of the ions. The size-based IM separation can be extended to distinguish...

  11. Laser cooling and sympathetic cooling in a linear quadrupole rf trap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryjkov, Vladimir Leonidovich

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the sympathetic cooling method for the studies of large ultra-cold molecular ions in a quadrupole ion trap has been conducted.Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the rf heating mechanisms in the ion trap...

  12. Analysis of Interstitial Elements in Niobium with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D. P. [Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Stevie, F. A. [Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Myeneni, G.; Ciovati, G. [Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Rigsbee, J. M. [Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States)

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities provide enhanced efficiency and reduced energy utilization in present day particle accelerators. Niobium (Nb) is the material of choice for these cavities due to its high critical temperature and critical magnetic field. In order to understand why certain treatments, especially a low temperature bake, improve performance, it is important to study Nb surface characteristics and identify elemental contamination that can affect the performance of the cavity. H, C, O, and N are of interest because they are interstitial impurities in Nb. In earlier work, SIMS analysis using a CAMECA IMS-6F with Cs{sup +} primary beam showed that C and N were probably not significant factors impacting performance but there was a very high level of H in the Nb. Ion implants of C, N, O, and D into Nb provided quantification of C, N, O and indicated that D is very mobile in the Nb. Further analyses showed that heat treated Nb has lower levels of surface H than non heat treated Nb and subsequent removal of surface oxide by etching causes intake of H in a heat treated Nb sample. This result helps confirm the role of surface oxide as a hydrogen barrier. To further understand the oxide, Nb samples were anodized to obtain a thicker surface oxide and H and D were implanted into this oxide to check for the appearance of implant peaks. SIMS depth profile analyses were carried out and confirmed the presence of the implant shape for these elements in the oxide. Relative Sensitivity Factor (RSFs) could then be calculated for quantification of H in the oxide. Since the Nb matrix signal showed little change from the oxide to the substrate, the same RSF was used to estimate the H concentration in the Nb at 2x10{sup 22} atoms/cm{sup 3}(approximately 40% mole fraction H).

  13. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, 78 (1987) 237-250 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam -Printed in The Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    of interest with high energy (- 100 MeV) 252Cf fission fragments [l]. This high-energy desorptionInternational Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, 78 (1987) 237-250 Elsevier Science polypeptide. Details of the slow unimolecular decay of high molecular weight multiply protonated polypeptides

  14. Commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; R. Collister; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. Large laser-cooled samples of francium are produced from a francium ion beam delivered by the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. The ion beam is neutralized on an yttrium foil, which is subsequently heated to transfer the atoms into the magneto-optical trapping region. We have successfully trapped $^{207}$Fr, $^{209}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr, with a maximum of $2.5 \\times 10^5$ $^{209}$Fr atoms. The neutral cold atoms will be used in studies of the weak interaction through measurements of atomic parity non-conservation.

  15. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

  16. Steam Trap Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, J. J.; Hirtner, H. H.

    problemA of water hammer and high back pressure. ? Exorbitantly hi~h percentage of cold trapA. ? External steam leaks within the steam trap stations, bypasA valves and/or strainer blowdown valvefl open, blowin~ steam. ! I ? Dirt nssociated... Trapping 2 Trap Installed Backwards 1 Misapplication of Technology 1 Strainer Blowdown Connections Capped 285 (*b) Test Tee Connections Capped 11 Trap Inlet Connected to Steam Line Strainer Blowdown Connection 3 Water Logged Coils (Vacuum Present) 7...

  17. Evaluating Steam Trap Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, N. Y.

    EVALUATING STEAM TRAP PERFORMANCE Noel Y Fuller, P.E. Holston Defense Corporation Kingsport, Tennessee ABSTRACT Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data... that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost. INTRODUCTION Steam traps used on distribution line drip...

  18. Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Intact Proteins by LAESI FT-ICR MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, András; Reschke, Brent R; Powell, Matthew J; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization is a recent development in mass spectrometry imaging. It has been shown that lipids and small metabolites can be imaged in various samples such as plant material, tissue sections or bacterial colonies without anysample pre-treatment. Further, laser ablation electrospray ionization has been shown to produce multiply charged protein ions from liquids or solid surfaces. This presents a means to address one of the biggest challenges in mass spectrometry imaging; the identification of proteins directly from biological tissue surfaces. Such identification is hindered by the lack of multiply charged proteins in common MALDI ion sources and the difficulty of performing tandem MS on such large, singly charged ions. We present here top-down identification of intact proteins from tissue with a LAESI ion source combined with a hybrid ion-trap FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The performance of the system was first tested with a standard protein with ECD and IRMPD fragmentation to prove the...

  19. Inertial measurement with trapped particles: A microdynamical system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, E. Rehmi; Popescu, George A.; Gershenfeld, Neil [Center for Bits and Atoms, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an inertial measurement device based on an electrodynamically trapped proof mass. Mechanical constraints are replaced by guiding fields, permitting the trap stiffness to be tuned dynamically. Optical readout of the proof mass motion provides a measurement of acceleration and rotation, resulting in an integrated six degree of freedom inertial measurement device. We demonstrate such a device - constructed without microfabrication - with sensitivity comparable to that of commercial microelectromechanical systems technology and show how trapping parameters may be adjusted to increase dynamic range.

  20. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieffer, Gregg

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

  1. Effective Steam Trap Selection/Maintenance - Its Payback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trap location, service, manufacturer, model, steam pressures, pipe size, type of connect ion, associated valves, strainer, and insulation. The condition in which each trap was found in the plant was reported and summarized as in Table 1. Other... leaks and any unsafe situations were also noted. Of the 5,000 surveyed traps, approximately 20% had failed open or were in another failure mode where live steam was leaking, 5% were found plugged, and 10% were found not losing steam but needing...

  2. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  3. acoustic waves trapped: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a magnetoplasma with a pair of trapped ions CERN Preprints Summary: The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with a pair of...

  4. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, K., E-mail: klaus.schmid@ipp.mpg.de; Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12?H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  5. HP Steam Trap Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

  6. Method and apparatus for confinement of ions in the presence of a neutral gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, A.J.; Barlow, S.E.

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for combining ions with a neutral gas and flowing the mixture with a radial flow component through a magnetic field so that the weakly ionized gas is confined by the neutral gas. When the weakly ionized gas is present in sufficient density, a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma is formed that may be trapped in accordance with the present invention. Applications for a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma exploit the trap`s ability to store and manipulate ionic species in the presence of neutral gas. The trap may be connected to a mass spectrometer thereby permitting species identification after a fixed period of time. Delicate and/or heavy particles such as clusters may be held and studied in a ``gentle`` environment. In addition, the trap can provide a relatively intense, low-energy source of a particular ion species for surface implantation or molecular chemistry. Finally, a long trap may permit spectroscopy of unprecedented accuracy to be performed on ionic species. 4 figs.

  7. Global sound modes in mirror traps with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skovorodin, D. I.; Zaytsev, K. V.; Beklemishev, A. D. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)] [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Global oscillations of inhomogeneous plasma with frequencies close to the bounce frequency of ions in mirror traps have been studied. It has been shown that, in some cases, the sound can be reflected from the axial plasma inhomogeneity. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model with Chew-Goldberger-Low approximation has been utilized to determine conditions of existence of the standing waves in the mirror-confined plasma. Linearized wave equation for the longitudinal plasma oscillations in thin anisotropic inhomogeneous plasma with finite ? has been derived. The wave equation has been treated numerically. The oscillations are studied for the case of the trap with partially filled loss-cone and the trap with sloshing ions. It has been shown that in cells of the multiple-mirror trap standing waves can exist. The frequency of the wave is of the order of the mean bounce-frequency of ions. In the trap with sloshing ions, the mode supported by the pressure of fast ions could exist. The results of oscillations observation in the experiment on the Gas Dynamic Trap have been presented.

  8. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

  9. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

  10. Study of multilayered SiGe semiconductor structures by X-ray diffractometry, grazing-incidence X-ray reflectometry, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunin, P. A., E-mail: yunin@ipmras.ru; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Drozdov, M. N.; Korolev, S. A.; Lobanov, D. N. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this publication, we report the results of studying a multilayerd nonperiodic SiGe/Si structure by the methods of X-ray diffractometry, grazing-angle X-ray reflectometry, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Special attention is paid to the processing of the component distribution profile using the SIMS method and to consideration of the most significant experimental distortions introduced by this method. A method for processing the measured composition distribution profile with subsequent consideration of the influence of matrix effects, variation in the etching rate, and remnants of ion sputtering is suggested. The results of such processing are compared with a structure model obtained upon combined analysis of X-ray diffractometry and grazing-angle reflectometry data. Good agreement between the results is established. It is shown that the combined use of independent techniques makes it possible to improve the methods of secondary-ion mass spectrometry and grazing-incidence reflectometry as applied to an analysis of multilayered heteroepitaxial structures (to increase the accuracy and informativity of these methods)

  11. Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Atmospheric Pressure Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    . Rodgers, & Alan G. Marshall, Analytical Chemistry 84, 7131-7137 (2012). Figure 1. Schematic diagram hydrocarbons (the primary components of gasoline) are difficult to analyze by mass spectrometry, because

  12. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, Travis

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

  13. Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

  14. Nano-Domain Analysis Via Massive Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry in the Event-by-Event Mode 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinnick, Veronica Tiffany

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    clusters useful probes to obtain molecular information from both nano-objects and nano-domains. The "event-by-event bombardment/detection mode" probes nano-objects one-at-a-time, while collecting and storing the corresponding secondary ion (SI) information...

  15. Effect of trapping in degenerate quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, H. A.; Qureshi, M. N. S. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work we consider the effect of trapping as a microscopic process in a plasma consisting of quantum electrons and nondegenerate ions. The formation of solitary structures is investigated in two cases: first when the electrons are fully degenerate and second when small temperature effects are taken into account. It is seen that not only rarefactive but coupled rarefactive and compressive solitons are obtained under different temperature conditions.

  16. Ion trajectory analysis for micromotion minimization and the measurement of small forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gloger, Timm F; Kaufmann, Delia; Baig, M Tanveer; Collath, Thomas; Johanning, Michael; Wunderlich, Christof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For experiments with ions confined in a Paul trap, minimization of micromotion is often essential. This is the case, for example, for experiments in quantum information science using trapped ions, in combined traps for neutral atoms and ions, and for precision measurements using trapped ions. In order to diagnose and compensate micromotion we have implemented a method that allows for finding the position of the radio-frequency (RF) null reliably and efficiently, in principle, without any variation of direct current (DC) voltages. We apply a trap modulation technique and tomographic imaging to extract 3d ion positions for various RF drive powers and analyze the power dependence of the equilibrium position of the trapped ion. In contrast to commonly used methods, the search algorithm directly makes use of a physical effect as opposed to efficient numerical minimization in a high-dimensional parameter space. The precise position determination of an harmonically trapped ion employed here can also be utilized for ...

  17. A single ion inside a miniature cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Matthias

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and the characterisation of the trap in terms of trap frequencies, external electric fields, micromotion compensation, ion lifetime and motional heating is discussed. Furthermore we introduce a set of experimental tech- niques to manipulate the ion on the infrared... .3.4. Calibration of the Electrostatic Compensation Fields . . . . . . . 52 1.3.5. Micromotion Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 1.3.6. Ion Lifetime and Heating Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 1.4. Manipulation on the 935 nm...

  18. Method and apparatus for confinement of ions in the presence of a neutral gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for combining ions with a neutral gas and flowing the mixture with a radial flow component through a magnetic field so that the weakly ionized gas is confined by the neutral gas. When the weakly ionized gas is present in sufficient density, a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma is formed that may be trapped in accordance with the present invention. Applications for a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma exploit the trap's ability to store and manipulate ionic species in the presence of neutral gas. The trap may be connected to a mass spectrometer thereby permitting species identification after a fixed period of time. Delicate and/or heavy particles such as clusters may be held and studied in a "gentle" environment. In addition, the trap can provide a relatively intense, low-energy source of a particular ion species for surface implantation or molecular chemistry. Finally, a long trap may permit spectroscopy of unprecedented accuracy to be performed on ionic species.

  19. Microchip and wedge ion funnels and planar ion beam analyzers using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodynamic ion funnels confine, guide, or focus ions in gases using the Dehmelt potential of oscillatory electric field. New funnel designs operating at or close to atmospheric gas pressure are described. Effective ion focusing at such pressures is enabled by fields of extreme amplitude and frequency, allowed in microscopic gaps that have much higher electrical breakdown thresholds in any gas than the macroscopic gaps of present funnels. The new microscopic-gap funnels are useful for interfacing atmospheric-pressure ionization sources to mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility separation (IMS) stages including differential IMS or FAIMS, as well as IMS and MS stages in various configurations. In particular, "wedge" funnels comprising two planar surfaces positioned at an angle and wedge funnel traps derived therefrom can compress ion beams in one dimension, producing narrow belt-shaped beams and laterally elongated cuboid packets. This beam profile reduces the ion density and thus space-charge effects, mitigating the adverse impact thereof on the resolving power, measurement accuracy, and dynamic range of MS and IMS analyzers, while a greater overlap with coplanar light or particle beams can benefit spectroscopic methods.

  20. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  1. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  2. Steam Trap Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, J. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment Collecting leg, same size as equip ment connection but not less than Install a Yarway Process Trap below be drained. Install a Provide vacuum strainer with a blow down valve. Use and Yarway Aldrain valves full ported stop valves, (gate... and Corrosion Problems Like any critical control device the steam trap should be protected from dirt and scale if optimum operation and adequate service life are to be attained. Strainers should be equipped with blowdown valves to provide an effective...

  3. ccsd00004463, Transverse Kinematics of Ions Stored in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , multiple scattering, cooling 1 Introduction The use and development of ion trapping techniques, which cooling has also been observed [10]. Interesting dynamics of the ion motion have been discovered

  4. The TITAN in-trap decay spectroscopy facility at TRIUMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Leach; A. Grossheim; A. Lennarz; T. Brunner; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; A. A. Kwiatkowski; T. Ma; T. D. Macdonald; S. Seeraji; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents an upgraded in-trap decay spectroscopy apparatus which has been developed and constructed for use with TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN). This device consists of an open-access electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT), which is surrounded radially by seven low-energy planar Si(Li) detectors. The environment of the EBIT allows for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles away from the trap centre via the strong (up to 6 T) magnetic field. In addition to excellent ion confinement and storage, the EBIT also provides a venue for performing decay spectroscopy on highly-charged radioactive ions. Recent technical advancements have been able to provide a significant increase in sensitivity for low-energy photon detection, towards the goal of measuring weak electron-capture branching ratios of the intermediate nuclei in the two-neutrino double beta ($2\

  5. Optothermal Molecule Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duhr, S; Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophoresis moves molecules along temperature gradients, typically from hot to cold. We superpose fluid flow with thermophoretic molecule flow under well defined microfluidic conditions, imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA is trapped and accumulated 16-fold in regions where both flows move in opposite directions. Strong 800-fold accumulation is expected, however with slow trapping kinetics. The experiment is equally described by a three-dimensional and one-dimensional analytical model. As an application, we show how a radially converging temperature field confines short DNA into a 10 um small spot.

  6. Electric-dipole 5s - 5p Transitions in Promethiumlike Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5s-5p electric-dipole resonance transitions in highly ionized promethiumlike ions have been studied applying relativistic multi-reference Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory. The transition wavelengths are determined to within 0.2 {angstrom} in the more highly charged ions, where the level degeneracies are small. For somewhat lighter ions a very large reference space was used in order to account for the many degeneracies. In order to calculate transition probabilities and lifetimes, correlation corrections have been added to the transition operator in the next order. The contributions from the higher orders of the theory, that is, frequency-dependent Breit correction, Lamb shift, and mass shifts, have been estimated. The results are used to re-assess spectroscopic data from beam-foil, electron beam ion trap, and tokamak observations.

  7. Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth's Magnetotail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth phase distributions, measured Wind spacecraft a rare crossing diffusion region in Earth's magnetotail, the presence a strong electrostatic potential within ion diffusion region is revealed. potential reaching

  8. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving...

  9. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buratto, Steven K. [UC Santa Barbara

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

  10. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  11. EMSL - Mass Spectrometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass-spectrometry Proteomics Capabilities High resolution and mass accuracy Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometers, from 6 Tesla (T) to 15T and 21T in...

  12. Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions W. M. Itano, J. C. Bergquist, A-16 . Keywords: aluminum, atomic clocks, frequency standards, ion traps, mercury 1. INTRODUCTION Optical frequency standards based on the mercury ion and, more recently, the aluminum ion are under devel- opment

  13. Ion-neutral chemical reactions between ultracold localized ions and neutral molecules with single-particle resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Stephan

    + ions and room-temperature O2 have been studied in a laser-cooling ion trap apparatus. For small Coulomb state-selectively. Regarding the ion side of this challenging program, sig- nificant progress was made using laser cooling techniques. In par- ticular, sympathetic cooling by laser-cooled atomic ions

  14. A New Pulsed Glow Discharge Source With Enhanced Ion Extraction for Small Non-Conductive Samples or Atmospheric Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Glen P. [Ohio University, Athens; Haire, Richard {Dick} G [ORNL; Duckworth, Douglas {Doug} C [ORNL

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionization source designed to efficiently utilize sub-milligram quantities of electrically non-conducting compounds (i.e. oxides) for prolonged periods of mass spectrometric analysis is described. The source is coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer in this report, but could readily be modified for alternative types of mass spectrometers. The coaxial-design glow discharge ion source is unique in that it incorporates a focusing lens behind the discharge surface to steer ions towards the ion sampling plate and thereby improve sensitivity. Non-conducting oxide samples are infused in indium and set in one end of an electrically conductive rod, to which the voltage is applied. Transmission efficiency is sufficient to allow the measurement of isotopes of tungsten from a tungsten rod using glow discharge pulse widths as narrow as 2 {micro}s, which is on the order of single-atom layer sputtering. The sputtering and ionization processes occurring in the discharge produces mainly atomic metal ions, regardless of the chemical form of the metals in the samples. This latter aspect is particularly useful for intended applications involving actinide samples, and allows a minimal amount of sample handling. In a second application, a metal capillary is used in place of the rod to create an atmospheric sampling glow discharge. In this mode, the ion-focusing lens was also found to enhance ion signals arising from volatile vapors entering the discharge from the capillary.

  15. Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu [Department 'Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public, Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Wegmann, Urs [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Maier, Urs [Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel [SPECS Zurich GmbH, Technoparkstr. 1, CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

  16. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  17. Hydration of gas-phase ytterbium ion complexes studied by experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, Philip X; Michelini, Maria C.; Bray, Travis H.; Russo, Nino; Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydration of ytterbium (III) halide/hydroxide ions produced by electrospray ionization was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and by density functional theory (DFT). Gas-phase YbX{sub 2}{sup +} and YbX(OH){sup +} (X = OH, Cl, Br, or I) were found to coordinate from one to four water molecules, depending on the ion residence time in the trap. From the time dependence of the hydration steps, relative reaction rates were obtained. It was determined that the second hydration was faster than both the first and third hydrations, and the fourth hydration was the slowest; this ordering reflects a combination of insufficient degrees of freedom for cooling the hot monohydrate ion and decreasing binding energies with increasing hydration number. Hydration energetics and hydrate structures were computed using two approaches of DFT. The relativistic scalar ZORA approach was used with the PBE functional and all-electron TZ2P basis sets; the B3LYP functional was used with the Stuttgart relativistic small-core ANO/ECP basis sets. The parallel experimental and computational results illuminate fundamental aspects of hydration of f-element ion complexes. The experimental observations - kinetics and extent of hydration - are discussed in relationship to the computed structures and energetics of the hydrates. The absence of pentahydrates is in accord with the DFT results, which indicate that the lowest energy structures have the fifth water molecule in the second shell.

  18. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR...

  19. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  20. Ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  1. Studies on the dissociation reactions of [M + H]? and [M + A]? ions of small, model peptides using tandem mass spectrometry and fast atom bombardment ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGlohon, Elizabeth Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectrum of the [M + H]+ ious of arg-gly Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectrum of the [M + Na]+ ions of arg-gly . 27 29 12 13 Collision-induced dissociation (CID) the [M + Li]+ ions ol' arg... the relative abundances of the [a + H]+ ions. Admixing a sodium source with solid samples of amino acids did not increase the relative 10 abundance of the [a + Na]+ ions. In fact, addition of a solid amino acid decreased the relative abundance, since...

  2. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggiore, M., E-mail: mario.maggiore@lnl.infn.it; Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A. [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  3. accuracy mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milos 2 High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging CERN Preprints Summary: Biological tissue imaging by...

  4. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C., E-mail: b-odom@northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  5. Radiation trapping in coherent media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Matsko; I. Novikova; M. O. Scully; G. R. Welch

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the effective decay rate of Zeeman coherence, generated in a Rb87 vapor by linearly polarized laser light, increases significantly with the atomic density. We explain this phenomenon as the result of radiation trapping. Our study shows that radiation trapping must be taken into account to fully understand many electromagnetically induced transparency experiments with optically thick media.

  6. Optimal traps in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Downing; A. R. Pearce; R. J. Churchill; M. E. Portnoi

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We transform the two-dimensional Dirac-Weyl equation, which governs the charge carriers in graphene, into a non-linear first-order differential equation for scattering phase shift, using the so-called variable phase method. This allows us to utilize the Levinson Theorem to find zero-energy bound states created electrostatically in realistic structures. These confined states are formed at critical potential strengths, which leads to us posit the use of `optimal traps' to combat the chiral tunneling found in graphene, which could be explored experimentally with an artificial network of point charges held above the graphene layer. We also discuss scattering on these states and find the zero angular momentum states create a dominant peak in scattering cross-section as energy tends towards the Dirac point energy, suggesting a dominant contribution to resistivity.

  7. Detection of Fusion Neutrons on the Multimirror Trap GOL-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdakov, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); England, A.C. [Korea Basic Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C.S. [Korea Basic Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Koidan, V.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Kwon, M. [Korea Basic Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Postupaev, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Rovenskikh, A.F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Sulyaev, Yu.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently GOL-3 has been reconfigured to a multimirror trap with improved confinement and high ion temperature. A dense plasma is created with a life time in the millisecond range. BTI neutron bubble detectors, a stilbene scintillation crystal, a BC501A liquid scintillator, and a silver-activation counter have been used for measurements of the neutron emission from GOL-3. The results are in agreement with charge-exchange (CX), spectral broadening of the D{alpha} line, and diamagnetic measurements.

  8. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  9. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  10. 2007NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods Higher-energy C-trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    be efficiently fragmented by high-accuracy and full-mass-range tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) via higher-energy©2007NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods Higher-energy C-trap dissociation Horning2 & Matthias Mann1 Peptide sequencing is the basis of mass spectrometry­driven proteomics. Here we

  11. Development of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a tool for proteomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruotolo, Brandon Thomas

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    typical of cellular protein complements. In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization is coupled with ion mobility (IM) separation for the analysis of biological molecules. The utility of liquid-phase separations coupled to MS lies...

  12. Development of a maldi ? ion mobility? surface-induced dissociation ? time-of-flight mass spectrometer with novel collision source configurations for high throughput peptide sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Wenjian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) – Ion Mobility (IM) – Surface-induced Dissociation (SID) – Time-of-Flight (TOF) instrument with three different collision source configurations was developed in order to improve the SID...

  13. Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Jody C.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with Electron Impact) grid a transparent array of thin wires used in charged particle optics IMS Ion Mobility Spectrometry LDI Laser Desorption/Ionization longitudinal/axial the direction parallel to the transit of the ion beam or swarm MALDI Matrix... 1-2.1 Electric Field Considerations for IMS Experiments .......... 13 1-2.2 Measurement of Mobility Constants and the Gas Phase Collision Cross Section ................................................... 15 1-3 Separation Efficiency...

  14. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, James W. (Canoga Park, CA); Schlanger, Herbert (Simi Valley, CA); McNulty, Jr., Hugh (Santa Monica, CA); Parker, Norman W. (Camarillo, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  15. A study of the regeneration process in diesel particulate traps using a copper fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, J.C.; Opris, C.N.; Baumgard, K.J.; Johnson, J.H. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this research are to understand the regeneration process in ceramic (Cordierite) monolith traps using a copper fuel additive and to investigate the various conditions that lead to trap regeneration failure. The copper additive lowers the trap regeneration temperature from approximately 500 C to 375 C and decreases the time necessary for regeneration. Because of these characteristics, it is important to understand the effect of the additive on regeneration when excessive particulate matter accumulation occurs in the trap. The effects of particulate mass loading on regeneration temperatures and regeneration time were studied for both the controlled (engine operated at full load rated speed) and uncontrolled conditions. The trap peak temperatures were higher for the uncontrolled than the controlled regeneration. The higher peak trap temperatures were predominantly controlled by the effect of the exhaust flow rates on the energy transfer processes. The total regeneration time was faster for the controlled regeneration compared to the uncontrolled regeneration. All traps passed the controlled regeneration tests having maximum temperatures less than 900 C. During the uncontrolled regeneration tests, trap failure occurred at 135 and 139 g particulate matter loadings. The maximum temperatures were in excess of 1,150 C. The pressure drop across the trap was modeled using the one dimensional Darcy`s law which accounted for the pressure drop due to the ceramic wall and the particulate layer. The experimental results for the substrate correlate well with the empirical substrate pressure drop models available in the literature. The models also enable an estimate to be made regarding trap mass loading. These data along with the laboratory data have indicated that mass loadings greater than 110 g followed by high temperature operation and subsequent engine idling can result in trap failures during regeneration.

  16. Breakdown of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation for the A = 20 and 21 Multiplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Gallant; M. Brodeur; C. Andreoiu; A. Bader; A. Chaudhuri; U. Chowdhury; A. Grossheim; R. Klawitter; A. A. Kwiatkowski; K. G. Leach; A. Lennarz; T. D. Macdonald; B. E. Schultz; J. Lassen; H. Heggen; S. Raeder; A. Teigelhöfer; B. A. Brown; A. Magilligan; J. D. Holt; J. Menéndez; J. Simonis; A. Schwenk; J. Dilling

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Penning trap mass spectrometer TITAN, we performed the first direct mass measurements of 20,21Mg, isotopes that are the most proton-rich members of the A = 20 and A = 21 isospin multiplets. These measurements were possible through the use of a unique ion-guide laser ion source, a development that suppressed isobaric contamination by six orders of magnitude. Compared to the latest atomic mass evaluation, we find that the mass of 21Mg is in good agreement but that the mass of 20Mg deviates by 3{\\sigma}. These measurements reduce the uncertainties in the masses of 20,21Mg by 15 and 22 times, respectively, resulting in a significant departure from the expected behavior of the isobaric multiplet mass equation in both the A = 20 and A = 21 multiplets. This presents a challenge to shell model calculations using either the isospin non-conserving USDA/B Hamiltonians or isospin non-conserving interactions based on chiral two- and three-nucleon forces.

  17. albumin ions injected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 Hunt, Galen 3 Characterizing Oligosaccharides Using Injected-Ion MobilityMass Spectrometry Chemistry Websites Summary: Characterizing Oligosaccharides Using Injected-Ion...

  18. Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of...

  19. Fast and efficient transport of large ion clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamsap, Marius Romuald; Champenois, Caroline; Guyomarc'H, Didier; Houssin, Marie; Knoop, Martina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manipulation of trapped charged particles by electric fields is an accurate, robust and reliable technique for many applications or experiments in high-precision spectroscopy. The transfer of the ion sample between multiple traps allows the use of a tailored environment in quantum information, cold chemistry, or frequency metrology experiments. In this article, we experimentally study the transport of ion clouds of up to 50 000 ions. The design of the trap makes ions very sensitive to any mismatch between the assumed electric potential and the actual local one. Nevertheless, we show that being fast (100 $\\mu$s to transfer over more than 20 mm) increases the transport efficiency to values higher than 90 %, even with a large number of ions. For clouds of less than 2000 ions, a 100 % transfer efficiency is observed.

  20. Manipulation of the magnetron orbit of a positron cloud in a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, T.; Deller, A.; Isaac, C. A.; Werf, D. P. van der; Charlton, M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Machacek, J. R. [Centre for Matter-Antimatter Studies, Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a simple and versatile method to manipulate the amplitude of the magnetron orbit of ions stored in a Penning trap, applied here to a cloud of low energy positrons. By applying a pulsed voltage to a split electrode in the trap, which is normally used for rotating wall compression of the particles, the size of the magnetron orbit can be changed at will. The modified orbit has been shown to be stable for many magnetron periods. The technique could find use in applications which require off-axis ejection of particles, for instance in the filling of arrays of traps for multicell positron storage.

  1. Trapping processes in CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Dongdong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China); Jia, Weiyi [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico)] [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Evans, D. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Dennis, W. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Liu, Huimin [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico)] [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Zhu, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China); Yen, W. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+} is a persistent red phosphor. Thermoluminescence was measured under different excitation and thermal treatment conditions. The results reveal that the charge defects, created by substituting Tm{sup 3+} for Ca{sup 2+}, serve as hole traps for the afterglow at room temperature. Tm{sup 3+} plays the role of deep electron trapping centers, capturing electrons either through the conduction band or directly from the excited Eu{sup 2+} ions. These two processes, in which two different sites of Tm{sup 3+} are involved, correspond to two traps with different depths. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  3. atomic ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lothar Ratschbacher; Carlo Sias; Michael Khl 2010-08-17 4 Micromotion in trapped atom-ion systems Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We examine the validity of the harmonic...

  4. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  5. Managing the Steam Trap Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    item? .However, some converts to the gospel of enlighten ed steam trap management expect to achieve the following benefits: A 95% trap performance level which is a better than 30% improvement over the industry norm. Plus, we have found a well... trained. This may six surveys per year with a guaf'8nteed performance level involve two days of training per man including of better than 9596. This program usually has the best cash classroom and field instruction plus periodic flow, and faster...

  6. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  7. adrenal mass characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that the origin 7 Characterizing Oligosaccharides Using Injected-Ion MobilityMass Spectrometry Chemistry Websites Summary: Characterizing Oligosaccharides Using Injected-Ion...

  8. An all-optical ion-loading technique for scalable microtrap architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Hendricks; D. M. Grant; P. F. Herskind; A. Dantan; M. Drewsen

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental demonstration of a novel all-optical technique for loading ion traps, that has particular application to microtrap architectures, is presented. The technique is based on photo-ionisation of an atomic beam created by pulsed laser ablation of a calcium target, and provides improved temporal control compared to traditional trap loading methods. Ion loading rates as high as 125 ions per second have so far been observed. Also described are observations of trap loading where Rydberg state atoms are photo-ionised by the ion Doppler cooling laser.

  9. Secondary ion emission from single massive gold cluster impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, George Joseph

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    massive projectile impacts. Secondary ion yield enhancements, resulting from use of the multi-anode detector, are reported along with secondary ion distributions for organic and inorganic targets. Au-adduct ions have been observed in mass spectra resulting...

  10. Reversing Hydride Ion Formation in Quantum Information Experiments with Be$^+$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Sawyer; Justin G. Bohnet; Joseph W. Britton; John J. Bollinger

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate photodissociation of BeH$^+$ ions within a Coulomb crystal of thousands of $^9$Be$^+$ ions confined in a Penning trap. Because BeH$^+$ ions are created via exothermic reactions between trapped, laser-cooled Be$^+$($^2\\text{P}_{3/2}$) and background H$_2$ within the vacuum chamber, they represent a major contaminant species responsible for infidelities in large-scale trapped-ion quantum information experiments. The rotational-state-insensitive dissociation scheme described here makes use of 157 nm photons to produce Be$^+$ and H as products, thereby restoring Be$^+$ ions without the need for reloading. This technique facilitates longer experiment runtimes at a given background H$_2$ pressure, and may be adapted for removal of MgH$^+$ and AlH$^+$ impurities.

  11. Effect of trapping in a degenerate plasma in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, H. A.; Iqbal, M. J.; Qureshi, M. N. S. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Masood, W. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of trapping as a microscopic phenomenon in a degenerate plasma is investigated in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. The plasma comprises degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions. The presence of the quantizing magnetic field is discussed briefly and the effect of trapping is investigated by using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. The linear dispersion relation for ion acoustic wave is derived in the presence of the quantizing magnetic field and its influence on the propagation characteristics of the linear ion acoustic wave is discussed. Subsequently, fully nonlinear equations for ion acoustic waves are used to obtain the Sagdeev potential and the investigation of solitary structures. The formation of solitary structures is studied both for fully and partially degenerate plasmas in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons are obtained for different conditions of temperature and magnetic field.

  12. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  13. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  14. Optical Trapping by Radiometric Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William L. Clarke

    1998-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron sized, neutral, non-dielectric particles immersed in a viscous fluid can be trapped in the focal plane of a Gaussian beam. A particle can absorb energy from such a beam with a large radial intensity gradient, resulting in substantial temperature gradients and a radiometric torque which causes it to spin rapidly about an axis perpendicular to the flux of radiant energy. The particles are also observed to orbit around the optical axis. Here we investigate the fundamental physics of this system, the Radiometric Particle Trap, and discuss its force laws using gas-kinetic theory.

  15. Jaynes-Cummings Models with trapped electrons on liquid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao Zhang; H. Y. Jia; L. F. Wei

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jaynes-Cummings model is a typical model in quantum optics and has been realized with various physical systems (e.g, cavity QED, trapped ions, and circuit QED etc..) of two-level atoms interacting with quantized bosonic fields. Here, we propose a new implementation of this model by using a single classical laser beam to drive an electron floating on liquid Helium. Two lowest levels of the {\\it vertical} motion of the electron acts as a two-level "atom", and the quantized vibration of the electron along one of the {\\it parallel} directions, e.g., $x$-direction, serves the bosonic mode. These two degrees of freedom of the trapped electron can be coupled together by using a classical laser field. If the frequencies of the applied laser fields are properly set, the desirable Jaynes-Cummings models could be effectively realized.

  16. Development of a MALDI-Ion Mobility-Surface-Induced Dissociation-Time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for the analysis of peptides and proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Earle Gregory

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of approximately 20 and TOF mass resolution better than 200. Peptide sequences of four peptides from a tryptic digest of cytochrome c (ca. 1 pmol deposited) were obtained. The advantage of IM-SID-o-TOFMS is that a single experiment can be used to simultaneously...

  17. instructions HisTrap FF crude,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    · p1 instructions HisTrap FF crude, 1 ml and 5 ml i 11-0012-38 Edition AA HisTrapTM FF crude, such as degradation and oxidation of sensitive target proteins, and is therefore of great importance. HisTrap FF crude properties HisTrap FF crude 1-ml and 5-ml columns are prepacked with the affinity medium Ni Sepharose 6 Fast

  18. European Conference on Trapped Ions 1924 September 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensinger, Winfried

    Redworth Hall Conference Handbook Sponsored by: #12;ECTI 2010 Committees and Invited indoor pool, a Jacuzzi, sauna and steam rooms, a cutting edge fitness suite and even outdoor tennis

  19. Fundamental Electroweak Studies using Trapped Ions & Atoms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2:Bioenergy SHARE

  20. Lasers for Hyperfine State Detection and Cooling of Ytterbium Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Lasers for Hyperfine State Detection and Cooling of Ytterbium Ions Sarah Innes-Gold University Quantum computing Why trapped ions? Theory and Procedure System implementation Project Specifics What and Procedure System implementation Project Specifics What we are actually working on #12;Quantum Computing

  1. Photoionisation loading of large Sr+ ion clouds with ultrafast pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Removille; Romain Dubessy; Quentin Glorieux; Samuel Guibal; Thomas Coudreau; Luca Guidoni; Jean-Pierre Likforman

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on photoionisation loading based on ultrafast pulses of singly-ionised strontium ions in a linear Paul trap. We take advantage of an autoionising resonance of Sr neutral atoms to form Sr+ by two-photon absorption of femtosecond pulses at a wavelength of 431nm. We compare this technique to electron-bombardment ionisation and observe several advantages of photoionisation. It actually allows the loading of a pure Sr+ ion cloud in a low radio-frequency voltage amplitude regime. In these conditions up to 4x10^4 laser-cooled Sr+ ions were trapped.

  2. Intense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), ultra-short laser light with atoms and molecules has led to the discovery of new phenomena such as bondIntense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in Beams and Traps A thesis presented through a re-scattering process where an electron is ionized, propagated in the laser field and is driven

  3. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  4. Fluorohydrogenate Cluster Ions in the Gas Phase: Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of the [1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium+][F(HF)2.3–] Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray ionization of the fluorohydrogenate ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium][F(HF)2.3] ionic liquid was conducted to understand the nature of the anionic species as they exist in the gas phase. Abundant fluorohydrogenate clusters were produced; however, the dominant anion in the clusters was [FHF-], and not the fluoride-bound HF dimers or trimers that are seen in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that HF molecules are bound to the clusters by about 30 kcal/mol. The DFT-calculated structures of the [FHF-]-bearing clusters show that the favored interactions of the anions are with the methynic and acetylenic hydrogen atoms on the imidazolium cation, forming planar structures similar to those observed in the solid state. A second series of abundant negative ions was also formed that contained [SiF5-] together with the imidazolium cation and the fluorohydrogenate anions that originate from reaction of the spray solution with silicate surfaces.

  5. Isoelectric Trapping and Mass Spectrometry: Tools for Proteomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cologna, Stephanie Marie

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ................... 4 Electrophoretic Separations............................................................ 5 Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) .............................................................. 6... including anode and cathode compartments, separation wells and buffering membranes. The number of separation wells and pH values of buffering membranes can be tailored for each experiment. ......................................... 21 Figure 6...

  6. Isoelectric Trapping and Mass Spectrometry: Tools for Proteomics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cologna, Stephanie Marie

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ................... 4 Electrophoretic Separations............................................................ 5 Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) .............................................................. 6... including anode and cathode compartments, separation wells and buffering membranes. The number of separation wells and pH values of buffering membranes can be tailored for each experiment. ......................................... 21 Figure 6...

  7. Confined Thermal Multicharged Ions Produced by Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, David A.; Kravis, S. D.; Sellin, I. A.; Levin, J. C.; Short, R. T.; Meron, M.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, K. W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy transfer. We have used the "white" radiation on the X- 26C beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory to generate multicharged argon ions in a Penning ion trap, using pro- posed methods designed... M. Meron, B. M. Johnson, and K. W. Jones Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (Received 2 April 1987) Synchrotron x rays have been used to produce a confined multicharged ion gas near room tem- perature. Comparison of charge...

  8. Passive regeneration of catalyst coated knitted fiber diesel particulate traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, A.; Emig, G.; Gmehling, B.; Popovska, N.; Hoelemann, K.; Buck, A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knitted fiber particulate traps facilitate deep-bed structures. These have excellent filtration properties, particularly for ultra-fine particulates. They are also suitable as substrate for catalytic processes. The two characteristics are: high total surface area of the filaments, and good mass transfer. These are prerequisites for intense catalytic activity. The deposited soot is uniformly distributed. Therefore, temperature peaks are avoided during regeneration. The tested coatings lower the regeneration temperature by about 200 C to burn-off temperatures below 350 C. Further improvements seem attainable. Thus, a purely passive regeneration appears feasible for most applications. The system is autonomous and cost effective. However, in extreme low load situations, e.g. city bus services, the necessary exhaust temperatures are not attained. Hence, burners or electrical heating is necessary for trap regeneration. Nevertheless, catalytic coating is attractive for substantially reducing the regeneration energy requirements.

  9. EFFECT OF FILTER TEMPERATURE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the {sup 65}Zn contamination issue in the TEF, a multi-task experimental program was initiated. The first experimental task was completed and is reported in Ref. 1. The results of the second experimental task are reported here. This task examined the effect of filter temperature on trapping efficiency and deposit morphology. Based on the first experimental tasks that examined filter pore size and trapping efficiency, stainless steel filter media with a 20 {micro}m pore size was selected. A series of experiments using these filters was conducted during this second task to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor trapping efficiency, adhesion and morphology. The tests were conducted with the filters heated to 60, 120, and 200 C; the zinc source material was heated to 400 C for all the experiments to provide a consistent zinc source. The samples were evaluated for mass change, deposit adhesion and morphology. As expected from the physical vapor deposition literature, a difference in deposit morphology and appearance was observed between the three filter temperatures. The filter held at 60 C had the largest average mass gain while the 120 and 200 C filters exhibited similar but lower weight gains. The standard deviations were large and suggest that all three temperatures exhibited comparable gains. No zinc was detected on the backside surface of the filters indicating high efficiency for front and internal trapping. A zinc rich deposit was formed on the surface of the 60 C filter. Based on a simple tape adhesion test, the surface zinc was readily removed from the 60 C filter while less zinc deposit was removed from the 120 and 200 C filter samples. It is surmised that the higher temperatures enable the zinc to deposit within the filter media rather than on the surface. Based on the findings that all three statistically trapped the same quantity of zinc vapor and that the higher temperatures resulted in a more adherent/better trapped product, operating the filters at 120 to 200 C is recommended.

  10. Effect of the Surface Morphology on the Energy Transfer in Ion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer in collisions of large ions with surfaces. Experiments were performed in a Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured...

  11. Charge Retention by Peptide Ions Soft-Landed onto Self-Assembled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performed using a novel ion deposition instrument constructed in our laboratory and a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially designed...

  12. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal electron and vortex-like ion distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, A.; Mandal, G.; Amin, M. R. [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons, vortex-like (trapped) distributed ions and mobile negative dust have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions are found to modify the properties of the DA solitary waves.

  13. The effect of the laser mode structure on the sideband spectrum of stored ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuessler, Hans

    structure is of particular significance during the initial phases of laser cooling experiments when presently substantial progress is being made to nearly eliminate all Doppler effects by radiation pressure cooling of atoms' and sideband cooling of ions trapped in electromagnetic traps.2 These techniques

  14. Nanofluidic Concentration Device for Biomolecules Utilizing Ion Concentration Polarization: Theory, Fabrication, and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Jae

    Recently, a new type of electrokinetic concentration devices has been developed in a microfluidic chip format, which allows efficient trapping and concentration of biomolecules by utilizing ion concentration polarization ...

  15. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC Supports - Energy3 PierreElectron Trapping by

  16. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC Supports - Energy3 PierreElectron Trapping

  17. State-insensitive bichromatic optical trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindiya Arora; M. S. Safronova; Charles W. Clark

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme for state-insensitive trapping of neutral atoms by using light with two independent wavelengths. In particular, we describe the use of trapping and control lasers to minimize the variance of the potential experienced by a trapped Rb atom in ground and excited states. We present calculated values of wavelength pairs for which the 5s and 5p_{3/2} levels have the same ac Stark shifts in the presence of two laser fields.

  18. Landau damping of ion acoustic wave in Lorentzian multi-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Plasma Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Shadra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Plasma Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Shadra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landau damping rates of ion acoustic wave are studied by using Vlasov-Poisson model for unmagnetized Lorentzian or kappa distributed plasma containing electrons, positively and negatively charged ions. It is found that the damping rate of ion acoustic wave is increased with the decrease of kappa (i.e., the spectral index of Lorentzian distribution) value. The damping rates of the electrostatic wave in multi-ion component plasmas are discussed in detail which depends on electron to ion temperature ratio and ions masses and density ratios. The numerical results are also shown by choosing some typical experimental parameters of multi-ion plasmas.

  19. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de [Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Morigi, Giovanna [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Theoretische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Pinkse, Pepijn W. H. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping potential, depending on whether they are charged or neutral, and confined inside a high-finesse optical resonator that enhances radiative emission into the cavity mode. Using realistic experimental parameters and COS as a representative molecular example, we show that in this setup, cooling to the trap ground state is feasible.

  20. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, N. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Hussain, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  1. Wigner crystals of ions as quantum hard drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Taylor; T. Calarco

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic systems in regular lattices are intriguing systems for implementing ideas in quantum simulation and information processing. Focusing on laser cooled ions forming Wigner crystals in Penning traps, we find a robust and simple approach to engineering non-trivial 2-body interactions sufficient for universal quantum computation. We then consider extensions of our approach to the fast generation of large cluster states, and a non-local architecture using an asymmetric entanglement generation procedure between a Penning trap system and well-established linear Paul trap designs.

  2. A Schamel equation for ion acoustic waves in superthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G., E-mail: gwilliams06@qub.ac.uk; Kourakis, I. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Verheest, F. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Anowar, M. G. M. [Department of Physics, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, Rangpur-5400 (Bangladesh)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the propagation of ion acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas in the presence of trapped electrons has been undertaken. This has been motivated by space and laboratory plasma observations of plasmas containing energetic particles, resulting in long-tailed distributions, in combination with trapped particles, whereby some of the plasma particles are confined to a finite region of phase space. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a non-Maxwellian-trapped electron distribution, which is modelled by a kappa distribution function combined with a Schamel distribution. The effect of particle trapping has been considered, resulting in an expression for the electron density. Reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct a KdV-like Schamel equation, and examine its behaviour. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality index ? and the characteristic trapping parameter ?. A pulse-shaped family of solutions is proposed, also depending on the weak soliton speed increment u{sub 0}. The main modification due to an increase in particle trapping is an increase in the amplitude of solitary waves, yet leaving their spatial width practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality, there is a decrease in both amplitude and width of solitary waves, for any given values of the trapping parameter and of the incremental soliton speed. Only positive polarity excitations were observed in our parametric investigation.

  3. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  4. Deconstruction of Activity-Dependent Covalent Modification of Heme in Human Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase by Multistage Mass Spectrometry (MS[superscript 4])

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Kieran F.; Varghese, Alison H.; Feng, Xidong; Bessire, Andrew J.; Conboy, James J.; Ruggeri, Roger B.; Ahn, Kay; Spath, Samantha N.; Filippov, Sergey V.; Conrad, Steven J.; Carpino, Philip A.; Guimarães, Cristiano R.W.; Vajdos, Felix F. (Pfizer)

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is known to be inactivated and covalently modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide and agents similar to 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (1), a 254.08 Da derivative of 2-thioxanthine. Peptide mapping by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detected modification by 1 in a labile peptide-heme-peptide fragment of the enzyme, accompanied by a mass increase of 252.08 Da. The loss of two hydrogen atoms was consistent with mechanism-based oxidative coupling. Multistage mass spectrometry (MS{sup 4}) of the modified fragment in an ion trap/Orbitrap spectrometer demonstrated that 1 was coupled directly to heme. Use of a 10 amu window delivered the full isotopic envelope of each precursor ion to collision-induced dissociation, preserving definitive isotopic profiles for iron-containing fragments through successive steps of multistage mass spectrometry. Iron isotope signatures and accurate mass measurements supported the structural assignments. Crystallographic analysis confirmed linkage between the methyl substituent of the heme pyrrole D ring and the sulfur atom of 1. The final orientation of 1 perpendicular to the plane of the heme ring suggested a mechanism consisting of two consecutive one-electron oxidations of 1 by MPO. Multistage mass spectrometry using stage-specific collision energies permits stepwise deconstruction of modifications of heme enzymes containing covalent links between the heme group and the polypeptide chain.

  5. Energy trapping and shock disintegration in a composite granular medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Daraio; V. F. Nesterenko; E. B. Herbold; S. Jin

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Granular materials demonstrate a strongly nonlinear behavior influencing the wave propagation in the medium. We report the first experimental observation of impulse energy confinement and the resultant disintegration of shock and solitary waves. The medium consists of alternating ensambles of high-modulus vs orders of magnitude lower modulus chains of different masses. The trapped energy is contained within the "softer" portions of the composite chain and is slowly released in the form of weak, separated pulses over an extended period of time. This effect is enhanced by using a specific group assembly and superimposed force.

  6. Holographic optical trapping David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Holographic optical trapping David G. Grier Yael Roichman Department of Physics and Center for Soft Matter Research, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 Holographic optical tweezers­beam optical traps use­ ful for capturing, moving and transforming mesoscopic objects. Through a combination

  7. Holographic optical trapping David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Holographic optical trapping David G. Grier Yael Roichman Department of Physics and Center for Soft Matter Research, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 Holographic optical tweezers-beam optical traps use- ful for capturing, moving and transforming mesoscopic objects. Through a combination

  8. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Andresen; W. Bertsche; P. D. Bowe; C. C. Bray; E. Butler; C. L. Cesar; S. Chapman; M. Charlton; J. Fajans; M. C. Fujiwara; R. Funakoshi; D. R. Gill; J. S. Hangst; W. N. Hardy; R. S. Hayano; M. E. Hayden; R. Hydomako; M. J. Jenkins; L. V. Jorgensen; L. Kurchaninov; R. Lambo; N. Madsen; P. Nolan; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; A. Povilus; P. Pusa; F. Robicheaux; E. Sarid; S. Seif El Nasr; D. M. Silveira; J. W. Storey; R. I. Thompson; D. P. van der Werf; J. S. Wurtele; Y. Yamazaki

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  9. New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Matthew Todd

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1-2% of the oil mass, however the calcium ion peak at m/z 40and elemental carbon (EC) peaks. The HDDV oil mass spectraoil mass spectra were characterized by an intense Ca + ion peak and

  10. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  11. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Chang; K. Sinha; J. M. Taylor; H. J. Kimble

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here, we show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. The trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyze realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement.

  12. When a trap is not a trap: converging entry and exit rates and their effect on trap saturation of black sea bass (Centropristis striata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When a trap is not a trap: converging entry and exit rates and their effect on trap saturation entries and exits of black sea bass (Centropristis striata) from chevron traps (n ¼ 26) to quantify catch at50 min, when the entry ratedeclined and the exit rate increased to a point where their confidence

  13. Secondary ion emission under keV carbon cluster bombardment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locklear, Jay Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a surface analysis technique capable of providing isotopic and molecular information. SIMS uses keV projectiles to impinge upon a sample resulting in secondary ion emission from ...

  14. The confined hydrogenoid ion in non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The confined hydrogeno¨id ion in non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics Laurent AMOUR, J for the hydrogen atom and more generally for the hydrogeno¨id ion confined by its center of mass. The fact

  15. Microfabricated Renewable Beads-Trapping/Releasing Flow Cell...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing Flow Cell for Rapid Antigen-Antibody Reaction in Chemiluminescent Immunoassay Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing...

  16. NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement #10049 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) Presentation from the U.S....

  17. H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sam Crane August 28, 2003 H 2 -Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations 2 Project Objectives * Determine Advantages of H 2 Assisted NO x Trap Regeneration *...

  18. Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implications in Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Charge Trapping in...

  19. atom trap trace: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors Physics Websites Summary: An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring...

  20. Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization 2005 Diesel Engine...

  1. Current leakage relaxation and charge trapping in ultra-porous low-k materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L., E-mail: plawsky@rpi.edu; Gill, William N. [Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lu, T.-M. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [University at Albany's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Time dependent dielectric failure has become a pivotal aspect of interconnect design as industry pursues integration of sub-22?nm process-technology nodes. Literature has provided key information about the role played by individual species such as electrons, holes, ions, and neutral impurity atoms. However, no mechanism has been shown to describe how such species interact and influence failure. Current leakage relaxation in low-k dielectrics was studied using bipolar field experiments to gain insight into how charge carrier flow becomes impeded by defects within the dielectric matrix. Leakage current decay was correlated to injection and trapping of electrons. We show that current relaxation upon inversion of the applied field can be described by the stretched exponential function. The kinetics of charge trapping events are consistent with a time-dependent reaction rate constant, k=k{sub 0}?(t+1){sup ??1}, where 0?trapping reactions in amorphous solids by W. H. Hamill and K. Funabashi, Phys. Rev. B 16, 5523–5527 (1977). We explain the relaxation process in charge trapping events by introducing a nonlinear charge trapping model. This model provides a description on the manner in which the transport of mobile defects affects the long-tail current relaxation processes in low-k films.

  2. Non-covalent Interactions: Effects on Gas-phase Ion Structure and Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prell, James Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    binding energies, such as high pressure mass spectrometry orhigh-pressure drift cell experiments, 37 energy resolved surface induced dissociation, 38, 39 or guided ion beam mass spectrometry,

  3. Parameter exploration of optically trapped liquid aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Burnham; P. J. Reece; D. McGloin

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying the motion of optically trapped particles on the $\\mu s$ time scale, in low viscous media such as air, inertia cannot be neglected. Resolution of unusual and interesting behaviour not seen in colloidal trapping experiments is possible. In attempt to explain the phenomena we use power spectral methods to perform a parameter study of the Brownian motion of optically trapped liquid aerosol droplets concentrated around the critically damped regime. We present evidence that the system is suitably described by a simple harmonic oscillator model which must include a description of Fax\\'{e}n's correction, but not necessarily frequency dependent hydrodynamic corrections to Stokes' law. We also provide results describing how the system behaves under several variables and discuss the difficulty in decoupling the parameters responsible for the observed behaviour. We show that due to the relatively low dynamic viscosity and high trap stiffness it is easy to transfer between over- and under-damped motion by experimentally altering either trap stiffness or damping. Our results suggest stable aerosol trapping may be achieved in under-damped conditions, but the onset of deleterious optical forces at high trapping powers prevents the probing of the upper stability limits due to Brownian motion.

  4. Spontaneous recoil effects of optical pumping on trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Wallentowitz; P. E. Toschek

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoil effects of spontaneous photon emissions during optical pumping of a trapped three-level atom are exactly calculated. Without resort to the Lamb-Dicke approximation, and considering arbitrary detuning and saturation of the pump laser, the density of recoil shifts in phase space is derived. It is shown that this density is not of Gaussian shape, and that it becomes isotropic in phase space only for a branching ratio corresponding to fluorescence scattering but unfavorable for optical pumping. The dependence of its anisotropy on the laser saturation is discussed in the resonant case, and the mapping of moments of the atom's center-of-mass motion due to the pumping is presented. Moreover, it is shown how optimum parameters for protecting the center-of-mass quantum state from pump-induced disturbance depend on the specific property to be protected.

  5. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  6. Trapping efficiency depending on particulate size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, A.; Czerwinski, J.; Scheidegger, P.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing concern about the risk potential of Diesel particulates. This prompted two Swiss R and D projects focused on the capabilities of different soot trap concepts for filtering finest particulates. Eight different filter media, some in numerous variants, were tested on four different Diesel engines. All traps attained their gravimetric target. However, there are noticeable performance differences for finest particulates at or smaller than 50 nm. Fiber deep filters seem to be noticeably better than other filter types. If the carcinogens are mainly the finest particulates, then this criterion may become important in future trap evaluation.

  7. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bouyer; P. Lemonde; M. Ben Dahan; A. Michaud; C. Salomon; J. Dalibard

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  8. High fidelity quantum gates with ions in cryogenic microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labaziewicz, Jaros?aw

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While quantum information processing offers a tantalizing possibility of a significant speedup in execution of certain algorithms, as well as enabling previously unmanageable simulations of large quantum systems, it remains ...

  9. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

  10. Dynamics of an Ion Coupled to a Parametric Superconducting Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir Kafri; Prabin Adhikari; Jacob M. Taylor

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting circuits and trapped ions are promising architectures for quantum information processing. However, the natural frequencies for controlling these systems -- radio frequency ion control and microwave domain superconducting qubit control -- make direct Hamiltonian interactions between them weak. In this paper we describe a technique for coupling a trapped ion's motion to the fundamental mode of a superconducting circuit. We do this by applying a carefully modulated external magnetic flux to the circuit. In conjunction with a non-linear element (Josephson junction), this gives the circuit an effective time-dependent inductance. We then show how to tune the external flux to generate a resonant coupling between circuit and ion's motional mode, and discuss the limitations of this approach compared to using a time-dependent capacitance.

  11. Detection of single-ion spectra by Coulomb-crystal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Dodia, Yatis K.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Brown, Kenneth R. [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry Computational Science and Engineering and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled motion of ions in a radiofrequency trap has been used to connect the frequency-dependent laser-induced heating of a sympathetically cooled spectroscopy ion with changes in the fluorescence of a laser-cooled control ion. This technique, sympathetic heating spectroscopy, is demonstrated using two isotopes of calcium. In the experiment, a few scattered photons from the spectroscopy ion are transformed into a large deviation from the steady-state fluorescence of the control ion. This allows us to detect an optical transition where the number of scattered photons is below our fluorescence detection limit. Possible applications of the technique to molecular ion spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  12. Stored-Ion Collisional Relaxation to Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, David A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using a chart recorder, an oscilloscope, or a multichannel analyzer, as appropriate. About n =1.5 X 10' hot ions initially produced in the trap were observed to cool from 1.2X 10 K to 4.3 X 10'K:?T? in=50 s via dissipation of random motional en... as for regular articles is followed, and page proofs are sent to authors. Stored-ion collisional relaxation to equihbrium D. A. Church Physics Department, Texas AkM Uniuersity, College Station, Texas 77843A242 (Received 10 August 1987) The rate of energy...

  13. Single-ion nonlinear mechanical oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerman, N.; Kotler, S.; Glickman, Y.; Dallal, Y.; Keselman, A.; Ozeri, R. [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the steady-state motion of a single trapped ion oscillator driven to the nonlinear regime. Damping is achieved via Doppler laser cooling. The ion motion is found to be well described by the Duffing oscillator model with an additional nonlinear damping term. We demonstrate here the unique ability of tuning both the linear as well as the nonlinear damping coefficients by controlling the laser-cooling parameters. Our observations pave the way for the investigation of nonlinear dynamics on the quantum-to-classical interface as well as mechanical noise squeezing in laser-cooling dynamics.

  14. adjustment ion exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogendeuterium exchange, and molecular...

  15. americium ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanusa, Christopher 23 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  16. aqueous ion testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence V. Gallacher 166 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  17. argentine ion exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogendeuterium exchange, and molecular...

  18. alloy ion bombarded: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we found a sizable 212 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  19. advanced ecr ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milos; Aharonovich, Igor 2015-01-01 95 Applications of Chemometric Algorithms to Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser DesorptionIonization Time-of-Flight Mass...

  20. actinide zintl ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Page Topic Index 101 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  1. actinide metal ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael D. Mayne 334 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  2. assisted ion energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alejandro; Porras, Diego 2012-01-01 36 Applications of Chemometric Algorithms to Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser DesorptionIonization Time-of-Flight Mass...

  3. antimony ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanusa, Christopher 39 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  4. aluminium ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanusa, Christopher 114 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  5. ar ion induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reveals ATP-induced reduction in conformational of conformational states. Using ion mobility mass spectrometry we compared the conformational dynamics of the intact at different...

  6. astatine ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanusa, Christopher 22 Instrumentation development for coupling ionion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  7. aluminum ions induce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reveals ATP-induced reduction in conformational of conformational states. Using ion mobility mass spectrometry we compared the conformational dynamics of the intact at different...

  8. Shattering of Peptide Ions on Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface was studied using a novel Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to...

  9. Molten Hydroxide Trapping Process for Radioiodine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten hydroxide trapping process has been considered for removing radioiodine species from off-gas streams whereby iodine is reacted directly with molten hydroxides such as NaOH or KOH. The resulting product is the corresponding iodide, which can be separated by simple cooling of the molten mixture to grow the iodide primary phase once the mixture reaches 70-80 mol% in the iodide component. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that such a chemical process is highly favorable. Experimental testing of the trapping process using molecular iodine showed trapping of up to 96% of the volatile iodine. The trapping efficiency was dependent on operational parameters such as temperature and gas-melt contact efficiency, and higher efficiencies are expected as the process is further developed. While an iodide phase could be effectively isolated by slow cooling of a molten iodide-hydroxide mixture, the persistent appearance of hydroxide indicated that an appreciable solubility of hydroxide occurred in the iodide phase.

  10. Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    design criteria and deployment specifications of bullet traps on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) live-fire ranges. Deviation from these design and deployment criteria must be...

  11. Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockwinkel, R. G.; French, S. A.

    , it's important to select and install the correct type and size steam trap for each application. This means a corruninnent must be made to training those who select, install, test and maintain steam traps on a. daily Scott A. French Application... generated. This paper will review each of these topics and then explore some of the new services, products, practices and technology available to help you maintain or improve the efficiency of your steam system. COSTLY STEAM LEAKS ENERGY RESOURCES...

  12. RICE UNIVERSITY A New Optical Trap System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.3 Alignment of the loading trap beams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.4 Power locking system for loading trap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2 Loading trap depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1.1 Description of trap optical design and beam profiles . . . . . . 22 3.1.2 Power locking

  13. Quenching Collisions of Low-Energy Metastable Multiply-Charged Argon Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, David A.; Yang, L. S.; Tu, S. G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quenching rates have been measured for selected metastable levels of Ar(q+) ions (q = 2, 3, 9, and 10) stored in a Kingdon ion trap, with mean energies of 262q eV and 181q eV. Effective quenching cross sections derived from these rates are found...

  14. Cooling the motion of a trapped atom with a cavity field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Bienert; Giovanna Morigi

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically analyze the cooling dynamics of an atom which is tightly trapped inside a high-finesse optical resonator. Cooling is achieved by suitably tailored scattering processes, in which the atomic dipole transition either scatters a cavity photon into the electromagnetic field external to the resonator, or performs a stimulated emission into the cavity mode, which then dissipates via the cavity mirrors. We identify the parameter regimes in which the atom center-of-mass motion can be cooled into the ground state of the external trap. We predict, in particular, that for high cooperativities interference effects mediated by the atomic transition may lead to higher efficiencies. The dynamics is compared with the cooling dynamics of a trapped atom inside a resonator studied in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 143001, (2005)] where the atom, instead of the cavity, is driven by a laser field.

  15. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 025002 (2011) Organizer: Ferdinand Hahn PH/DT Detector Seminar webpage  

  16. Spontaneous ion beam formation in the laboratory, space, and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Cassak, P. A.; Galante, M.; Keesee, A. M.; Lusk, G.; Magee, R. M.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; Vandervort, R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway)] [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Eastwood, J. P. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence for the spontaneous formation of multiple double layers within a single divergent magnetic field structure. Downstream of the divergent magnetic field, multiple accelerated ion populations are observed. The similarity of the accelerated ion populations observed in these laboratory experiments to ion populations observed in the magnetosphere and in numerical simulations suggests that the observation of a complex ion velocity distribution alone is insufficient to distinguish between simple plasma expansion and magnetic reconnection. Further, the effective temperature of the aggregate ion population is significantly larger than the temperatures of the individual ion population components, suggesting that insufficiently resolved measurements could misidentify multiple beam creation as ion heating. Ions accelerated in randomly oriented electric fields that mimic heating would have an ion heating rate dependent on the ion charge and mass that is qualitatively consistent with recent experimental observations of ion heating during magnetic reconnection.

  17. Millikelvin cooling of an optically trapped microsphere in vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tongcang Li; Simon Kheifets; Mark G. Raizen

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparent conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics remains one of the unresolved mysteries of the physical world. According to recent theories, this conflict results in gravity-induced quantum state reduction of "Schr\\"odinger cats", quantum superpositions of macroscopic observables. In recent years, great progress has been made in cooling micromechanical resonators towards their quantum mechanical ground state. This work is an important step towards the creation of Schr\\"odinger cats in the laboratory, and the study of their destruction by decoherence. A direct test of the gravity-induced state reduction scenario may therefore be within reach. However, a recent analysis shows that for all systems reported to date, quantum superpositions are destroyed by environmental decoherence long before gravitational state reduction takes effect. Here we report optical trapping of glass microspheres in vacuum with high oscillation frequencies, and cooling of the center-of-mass motion from room temperature to a minimum temperature of 1.5 mK. This new system eliminates the physical contact inherent to clamped cantilevers, and can allow ground-state cooling from room temperature. After cooling, the optical trap can be switched off, allowing a microsphere to undergo free-fall in vacuum. During free-fall, light scattering and other sources of environmental decoherence are absent, so this system is ideal for studying gravitational state reduction. A cooled optically trapped object in vacuum can also be used to search for non-Newtonian gravity forces at small scales, measure the impact of a single air molecule, and even produce Schr\\"odinger cats of living organisms.

  18. 21 Tesla mass spectrometry magnet arrives at EMSL | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and biological materials are one step closer to using EMSL's new 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer. The magnet, a critical piece of...

  19. Targeted Tandem Mass Spectrometry for High-Throughput Comparative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states. Herein, we report on a targeted LC-MSMS capability realized with a 7 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer equipped with a...

  20. Chapter 44. Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transition. This year, we made progress in developing novel detection and cooling techniques. 1. SpinChapter 44. Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms 44-1 Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms RLE Groups in optical lattices. Additional cooling methods will be needed to reach this very interesting temperature

  1. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  2. Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive and Polyvinylidene Difluoride Composition for High Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Zheng, H.; Battaglia, V.S.; Simens, A.S.; Minor, A.M.; Song, X.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7), A365 G. M. Ehrlich, Lithium-ion Batteries, 3rd ed ed. (High Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells G. Liu a,z , H.local environment. (A) lithium-ion mass transfer in the

  3. Study of Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. . ~0s ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY

  4. EMSL - ions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  5. Nano Vacancy Clusters and Trap Limited Diffusion of Si Interstitials in Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Wei-Kan Chu

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to characterize nano vacancy clusters and the dynamics of their formation in ion-irradiated silicon. It will impact (1) semiconductor device processing involving ion implantation, and (2) device design concerning irradiation hardness in harsh environments. It also aims to enhance minority participation in research and curricula on emerging materials and ion beam science. Vacancy defects are of scientific and technological importance since they are ubiquitous when the host materials are exposed to particle irradiation. Studies on vacancy clustering in the past decades were mainly theoretical and the approach heavily relied on the total-energy calculation methods. The lack of experimental data is mainly due to the formidable task in measuring the cluster size and density using modern metrological techniques, including transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy. To surmount these challenges, we proposed a novel approach to tackle the metrological problems on the nano vacancy clusters, especially in determining densities and sizes of the nano vacancies based on the premise that the vacancy-clusters act as diffusion-trapping centers. For a silicon substrate containing vacancyclusters, the diffusion of interstitials (from the surface) can be classified into three phases: (1) an ultrafast phase-I in which the trapping centers have little effect on the diffusion of interstitials; (2) a prolonged phase-II in which the loss rate of interstitials by trapping balances the influx of interstitials from the surface; and (3) a phase-III diffusion in which surface influx of interstitials depletes the trapping centers and interstitials consequently propagate deeper into the bulk. By measuring diffusion profiles of Si interstitials as a function of diffusion time, void sizes and void densities can be obtained through fitting. Experimentally, our approach to characterize voids is realized through three consecutive steps. (a) First, high energy self ion irradiation is used to create a wide vacancy-rich region, and to form voids by post implantation annealing. (b) In an additional annealing step in oxygen ambient, Si interstitials are injected in by surface oxidation. (c) Analyzing trap-limited diffusion of Si interstitials, which is experimentally detectable by studying the diffusion of multiple boron superlattices grown in Si, and enables us to characterize the nano voids, e.g. their sizes and densities.

  6. Magnetic piston model for higher ion charge and different electron and ion plasma temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogatu, I. N. [FAR-TECH, Inc., 10350 Science Center Drive, Bldg.14, Suite 150, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [FAR-TECH, Inc., 10350 Science Center Drive, Bldg.14, Suite 150, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new formula for the magnetic piston model, which explicitly describes how the momentum imparted to the ions by the magnetic pressure depends not only on the ion mass but also on the ion charge, as well as, on the plasma electron and ion temperatures, is derived following Rosenbluth's classical particle-field self-consistent plane approximation analytic calculation. The formula presented in this paper has implications in explaining the experimentally observed separation of the ions of different species and charges by the magnetic field penetrating the plasma and specularly reflecting them.

  7. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  8. BREAKING NEWS! EMSL's 21 T mass spectrometer at field | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Q&A is available on the 21T FTICR mass spectrometer web page. EMSL's new 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer is now at its full magnetic field...

  9. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  10. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surfaceinterface studies using its combined...

  11. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope Bruce Arey discusses the capabilities of EMSL's new helium ion microscope housed in EMSL's Quiet Wing....

  12. A large Bradbury Nielsen ion gate with flexible wire spacing based on photo-etched stainless steel grids and its characterization applying symmetric and asymmetric potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brunner; A. R. Mueller; K. O'Sullivan; M. C. Simon; M. Kossick; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; E. Mané; D. Bishop; M. Good; G. Gratta; J. Dilling

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Bradbury Nielsen gates are well known devices used to switch ion beams and are typically applied in mass or mobility spectrometers for separating beam constituents by their different flight or drift times. A Bradbury Nielsen gate consists of two interleaved sets of electrodes. If two voltages of the same amplitude but opposite polarity are applied the gate is closed, and for identical (zero) potential the gate is open. Whereas former realizations of the device employ actual wires resulting in difficulties with winding, fixing and tensioning them, our approach is to use two grids photo-etched from a metallic foil. This design allows for simplified construction of gates covering large beam sizes up to at least 900\\,mm$^2$ with variable wire spacing down to 250\\,\\textmu m. By changing the grids the wire spacing can be varied easily. A gate of this design was installed and systematically tested at TRIUMF's ion trap facility, TITAN, for use with radioactive beams to separate ions with different mass-to-charge ratios by their time-of-flight.

  13. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  14. Ion acoustic solitons/double layers in two-ion plasma revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: gslakhina@gmail.com; Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Kakad, A. P., E-mail: amar@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion acoustic solitons and double layers are studied in a collisionless plasma consisting of cold heavier ion species, a warm lighter ion species, and hot electrons having Boltzmann distributions by Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. In contrast to the previous results, no double layers and super-solitons are found when both the heavy and lighter ion species are treated as cold. Only the positive potential solitons are found in this case. When the thermal effects of the lighter ion species are included, in addition to the usual ion-acoustic solitons occurring at M?>?1 (where the Mach number, M, is defined as the ratio of the speed of the solitary wave and the ion-acoustic speed considering temperature of hot electrons and mass of the heavier ion species), slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers are found to occur at low Mach number (M?ion-acoustic mode is actually a new ion-ion hybrid acoustic mode which disappears when the normalized number density of lighter ion species tends to 1 (i.e., no heavier species). An interesting property of the new slow ion-acoustic mode is that at low number density of the lighter ion species, only negative potential solitons/double layers are found whereas for increasing densities there is a transition first to positive solitons/double layers, and then only positive solitons. The model can be easily applicable to the dusty plasmas having positively charged dust grains by replacing the heavier ion species by the dust mass and doing a simple normalization to take account of the dust charge.

  15. Dynamic multiplexed analysis method using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer in which the effectiveness and efficiency of the multiplexed method is optimized by automatically adjusting rates of passage of analyte materials through an IMS drift tube during operation of the system. This automatic adjustment is performed by the IMS instrument itself after determining the appropriate levels of adjustment according to the method of the present invention. In one example, the adjustment of the rates of passage for these materials is determined by quantifying the total number of analyte molecules delivered to the ion trap in a preselected period of time, comparing this number to the charge capacity of the ion trap, selecting a gate opening sequence; and implementing the selected gate opening sequence to obtain a preselected rate of analytes within said IMS drift tube.

  16. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford`s nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list.

  17. Parametric Resonance of Optically Trapped Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Di Leonardo; G. Ruocco; J. Leach; M. J. Padgett; A. J. Wright; J. M. Girkin; D. R. Burnham; D. McGloin

    2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brownian dynamics of an optically trapped water droplet are investigated across the transition from over to under-damped oscillations. The spectrum of position fluctuations evolves from a Lorentzian shape typical of over-damped systems (beads in liquid solvents), to a damped harmonic oscillator spectrum showing a resonance peak. In this later under-damped regime, we excite parametric resonance by periodically modulating the trapping power at twice the resonant frequency. The power spectra of position fluctuations are in excellent agreement with the obtained analytical solutions of a parametrically modulated Langevin equation.

  18. Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouba, C.

    Maintenance Mechanic), Rick Ragsdale (Fluor), Joyce Finkle (PC), Denis P Humphreys (Fluoroproducts), Jack Hemmert, Charlie Brown 10/20/2010 2 Steam trap failures are nothing new Steam trap programs are nothing new WHAT makes this program have such a huge... impact and How is it sustainable HOW we went about finding a solution What do you have learn from this 10/20/2010 3 Six Sigma Methodology was KEY to success Savings: $1MM annualized in only 6 months! 10/20/2010 4Define: Project CTQ?s Customer...

  19. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  20. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry (Tracy, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

  1. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 32483252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    to be that photofragment ions generated at this wavelength are similar to those from low- and high-energy CAD, and are thusRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 3248 of singly protonated peptides at 193 nm investigated with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry Jeong Hee

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 24812487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    chromophore dissociated efficiently when a suf- ficiently high laser pulse energy was used. Also, the pulseRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 2481 time-of- flight (TOF) mass spectrometry of ions generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption

  3. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2004; 18: 27062712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    mass spectrometry.7,8 The internal energy that ions acquire in the MALDI process or via colli- sional of high quality. Tandem mass spectrometry utilizing photodissociation (PD) with ultraviolet (UV) radiation be a viable alternative to CAD for tandem mass spectrometry of large molecules because the energy requirement

  4. Mass measurements in the vicinity of the rp-process and the nu p-process paths with JYFLTRAP and SHIPTRAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Weber; V. -V. Elomaa; R. Ferrer; C. Fröhlich; D. Ackermann; J. Äystö; G. Audi; L. Batist; K. Blaum; M. Block; A. Chaudhuri; M. Dworschak; S. Eliseev; T. Eronen; U. Hager; J. Hakala; F. Herfurth; F. P. Heßberger; S. Hofmann; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; H. -J. Kluge; K. Langanke; A. Martín; G. Martínez-Pinedo; M. Mazzocco; I. D. Moore; J. B. Neumayr; Yu. N. Novikov; H. Penttilä; W. R. Plaß; A. V. Popov; S. Rahaman; T. Rauscher; C. Rauth; J. Rissanen; D. Rodríguez; A. Saastamoinen; C. Scheidenberger; L. Schweikhard; D. M. Seliverstov; T. Sonoda; F. -K. Thielemann; P. G. Thirolf; G. K. Vorobjev

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of very neutron-deficient nuclides close to the astrophysical rp- and nu p-process paths have been determined with the Penning trap facilities JYFLTRAP at JYFL/Jyv\\"askyl\\"a and SHIPTRAP at GSI/Darmstadt. Isotopes from yttrium (Z = 39) to palladium (Z = 46) have been produced in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions. In total 21 nuclides were studied and almost half of the mass values were experimentally determined for the first time: 88Tc, 90-92Ru, 92-94Rh, and 94,95Pd. For the 95Pdm, (21/2^+) high-spin state, a first direct mass determination was performed. Relative mass uncertainties of typically $\\delta m / m = 5 \\times 10^{-8}$ were obtained. The impact of the new mass values has been studied in nu p-process nucleosynthesis calculations. The resulting reaction flow and the final abundances are compared to those obtained with the data of the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003.

  5. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  6. Carbon dioxide dissolution in structural and stratigraphic traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesse, M. A.

    The geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in structural and stratigraphic traps is a viable option to reduce anthropogenic emissions. While dissolution of the CO[subscript 2] stored in these traps ...

  7. Energy Conservation Thru Steam Trap Surveys and Preventive Maintenance Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, T.; Dewhirst, B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will deal with steam trap surveys and preventive maintenance programs and the energy savings that may be realized from such efforts. Trap survey organization, flexibility, simplicity, and mechanics will be reviewed, including the economic...

  8. Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. Abstract: Lab-on-a-chip systems have substantially impacted the way...

  9. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Traykov; U. Dammalapati; S. De; O. C. Dermois; L. Huisman; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; A. J. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. da Silva e Silva; M. Sohani; O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI$\\mu$P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for $^{21}$Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped $^{21}$Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  10. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Page, Jason S (Kennewick, WA); Kelly, Ryan T (West Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D (Richland, WA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. An "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates an electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer. Furthermore, chambers maintained at different pressures can allow for more optimal operating conditions for an electrospray emitter and an ion guide.

  11. Trapping Light With Mirrors David Milovich Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milovich, David

    Trapping Light With Mirrors David Milovich Jr. February 20, 2004 Abstract. We show that, given finitely many line-segment mirrors in the plane, that do not touch, and an arbitrary point source of light emitted light beams escape. This result is shown to imply that, for a given point source of light

  12. Acceleration of trapped particles and beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Er'el Granot; Boris Malomed

    2011-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of a quantum particle bound by an accelerating delta-functional potential is investigated. Three cases are considered, using the reference frame moving along with the {\\delta}-function, in which the acceleration is converted into the additional linear potential. (i) A stationary regime, which corresponds to a resonance state, with a minimum degree of delocalization, supported by the accelerating potential trap. (ii) A pulling scenario: an initially bound particle follows the accelerating delta-functional trap, within a finite time. (iii) The pushing scenario: the particle, which was initially localized to the right of the repulsive delta-function, is shoved to the right by the accelerating potential. For the two latter scenarios, the life time of the trapped particle, and the largest velocity to which it can be accelerated while staying trapped, are found. Analytical approximations are developed for the cases of small and large accelerations in the pulling regime, and also for a small acceleration in the stationary situation, and in the regime of pushing. The same regimes may be realized by Airy-like planar optical beams guided by a narrow bending potential channel or crest. Physical estimates are given for an atom steered by a stylus of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and for the optical beam guided by a bending stripe.

  13. ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  14. Spectra of Ions Produced by Corona Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalny, J.; Hortvath, G. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F-2, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mason, N. J. [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometric study of ions extracted from both positive and negative DC corona discharges, initiated in point-to plane electrode system, has been carried out in ambient air at low air pressure (5 - 30) kPa. The average relative humidity of air was typically 40-50 %. Ions were extracted through a small orifice in the plane electrode into an intermediate gap where the low pressure prevented further ion-molecule reactions. Mass analysis of negative ions formed in the negative corona discharge using ambient air has shown that the yield of individual ions is strongly affected by trace concentrations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide and water vapour. In dry air the CO{sub 3}{sup -} ion was found to be dominant. In presence of water this is converted very efficiently to cluster ions CO{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} containing one and more water molecules. The yield of O{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters or core ions was found to be considerably lower than in some other studies at atmospheric pressure. The mass spectrum of ions extracted from drift region of a positive corona discharge was simpler being dominantly cluster ions H3O+{center_dot}(H2O)n most probably formed from O{sub 2}{sup +} ions, a two step process being active if water molecules are present in the discharge gap even at relatively low concentration.

  15. Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias (Berkeley, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as "stop" detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

  16. Trap Design for Vibratory Bowl Feeders Robert-Paul Berretty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    devices such as wiper blades, grooves and traps. Most of these devices are filters Research is supported

  17. Wavelength measurement of n = 3 - n' = 3 transitions in highly charged tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    3s{sub 1/2} - 3p{sub 3/2} and 3p{sub 1/2} - 3d{sub 3/2} transitions have been studied in potassium-like W{sup 55+} through neon-like W{sup 64}+ ions at the electron-beam ion trap facility in Livermore. The wavelengths of the lines have been measured in high resolution relative to well known reference lines from oxygen and nitrogen ions. Using the high-energy SuperEBIT electron-beam ion trap and an R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence soft x-ray spectrometer, the lines were observed with a cryogenic charge-coupled device camera. The wavelength data for the sodium-like and magnesium-like tungsten lines are compared with theoretical predictions for ions along the isoelectronic sequences.

  18. Plasma hydrogenation of strained Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure for layer transfer without ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao Lin; Lin Yuan; Lee, J.K.; Jia, Q.X.; Wang Yongqiang; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Theodore, N. David; Chu, Paul K.; Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W.; Chen Peng; Lau, S.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Code 6812, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5347 (United States); Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratory, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an innovative approach without the use of ion implantation to transfer a high-quality thin Si layer for the fabrication of silicon-on-insulator wafers. The technique uses a buried strained SiGe layer, a few nanometers in thickness, to provide H trapping centers. In conjunction with H plasma hydrogenation, lift-off of the top Si layer can be realized with cleavage occurring at the depth of the strained SiGe layer. This technique avoids irradiation damage within the top Si layer that typically results from ion implantation used to create H trapping regions in the conventional ion-cut method. We explain the strain-facilitated layer transfer as being due to preferential vacancy aggregation within the strained layer and subsequent trapping of hydrogen, which lead to cracking in a well controlled manner.

  19. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in G.B. Andresen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    . The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The de- vice comprises OF EACH PAPER CP1037, Cold Antimatter Plasmas and Application to Fundamental Physics, edited by Y. Kanai captured and cooled antiprotons in the catching trap. The catching trap includes a "rotating wall" electric

  20. An optical trap for relativistic plasmaa... Ping Zhang,b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    An optical trap for relativistic plasmaa... Ping Zhang,b) Ned Saleh, Shouyuan Chen, Zhengming Sheng November 2002; accepted 14 February 2003 The first optical trap capable of confining relativistic electrons that the optical trap acted to heat electrons, increasing their temperature by two orders of magnitude

  1. Enhancing entanglement trapping by weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Jie Zhang; Wei Han; Heng Fan; Yun-Jie Xia

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose a scheme to enhance trapping of entanglement of two qubits in the environment of a photonic band gap material. Our entanglement trapping promotion scheme makes use of combined weak measurements and quantum measurement reversals. The optimal promotion of entanglement trapping can be acquired with a reasonable finite success probability by adjusting measurement strengths.

  2. Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab Zongfu Yu,bc Victor Liu,bd Aaswath Raman,b Yi Cuief and Shanhui Fan*b We consider light trapping in photonic crystals in the weak material-integrated absorption enhancement by light trapping is proportional to the photonic density of states. The tight bound

  3. Commons as insurance: safety nets or poverty traps? Philippe Delacote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Commons as insurance: safety nets or poverty traps? Philippe Delacote Economics Department, EUI. The aim of this paper is to consider the potential poverty-trap implications of this use. If the capacity, the introduction of an insurance scheme could be an exit to the poverty trap and relax pressure on the resource

  4. Light-assisted ion-neutral reactive processes in the cold regime: radiative molecule formation vs. charge exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Felix H J; Bouloufa, Nadia; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of cold reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap. We observe rich chemical dynamics consisting of a complex interplay between non-adiabatic and radiative charge exchange as well as radiative molecule formation which are interpreted using high-level electronic structure calculations. We study the role of light-assisted processes and show that the efficiency of the dominant chemical pathways is considerably enhanced in excited reaction channels. Our results point to a general framework of radiative and non-radiative processes dominating the cold chemistry in ion-atom hybrid traps.

  5. Collisional population transfer in yterbium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schauer, Martin Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torgerson, Justin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Danielson, Jeremy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Xinxin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Ahn - Tuan [UNIV OF PITTSBURGH; Wang, Li - Bang [NATIONAL TSING HUA UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-lived metastable states of Yb+ ions are used for atomic frequency standards, precision measurements, and quantum information research. The effect of population trapping and transfer in these states must be well understood. We report here the transfer of Yb+ ions into the long-lived {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} state by means of collisions between He buffer gas and Yb+ ions held in a linear Paul trap. Transfer rates were measured as functions of buffer-gas pressure and repump-laser power, and the collisional population transfer rates were extracted. The measured transfer rate coefficients are 8.32(75)x10-11 and 8.65(33)x10-11 cm3/s for the collisional processes {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}, respectively.

  6. Laser cooling and sympathetic cooling in a linear quadrupole rf trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryjkov, Vladimir Leonidovich

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .u. was used as a test in these studies. The experimental apparatus has been developed. It was used in the first stage of this research[14]. It consists of the vacuum chamber with the quadrupole ion trap, the laser and optical system, and related electronics... into the external buildup cavity through the mode matching lens. In the buildup cavity the intensity of the light is increased due to the coherent addition of the laser light over multiple paths inside the cavity, and also due to the narrow waist of the cavity mode...

  7. Energy Efficient Steam Trapping of Trace Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to insure low back pressure. Caution: Make certain the trap you select can handle the system back pressure. Each trap has specific limitations in this regard. 8. A Y-Strainer is considered mandatory for use on any Tracer Trap to reduce the potential... for plugging based on the small orifice sizes being employed. (Refer to Fig. 3). 9. Freeze-proofing each trap should be in accord with each manufacturer's recommendations. 10. When multiple traps are installed to discharge into a common manifold, check...

  8. Trapped surfaces in vacuum arising dynamically from mild incoming radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xinliang An; Jonathan Luk

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the "minimal requirement" on the incoming radiation that guarantees a trapped surface to form in vacuum. First, we extend the region of existence in Christodoulou's theorem on the formation of trapped surfaces and consequently show that the lower bound required to form a trapped surface can be relaxed. Second, we demonstrate that trapped surfaces form dynamically from a class of initial data which are large merely in a scaling-critical norm. This result is motivated in part by the scaling in Christodoulou's formation of trapped surfaces theorem for the Einstein-scalar field system in spherical symmetry.

  9. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA)

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  10. Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien [Ames Laboratory

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

  11. Ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  12. Thermodynamics of Interacting Fermions in Atomic Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Qijin; Stajic, Jelena; Levin, K. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the entropy in a trapped, resonantly interacting Fermi gas as a function of temperature for a wide range of magnetic fields between the BCS and Bose-Einstein condensation end points. This provides a basis for the important technique of adiabatic sweep thermometry and serves to characterize quantitatively the evolution and nature of the excitations of the gas. The results are then used to calibrate the temperature in several ground breaking experiments on {sup 6}Li and {sup 40}K.

  13. Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouba, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    automatically within SAP ? Survey performed and work orders created ? Surveyor/Team Leader coordinates repair work ? Use backlog of work to justify number of mechanics ? Prioritize work for mechanics ? Repair Mechanics work across the site ? SAP Work Order... history updated for individual traps ? Surveyor updates excel spreadsheet with repair history ? Monthly reports sent to area and site management 10/20/2010 11Piloted Solution Key Learnings ? SAP Cumbersome and slows repair process ? Use SAP...

  14. Steam Trap Maintenance as a Profit Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchillon, J. L.

    of the proper piping arrangements to all your basic equipment showing the traps, strainers, air vents, vacuum breakers, etc. These diagrams need to apply only to your plant, not to the hundreds of possibilities found in an all-purpose publication. See Fig... and rust ("dirt") E Size L Mechanical failure usually is... OJ Recommended design factor 2-3 Loud, popping condensate discharge No Renewable wlo piping disassembly No Requires strainer No Tbennal efficiency (low steam loss) Fair Condensate Wscharge...

  15. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  16. Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Weinheimer; Kai Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The various experiments on neutrino oscillation evidenced that neutrinos have indeed non-zero masses but cannot tell us the absolute neutrino mass scale. This scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing constraints on the sum of all neutrino masses from cosmological observations two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay and the direct neutrino mass search by investigating single $\\beta$-decays or electron captures. The former method is not only sensitive to neutrino masses but also probes the Majorana character of neutrinos and thus lepton number violation with high sensitivity. Currently quite a few experiments with different techniques are being constructed, commissioned or are even running, which aim for a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of {\\cal O}(100) meV. The principle methods and these experiments will be discussed in this short review.

  17. The relative efficiency of the Malaise trap and animal-baited traps for collecting biting flies in Southwest Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easton, Emmett Richard

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to laboratory animals. A trap model was desired that would require little or no handling of the trapped animal. Disney (1966) placed a metal sheet around a cubical rat cage and liberally applied castor oil to the metal sheet so that phlebotomine sand flies... could be caught and trapped in the castor oil. Since this sand fly moves in a hopping fashion the trap would seem to be more efficient for this fly than for mosquitoes. Bellamy and Res~ca (1952) employed a 110-lb. lard can as a portable baited trap...

  18. Resonances of the confined hydrogenoid ion and the Dicke effect in non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonances of the confined hydrogeno¨id ion and the Dicke effect in non-relativistic quantum describes a hydrogeno¨id ion confined by its center of mass, and is used in theoretical physics to explain

  19. Ion-Acoustic Solitons in Bi-Ion Dusty Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Prudskikh

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of ion-acoustic solitons in a warm dusty plasma containing two ion species is investigated theoretically. Using an approach based on the Korteveg-de-Vries equation, it is shown that the critical value of the negative ion density that separates the domains of existence of compressi- on and rarefaction solitons depends continuously on the dust density. A modified Korteveg-de Vries equation for the critical density is derived in the higher order of the expansion in the small parameter. It is found that the nonlinear coefficient of this equation is positive for any values of the dust density and the masses of positive and negative ions. For the case where the negative ion density is close to its critical value, a soliton solution is found that takes into account both the quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. The propagation of a solitary wave of arbitrary amplitude is investigated by the quasi-potential method. It is shown that the range of the dust densities around the critical value within which solitary waves with positive and negative potentials can exist simultaneously is relatively wide.

  20. Ion and photon emission from keV cluster impacts on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yau, Alice Yau-Lic

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ion Csi2- was used as the primary ion versus monoatomic I primary ion, a 6 - 12 fold increase in the molecular ion yield was reported. The increase in the molecular ion yield suggested that higher sensitivity can be obtained by using a molecular ion... mass cannot be a large factor in the increase yield obtained from SF6c primary ion. In a recent study by Inman [5], four organic, biologically active compounds were analyzed using I and Csin' primary ions at the same kinetic energy. When the cluster...