Sample records for ion nano titanate

  1. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company-v3832/Lithium-Ion-Batteries- Outlook-Alternative-Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Marca M. Doeff * , Jordirechargeable sodium ion batteries, particularly for large-

  2. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Identification of a suitabledevelopment of sodium ion batteries, because graphite, theanode for lithium ion batteries, does not undergo sodium

  3. Sodium Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Sodium  Ion  Batteries   One   of   the   challenges  of   sodium   ion   batteries   is   identification   of  for   use   in   batteries.   Our   recent   work   has  

  4. Titan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPointsThrust 1: Structure andBlandineTitan

  5. Ion transport in Titan's upper atmosphere M. Galand,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    ] The Voyager 1 radio occultation experiment revealed the presence of a substantial ionosphere on Titan [Bird et et al., 2008]. PreCassini investigations con- sidered both photoionization by solar radiation considerations alone. [3] Cassini data has shown quite definitively that solar radiation is the dominant

  6. Sodium Titanates as Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes  for  Sodium  Ion  Batteries   Marca  M.  Doeff,  dual   intercalation   batteries   based   on   sodium  future   of   sodium  ion  batteries  will  be  discussed  

  7. Detection of high-energy heavy ions using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Morinaga, Shin-ya; Kurozumi, Atsuma [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a radiation detector fabricated with stacks of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements were studied by irradiating it with a 400 MeV/n xenon (Xe) beam for various beam pulse durations. This detector is referred to as the multilayered detector (MD). To understand the production mechanism behind the output voltage obtained from the MD, measurement of the spatial distribution of the output signals generated in the MD was attempted. It was found that the amplitude observed was dependent on the number of Xe ions per unit time and the amount of ionization loss energy of Xe ions in PZT.

  8. TITAN's Digital RFQ Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher, Operation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brunner; M. J. Smith; M. Brodeur; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri A. Lapierre; E. Mané; R. Ringle; M. C. Simon; J. A. Vaz; P. Delheij; M. Good; M. R. Pearson; J. Dilling

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap built as part of the TITAN facility. It consists of a gas-filled, segmented, linear Paul trap and is the first stage of the TITAN setup with the purpose of cooling and bunching radioactive ion beams delivered from ISAC-TRIUMF. This is the first such device to be driven digitally, i.e., using a high voltage ($V_{pp} = \\rm{400 \\, V}$), wide bandwidth ($0.2 < f < 1.2 \\, \\rm{MHz}$) square-wave as compared to the typical sinusoidal wave form. Results from the commissioning of the device as well as systematic studies with stable and radioactive ions are presented including efficiency measurements with stable $^{133}$Cs and radioactive $^{124, 126}$Cs. A novel and unique mode of operation of this device is also demonstrated where the cooled ion bunches are extracted in reverse mode, i.e., in the same direction as previously injected.

  9. Amorphization and recrystallization of single-crystalline hydrogen titanate nanowires by N{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Akshaya K.; Bandyopadyay, Malay K.; Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar 751007 (India); Facsko, Stefan [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the phase transformation of hydrogen titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}) nanowires induced by 50?keV N{sup +} ion irradiation at room temperature with fluences of 1?×?10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1?×?10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Using transmission electron microscopy, the internal structure of the ion irradiated nanowires is analyzed. At low fluence, a transformation from crystalline H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} to amorphous TiO{sub 2} is observed. However, at higher fluence, a remarkable crystalline-amorphous TiO{sub 2} core-shell structure is formed. At this higher fluence, the recrystallization occurs in the core of the nanowire and the outer layer remains amorphous. The phase transformation and formation of core-shell structure are explained using the thermal spike model, radiation enhanced diffusion, and classical theory of nucleation and growth under non-equilibrium thermodynamics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman scattering reveal further insight into the structure of the nanowires before and after ion irradiation.

  10. Formation and structural characterization of potassium titanates and the potassium ion exchange property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qiang, E-mail: wulihe@postech.ac.kr [Department of Catalysis Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Guo Zhanhu [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 (United States); Chung, Jong Shik [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} are synthesized by solid state method. Their structures and morphologies are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and scanning electron microscopy. The binding energies of K, Ti and O in potassium titanates were then evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with those in K/TiO{sub 2}. Finally the corresponding K ion exchange properties are investigated by synthesizing NO oxidation catalysts with Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} precursor. It is found that the binding energy of K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much higher than those in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}, and because of which, it shows quite different catalytic performances. Compared with other potassium titanates, the K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much easier to be exchanged out.

  11. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  12. Synthesis and electrical analysis of nano-crystalline barium titanate nanocomposites for use in high-energy density applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Huber, Dale L.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic based nanocomposites have recently demonstrated the ability to provide enhanced permittivity, increased dielectric breakdown strength, and reduced electromechanical strain making them potential materials systems for high energy density applications. A systematic characterization and optimization of barium titanate and PLZT based nanoparticle composites employing a glass or polymer matrix to yield a high energy density component will be presented. This work will present the systematic characterization and optimization of barium titanate and lead lanthanum zirconate titanate nanoparticle based ceramics. The nanoparticles have been synthesized using solution and pH-based synthesis processing routes and employed to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic and nanocomposite based components. The dielectric/ferroelectric properties of these various components have been gauged by impedance analysis and electromechanical response and will be discussed.

  13. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both strontium-85 and cesium-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor for strontium-85 with monosodium titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% strontium-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the strontium-85 instantaneous decontamination factor with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the monosodium titanate impregnated membrane cartridges and crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges and co-sintered active crystalline silicotitanate cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of cesium-137 with co-sintered crystalline silicotitanate cartridges. Tests results with crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges for cesium-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semicontinuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  14. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

  15. Nano-Domain Analysis Via Massive Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry in the Event-by-Event Mode 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinnick, Veronica Tiffany

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    clusters useful probes to obtain molecular information from both nano-objects and nano-domains. The "event-by-event bombardment/detection mode" probes nano-objects one-at-a-time, while collecting and storing the corresponding secondary ion (SI) information...

  16. Nano-porosity in GaSb induced by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluth, P., E-mail: patrick.kluth@anu.edu.au; Schnohr, C. S.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Lei, W.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, J.; Weed, R. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Li, W.; Ewing, R. C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-porous structures form in GaSb after ion irradiation with 185 MeV Au ions. The porous layer formation is governed by the dominant electronic energy loss at this energy regime. The porous layer morphology differs significantly from that previously reported for low-energy, ion-irradiated GaSb. Prior to the onset of porosity, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates the formation of small vacancy clusters in single ion impacts, while transmission electron microscopy reveals fragmentation of the GaSb into nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Following this fragmentation process, macroscopic porosity forms, presumably within the amorphous phase.

  17. Modification of phonon processes in nano-structured rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Thomas; Thiel, Charles W; Cone, Rufus L; Barclay, Paul E; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable, or improve, persistent spectral hole-burning and optical coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and certain approaches to optical quantum memories. We specifically discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the telecommunication band, and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y$_2$SiO$_5$, a widely-used material in current quantum memory research.

  18. A layered sodium titanate as promising anode material for sodium ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Di, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium ion batteries have recently received great attention for large-scale energy applications because of the abundance and low cost of sodium source. Although some cathode materials with desirable electrochemical properties ...

  19. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning,...

  20. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions using monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST)-laden filter cartridges. Four types of ion exchange cartridge media (CST and MST designed by both 3M and POROX{reg_sign}) were evaluated. In these proof-of-principle tests effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 was observed. However, the experiments were not performed long enough to determine the saturation levels or breakthrough curve for each filter cartridge. POREX{reg_sign} MST cartridges, which by design were based on co-sintering of the active titanates with polyethylene particles, seem to perform as well as the 3M-designed MST cartridges (impregnated filter membrane design) in the uptake of strontium. At low salt simulant conditions (0.29 M Na{sup +}), the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with the 3M-design MST cartridge measured 26, representing the removal of 96% of the Sr-85. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with the POREX{reg_sign} design MST cartridge measured 40 or 98% removal of the Sr-85. Strontium removal with the 3M-design MST and CST cartridges placed in series filter arrangement produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 or 97.6% removal compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 or 99.7% removal of the strontium with the POREX{reg_sign} MST and CST cartridge design placed in series. At high salt simulant conditions (5.6 M Na{sup +}), strontium removal with 3M-designed MST cartridge only and with 3M-designed MST and CST cartridges operated in a series configuration were identical. The instantaneous decontamination factor and the strontium removal efficiency, under the above configuration, averaged 8.6 and 88%, respectively. There were no POREX{reg_sign} cartridge experiments using the higher ionic strength simulant solution. At low salt simulant conditions, the uptake of Cs-137 with POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge out performed the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge, with a Cs-137 instantaneous decontamination factor of 55 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of 98% does meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in the low salt simulant liquor. The Cs-137 removal with 3M-designed CST cartridge produced a decontamination factor of 2 or 49% removal efficiency. The Cs-137 performance graph for the 3M-designed CST cartridge showed an early cessation in the uptake of cesium-137. This behavior was not observed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges. No Cs-137 uptake tests were performed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges at high salt simulant conditions. The 3M-designed CST cartridges, with an instantaneous Cs-137 decontamination factor of less than 3 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of less than 50% failed to meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in both the low and high salt simulant liquors. This poor performance in the uptake of Cs-137 by the 3M CST cartridges may be attributed to fabrication flaws for the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The reduced number of CST membrane wraps per cartridge during the cartridge design phase, from 3-whole wraps to about 1.5, may have contributed to Cs-137 laden simulant channeling/by-pass which led to the poor performance in terms of Cs-137 sorption characteristics for the 3M designed CST cartridges. The grinding of CST ion exchange materials, to reduce the particle size distribution and thus enhance their easy incorporation into the filter membranes and the co-sintering of MST with polyethylene particles, did not adversely affect the sorption kinetics of both CST and MST in the uptake of Cs-137 and Sr-85, respectively. In general, the POREX{reg_sign} based cartridges showed more resistance to simulant flow through the filter cartridges as evidenced by higher pressure differences across the cartridges. Based on these findings they conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into filter membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium a

  1. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with MST impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% Sr-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with co-sintered active MST cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the MST impregnated membrane cartridges and CST impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active MST cartridges and co-sintered active CST cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of Cs-137 with co-sintered CST cartridges. Tests results with CST impregnated membrane cartridges for Cs-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  2. THE IMPLANTATION AND INTERACTIONS OF O{sup +} IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS OF COLLISION-INDUCED DISSOCIATION OF N{sub 2} AND MODELING OF POSITIVE ION FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, M. B.; Latimer, C. J. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970, RJ (Brazil); Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E. [Engineering Physics and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall B102, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Smith, H. T. [Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic oxygen ions are an important component of the plasma incident onto Titan's atmosphere. Therefore, we report measurements of electron capture and ionization collisions of N{sub 2} with incident O{sup +} over the energy range 10-100 keV. Using time of flight coincidence counting techniques we also measured the collision-induced dissociation of N{sub 2} following ionization and electron capture. The electron capture and ionization cross sections were found to have comparable magnitudes. Capture collisions are dominated by non-dissociative processes with the dissociative processes providing contributions that are only slightly smaller. In contrast, ionization is entirely dominated by the dissociative processes. The energy distributions of the N{sup +} and N atom fragments ejected by 20, 50, and 100 keV incident O{sup +} projectiles have also been determined. These fragments carry considerable amounts of energy and if produce in the exobase region can readily escape. The cross sections measured here have been used with Cassini energetic ion and atmospheric density data to determine the ionization by and neutralization of energetic O{sup +} penetrating Titan's N{sub 2} rich atmosphere. Neutralization by charge exchange is found not to occur efficiently above Titan's exobase, so energetic particles with large gyroradii penetrate the atmosphere primarily as ions. When the energetic O{sup +} flux is large, we also show it is an important source of ionization and heating at depth into Titan's atmosphere and the fragments contribute to the net atmospheric loss rate.

  3. Nano-SIMS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new-generation ion microprobe extends high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis to extremely small areas (down to 50 nm) and volumes while...

  4. Revealing lithium-silicide phase transformations in nano-structured silicon based lithium ion batteries via in-situ NMR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogata, K.; Salager, E.; Kerr, C. J.; Fraser, A. E.; Ducati, C.; Morris, A. J.; Hofmann, S.; Grey, C. P.

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structured silicon anodes are attractive alternatives to graphitic carbons in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, owing to their extremely high capacities. Despite their advantages, numerous issues remain to be addressed, the most basic being...

  5. Ion exchange columns for selective removal of cesium from aqueous radioactive waste using hydrous crystalline silico-titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, David Michael

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conscious society. In Hanford, WA, hundreds of underground storage tanks hold tens of millions of gallons of aqueous radioactive waste. This liquid waste, which has a very high sodium content, contains trace amounts of radioactive cesium 137. Since... the material for batch ion exchange of the nuclear waste solution. More research was needed to investigate the material's effectiveness in a column operation. An ion exchange column system was developed to study column performance. The column design...

  6. Nano-structured Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon composite for high-rate lithium-ion batteries Anqiang Pan a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Nano-structured Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon composite for high-rate lithium-ion batteries Anqiang Pan a in three dimensions. Three reversible lithium ions can be totally extracted from the lattice of Li3V2(PO4 structure and a curved one-dimensional channel for lithium-ion diffusion, monoclinic Li3V2(PO4)3 provides

  7. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34102 Basovizza (Italy)

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  8. Novel Laser-Based Manufacturing of nano-LiFePO4-Based Materials for High Power Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Craig R.; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Chang, On; Crane, S.; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Emile

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    17-18, 2007 Novel Laser-Based Manufacturing of nano-LiFePO 4laser-based process for synthesizing nanomaterials, NanoParticle Manufacturing (

  9. Electrospray neutralization process and apparatus for generation of nano-aerosol and nano-structured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charles L. (Cross Junction, VA); Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA); Vsevolodov, Nikolai N. (Kensington, MD)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The claimed invention describes methods and apparatuses for manufacturing nano-aerosols and nano-structured materials based on the neutralization of charged electrosprayed products with oppositely charged electrosprayed products. Electrosprayed products include molecular ions, nano-clusters and nano-fibers. Nano-aerosols can be generated when neutralization occurs in the gas phase. Neutralization of electrospan nano-fibers with molecular ions and charged nano-clusters may result in the formation of fibrous aerosols or free nano-mats. Nano-mats can also be produced on a suitable substrate, forming efficient nano-filters.

  10. Titan Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titan Titan is a two-beam laser platform. The nanosecond "long-pulse" beam is one of the Janus lasers, up to 1 kJ at 1.053 m. The "short-pulse" beam is 1-to-10 ps and energies up...

  11. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  12. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, Trevor A., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu; Yu, Tian [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Croft, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Tao, Jing [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ?10?nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10?nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300?K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  13. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  14. Phase separation in ion-irradiated compound semiconductors: an alternate route to ordered nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott A. Norris

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, observations of highly-ordered, hexagonal arrays of self-organized nanostructures on binary or impurity-laced targets under normal-incidence ion irradiation have excited interest in this phenomenon as a potential route to high-throughput, low-cost manufacture of nanoscale devices or nanostructured coatings. The currently-prominent explanation for these structures is a morphological instability driven by ion erosion discovered by Bradley and Shipman; however, recent parameter estimates via molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this erosive instability may not be active for the representative GaSb system in which hexagonal structures were first observed. Motivated by experimental and numerical evidence suggesting the possible importance of phase separation in ion-irradiated compounds, we here generalize the Bradley-Shipman theory to include the effect of ion-assisted phase separation. The resulting system admits a chemically-driven finite-wavelength instability that can explain the order of observed patterns even when the erosive Bradley-Shipman instability, and in a relevant simplifying limit, provides an intuitive instability criteria that agrees qualitatively with experimental observations on pattern wavelengths. Finally, we identify a characteristic experimental signature that distinguishes the chemical and morphological instabilities, and highlights the need for specific additional experimental data on the GaSb system.

  15. Novel Laser-Based Manufacturing of nano-LiFePO4-Based Materials for High Power Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Craig R.; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Chang, On; Crane, S.; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Emile

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NanoParticle Manufacturing (NPM™), has been used tomaterials synthesized by the NPM™ process (branded as nPWR™)phosphoric acid into an NPM™ reactor. The powder collected

  16. High power laser coupling to carbon nano-tubes and ion Coulomb explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K, Magesh Kumar K; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and non linear interaction of laser with an array of carbon nanotubes is investigated. The ac conductivity of nanotubes, due to uneven response of free electrons in them to axial and transverse fields, is a tensor. The propagation constant for p-polarization shows resonance at a specific frequency that varies with the direction of laser propagation. It also shows surface plasmon resonance at ?=?{sub p}/?(2), where ?{sub p} is the plasma frequency of free electrons inside a nanotube, assumed to be uniform plasma cylinder. The attenuation constant is also resonantly enhanced around these frequencies. At large laser amplitude, the nanotubes behave as thin plasma rods. As the electrons get heated, the nanotubes undergo hydrodynamic expansion. At an instant when plasma frequency reaches ?{sub p}=?(2)?, the electron temperature rises rapidly and then saturates. For a Gaussian laser beam, the heating rate is maximum on the laser axis and falls off with the distance r from the axis. When the excursion of the electrons ? is comparable or larger than the radius of the nanotube r{sub c}, the nanotubes undergo ion Coulomb explosion. The distribution function of ions turns out to be a monotonically decreasing function of energy.

  17. Towards sub-200?nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low ?m range. Deposition of a protective layer (50?nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ?300?nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  18. Propane on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. G. Roe; T. K. Greathouse; M. J. Richter; J. H. Lacy

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observations of propane (C$_3$H$_8$) on Titan that unambiguously resolve propane features from other numerous stratospheric emissions. This is accomplished using a $R=\\lambda/\\delta\\lambda\\approx10^5$ spectrometer (TEXES) to observe propane's $\

  19. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  20. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  1. Novel Laser-Based Manufacturing of nano-LiFePO4-Based Materials for High Power Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Craig R.; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Chang, On; Crane, S.; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Emile

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    II “Olivines in Lithium Batteries” The Beckman Institute,for High Power Li Ion Batteries C.R. Horne 1 , A. Jaiswal

  2. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  3. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  4. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. D. A. Stevens, J. R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc. 147,Xia, M. N. Obravac, J. R. Dahn, Electrochem. and Sol. State

  5. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Leach; A. Lennarz; A. Grossheim; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers; M. Good; S. Seeraji

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT). The unique environment of the EBIT provides backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  6. TITAN TECH TALK INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    TITAN TECH TALK INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY VOLUME I, ISSUE II AUGUST 2013 INSIDE THIS ISSUE Pg. 6 Mobile Yes Yes Yes PC Yes TOP 4 REASONS to use iFullerton: With more than 20 features, you may be asking management system, powered by Moodle, gives you access to your classes. 2. MAPS First day at Cal State

  7. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  8. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive...

  9. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive...

  10. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 /Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract:...

  11. Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate Researchers have found a way to magnetize this material using light,...

  12. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ?32?MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  13. Solar cycle modulation of Titan's ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Shebanits, O.; Å gren, K.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Cravens, Thomas Edward; Girazian, Z.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    During the six Cassini Titan flybys T83–T88 (May 2012 to November 2012) the electron density in the ionospheric peak region, as measured by the radio and plasma wave science instrument/Langmuir probe, has increased ...

  14. Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI% Budgeted # of Paying Students 7,500 37,250 34

  15. Investigation of modified strontium titanate photoanodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisyan, A.G.; Arutyunyan, V.M.; Melikyan, V.V.; Putnyn', E.V.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies semiconducting phases on the basis of single-crystal and polycrystalline strontium titanate. An attempt is made to correlate the photoelectrochemical behavior of SrTiO/sub 3/ photoanodes with their electrophysical properties. It is shown that the photoelectrochemical properties of the photoanodes studied largely depend on the electrophysical parameters of the semiconducting strontium titanate. Ceramic electrodes doped with lanthanum display high photosensitivity.

  16. Parallel contingency statistics with Titan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents the recently parallelized contingency statistics engine. It is a sequel to [PT08] and [BPRT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, and principal component analysis engines. The ease of use of this new parallel engines is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets. Furthermore, this report justifies the design of these engines with parallel scalability in mind; however, the very nature of contingency tables prevent this new engine from exhibiting optimal parallel speed-up as the aforementioned engines do. This report therefore discusses the design trade-offs we made and study performance with up to 200 processors.

  17. Nano Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ONThe Role9085023Nano

  18. The TITAN in-trap decay spectroscopy facility at TRIUMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Leach; A. Grossheim; A. Lennarz; T. Brunner; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; A. A. Kwiatkowski; T. Ma; T. D. Macdonald; S. Seeraji; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents an upgraded in-trap decay spectroscopy apparatus which has been developed and constructed for use with TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN). This device consists of an open-access electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT), which is surrounded radially by seven low-energy planar Si(Li) detectors. The environment of the EBIT allows for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles away from the trap centre via the strong (up to 6 T) magnetic field. In addition to excellent ion confinement and storage, the EBIT also provides a venue for performing decay spectroscopy on highly-charged radioactive ions. Recent technical advancements have been able to provide a significant increase in sensitivity for low-energy photon detection, towards the goal of measuring weak electron-capture branching ratios of the intermediate nuclei in the two-neutrino double beta ($2\

  19. Dissolution on Titan and on Earth: Towards the age of Titan's karstic landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornet, Thomas; Bahers, Tangui Le; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Altobelli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's polar surface is dotted with hundreds of lacustrine depressions. Based on the hypothesis that they are karstic in origin, we aim at determining the efficiency of surface dissolution as a landshaping process on Titan, in a comparative planetology perspective with the Earth as reference. Our approach is based on the calculation of solutional denudation rates and allow inference of formation timescales for topographic depressions developed by chemical erosion on both planetary bodies. The model depends on the solubility of solids in liquids, the density of solids and liquids, and the average annual net rainfall rates. We compute and compare the denudation rates of pure solid organics in liquid hydrocarbons and of minerals in liquid water over Titan and Earth timescales. We then investigate the denudation rates of a superficial organic layer in liquid methane over one Titan year. At this timescale, such a layer on Titan would behave like salts or carbonates on Earth depending on its composition, which mea...

  20. | Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    | Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano Printer optical cloaking design for invisibility Posted: Apr 2nd, 2007 Rationally designed smart nanotechnology | Reports | Encyclopædia | Events | Debate | Neat Stuff Home Database News Resources Nanowerk Nanomaterials

  1. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  2. Morphology of fluvial networks on Titan: Evidence for structural control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burr, Devon M.

    Although Titan’s surface shows clear evidence of erosional modification, such as fluvial incision, evidence for tectonism has been less apparent. On Earth, fluvial networks with strongly preferred orientations are often ...

  3. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcinek, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting on Lithium Batteries, Biarritz, France, June 18–23,Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries M. Marcinek, L. J.Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic

  4. Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1 R. V. Yelle,1 and J. Cui1 Received 29 a study of the formation and distribution of benzene (C6H6) on Titan. Analysis of the Cassini Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements of benzene densities on 12 Titan passes shows that the benzene signal exhibits

  5. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Feng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered Oxides for Lithium Batteries. Nano Lett. 13, 3857–O 2 Cathode Material in Lithium Ion Batteries. Adv. Energydecomposition in lithium ion batteries: first-principles

  6. Plasma Interactions in Titan's Ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard, Matthew

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , that more accurately reflect the varied ionospheric environment. The impacts of these cases on ion production and electron temperature are discussed in Chapter 7. Figure 1.2 Superthermal electron fluxes plotted against energy for the four...

  7. Magnetoelectric nano-Fe3O4?CoFe2O4?PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3 composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shenqiang; Wuttig, Manfred

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new magnetoelectric hybrid device composed of a nanoparticulate magnetostrictive iron oxide-cobalt ferritefilm on a piezoelectric lead zirconic titanate crystal serving as both substrate and straining medium is described. Nano-Fe3O4?CoFe2O4...

  8. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl201501s |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/NanoLett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­000 LETTER pubs.acs.org/NanoLett Lithium-Assisted Plastic Deformation of Silicon Electrodes in Lithium-Ion and electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the current industry standard.2 Each electrode in a lithium-ion of existing commercial batteries but also acts as a bottleneck for developing high-capacity lithium-ion

  9. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  10. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Makoto, E-mail: waseda.ogawa@gmail.com [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Department of Earth Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Morita, Masashi, E-mail: m-masashi@y.akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Igarashi, Shota, E-mail: uxei_yoshi_yoshi@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Sato, Soh, E-mail: rookie_so_sleepy@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

  11. Sodium Titanate Anodes for Dual Intercalation Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Dual Intercalation Batteries Lithium supply securityinterest in sodium-ion batteries. These devices operate muchsodium-ion or lithium-ion batteries that utilize them as

  12. Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden The Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden The Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility Nano technology for basic research and small commercial enterprises Director: Prof. David Haviland #12;Nano Fab Lab, Stockholm Sweden Nano-Lab Philosophy · Nanometer scale patterning and metrology · Broad spectrum of user research

  13. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate...

  14. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  15. Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory January 17, 2014 The amount of global electricity supplied by wind, the world's fastest growing energy source, is expected...

  16. Coated Silicon Nanowires as Anodes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for rechargeable lithium batteries. J. Power Sources 139,for advanced lithium-ion batteries. J. Power Sources 174,nano-anodes for lithium rechargeable batteries. Angew. Chem.

  17. Near-field resonance shifts of ferroelectric barium titanate domains upon low-temperature phase transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Döring, Jonathan; Ribbeck, Hans-Georg von; Kehr, Susanne C.; Eng, Lukas M. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Fehrenbacher, Markus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has been established as an excellent tool to probe domains in ferroelectric crystals at room temperature. Here, we apply the s-SNOM possibilities to quantify low-temperature phase transitions in barium titanate single crystals by both temperature-dependent resonance spectroscopy and domain distribution imaging. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal structural phase transition at 263?K manifests in a change of the spatial arrangement of ferroelectric domains as probed with a tunable free-electron laser. More intriguingly, the domain distribution unravels non-favored domain configurations upon sample recovery to room temperature as explainable by increased sample disorder. Ferroelectric domains and topographic influences are clearly deconvolved even at low temperatures, since complementing our s-SNOM nano-spectroscopy with piezoresponse force microscopy and topographic imaging using one and the same atomic force microscope and tip.

  18. DETECTION OF PROPENE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jennings, D. E. [Detector Systems Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Detector Systems Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)] [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Sung, K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, CA 91109 (United States); Ansty, T. M. [Department of Space Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Department of Space Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Gorius, N. [IACS, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)] [IACS, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Cottini, V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voyager 1 flyby of Titan in 1980 gave a first glimpse of the chemical complexity of Titan's atmosphere, detecting many new molecules with the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS). These included propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and propyne (CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H), while the intermediate-sized C{sub 3}H {sub x} hydrocarbon (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was curiously absent. Using spectra from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini, we show the first positive detection of propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) in Titan's stratosphere (5? significance), finally filling the three-decade gap in the chemical sequence. We retrieve a vertical abundance profile from 100-250 km, that varies slowly with altitude from 2.0 ± 0.8 ppbv at 125 km, to 4.6 ± 1.5 ppbv at 200 km. The abundance of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} is less than both C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H, and we remark on an emerging paradigm in Titan's hydrocarbon abundances whereby alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C{sub 2}H {sub x} and C{sub 3}H {sub x} chemical families in the lower stratosphere. More generally, there appears to be much greater ubiquity and relative abundance of triple-bonded species than double-bonded, likely due to the greater resistance of triple bonds to photolysis and chemical attack.

  19. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000824120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  20. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000524120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.46000524120 qualification and the 14 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  1. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000619120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000619120 qualification and the 13 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  2. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000908120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp (France); Le Mouelic, Stephane [Laboratoire de Planetologie et Geodynamique, CNRS, UMR-6112, Universite de Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clark, Roger [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Nicholson, Phil [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Jaumann, Ralf [Institute of Planetary Exploration, Deutsche Zentrum, fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  4. 34 McCormick / spring Lead mechanical engineer, Titan Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    and solar panels. Anyway, I learned about the job through a solar car listserv. I contacted him and becameCormick: What does Titan Aerospace do? Cornew: Titan Aerospace is a startup that designs and builds solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Our long-term goal is to build solar-powered UAVs that could stay

  5. Energetic ion precipitation at Titan T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    species [Waite et al., 2005]. Solar radiation and energetic plasma from Saturn's magnetosphere ionize the neutral atmosphere and create an ionosphere at altitudes above about 800 km [Bird et al., 1997; Wahlund et an iono- sphere at very low altitudes [Bird et al., 1997]. The creation of an ionosphere below 1000 km

  6. Response of Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interface under electron irradiation. Citation: Zhang Y, J Lian, Z Zhu, WD Bennett, LV Saraf, JL Rausch, CA Hendricks, RC Ewing, and WJ Weber.2009."Response of...

  7. The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group From Nano-Particles to Nano-Polymers Francesco Stellacci Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT frstella@mit.edu #12;S u N M a G The Supramolecular NanoMaterials Group Supramolecular Materials Science Monolayer Protected Metal Nanoparticles Functionalized Carbon

  8. In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

  9. Scalable k-means statistics with Titan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David C.; Bennett, Janine C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents both the serial and parallel k-means statistics engines. It is a sequel to [PT08], [BPRT09], and [PT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, principal component analysis, and contingency engines. The ease of use of the new parallel k-means engine is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets and algorithm verification is provided. This report justifies the design of the statistics engines with parallel scalability in mind, and provides scalability and speed-up analysis results for the k-means engine.

  10. Titan Energy Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson, New5661°, -86.0529604° ShowEnergyTitan

  11. Titan Omsk Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station Jump to:Tioga Energy Jump to:TippahTitan

  12. Morphologic and computational fluid dynamic analysis of sand dune-topographic obstacle interactions on Earth and Titan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Julia

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth and Titan have vastly different physical environments, but similar landscapes. Sand dunes, like those found in Earth’s deserts, cover large areas of Titan’s equatorial region and are important records of climate. Titan’s linear dunes...

  13. Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. es009jang2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Hybrid Nano Carbon FiberGraphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle...

  14. Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    es009jang2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Hybrid Nano Carbon FiberGraphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Progress of DOE...

  15. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  16. Performance of Kepler GTX Titan GPUs and Xeon Phi System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwancheol Jeong; Weonjong Lee; Jeonghwan Pak; Kwang-jong Choi; Sang-Hyun Park; Jun-sik Yoo; Joo Hwan Kim; Joungjin Lee; Young Woo Lee

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    NVIDIA's new architecture, Kepler improves GPU's performance significantly with the new streaming multiprocessor SMX. Along with the performance, NVIDIA has also introduced many new technologies such as direct parallelism, hyper-Q and GPU Direct with RDMA. Apart from other usual GPUs, NVIDIA also released another Kepler 'GeForce' GPU named GTX Titan. GeForce GTX Titan is not only good for gaming but also good for high performance computing with CUDA. Nevertheless, it is remarkably cheaper than Kepler Tesla GPUs. We investigate the performance of GTX Titan and find out how to optimize a CUDA code appropriately for it. Meanwhile, Intel has launched its new many integrated core (MIC) system, Xeon Phi. A Xeon Phi coprocessor could provide similar performance with NVIDIA Kepler GPUs theoretically but, in reality, it turns out that its performance is significantly inferior to GTX Titan.

  17. Performance of Kepler GTX Titan GPUs and Xeon Phi System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hwancheol; Pak, Jeonghwan; Choi, Kwang-jong; Park, Sang-Hyun; Yoo, Jun-sik; Kim, Joo Hwan; Lee, Joungjin; Lee, Young Woo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NVIDIA's new architecture, Kepler improves GPU's performance significantly with the new streaming multiprocessor SMX. Along with the performance, NVIDIA has also introduced many new technologies such as direct parallelism, hyper-Q and GPU Direct with RDMA. Apart from other usual GPUs, NVIDIA also released another Kepler 'GeForce' GPU named GTX Titan. GeForce GTX Titan is not only good for gaming but also good for high performance computing with CUDA. Nevertheless, it is remarkably cheaper than Kepler Tesla GPUs. We investigate the performance of GTX Titan and find out how to optimize a CUDA code appropriately for it. Meanwhile, Intel has launched its new many integrated core (MIC) system, Xeon Phi. A Xeon Phi coprocessor could provide similar performance with NVIDIA Kepler GPUs theoretically but, in reality, it turns out that its performance is significantly inferior to GTX Titan.

  18. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  19. Titan Simulates Earthquake Physics Necessary for Safer Building...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations took 24 hours to run on Jaguar, but the higher frequency, higher resolution simulations took only five and a half hours on Titan. And considering the "big one" could...

  20. Direct printing of lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bathurst, Stephen, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thus far, use of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) in MEMS has been limited due to the lack of process compatibility with existing MEMS manufacturing techniques. Direct printing of thin films eliminates the need for photolithographic ...

  1. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  2. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattering of the Al film. Citation: Alvine KJ, V Shutthanandan, BW Arey, CM Wang, WD Bennett, and SG Pitman.2012."Pb nanowire formation on Allead zirconate titanate surfaces in...

  3. Estimating erosional exhumation on Titan from drainage network morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, Taylor

    , to estimate cumulative erosion into an initially rough surface. We calibrate this method with a numerical the Cassini spacecraft. While Titan does not host a global surface ocean, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  4. Tuesday, March 24, 2009 POSTER SESSION I: TANTALIZING TITAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Reflectance from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer [#1863] Using a ground calibration. Paillou P. Radar-Bright Channels on Titan [#1533] The Cassini SAR observed channels in the Xanadu region

  5. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  6. Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer---chemical, biological, or radiological. Notify the lab manager, Dr. Yujie Xiong at 5-4530. Eye Contact: Promptly flush

  7. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000908120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in October 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 16 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  8. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000824120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in September 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 14 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  9. Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values for the powdered CST materials compared to previously tested ion exchange materials: IONSIV IE-96 (a zeolite produced by UOP), CS-100 (an organic resin produced by Rohm and Haas), and BIB-DJ (a new resorcinol-formaldehyde organic resin produced by Boulder Scientific). Excellent results were obtained for CST inorganic exchangers that could be significant in the development of processes for the near-term pretreatment of Hanford alkaline wastes. The following observations and conclusions resulted from this study: (1) Several CST samples prepared at SNL had a higher capacity to remove Cs from solution as compared to BIB-DJ, IE-96, and CS-100. (2) Cesium distribution results showed that CST samples TAM-40, -42, -43, -70, and -74 had {lambda} values of {approximately}2,200 ({lambda} = Cs K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}; where {lambda} represents the number of exchanger bed volumes of feed that can be loaded on an ion exchange column) at a pH value >14. (3) Cesium distribution values for CST exchangers doubled as the aqueous temperature decreased from 40{degrees} to 10{degrees}C. (4) Crystalline silico-titanates have the capacity to remove Cs as well as Sr and Pu from alkaline wastes unless organic complexants are present. Experimental results indicated that complexed Sr was not removed, and Pu is not expected to be removed.

  10. Estimates of fluvial erosion on Titan from sinuosity of lake shorelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewelde, Yodit

    Titan has few impact craters, suggesting that its surface is geologically young. Titan's surface also has abundant landforms interpreted to be fluvial networks. Here we evaluate whether fluvial erosion has caused significant ...

  11. Study of the characteristics of a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate radiation detector using a pulsed xenon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyachi, Takashi [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Okudaira, Osamu [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Takechi, Seiji; Kurozumi, Atsuma; Morinaga, Shinya; Uno, Takefumi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka-City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto-University, Kyoto-606-8501 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masanori [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co. Ltd., Toyohashi, Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detector characteristics of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) were studied by directly irradiating a multilayered PZT detector with 400 MeV/n xenon ions. An extracted beam was processed with a rotating slit. Thus, passed through {approx}10{sup 3} xenon ions were available for 50 to 250 {mu}s. The effect of polarization on the output signal was discussed, and the optimal electrode configuration was determined. The output signal appeared as an isolated pulse whose amplitude was qualitatively understood by the Bethe-Bloch formula. However, the calculated and the observed values differed depending on the rotation speed of the slit. A process that can explain the differences is presented here. The output signal appearing beyond the range of 400 MeV/n xenon ion beam was discussed. The sensitivity was compared with that obtained with hypervelocity collision of dust.

  12. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  13. Titan's Prolific Propane: The Cassini CIRS Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, C A; Flaud, J -M; Bezard, B; Teanby, N A; Irwin, P G J; Ansty, T M; Coustenis, A; Vinatier, S; Flasar, F M; 10.1016/j.pss.2009.06.021

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we select large spectral averages of data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) obtained in limb-viewing mode at low latitudes (30S--30N), greatly increasing the path length and hence signal-to-noise ratio for optically thin trace species such as propane. By modeling and subtracting the emissions of other gas species, we demonstrate that at least six infrared bands of propane are detected by CIRS, including two not previously identified in Titan spectra. Using a new line list for the range 1300-1400cm -1, along with an existing GEISA list, we retrieve propane abundances from two bands at 748 and 1376 cm-1. At 748 cm-1 we retrieve 4.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-7) (1-sigma error) at 2 mbar, in good agreement with previous studies, although lack of hotbands in the present spectral atlas remains a problem. We also determine 5.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-7) at 2 mbar from the 1376 cm-1 band - a value that is probably affected by systematic errors including continuum gradients due to haze and also an imperf...

  14. On the photoluminescence of semiconducting titanates applied in photoelectrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHaart, L.G.J.; Blasse, G.; DeVries, A.J.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the photoluminescence of the semiconducting titanates TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), SrTiO/sub 3/, MgTiO/sub 3/, K /SUB 1.8/ Mg /SUB 0.9/ Ti /SUB 7.1/ O/sub 16/, and La/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/, which are known to act as photoanodes in a photoelectrochemical cell. For all materials, except TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), self-trapped exciton emission from a titanate group is observed at LHeT. The importance of the self-trapped excited state is discussed and related to the photoelectrochemical behavior of these semiconducting titanates.

  15. Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charnay, Benjamin; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clément; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward propagating linear dunes. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs), which are oriented westward at these latitudes, similar to trade winds on Earth. Different hypotheses have been proposed to address this apparent contradiction, involving Saturn's gravitational tides, large scale topography or wind statistics, but none of them can explain a global eastward dune propagation in the equatorial band. Here we analyse the impact of equinoctial tropical methane storms developing in the superrotating atmosphere (i.e. the eastward winds at high altitude) on Titan's dune orientation. Using mesoscale simulations of convective methane clouds with a GCM wind profile featuring superrotation, we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport, allowing dunes to extend eastward. This analysis therefore suggests a coupling between superrotation, tro...

  16. Nano-Machines Achieve Huge Mechanical Breakthrough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, David A.

    NANO TECH Nano-Machines Achieve Huge Mechanical Breakthrough Dublin, Ireland (SPX) Sep 08, 2005 that use molecular 'nano'-machines of this kind to help perform physical tasks. Nano-machines could also owners set to return to battered Orleans l Six dead, two missing after heavy rains hit Page 1 of 3Nano

  17. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Feng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered Oxides for Lithium Batteries. Nano Lett. 13, 3857–Material in Lithium Ion Batteries. Adv. Energy Mater. n/a–n/decomposition in lithium ion batteries: first-principles

  18. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

  19. Network algorithms for information analysis using the Titan Toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLendon, William Clarence, III; Baumes, Jeffrey (Kitware Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Andrew T.; Wylie, Brian Neil; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of networked activities is dramatically more challenging than many traditional kinds of analysis. A network is defined by a set of entities (people, organizations, banks, computers, etc.) linked by various types of relationships. These entities and relationships are often uninteresting alone, and only become significant in aggregate. The analysis and visualization of these networks is one of the driving factors behind the creation of the Titan Toolkit. Given the broad set of problem domains and the wide ranging databases in use by the information analysis community, the Titan Toolkit's flexible, component based pipeline provides an excellent platform for constructing specific combinations of network algorithms and visualizations.

  20. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  1. Adsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) Micro. It was shown that particle size played a very important role in the adsorption process. The nano-scale particles showed much improved Cu ion adsorption efficiency, compared with the micro hydro- gels. The amount

  2. Nano-Punk For Tomorrow's People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newfield, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-Punk for Tomorrow’s People By Christopher NewfieldMikhail Roco’s NBIC (nano- bio-info-cognitive) convergenceset in a Victorian-style nano era. Why Victorian? Perhaps

  3. Nano-Optoelectronic Integration on Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Roger

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal Si Nanopillars,” Nano Lett. , vol. 10, no. 11, pp.?V Nanowires on Silicon,” Nano Letters, vol. 4, no. 10, pp.and nanoribbon lasers,” Nano Letters, vol. 4, no. 2, pp.

  4. Nano-/micro metallic wire synthesis on Si substrate and their characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Jaskiran, E-mail: kaur.jaskiran@gmail.com; Kaur, Harmanmeet, E-mail: kaur.jaskiran@gmail.com; Singh, Surinder, E-mail: kaur.jaskiran@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Kanjilal, Dinakar [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India); Chakarvarti, Shiv Kumar [Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad-121003 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-/micro wires of copper are grown on semiconducting Si substrate using the template method. It involves the irradiation of 8 um thick polymeric layer coated on Si with150 MeV Ni ion beam at a fluence of 2E8. Later, by using the simple technique of electrodeposition, copper nano-/micro wires were grown via template synthesis. Synthesized wires were morphologically characterized using SEM and electrical characterization was carried out by finding I-V plot.

  5. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: TITAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    . Griffith C. Hirtzig M. Barnes J. W. Buratti B. J. Brown R. H. Nicholson P. D. Baines K. H. VIMS Team models. Campbell D. B. Black G. J. Carter L. M. Nolan M. C. Titan: 13 cm Arecibo Radar Observations. M. Brown R. H. Barnes J. W. Baines K. Clark R. Jaumann R. Nicholson P. Sotin C. Exploring Methods

  6. Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide using titanate nanoscrolls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide using titanate nanoscrolls Alfred Kleinhammes a of TiO2 nanocrystals, are tested as reactive sorbent for chemical warfare agent (CWA) decontamination as a decontaminant for CWAs. Ó 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Hydrolysis reactions have shown promising

  7. Direct Nano-Patterning With Nano-Optic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meenashi Sundaram, Vijay

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    with the requirement for vacuum conditions limit the application of these techniques compared with nano-scale processing with laser ablation. Nano-patterning on a material with a laser requires confinement of the laser light to a nanometer spot. Even with a...

  8. Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applicatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Schwenzer, J Xiao, Z Nie, LV Saraf, Z Yang, and J Liu.2012."Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applications."Nano Letters 12(7):37833787....

  9. Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    stability of Si-based anode. 4 Milestones * Synthesize and characterize TiO 2 Graphene and SnO 2 Graphene nano-composite as anode for Li-ion batteries. - on going *...

  10. Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 are transparent materials with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 that are lead-free. If we cannot shield effectively at nanofiller levels where transparency is maintained, we, Condensed Matter, Vol. 15, 8927 (2003). 21. "Highly Nonlinear Bismuth-Oxide Fiber for Smooth Supercontinuun

  11. NanoDays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ONTheStorage -NanoDays

  12. How to Turn a Jaguar into a Titan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Three years later though, the petascale is long in the rearview mirror as high-performance computing advances to the next big milestone, the exascale. Looking under Titan's...

  13. Chinese supercomputer stays No. 1, Titan at ORNL still No. 2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chinese supercomputer stays No. 1, Titan at ORNL still No. 2 November 18, 2014 For the fourth consecutive time, Tianhe-2, a supercomputer developed by China's National University...

  14. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl201470j |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/NanoLett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    ­000 LETTER pubs.acs.org/NanoLett Interconnected Silicon Hollow Nanospheres for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes silicon structure.13 This electrochem- ical conditioning method is promising, but limited capacities (960 the diffusion-induced stress evolution and investigated the volume expansion of the same single hollow spheres

  15. Synthesis and Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks. Synthesis and Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks. Abstract: Nano sized zeolitic imidazolate frameworks nZIF-8...

  16. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  17. Equilibrium composition between liquid and clathrate reservoirs on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundreds of lakes and a few seas of liquid hydrocarbons have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft to cover the polar regions of Titan. A significant fraction of these lakes or seas could possibly be interconnected with subsurface liquid reservoirs of alkanes. In this paper, we investigate the interplay that would happen between a reservoir of liquid hydrocarbons located in Titan's subsurface and a hypothetical clathrate reservoir that progressively forms if the liquid mixture diffuses throughout a preexisting porous icy layer. To do so, we use a statistical-thermodynamic model in order to compute the composition of the clathrate reservoir that forms as a result of the progressive entrapping of the liquid mixture. This study shows that clathrate formation strongly fractionates the molecules between the liquid and the solid phases. Depending on whether the structure I or structure II clathrate forms, the present model predicts that the liquid reservoirs would be mainly composed of either propane or ethane, r...

  18. *SINAM NANO SEMINAR * Center for Scalable and Integrated NAnoManufacturing (SINAM) -NSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    *SINAM NANO SEMINAR * Center for Scalable and Integrated NAnoManufacturing (SINAM) - NSF Nanoscale and Integrated NAnoManufacturing (SINAM) Email:xz_asst@me.berkeley.edu Phone: 510.642.0390 Fax: 510.643.2311 #12;

  19. A statistical model approximation for perovskite solid-solutions: a Raman study of lead-zirconate- titanate single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantti, Johannes [Aalto University, Finland; Fujioka, Y [Aalto University, Finland; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Xie, Y [Simon Fraser University, Canada; Glazer, A [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead titanate (PbTiO3) is a classical example of a ferroelectric perovskite oxide illustrating a displacive phase transition accompanied by a softening of a symmetry-breaking mode. The underlying assumption justifying the soft-mode theory is that the crystal is macroscopically sufficiently uniform so that a meaningful free energy function can be formed. In contrast to PbTiO3, experimental studies show that the phase transition behaviour of lead-zirconate-titanate solid solution (PZT) is far more subtle. Most of the studies on the PZT system have been dedicated to ceramic or powder samples, in which case an unambiguous soft-mode study is not possible, as modes with different symmetries appear together. Our Raman scattering study on titanium-rich PZT single crystal shows that the phase transitions in PZT cannot be described by a simple soft-mode theory. In strong contrast to PbTiO3, splitting of transverse E-symmetry modes reveals that there are different locally-ordered regions. The role of crystal defects, random distribution of Ti and Zr at the B- cation site and Pb ions shifted away from their ideal positions, dictates the phase transition mechanism. A statistical model explaining the observed peak splitting and phase transformation to a complex state with spatially varying local order in the vicinity of the morphotropic phase boundary is given.

  20. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  1. SEASONAL DISAPPEARANCE OF FAR-INFRARED HAZE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Cottini, V. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Samuelson, R. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); De Kok, R. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Calcutt, S. B., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A far-infrared emission band attributed to volatile or refractory haze in Titan's stratosphere has been decreasing in intensity since Cassini's arrival in 2004. The 220 cm{sup -1} feature, first seen by the Voyager Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer, has only been found in Titan's winter polar region. The emission peaks at about 140 km altitude near the winter stratospheric temperature minimum. Observations recorded over the period 2004-2012 by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini show a decrease in the intensity of this feature by about a factor of four. Possible seasonal causes of this decline are an increase in photolytic destruction of source chemicals at high altitude, a lessening of condensation as solar heating increased, or a weakening of downwelling of vapors. As of early 2012, the 220 cm{sup -1} haze has not yet been detected in the south. The haze composition is unknown, but its decrease is similar to that of HC{sub 3}N gas in Titan's polar stratosphere, pointing to a nitrile origin.

  2. Midterm Summary of Japan-US Fusion Cooperation Program TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sze, Dai-Kai [University of California, San Diego; Sokolov, Mikhail [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan-US cooperation program TITAN (Tritium, Irradiation and Thermofluid for America and Nippon) started in April 2007 as 6-year project. This is the summary report at the midterm of the project. Historical overview of the Japan-US cooperation programs and direction of the TITAN project in its second half are presented in addition to the technical highlights. Blankets are component systems whose principal functions are extraction of heat and tritium. Thus it is crucial to clarify the potentiality for controlling heat and tritium flow throughout the first wall, blanket and out-of-vessel recovery systems. The TITAN project continues the JUPITER-II activity but extends its scope including the first wall and the recovery systems with the title of 'Tritium and thermofluid control for magnetic and inertial confinement systems'. The objective of the program is to clarify the mechanisms of tritium and heat transfer throughout the first-wall, the blanket and the heat/tritium recovery systems under specific conditions to fusion such as irradiation, high heat flux, circulation and high magnetic fields. Based on integrated models, the breeding, transfer, inventory of tritium and heat extraction properties will be evaluated for some representative liquid breeder blankets and the necessary database will be obtained for focused research in the future.

  3. Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

  4. Microsystems Micro and Nano Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingrand, François

    , virtual prototyping · Microsystems reliability · Micro and nano systems for detection and actuation, nanophotonics, MOEMS and micro-optics · Power-electronics components, electrical and photovoltaic energy

  5. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  6. Planning for post-Cassini/HuygensPlanning for post-Cassini/Huygens Exploration of Titan:Exploration of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchamp, Jack

    , with an admixture (2-10%) of methane · Temperatures are very low (95 K surface, 70 K @ 50 km), so that methane the Sun; makes C2 and higher hydrocarbons Pressure, bars #12;July 1, 2004 "T0" A spectrum of Titan distribution of the compounds in regularly spaced clusters 1 2 1 C11H18N3 192.1501 u 2 C9H14N5 192.1249 u

  7. Near-infrared spectral mapping of Titan's mountains and channels Jason W. Barnes,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    Near-infrared spectral mapping of Titan's mountains and channels Jason W. Barnes,1,2 Jani Radebaugh ranges on Titan using data from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtained during bright spectral units based on our findings. Citation: Barnes, J. W., et al. (2007), Near-infrared

  8. Plasma environment in the wake of Titan from hybrid simulation: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Plasma environment in the wake of Titan from hybrid simulation: A case study R. Modolo,1 G. M] On 26 December 2005, the Cassini spacecraft flew through Titan's plasma wake and revealed a complex position of the wake. Two distinct plasma regions are identified with a significant difference

  9. Mechanisms for the formation of benzene in the atmosphere of Titan E. H. Wilson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    Mechanisms for the formation of benzene in the atmosphere of Titan E. H. Wilson1 and S. K. Atreya (PAHs) are important interstellar species, and their precursor benzene (C6H6) has been detected in our solar system. In this study the possibility of benzene formation in the atmosphere of Titan

  10. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  11. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  12. Parallel Processing of Large Datasets from NanoLC-FTICR-MS Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.

    for these biomarkers Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is a powerful tool becauseParallel Processing of Large Datasets from NanoLC-FTICR-MS Measurements Y. E. M. van der Burgt, I parallel processing of large mass spectral datasets in a distributed computing environment is demonstrated

  13. Synthesis of gold nano-particles in a microfluidic platform for water quality monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Sayak

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for in-situ synthesis of gold nano-particles was developed. The long term goal is to develop a portable hand-held diagnostic platform for monitoring water quality (e.g., detecting metal ion pollutants...

  14. Nano Res. 2011, 4(3): 290296290 Hybrid Silicon-Carbon Nanostructured Composites as Superior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    ­6]. Among the above-mentioned energy conversion and storage devices, lithium ion batteries have been widely as components for next-generation electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices [9­11]. For instance, TiNano Res. 2011, 4(3): 290­296290 Hybrid Silicon-Carbon Nanostructured Composites as Superior Anodes

  15. Whither `nano' or `bio'? | Rob Ritchie So what's all this hype about `nano' and `bio'?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    OPINION Whither `nano' or `bio'? | Rob Ritchie So what's all this hype about `nano' and `bio of these words. Indeed, I've heard numerous people glibly state that, unless the title of your proposal has `nano! The nano revolution has certainly taken our field by storm. One constantly hears of the new paradigm ­ we

  16. NANO EXPRESS Open Access Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    NANO EXPRESS Open Access Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer- bridged carbon nanoscrolls nano-oscillators based on carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) using molecular dynamics simulations. Initiated of gigahertz. We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano

  17. Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure in Genotoxicity Studies to Support Engineering Development of Emission Controls Preserving Diesel Exhaust...

  18. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hobbs, David T. (North Augusta, SC)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  19. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Sun, F. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S. [Structured Materials Industries, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Kalkur, T. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Alpay, S. P., E-mail: p.alpay@ims.uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  20. China Titans Energy Technology Group Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International New Energy Holding LtdTitans Energy

  1. Coaxial Si/anodic titanium oxide/Si nanotube arrays for lithium-ion battery anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Nano Res 1 Coaxial Si/anodic titanium oxide/Si nanotube arrays for lithium-ion battery anode Titanium Oxide / Si Nanotube Arrays for Lithium-ion Battery Anode JiepengRong,,§Xin Fang Oxide / Si Nanotube Arrays for Lithium-ion Battery Anode Jiepeng Rong,1,§ Xin Fang,1,§ Mingyuan Ge,1

  2. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  3. Photolytically generated aerosols in the mesosphere and thermosphere of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Chang Liang; Yuk L. Yung; Donald E. Shemansky

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) stellar and solar occultations at Titan to date include 12 species: N$_{2}$ (nitrogen), CH$_{4}$ (methane), C$_{2}$H$_{2}$ (acetylene), C$_{2}$H$_{4}$ (ethylene), C$_{2}$H$_{6}$ (ethane), C$_{4}$H$_{2}$ (diacetylene), C$_{6}$H$_{6}$ (benzene), C$_{6}$N$_{2}$ (dicyanodiacetylene), C$_{2}$N$_{2}$ (cyanogen), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), HC$_{3}$N (cyanoacetylene), and aerosols distinguished by a structureless continuum extinction (absorption plus scattering) of photons in the EUV. The introduction of aerosol particles, retaining the same refractive index properties as tholin with radius $\\sim$125 \\AA and using Mie theory, provides a satisfactory fit to the spectra. The derived vertical profile of aerosol density shows distinct structure, implying a reactive generation process reaching altitudes more than 1000 km above the surface. A photochemical model presented here provides a reference basis for examining the chemical and physical processes leading to the distinctive atmospheric opacity at Titan. We find that dicyanodiacetylene is condensable at $\\sim$650 km, where the atmospheric temperature minimum is located. This species is the simplest molecule identified to be condensable. Observations are needed to confirm the existence and production rates of dicyanodiacetylene.

  4. Evidence of Titan's Climate History from Evaporite Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Shannon M; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Phillip D; McCord, Thomas B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-ice-poor, 5-$\\mu$m-bright material on Saturn's moon Titan has previously been geomorphologically identified as evaporitic. Here we present a global distribution of the occurrences of the 5-$\\mu$m-bright spectral unit, identified with Cassini's Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and examined with RADAR when possible. We explore the possibility that each of these occurrences are evaporite deposits. The 5-$\\mu$m-bright material covers 1\\% of Titan's surface and is not limited to the poles (the only regions with extensive, long-lived surface liquid). We find the greatest areal concentration to be in the equatorial basins Tui Regio and Hotei Regio. Our interpretations, based on the correlation between 5-$\\mu$m-bright material and lakebeds, imply that there was enough liquid present at some time to create the observed 5-$\\mu$m-bright material. We address the climate implications surrounding a lack of evaporitic material at the south polar basins: if the south pole basins were filled at some point in ...

  5. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A., E-mail: tareqabdelshafy@yahoo.ca [Water Pollution Research Department, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt); Margha, Fatma H. [Department of Glass Research, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt)] [Department of Glass Research, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ? Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ? Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ? Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO{sub 2} wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO{sub 2} used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  6. Constraining the average fill densities of Mars' lowlands and fluvial erosion of Titan's polar regions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewelde, Yodit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Other than Earth, Mars and Titan are the only bodies in our Solar System where we have observed widespread fluvial activity. In this thesis I present two approaches for constraining the extent of multiple resurfacing ...

  7. A TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF TITAN'S NORTH POLAR ATMOSPHERE FROM A SPECULAR REFLECTION OF THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Jason W.

    Cassini/VIMS T85 observations of a solar specular reflection off of Kivu Lacus (87[° over .]4N 241[° over .]1E) provide an empirical transmission spectrum of Titan's atmosphere. Because this observation was acquired from ...

  8. Evaluation of a heated-air airship for the environment of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Richard, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future exploration of Saturn's moon Titan can be carried out by airships, which have the capability to study the atmosphere as well as the capability to land and study the surface at multiple locations. Several lighter-than-air ...

  9. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles as Exogenous Contrast Agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Jeremy T

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose and demonstrate a method by which barium titanate nanoparticle clusters can be used as exogenous contrast agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography imaging systems to localize and highlight desired regions of tissue. SH...

  10. Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang Y, J Jagielski, IT Bae, X Xiang, L Thome, G Balakrishnan, DM Paul, and WJ Weber.2010."Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore."Nuclear...

  11. Pyroelectric properties of barium strontium titanate films: Effect of thermal M. W. Cole,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Pyroelectric properties of barium strontium titanate films: Effect of thermal stresses J. Zhang,1 M.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

  12. ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  13. The Nano-Micro Interface Bridging the Micro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    The Nano-Micro Interface Bridging the Micro and Nano Worlds. Edited by Hans-Jörg Fecht and Matthias- tion among researchers. The book The Nano-Micro Interface: Bridging the Micro and Nano Worlds fills one of these gaps. More specifically, this book, as its subtitle indicates, bridges the micro and nano worlds

  14. Direct Nano-Patterning With Nano-Optic Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meenashi Sundaram, Vijay

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    experimental conditions, Si samples after near field laser-material interactions were processed with buffered hydrogen fluoride solution 17 (BHF 7:1) for ten minutes and then scanned again with the AFM. Note that BHF selectively etches silicon dioxide... .................................................................... 17 Figure 5: Nano-patterns generated on silicon using nanosecond laser (a) before etching with BHF (b) after etching with BHF (c) protrusion after 900 laser pulses...

  15. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  16. On the chemical composition of Titan's dry lakebed evaporites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordier, Daniel; Ferreira, Abel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has an active cycle of methane in its troposphere. Among other evidence for a mechanism of evaporation at work on the ground, dry lakebeds have been discovered. Recent Cassini infrared observations of these empty lakes have revealed a surface composition poor in water ice compared to that of the surrounding terrains --- suggesting the existence of organic evaporites deposits. The chemical composition of these possible evaporites is unknown. In this paper, we study evaporite composition using a model that treats both organic solids dissolution and solvent evaporation. Our results suggest the possibility of large abundances of butane and acetylene in the lake evaporites. However, due to uncertainties of the employed theory, these determinations have to be confirmed by laboratory experiments.

  17. THE HYDROTHERMAL REACTIONS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE, CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE AND SLUDGE IN THE MODULAR SALT PROCESS: A LITERATURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Pennebaker, F.; Fink, S.

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is proposed for an at-tank process to treat High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site. The proposed configuration includes deployment of ion exchange columns suspended in the risers of existing tanks to process salt waste without building a new facility. The CST is available in an engineered form, designated as IE-911-CW, from UOP. Prior data indicates CST has a proclivity to agglomerate from deposits of silica rich compounds present in the alkaline waste solutions. This report documents the prior literature and provides guidance for the design and operations that include CST to mitigate that risk. The proposed operation will also add monosodium titanate (MST) to the supernate of the tank prior to the ion exchange operation to remove strontium and select alpha-emitting actinides. The cesium loaded CST is ground and then passed forward to the sludge washing tank as feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Similarly, the MST will be transferred to the sludge washing tank. Sludge processing includes the potential to leach aluminum from the solids at elevated temperature (e.g., 65 C) using concentrated (3M) sodium hydroxide solutions. Prior literature indicates that both CST and MST will agglomerate and form higher yield stress slurries with exposure to elevated temperatures. This report assessed that data and provides guidance on minimizing the impact of CST and MST on sludge transfer and aluminum leaching sludge.

  18. Luminescent organosilicon polymers and sol-gel synthesis of nano-structured silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, H. Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    filled   hollow   silica   nano-­?   and   microshells  nano-­? extracting  sensor.   Conclusions   The   adsorptive   properties   of   hollow  

  19. SUB-NANO CLUSTERS: THE LAST FRONTIER OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, AN; Bouchard, L-S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assembled Materials." ACS Nano 3: 244. Clayborne AP, Lopez-superconductivity, novel nano-based tunneling networks."narrow nanowires. ." Nano Lett. 5: Zhai H-J, Alexandrova AN,

  20. Nano-tribology of discrete track recording media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Yeoungchin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. L. Warren and F. E. Talke, “ Nano-hardness testing withBhushan, Handbook of Micro/Nano Tribology 2 nd edition, CRCLu, B. Guelorget, H. Chen, “Nano-scratch and fretting wear

  1. Nano fabrication approaches for patterned magnetic recording media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Chulmin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    domains into V-shaped grooves. Nano Letters, 2006. 6(10): p.of a diblock copolymer. Nano Letters, 2008. 8(9): p. Chuang,an ABC Triblock Terpolymer. Nano Letters, 2009. 9(12): p.

  2. New nano structure approaches for bulk thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeonghoon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 29. Schematic of Nano-composite particle fabricationX-ray analysis) of nano-composite particles.. 45Handbook:Macro to Nano" (Ed: D. M. Rowe), Taylor and

  3. Nano for Business 2014: Partnering for Regional Success Our Fifth Nano for Business Conference!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Nano for Business 2014: Partnering for Regional Success Our Fifth Nano for Business Conference! Thursday, May 22, 2014 from 8:30-4:30 Lehigh University, Rauch Business Center Agenda: http://www.lehigh.edu/lnn/docs/Nano_for_Business CAMN members, Drexel faculty Meet business and university contacts and learn about: · Nanotechnology

  4. Microstrain in tetragonal lead-zirconate-titanate: The effect of pressure on the ionic displacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantti, J., E-mail: Johannes.Frantti@fre.fi; Fujioka, Y. [Finnish Research and Engineering, Jaalaranta 9 B 42, 00180 Helsinki (Finland); Zhang, J.; Zhu, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Zhao, Y. [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoelectric materials respond to external stimuli by adjusting atomic positions. In solid-solutions, the changes occurring in atomic scale are very complex since the short- and long-range order are different. Standard methods used in diffraction data analysis fail to model the short-range order accurately. Pressure-induced cation displacements in ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.45}Ti{sub 0.55})O{sub 3} perovskite oxide are modeled by starting from a short-range order. We show that the model gives the average structure correctly and properly describes the local structure. The origin of the microstrain in lead zirconate titanate is the spatially varying Zr and Ti concentration and atomic distances, which is taken into account in the simulation. High-pressure neutron powder diffraction and simulation techniques are applied for the determination of atomic positions and bond-valences as a function of pressure. Under hydrostatic pressure, the material loses its piezoelectric properties far before the transition to the cubic phase takes place. The total cation valence +6 is preserved up to 3.31 GPa by compensating the increasing B-cation valence by decreasing Pb-displacement from the high-symmetry position. At 3.31 GPa, Pb-displacement is zero and the material is no more ferroelectric. This is also the pressure at which the Pb-valence is minimized. The average structure is still tetragonal. The model for microstrain predicts that the transition occurs over a finite pressure range: Pb-displacements are spatially varying and follow the distribution of Zr and Ti ions.

  5. Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' By Jared Sagoff * December 4, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Like snowflakes, nanoparticles come in a wide variety of shapes and...

  6. CO2 Conversion By Nano Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A graduate student named Oshadha Ranasingha created this animation on the research he performed on nano heaters while working at NETL.

  7. CO2 Conversion By Nano Heaters

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A graduate student named Oshadha Ranasingha created this animation on the research he performed on nano heaters while working at NETL.

  8. Preparation and photocatalytic properties of AgI–SnO{sub 2} nano-composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Biao; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Juan; Cao, Jia-Lei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Wang, Zuo-Shan, E-mail: zuoshanwang@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? AgI–SnO{sub 2} nano-composites have been successfully synthesized. ? As-prepared AgI–SnO{sub 2} nano-composites own the excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. ? As-prepared AgI–SnO{sub 2} nano-composites own the excellent stability. - Abstract: AgI doped SnO{sub 2} nano-composites were prepared by the chemical coprecipitation method and were characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results showed that main of the I{sup ?} ions remained in the AgI lattice which is highly dispersed in the system. The photo-catalytic experiments performed under visible light irradiation using methylene blue as the pollutant revealed that not only the photo-catalytic activity but also the stability of SnO{sub 2} based photocatalyst could be improved by introduction of an appropriate amount of AgI, and the result was further supported by the UV–Vis diffuse reflection spectra and the electron spin-resonance spectra. Among all of the samples, AgI–SnO{sub 2} nano-composite with 2At% AgI exhibited the best catalytic efficiency and stability.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of high power LiFePO4/C nano-plate thin films Nan Zhou a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Synthesis and characterization of high power LiFePO4/C nano-plate thin films Nan Zhou a,b , Yanyi battery Solvothermal growth Nano-carbon coating a b s t r a c t Tunable LiFePO4/C thin films demonstrating.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Thin film lithium ion batteries have been developed over recent

  10. Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy. Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy. Abstract: True nanoscale optical spectroscopy requires the...

  11. Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel ThermoelectricMaterials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nano-structuring Routes for Novel Thermoelectric Materials;Phonon Blocking & DOS Engineering Innovative Nano-structuring Routes for Novel Thermoelectric Materials;Phonon Blocking &...

  12. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  13. Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Walker, Bennett N. (Washington, DC)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  14. Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  15. R.M.S. Titanic Maritime Memorial Act of 1986 To encourage international efforts to designate the shipwreck of the R.M.S. Titanic as an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the shipwreck of the R.M.S. Titanic as an international maritime memorial and to provide for reasonable research as an international maritime memorial to the men,' women, and children who perished aboard her; (2) The recent. The Congress declares that the purposes of this Act are: (1) To encourage international efforts to designate

  16. Dipole nano-laser: Theory and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghannam, T., E-mail: gtalal@hotmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nano-Technology, King Saud University, PO Box 2454, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we outline the main quantum properties of the system of nano-based laser called Dipole Nano-Laser emphasizing mainly on its ability to produce coherent light and for different configurations such as different embedding materials and subjecting it to an external classical electric field.

  17. A kinetic model for ion exchange between cesium and sodium using silico-titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Luan Thanh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    28 tanks are double-shell tanks built between 1968 and 1986 for storage of liquid waste with a capacity of 28, 000, 000 gallons. Leaking problems, tank age and integrity, and potentially dangerous chemical reactions occurring in some tanks.... . . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 93 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Radioactive waste remediation problems exist at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U. S. Department of Defense (DOD), and many commercial nuclear power reactor sites. For example, at the DOE Hanford Site...

  18. Fracture and debonding in lithium-ion batteries with electrodes of hollow coreeshell nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    . In particular, silicon anodes of such coreeshell nano- structures have been cycled thousands of times failure modes in a coated-hollow electrode particle. -ion batteries Fracture Debonding Silicon a b s t r a c t In a novel design of lithium-ion batteries, hollow

  19. Graphene-enhanced hybrid phase change materials for thermal management of Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Li-ion batteries suffer from strong self-heating, which limits their life-time and creates* Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, automotive and aerospace industries. Li-ion batteries are an essential part of the hybrid electric vehicles

  20. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, C; Ballenegger, V; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on J...

  1. COSMIC-RAY-MEDIATED FORMATION OF BENZENE ON THE SURFACE OF SATURN'S MOON TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Li; Zheng Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Landera, Alexander; Mebel, Alexander M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Liang, Mao-Chang [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aromatic benzene molecule (C{sub 6}H{sub 6})-a central building block of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules-is of crucial importance for the understanding of the organic chemistry of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Here, we show via laboratory experiments and electronic structure calculations that the benzene molecule can be formed on Titan's surface in situ via non-equilibrium chemistry by cosmic-ray processing of low-temperature acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ices. The actual yield of benzene depends strongly on the surface coverage. We suggest that the cosmic-ray-mediated chemistry on Titan's surface could be the dominant source of benzene, i.e., a factor of at least two orders of magnitude higher compared to previously modeled precipitation rates, in those regions of the surface which have a high surface coverage of acetylene.

  2. Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Parallel nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A New Device for Combinatorial Analysis of Complex nano-Scale Material Systems Patrick James McCluskey, and Joost J. Vlassak Division of Engineering is presented for the combinatorial analysis of complex nano-scale material systems. The parallel nano

  3. Long-term superelastic cycling at nano-scale in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Juan, J., E-mail: jose.sanjuan@ehu.es; Gómez-Cortés, J. F. [Dpto. Física Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)] [Dpto. Física Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); López, G. A.; Nó, M. L. [Dpto. Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)] [Dpto. Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Univ. del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Jiao, C. [FEI, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [FEI, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Superelastic behavior at nano-scale has been studied along cycling in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars. Arrays of square micropillars were produced by focused ion beam milling, on slides of [001] oriented Cu-Al-Ni single crystals. Superelastic behavior of micropillars, due to the stress-induced martensitic transformation, has been studied by nano-compression tests during thousand cycles, and its evolution has been followed along cycling. Each pillar has undergone more than thousand cycles without any detrimental evolution. Moreover, we demonstrate that after thousand cycles they exhibit a perfectly reproducible and completely recoverable superelastic behavior.

  4. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450?K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  5. Polymerization of acetaldehyde using tetraiso-Propyl titanate as a catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makita, Muneharu

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the polymerization reactions of acetaldehyde in the presence of tetraiso-propyl titanate at 280'C, 200'C, 50'C, 20'C, 5'C and -20'C. The polymerization reaction of acetaldehyde, employing tetraiso- propyl titanate as a catalyst at 280'C for 24 hrs, may proceed.... The polymerization reaction at 200'C yield a poly- meric product similar to that obtained at 280'C. A product containing titanium, which could be the initial inter- mediate in the polymerization reactions at 200'C and 280'C, was ob- tained when the reaction...

  6. Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studied with X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bras, Wim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studiedmatrix in which crystalline nano-crystals are embedded. Bysample the Cr containing spinel nano crystals. In these SEM

  7. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug Delivery Vehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu, Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drugmicroemulsion; peptide; nano-low density lipoproteintherapeutic agents. A synthetic nano-LDL (nLDL) particle was

  8. Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    anode materials- Si nano coatingparticles supported by a 3-D network (mat) of nano graphene platelets (NGP)carbon nano-fibers (CNF). Phase 2: Technology Development (This...

  9. DNA Assembly Line for Nano-Construction

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Oleg Gang

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on the idea of using DNA to link up nanoparticles scientists at Brookhaven National Lab have designed a molecular assembly line for high-precision nano-construction. Nanofabrication is essential for exploiting the unique properties of nanoparticl

  10. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

  11. NANO - "Green" metal oxides ... | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Green" metal oxides ... Water and nano-sized particles isolated from trees, plants and algae are the ingredients of a new recipe for low-cost metal oxides that are widely used in...

  12. A nano-stepping robotic instrumentation platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahab, Adam Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an Autonomous Nano-stepping Tool (ANT) system is presented. Each ANT is a small, tripodal, robotic instrument capable of untethered precision motion within a quasi-three-dimensional workspace of arbitrary ...

  13. NanoSIMS analysis of arsenic and selenium in cereal grain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Katie L.; Schröder, Markus; Lombi, Enzo; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Shewry, Peter R.; Grovenor, Chris R.M. (Rothamsted); (UCopenhagen); (Oxford)

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cereals are an important source of selenium (Se) to humans and many people have inadequate intakes of this essential trace element. Conversely, arsenic (As) is toxic and may accumulate in rice grain at levels that pose a health risk. Knowledge of the localization of selenium and arsenic within the cereal grain will aid understanding of their deposition patterns and the impact of processes such as milling. High-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) was used to determine the localization of Se in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and As in rice (Oryza sativa). Combined synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) and NanoSIMS analysis utilized the strengths of both techniques. Selenium was concentrated in the protein surrounding the starch granules in the starchy endosperm cells and more homogeneously distributed in the aleurone cells but with Se-rich hotspots. Arsenic was concentrated in the subaleurone endosperm cells in association with the protein matrix rather than in the aleurone cells. NanoSIMS indicated that the high intensity of As identified in the S-XRF image was localized in micron-sized hotspots near the ovular vascular trace and nucellar projection. This is the first study showing subcellular localization in grain samples containing parts per million concentrations of Se and As. There is good quantitative agreement between NanoSIMS and S-XRF.

  14. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Artyukhin, Alexander B. (Menlo Park, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Stoeve, Pieter (Davis, CA)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  15. Paper AAS 02-141 Navigation of Aerial Platforms on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    -shrouded moon Titan may involve aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. A significant challenge Cassini-Huygens mission may involve mobile aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. Such vehicles (these may not be the same thing ­ sample acquisition systems may be deployable from an airship

  16. Titan's ionosphere: Model comparisons with Cassini Ta data T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and measured electron densities along the spacecraft track. Ionization both by solar radiation and by incoming technique [Bird et al., 1997]. Many models of Titan's ionosphere have been constructed over the past decade below the exobase [Waite et al., 2005]. The solar zenith angle (SZA) and latitude at CA were 91

  17. Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    changes.1 Damage accumulates when fast neutrons undergo scattering collisions with atomic nuclei resultingNeutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to ] IP: 146.6.84.63 On: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:34:29 #12;Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall

  18. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  19. Attrition resistant, zinc titanate-containing, reduced sulfur sorbents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierheilig, Albert A.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced sulfur gas species (e.g., H.sub.2S, COS and CS.sub.2) are removed from a gas stream by compositions wherein a zinc titanate ingredient is associated with a metal oxide-aluminate phase material in the same particle species. Nonlimiting examples of metal oxides comprising the compositions include magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, calcium oxide, nickel oxide, etc.

  20. Influence of stoichiometry on the dielectric properties of sputtered strontium titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Influence of stoichiometry on the dielectric properties of sputtered strontium titanate thin films.1063/1.1598274 INTRODUCTION SrTiO3 thin films have been widely studied for their high dielectric constants and potential temperature superconductors. The dielectric permittivity of SrTiO3 thin films is significantly smaller than

  1. Effects of thickness on the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Lead zirconate titanate PZT thin films with a Zr/Ti ratio of 52/48 were deposited on platinized silicon. Both the piezoelectric properties and the dielectric constants of the PZT thin films were found thin films. The measured changes in properties with thickness were correlated with the residual stress

  2. The role of photochemistry in Titans atmospheric chemistry James Ferris a,*, Buu Tran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, James P.

    performed to simulate the action of long wavelength solar UV light on TitanÕs atmosphere. The exper- iments of solar ultraviolet (UV) light and SaturnÕs magnetospheric electrons on the methane and nitrogen in its of Life and Department of Chemistry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA

  3. Dielectric tunability of graded barium strontium titanate multilayers: Effect of thermal strains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Dielectric tunability of graded barium strontium titanate multilayers: Effect of thermal strains M Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 A thermodynamic model was developed to analyze the effect of the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient

  4. In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1, Denmark antonin.faes@epfl.ch Keywords: In situ ETEM, nickel oxide, reduction, RedOx, SOFC Solid Oxide Fuel. C. Singhal, K. Kendall, High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell - Fundamentals, Design

  5. CMENTATION DU NIOBIUM PAR DES SILICIURES DE TITANE ET DE CHROME EN VUE DE RALISER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    551 CÉMENTATION DU NIOBIUM PAR DES SILICIURES DE TITANE ET DE CHROME EN VUE DE RÉALISER DES of titanium 2014 and chromium modified silicide coatings suitable for oxidation protection of niobium. One, susceptibles de protéger le niobium et ses alliages contre l'oxydation. Le disiliciure de niobium pur n

  6. Titan's bright spots: Multiband spectroscopic measurement of surface diversity and hazes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamkovics, Mate

    in a methane- based meteorological cycle that is similar to the Earth's hydrological cycle [Toon et al., 1988 initiates a series of chemical reactions that result in the formation of condensible hydrocarbons aerosols settle into the tropo- sphere, they can serve as condensation nuclei for Titan's methane

  7. No oceans on Titan from the absence of a near-infrared specular reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    No oceans on Titan from the absence of a near-infrared specular reflection R. A. West1 , M. E shown specular reflection are shown in Fig. 2. To understand how sensitive the near-infrared images-based observations (at near-infrared wavelengths) and calculations showing that there is no evidence thus far

  8. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Thomas; O. Mousis; V. Ballenegger; S. Picaud

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on January 14, 2005. However, in order to interpret the subsolar abundance of primordial Ar also revealed by {\\it Huygens}, other processes that occurred either during the formation of Titan or during its evolution must be also invoked.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, Melissa G. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, Code 699, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sebree, Joshua A. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, Code 699, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A., E-mail: melissa.trainer@nasa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Box 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  10. Final Report on Phase III Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the extent and rate of adsorption of strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium as a function of temperature, monosodium titanate (MST) concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium.

  11. Convective plumes and the scarcity of Titan's clouds Ralph D. Lorenz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    dynamical models and with the relative tropospheric cloud cover, which is only $1% on Titan. Rainstorms is significantly opaque to thermal infrared radiation, leading to a strong greenhouse effect. The equivalent grey is absorbed by methane in the troposphere. Only around 10% of the incident solar radiation reaches the surface

  12. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  13. Titan's rotational state : The effects of a forced "free" resonant wobble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Noyelles

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In Noyelles et al. (2008, Astron. Astrophys., 478, 959-970), a resonance involving the wobble of Titan is hinted. This paper studies this scenario and its consequences. The first step is to build an accurate analytical model that would help to find the likely resonances in the rotation of every synchronous body. In this model, I take the orbital eccentricity of the body into account, as well as its variable inclination with respect to Saturn's equator. Then an analytical study using the second fundamental model of the resonance is performed to study the resonance of interest. Finally, I study the dissipative consequences of this resonance. I find that this resonance may have increased the wobble of Titan by several degrees. For instance, if Titan's polar momentum C is equal to 0.355MR_T^2 (M and R_T being respectively Titan's mass and radius), the wobble might be forced to 41 degrees. Thanks to an original formula, I find that the dissipation associated with the forced wobble might not be negligible compared to the contribution of the eccentricity. I also suspect that, due to the forced wobble, Titan's period of rotation may be somewhat underestimated by observers. Finally, I use the analytical model presented in this paper to compute the periods of the free librations of the four Galilean satellites as well as the Saturnian satellite Rhea. For Io and Europa, the results are consistent with previous studies. For the other satellites, the periods of the free librations are respectively 186.37 d, 23.38 y and 30.08 y for Ganymede, 2.44 y, 209.32 y and 356.54 y for Callisto, and 51.84 d, 2.60 y and 3.59 y for Rhea.

  14. Clathration of Volatiles in the Solar Nebula and Implications for the Origin of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Jonathan I. Lunine; Caroline Thomas; Matthew Pasek; Ulysse Marboeuf; Yann Alibert; Vincent Ballenegger; Daniel Cordier; Yves Ellinger; Francoise Pauzat; Sylvain Picaud

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scenario of Titan's formation matching the constraints imposed by its current atmospheric composition. Assuming that the abundances of all elements, including oxygen, are solar in the outer nebula, we show that the icy planetesimals were agglomerated in the feeding zone of Saturn from a mixture of clathrates with multiple guest species, so-called stochiometric hydrates such as ammonia hydrate, and pure condensates. We also use a statistical thermodynamic approach to constrain the composition of multiple guest clathrates formed in the solar nebula. We then infer that krypton and xenon, that are expected to condense in the 20-30 K temperature range in the solar nebula, are trapped in clathrates at higher temperatures than 50 K. Once formed, these ices either were accreted by Saturn or remained embedded in its surrounding subnebula until they found their way into the regular satellites growing around Saturn. In order to explain the carbon monoxide and primordial argon deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere, we suggest that the satellite was formed from icy planetesimals initially produced in the solar nebula and that were partially devolatilized at a temperature not exceeding 50 K during their migration within Saturn's subnebula. The observed deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere in krypton and xenon could result from other processes that may have occurred both prior or after the completion of Titan. Thus, krypton and xenon may have been sequestrated in the form of XH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, causing the formation of noble gas-poor planetesimals ultimately accreted by Titan. Alternatively, krypton and xenon may have also been trapped efficiently in clathrates located on the satellite's surface or in its atmospheric haze.

  15. Self-Assembled Silica Nano-Composite Polymer Electrolytes: Synthesis, Rheology & Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Saad A.: Fedkiw Peter S.; Baker, Gregory L.

    2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objectives of this research are to understand the principles underpinning nano-composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) and facilitate development of novel CPEs that are low-cost, have high conductivities, large Li+ transference numbers, improved electrolyte-electrode interfacial stability, yield long cycle life, exhibit mechanical stability and are easily processable. Our approach is to use nanoparticulate silica fillers to formulate novel composite electrolytes consisting of surface-modified fumed silica nano-particles in polyethylene oxides (PEO) in the presence of lithium salts. We intend to design single-ion conducting silica nanoparticles which provide CPEs with high Li+ transference numbers. We also will develop low-Mw (molecular weight), high-Mw and crosslinked PEO electrolytes with tunable properties in terms of conductivity, transference number, interfacial stability, processability and mechanical strength

  16. TITAN code development for application to a PWR steam line break accident : final report 1983-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chon-Kwo

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of the TITAN computer code which enables it to be applied to a PWR steam line break accident has been accomplished. The code now has the capability of simulating an asymmetric inlet coolant temperature transient ...

  17. In This Issue New Startup -NanoCarbon......................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    ." (More) New Startup: NanoCarbon ­ Surfactant-free graphene Quantum Computers: Another giant leap ArtistIn This Issue · New Startup - NanoCarbon......................1 · Quantum Computers: Another giant leap.. ...1 · ANFF Design House... .............................2 · Annual Research Showcase

  18. Droplet Impingement Cooling Experiments on Nano-structured Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yen-Po

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ), was defined based on the radial temperature profiles inside the impact zone to quantify the effects of the nano-structured surface in droplet cooling. Results indicate that larger effective cooling area can be achieved using nano-structured surface...

  19. Carbon nano-relays for low power switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milaninia, Kaveh Mehdi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis two unique carbon based nanoelectromechanical switches or carbon nano-relays are demonstrated as a toolkit for investigating NEMs based low power switching. The first is a vertical carbon nano-relay, consisting ...

  20. Dynamics of heat transfer between nano systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical theory of heat transfer between two nano systems. In particular, we consider the resonant heat transfer between two nanoparticles due to the coupling of localized surface modes having a finite spectral width. We model the coupled nanosystem by two coupled quantum mechanical oscillators, each interacting with its own heat bath, and obtain a master equation for the dynamics of heat transfer. The damping rates in the master equation are related to the lifetimes of localized plasmons in the nanoparticles. We study the dynamics towards the steady state and establish connection with the standard theory of heat transfer in steady state. For strongly coupled nano particles we predict Rabi oscillations in the mean occupation number of surface plasmons in each nano particle.

  1. Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Yeol

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. -H. Chen, and S. Jin, NANO, 5(2), 1-7 (2010) 6. 50 nm DNAS. Jin, and J. N. Cha, ACS NANO, 3(8), 7. Effect of Plantcarbon nanotube forests. Nano lett. , 2003. 3(12): p. 1701-

  2. New nano structure approaches for bulk thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeonghoon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    erosion process for hollow nano-walled particles should beNano-grain structure in the Spark Eroded Bi-Sb-Te alloy particles .. 46 3.2.3 HollowHollow BiSbTe spheres Pulverized nanowall BST Nanocomposite TE alloy (Thin walled TE flakes + phonon scattering nano

  3. Peristaltic pumps work in nano scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnoush Farahpour; Mohammad Reza Ejtehadi

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a pump is suggested which is based on well-known peristaltic pumps. In order to simply describe the operation of the proposed pump, an innovative interpretation of low Reynolds number swimmers is presented and thereafter a similar theoretical model would be suggested to quantify the behavior of the pumps. A coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulation is used to examine the theoretical predictions and measure the efficiency of the pump in nano scales. It is shown that this pump with a modest design is capable of being a good option for transport processes in nano scale.

  4. Global circulation as the main source of cloud activity on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Sébastien; Rannou, Pascal; Tobie, Gabriel; Baines, Kevin H; Barnes, Jason W; Griffith, Caitlin A; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Pitman, Karly M; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Phil D; 10.1038/NATURE08014

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds on Titan result from the condensation of methane and ethane and, as on other planets, are primarily structured by circulation of the atmosphere. At present, cloud activity mainly occurs in the southern (summer) hemisphere, arising near the pole and at mid-latitudes from cumulus updrafts triggered by surface heating and/or local methane sources, and at the north (winter) pole, resulting from the subsidence and condensation of ethane-rich air into the colder troposphere. General circulation models predict that this distribution should change with the seasons on a 15-year timescale, and that clouds should develop under certain circumstances at temperate latitudes (~40\\degree) in the winter hemisphere. The models, however, have hitherto been poorly constrained and their long-term predictions have not yet been observationally verified. Here we report that the global spatial cloud coverage on Titan is in general agreement with the models, confirming that cloud activity is mainly controlled by the global circ...

  5. Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ampem-Lassen; D. A. Simpson; B. C. Gibson; S. Trpkovski; F. M. Hossain; S. T. Huntington; K. Ganesan; L. C. L. Hollenberg; S. Prawer

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a new technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a ~ 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

  6. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  7. Nano Vacancy Clusters and Trap Limited Diffusion of Si Interstitials in Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Wei-Kan Chu

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to characterize nano vacancy clusters and the dynamics of their formation in ion-irradiated silicon. It will impact (1) semiconductor device processing involving ion implantation, and (2) device design concerning irradiation hardness in harsh environments. It also aims to enhance minority participation in research and curricula on emerging materials and ion beam science. Vacancy defects are of scientific and technological importance since they are ubiquitous when the host materials are exposed to particle irradiation. Studies on vacancy clustering in the past decades were mainly theoretical and the approach heavily relied on the total-energy calculation methods. The lack of experimental data is mainly due to the formidable task in measuring the cluster size and density using modern metrological techniques, including transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy. To surmount these challenges, we proposed a novel approach to tackle the metrological problems on the nano vacancy clusters, especially in determining densities and sizes of the nano vacancies based on the premise that the vacancy-clusters act as diffusion-trapping centers. For a silicon substrate containing vacancyclusters, the diffusion of interstitials (from the surface) can be classified into three phases: (1) an ultrafast phase-I in which the trapping centers have little effect on the diffusion of interstitials; (2) a prolonged phase-II in which the loss rate of interstitials by trapping balances the influx of interstitials from the surface; and (3) a phase-III diffusion in which surface influx of interstitials depletes the trapping centers and interstitials consequently propagate deeper into the bulk. By measuring diffusion profiles of Si interstitials as a function of diffusion time, void sizes and void densities can be obtained through fitting. Experimentally, our approach to characterize voids is realized through three consecutive steps. (a) First, high energy self ion irradiation is used to create a wide vacancy-rich region, and to form voids by post implantation annealing. (b) In an additional annealing step in oxygen ambient, Si interstitials are injected in by surface oxidation. (c) Analyzing trap-limited diffusion of Si interstitials, which is experimentally detectable by studying the diffusion of multiple boron superlattices grown in Si, and enables us to characterize the nano voids, e.g. their sizes and densities.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic, X-ray and Nanoscale Characterization of Strontium Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J. D.; Moutinho, H. R.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mueller, C. H.; Rivkin, T. V.; Treece, R. E.; Dalberth, M.; Rogers, C. T.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) measurements were performed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the ATR mode with a thallium iodobromide (KRS-5) crystal to measure the frequencies of the v{sub 3} and v{sub 4} phonon absorption bands in thin strontium titanate films deposited on single-crystal yttrium-barium copper oxide (YBCO), lanthanum aluminate, magnesium oxide, and strontium titanate substrates. The KRS-5 crystal enabled FTIR-ATR measurements to be made at frequencies above 400 cm-1. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were also made to further characterize the films. The measurements were repeated on single-crystal specimens of strontium titanate and the substrates for comparison. Softening in the frequency of the v{sub 4} transverse optical phonon in the lattice-mismatched films below the established value of 544 cm-1 is indicative of the highly textured, polycrystalline ceramic nature of the films and is consistent with the XRD and AFM results.

  9. Rapid synthesis of barium titanate microcubes using composite-hydroxides-mediated avenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xi; Ouyang, Jing, E-mail: jingouyang@csu.edu.cn; Jin, Jiao; Yang, Huaming, E-mail: hmyang@csu.edu.cn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Barium titanate oxides microcubes can be synthesized within 1 min. • Composite-hydroxides-mediated strategy provided a possible large scale production. • BST obtained in the strategy showed fairly good crystallinity and tetragonality. - Abstract: This paper reports the rapid synthesis of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}, BTO) microcubes via composite-hydroxides-mediated reaction within 1 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) results confirmed both cubic and tetragonal lattices in the sample and the uniform microcubes with an average size of 1 ?m. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum indicated that the band gap of the BTO powder was 3.05 eV. Ferroelectric polarization vs. electric field (P–E) tests showed that the ferroelectric domains had formed in the as-synthesized BTO microcubes and sintered ceramics. BTO ceramics sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h showed fairly good tetragonality and possessed a maximum polarization of 0.21 ?C/cm{sup 2}, indicating that the sintering temperature for the BTO powders prepared via this method was relatively low. The process and equipment reported herein provided a potential method for the rapid synthesis of titanate based perovskites.

  10. Integration of PanDA workload management system with Titan supercomputer at OLCF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panitkin, Sergey; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, Alexei; Oleynik, Danila; Petrosyan, Artem; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) workload management system (WMS) was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. While PanDA currently uses more than 100,000 cores at well over 100 Grid sites with a peak performance of 0.3 petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking run will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, ATLAS is engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Current approach utilizes modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to Titan's batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single threaded workloads in parallel on Titan's multi-core worker nodes. It also gives PanDA new capability to collect, in real tim...

  11. I/O Router Placement and Fine-Grained Routing on Titan to Support Spider II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL] [ORNL; Dillow, David [None] [None; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Tiwari, Devesh [ORNL] [ORNL; Maxwell, Don E [ORNL] [ORNL; Leverman, Dustin B [ORNL] [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) introduced the concept of Fine-Grained Routing in 2008 to improve I/O performance between the Jaguar supercomputer and Spider, OLCF s center-wide Lustre file system. Fine-grained routing organizes I/O paths to minimize congestion. Jaguar has since been upgraded to Titan, providing more than a ten-fold improvement in peak performance. To support the center s increased computational capacity and I/O demand, the Spider file system has been replaced with Spider II. Building on the lessons learned from Spider, an improved method for placing LNET routers was developed and implemented for Spider II. The fine-grained routing scripts and configuration have been updated to provide additional optimizations and better match the system setup. This paper presents a brief history of fine-grained routing at OLCF, an introduction to the architectures of Titan and Spider II, methods for placing routers in Titan, and details about the fine-grained routing configuration.

  12. Composite solid oxide fuel cell anode based on ceria and strontium titanate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A. (Richland, WA); Pederson, Larry R. (Richland, WA)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An anode and method of making the same wherein the anode consists of two separate phases, one consisting of a doped strontium titanate phase and one consisting of a doped cerium oxide phase. The strontium titanate phase consists of Sr.sub.1-xM.sub.xTiO.sub.3-.delta., where M is either yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc), or lanthanum (La), where "x" may vary typically from about 0.01 to about 0.5, and where .delta. is indicative of some degree of oxygen non-stoichiometry. A small quantity of cerium may also substitute for titanium in the strontium titanate lattice. The cerium oxide consists of N.sub.yCe.sub.1-yO.sub.2-.delta., where N is either niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), antimony (Sb) or tantalum (Ta) and where "y" may vary typically from about 0.001 to about 0.1 and wherein the ratio of Ti in said first phase to the sum of Ce and N in the second phase is between about 0.2 to about 0.75. Small quantities of strontium, yttrium, and/or lanthanum may additionally substitute into the cerium oxide lattice. The combination of these two phases results in better performance than either phase used separately as an anode for solid oxide fuel cell or other electrochemical device.

  13. Nanotubes, Nanowires and Nano-electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    composites have applications in integrated circuits, photonics, solar cells, and displays. ECE professor promising light sensitivity, and which could be used for developing future solar cells. Advances in Nano industrial uses. One potential application for single-walled nanotubes is electron emitters for flat-panel

  14. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPAR?, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ? PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin attenuates arsenic-induced diabetes in mice. ? Encapsulated insulin acts effectively at nearly 10 fold lesser dose than insulin. ? Injection route is more effective than oral administration route. ? Nano-insulin can cross blood–brain barrier with added physiological implications. ? Nano-insulin acts mainly through regulation of mitochondrial signaling cascade.

  15. Appendix 1: Cases A pre-project on nano innovation in Danish Construction March 2007 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials (SCMs) in Cement-based Materials iNANO research project: Jørgen Skibsted, Instrument CentreNanoByg Appendix 1: Cases A pre-project on nano innovation in Danish Construction ­ March 2007 1 Appendix 1: Cases 1 Nano structured material Case 1.1: Application of Nano-sized Supplementary Cementitious

  16. Ion irradiation induced structural and electrical transition in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yangbo; Wang Yifan; Xu Jun; Fu Qiang; Wu Xiaosong; Yu Dapeng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liao Zhimin [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the electrical properties and structure evolution of single layer graphene was studied by gradually introducing the gallium ion irradiation. Raman spectrums show a structural transition from nano-crystalline graphene to amorphous carbon as escalating the degree of disorder of the graphene sample, which is in correspondence with the electrical transition from a Boltzmann diffusion transport to a carrier hopping transport. The results show a controllable method to tune the properties of graphene.

  17. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  18. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  19. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surfaceinterface studies using its combined...

  20. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope Bruce Arey discusses the capabilities of EMSL's new helium ion microscope housed in EMSL's Quiet Wing....

  1. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  2. Nano watermill driven by the revolving charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Nie, Xuechuan; Wu, Fengmin; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hangjun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a novel nanoscale watermill for unidirectional transport of water molecules through a curved single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In this nanoscale system, a revolving charge is introduced to drive water chain confined inside the SWNT, which is served as nano waterwheel and nano engine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found that the revolving frequency of the charge plays a key role in pumping water chain. The water flux across the SWNT increases with respect to the revolving frequency of the external charge and reaches the maximum when the frequency is 4 THz. Correspondingly, the number of the hydrogen bonds of water chain inside the SWNT decreases dramatically with the frequency ranging from 4 THz to 25 THz. The mechanism behind the resonant phenomenon has been investigated systematically. Our findings are helpful for designing nanoscale fluidic devices and energy converters.

  3. Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  4. Asphaltenes-based polymer nano-composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, III, Daniel E

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Inventive composite materials are provided. The composite is preferably a nano-composite, and comprises an asphaltene, or a mixture of asphaltenes, blended with a polymer. The polymer can be any polymer in need of altered properties, including those selected from the group consisting of epoxies, acrylics, urethanes, silicones, cyanoacrylates, vulcanized rubber, phenol-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde, urea-formaldehyde, imides, esters, cyanate esters, allyl resins.

  5. Nano-scale strengthening from grains, subgrains, and particles in Fe-based alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesuer, D. R.; Syn, C. K.; Sherby, O. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x ULTRAFINE GRAINED MATERIALS Nano-scale strengthening fromSpringerlink.com Abstract Nano-scale strengthening has beenless than 20 h), develop nano-scale subgrains [15]. These

  6. Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, Sara

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanotube Forests”. In: Nano Letters 3 (2003), p. 1701. [37]Namib Desert Beetle”. In: Nano Letters 6.6 (2006), pp. 1213–Surface Energy”. In: ACS Nano 3.7 (2009), pp. 1703–1710. [

  7. Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility: Activity Report D. B. Haviland Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility: Activity Report D. B. Haviland Activity Report Albanova contains a report of the activity carried out in the Albanova Nano- Fabrication Facility, located...................................................................................................... 5 Appendix 1: Nano-Lab projects

  8. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement in Pool Boiling of Nano-fluids,” InternationalLiquid Spreading Due to Nano/Microstructures on the CriticalWicking Action of Micro/Nano Structures on Pool Boiling

  9. Numerical Study of Coulomb Scattering Effects on Electron Beam from a Nano-Tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electron beam emitted from a nano- tip. We found that theon Electron Beam from a Nano-Tip ? J. Qiang † , J. Corlett,Switzerland ‡ Abstract Nano-tips with high acceleration

  10. Nano-scale positioning, control and motion planning in hard disk drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Uwe

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Nano-scale Positioning, Control andABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Nano-scale Positioning, Controlmm) height (mm) mini micro nano pico femto Figure 2.8:

  11. Carbon Based Nano-Materials Research, Development and Applications in Optoelectronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Feihu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes. Nano Lett. 4, 35-39 (2004).on Clean Substrates. Nano Lett. 9, 3137-3141 Dalton, A. B.Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube. Nano Lett. 5, Wu, Z. et al.

  12. Nano-scale magnetic film formation by decompression of supercritical CO?/ferric acetylacetonate solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Dea, Silvia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING CO 2 RESS EX-113 GROWTH OF NANO-SCALE MAGNETIC FILMS USING A SUPERCRIT-of EDX analysis on nano-scale ?lms. . . . . . . . . . . 109

  13. Annealing Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC. Annealing Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC. Abstract: A two-dimensional model of a nano-sized amorphous...

  14. Investigation of growth, coverage and effectiveness of plasma assisted nano-films of fluorocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    Investigation of growth, coverage and effectiveness of plasma assisted nano-films of fluorocarbon and uneven shaped nano-materials. In this paper, results on plasma-assisted nano-scale fluorocarbon films

  15. Titanate nanotube thin films with enhanced thermal stability and high-transparency prepared from additive-free sols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koroesi, Laszlo, E-mail: korosi@enviroinvest.hu [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Papp, Szilvia [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Hornok, Viktoria [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Oszko, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Petrik, Peter; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science MFA, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dekany, Imre [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized from TiO{sub 2} in alkaline medium by a conventional hydrothermal method (150 Degree-Sign C, 4.7 bar). To obtain hydrogen titanates, the as-prepared sodium titanates were treated with either HCl or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. A simple synthesis procedure was devised for stable titanate nanotube sols without using any additives. These highly stable ethanolic sols can readily be used to prepare transparent titanate nanotube thin films of high quality. The resulting samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The comparative results of using two kinds of acids shed light on the superior thermal stability of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated titanate nanotubes (P-TNTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that P-TNTs contains P in the near-surface region and the thermal stability was enhanced even at a low ({approx}0.5 at%) concentration of P. After calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C, the specific surface areas of the HCl- and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated samples were 153 and 244 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. The effects of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment on the structure, morphology and porosity of titanate nanotubes are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: TEM picture (left) shows P-TNTs with diameters about 5-6 nm. Inset shows a stable titanate nanotube sol illuminated by a 532 nm laser beam. Due to the presence of the nanoparticles the way of the light is visible in the sol. Cross sectional SEM picture (right) as well as ellipsometry revealed the formation of optical quality P-TNT films with thicknesses below 50 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment led to TNTs with high surface area even after calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated TNTs preserved their nanotube morphology up to 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable TNT sols can be prepared by the peptization of TNT gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-transparency TNT thin films of high quality were fabricated.

  16. Electrosynthesis of nanofibers and nano-composite films | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrosynthesis of nanofibers and nano-composite films Re-direct Destination: A method for producing an array of oriented nanofibers that involves forming a solution that includes...

  17. Decomposition Pathway of Ammonia Borane on the Surface of nano...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nano-BN. Abstract: Ammonia borane (AB) is under significant investigation as a possible hydrogen storage material. While many chemical additives have been demonstrated to have a...

  18. Nonlinear coupling of nano mechanical resonators to Josephson quantum circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a technique to couple the position operator of a nano mechanical resonator to a SQUID device by modulating its magnetic flux bias. By tuning the magnetic field properly, either linear or quadratic couplings can be realized, with a discretely adjustable coupling strength. This provides a way to realize coherent nonlinear effects in a nano mechanical resonator by coupling it to a Josephson quantum circuit. As an example, we show how squeezing of the nano mechanical resonator state can be realized with this technique. We also propose a simple method to measure the uncertainty in the position of the nano mechanical resonator without quantum state tomography.

  19. Nano-mechanical plasmonic phase modulator with potential for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano-mechanical plasmonic phase modulator with potential for electronics April 3, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Using standard semiconductor manufacturing equipment, a team from Argonne's...

  20. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschamps, Frederic [Institute of Geophysics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Sanchez-Valle, Carmen [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@erdw.ethz.c [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  1. Structural and crystal chemical properties of rare-earth titanate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew [ORNL] [ORNL; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL] [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bryan, Jeff C. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth titanates, RE2Ti2O7 (where RE = a rare-earth) with the pyrochlore structure continue to be investigated for use as potential stable host materials for nuclear and actinide-rich wastes. Accordingly, the present work is directed towards the elucidation of the fundamental structural, physical, and thermochemical properties of this class of compounds. Single-crystals of the rare earth pyrochlores were synthesized using a high-temperature flux technique and were subsequently characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cubic lattice parameters display an approximately linear correlation with the RE-site cation radius. Theoretical calculations of the lattice constants and bond lengths of the subject materials were carried out using density functional theory, and the results are compared to the experimental values. The Sm and Eu titanates exhibit a covalency increase between the REO8 and TiO6 polyhedra resulting in a deviation from the increasing linear lattice parameter through the transition series. Gd2Ti2O7 with the 4f7 half-filled f-orbital Gd3+ sub-shell exhibits the lowest 48f oxygen positional parameter. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the rare-earth titanate series is approximately linear, and it has a range of 10.1 11.2 x 10-6 C-1. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the ~530 cm-1 peak associated with the Ti-O stretching mode follows a general trend of decreasing frequency with increasing RE reduced mass.

  2. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #s 46000606120, 46000722120, AND 46000808120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #s 46000706120, 46000722120, and 460008081120 qualification and verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested with the exception of a few pails being marginally below the lower weight percent solids limit. These deviations from the specifications are viewed as negligible since the corresponding density of the slurries indicates no appreciable shortage of MST solids. Therefore, SRNL recommends acceptance and use of these pails.

  3. Measurement of incident position of hypervelocity particles on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Onishi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Shigeyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Ken-ichi [Department of Physics, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Ohashi, Hideo [Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 108-8477 (Japan); Sasaki, Sho [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic dust detector for use onboard a satellite is currently being developed by using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The characteristics of the PZT detector have been studied by bombarding it with hypervelocity iron (Fe) particles supplied by a Van de Graaff accelerator. One central electrode and four peripheral electrodes were placed on the front surface of the PZT detector to measure the impact positions of the incident Fe particles. It was demonstrated that the point of impact on the PZT detector could be identified by using information on the time at which the first peak of the output signal obtained from each electrode appeared.

  4. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Highfield, James, E-mail: James_Highfield@ices.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Pehkonen, Simo O. [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)] [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pichat, Pierre [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)] [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Schreyer, Martin K. [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of nanoscale titanate and anatase titania phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst displays high activity in degrading phenol under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanisms for the sensitization to visible light are considered.

  5. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 [mu]m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO[sub 3]; and then indurating it at 800 to 900 C for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  6. Relationship between orientation factor of lead zirconate titanate nanowires and dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Haixiong, E-mail: htang15@ufl.edu, E-mail: hsodano@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Malakooti, Mohammad H. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Sodano, Henry A., E-mail: htang15@ufl.edu, E-mail: hsodano@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the orientation of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanowires dispersed in nanocomposites and the resulting dielectric constants are quantified. The orientation of the PZT nanowires embedded in a polymer matrix is controlled by varying the draw ratio and subsequently quantified using Herman's Orientation Factor. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the dielectric constants of nanocomposites are improved by increasing the orientation factor of the PZT nanowires. This technique is proposed to improve the dielectric constant of the nanocomposites without the need for additional filler volume fraction since the nanocomposites are utilized in a wide range of high dielectric permittivity electronic components.

  7. Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91 to TipsTitan

  8. Effect Of Chromium Underlayer On The Properties Of Nano-Crystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Chromium Underlayer On The Properties Of Nano-Crystalline Diamond Films. Effect Of Chromium Underlayer On The Properties Of Nano-Crystalline Diamond Films. Abstract: This paper...

  9. INFRARED SPECTRA AND OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NITRILE ICES RELEVANT TO TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ferrante, Robert F. [Chemistry Department, US Naval Academy, 572 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); James Moore, W., E-mail: Marla.h.moore@nasa.go [USRA NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.0 to 333.3 {mu}m ({approx}5000-30 cm{sup -1}). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied are: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, cyanogen; CH{sub 3}CN, acetonitrile; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, propionitrile; and HC{sub 3}N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules, we also report new cryogenic measurements of the real refractive index, n, determined in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. These new values have been incorporated into our optical constant calculations. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrile at a variety of temperatures, including, but not limited to, 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in both the amorphous phase and the crystalline phase. This laboratory effort used a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference was used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, were determined using Kramers-Kronig analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects.

  10. Photochemical enrichment of deuterium in Titan's atmosphere: new insights from Cassini-Huygens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cordier; O. Mousis; I. J. Lunine; A. Moudens; V. Vuitton

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassini-Huygens data are used to re-examine the potential sources of the D/H enhancement over solar, measured in methane, in Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that the system is closed with respect to carbon, the use of constraints from the Huygens probe for the determination of the current mass of atmospheric methane and the most up-to-date determination of D/H from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra allow us to show that photochemical enrichment of deuterium is not sufficient to be the sole mechanism yielding the measured D/H value. A possible fractionation between CH3D and CH4 during the escape process may slightly enhance the deuterium enrichment, but is not sufficient to explain the observed D/H value over the range of escape values proposed in the literature. Hence, alternative mechanisms such as a primordial deuterium enrichment must be combined with the photochemical enrichment in Titan's atmosphere in order to explain its current D/H value.

  11. Laminar Flame Speeds of Nano-Aluminum/Methane Hybrid Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Travis

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    so that the mass of suspended nano-particles could be determined as a function of time up until combustion has occurred. The particles used in these experiments were aluminum nano-particles with a manufacturer-stated average fundamental particle size...

  12. (WPI-iCeMS) Pure Nano Drugs*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    (WPI-iCeMS) SN-38 50 nm * Pure Nano Drugs* SN-38 10 HepG2* JST (-STEP Permeation and Retention (EPR)* EPR 20100 nm SN-38 SN-38 * SN-38 * SN-38 20 SN-38 Pure Nano Drugs

  13. Structural Testing at the Micro and Nano Scales: Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarini, Roberto

    Structural Testing at the Micro and Nano Scales: Breaking Invisible Specimens With Zero Force). "Nano measurements with micro devices: mechanical properties of hydrated collagen fibrils," J. of the R tangential slots · Fuel swirls in the spin chamber and exits through the orifice in a hollow conical spray

  14. NANO-INDENTATION OF COPPER THIN FILMS ON SILICON SUBSTRATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Subra

    on the nano-indentation of polycrystalline Cu thin films, of three different thicknesses) Si substrates. The films were then vacuum-annealed at 475°C for 1 h. The resulting polycrystalline. A diamond Berkovich pyramid indentor with a tip radius, R 50 nm, was used. It is known from nano

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface are likely craters. Accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters. Copyright 2004 American Geophysical Union. Further re- production or electronic distribution is not permitted. 1. Introduction

  16. Method for making fine and ultrafine spherical particles of zirconium titanate and other mixed metal oxide systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for making amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate and crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous solution of zirconium salt and an aqueous solution of titanium salt into a mixed solution having equal moles of zirconium and titanium and having a total salt concentration in the range from 0.01 M to about 0.5 M. A stearic dispersant and an organic solvent is added to the mixed salt solution, subjecting the zirconium salt and the titanium salt in the mixed solution to a coprecipitation reaction forming a solution containing amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate wherein the volume ratio of the organic solvent to aqueous part is in the range from 1 to 5. The solution of amorphous spherical particles is incubated in an oven at a temperature .ltoreq.100.degree. C. for a period of time .ltoreq.24 hours converting the amorphous particles to fine or ultrafine crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate.

  17. Cima NanoTech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower InternationalChuichu,Cima NanoTech Jump to: navigation,

  18. Nano Communication Networks Update | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNREL inNano Communication

  19. Nano Nouvelle Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar05ZipNandanNanjingNano

  20. NanoPV Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNanceNanoMas Technologies

  1. NanoeXa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNanceNanoMas

  2. Ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  3. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

  4. Nano-compact disks with 400 Gbit/in2 storage density fabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano-compact disks with 400 Gbit/in2 storage density fabricated using nanoimprint lithography and read with proximal probe Peter R. Kraussa) and Stephen Y. Choub) NanoStructure Laboratory, Department for publication 30 September 1997 Nano-compact disks Nano-CDs with 400 Gbit/in2 topographical bit density nearly

  5. Jaszczak et al. 1 MICRO-AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaszczak, John A.

    of micro- and nano-scale RGS. The largest of the RGS are hollow scrolls, with the c-axis predominantly at the micro- and nano-scales. The nano-scale cones tend not to be hollow and may have a cone-helix structureJaszczak et al. 1 MICRO- AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN VALLEY, KOLA

  6. NANO-FABRICATION FOR MESOSCOPIC PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    (e-, ions...) IMPRINT mold g contact e- substrate 1. Heat + apply pressure (~50B) 2. Cooling&D Economical but weak resolution Projection 50nm Industrial Expensive but with constant progress EUV progress EUV

  7. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S., E-mail: su.hoffmann@fz-juelich.de [Peter-Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Jülich and JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350?°C, and a subsequent annealing at 600?°C in nitrogen. Films of 15?nm and 12?nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr]?+?[Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100??m{sup 2} to 0.01??m{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01??m{sup 2} size with a 12?nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50??A with voltages of about ±1.0?V between resistance states of about 40?k? (LRS) and 1 M? (HRS). After identification of the influences of the films' microstructures, i.e., grain boundaries and small cracks, the remaining RS properties could be ascribed to the effect of the [Sr]/([Sr]?+?[Ti]) composition of the ALD STO thin films.

  8. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  9. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  10. Novel Hybrid Materials with High Stability for Electrically Switched Ion Exchange: Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline/Nickel Hexacyanoferrate Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli

    2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel and stable carbon nanotubes /polyaniline /nickel hexacyanoferrates composite film has been synthesized with electrodeposition method, and the possibility for removing cesium through an electrically switched ion exchange has been evaluated in a mixture containing NaNO3 and CsNO3.

  11. Preparation of Lead Zirconate Titanate (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) by Homogeneous Precipitation and Calcination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Preparation of Lead Zirconate Titanate (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) by Homogeneous Precipitation-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). I. Introduction LEAD ZIRCONATE TITANATE (PbZrxTi1-xO3) ceramics are of great technological, and TiO2). However, because of intermediate reactions which lead to the formation of PbTiO3 (PT) and Pb

  12. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  13. Effect of entropy of lithium intercalation in cathodes and anodes on Li-ion battery thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Xu, Wu; Towne, Silas A.; Williford, Ralph E.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy changes (?S) in various cathode and anode materials, as well as complete Li-ion batteries, were measured using an electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system (ETMS). LiCoO2 has a much larger entropy change than electrodes based on LiNixCoyMnzO2 and LiFePO4, while lithium titanate based anode has lower entropy change compared to graphite anodes. Reversible heat generation rate was found to be a significant portion of the total heat generation rate. The appropriate combinations of cathode and anode were investigated to minimize reversible heat.

  14. Heavy Ion Event Displays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

  15. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggio, Flavio [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S [ORNL; Kim, H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Jackson, T. N. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Damjanovic, Dragan [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  16. Resuspension and Settling of Monosodium Titanate and Sludge in Supernate Simulate for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P.A.; Mattus, C.H.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is testing several methods for their effectiveness in removing the major radionuclides from the supernate solutions that are stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. One option is to mix the tank contents (sludge and supernate), in situ, with monosodium titanate (MST) powder to remove 90Sr and transuranics. The sludge and MST would be allowed to settle, and thet reated supernate would then be decanted. The sludge and MST would need to be resuspended later so that the solids could be pumped to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. Small-scale tests evaluated the effect of various storage conditions on the rheological properties of the sludge/MST slurry. Laboratory-scale and pilot-scale tests were conducted to determine the mixing requirements for resuspending slurries of sludge simulant and MST, following settleing periods of various lengths.`

  17. Upper limits for undetected trace species in the stratosphere of Titan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, Connor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Kleiner, I.; Dehayem-kamadjeu, A.; Brown, Linda R.; Sams, Robert L.; Bezard, Bruno; Coustenis, Athena; Ansty, Todd M.; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Vinatier, Sandrine; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe a first quantitative search for several molecules in Titans stratosphere ni Cassini CIRS infrared spectra. These are: ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO), and acetonitrile (CH3CN), all of which are predicted by photochemical models but only the last of which observed, and not in the infrared,. We find non-detections in all cases, but derive upper limits on the abundances from low-noise observations at 25 degreesS and 75 degreesN. Comparing these constraints to model predictions, we conclude that CIRS is highly unlikely to see NH3 or CH3OH emissions. However, CH3CN and H2CO are closer to CIRS detectability, and we suggest ways in which the sensitivity threshold may be lowered towards this goal.

  18. Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

  19. Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

  20. Blocking effect of crystal–glass interface in lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiangrong [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: yzhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Baturin, Ivan [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Science, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620000 (Russian Federation); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The blocking effect of the crystal–glass interface on the carrier transport behavior in the lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics: preparation and characterization. - Highlights: • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition promotes the crystallization of the major crystalline phase. • The Z? and M? peaks exist a significant mismatch for 0.5 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • The Z? and M? peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • Crystallite impedance decreases while crystal–glass interface impedance increases. • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface. - Abstract: The microstructures and dielectric properties in La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. SEM analysis indicated that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive decreases the average crystallite size. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the positions of Z? and M? peaks are close for undoped samples. When La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration is 0.5 mol%, the Z? and M? peaks show a significant mismatch. Furthermore, these peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. With increasing La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration, the contribution of the crystallite impedance becomes smaller, while the contribution of the crystal–glass interface impedance becomes larger. More interestingly, it was found that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface in the temperature range of 250–450 °C. This may be attributed to a decrease of activation energy of the crystallite and an increase of the crystal–glass interface area.

  1. Nano-fabricated solid immersion lenses registered to single emitters in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Marseglia; J. P. Hadden; A. C. Stanley-Clarke; J. P. Harrison; B. Patton; Y. -L. D. Ho; B. Naydenov; F. Jelezko; J. Meijer; P. R. Dolan; J. M. Smith; J. G. Rarity; J. L. O'Brien

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a technique for fabricating micro- and nano-structures incorporating fluorescent defects in diamond with a positional accuracy in the hundreds of nanometers. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) etching we first locate a suitable defect with respect to registration marks on the diamond surface and then etch a structure using these coordinates. We demonstrate the technique here by etching an 8 micron diameter hemisphere positioned such that a single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect lies at its origin. This type of structure increases the photon collection efficiency by removing refraction and aberration losses at the diamond-air interface. We make a direct comparison of the fluorescence photon count rate before and after fabrication and observe an 8-fold increase due to the presence of the hemisphere.

  2. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  3. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  4. Nano-sized Lithium Manganese Oxide Dispersed on Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak, S.B.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-sized lithium manganese oxide (LMO) dispersed on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized successfully via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction at 200 C for 30 min using MnO{sub 2}-coated CNT and an aqueous LiOH solution. The initial specific capacity is 99.4 mAh/g at a 1.6 C-rate, and is maintained at 99.1 mAh/g even at a 16 C-rate. The initial specific capacity is also maintained up to the 50th cycle to give 97% capacity retention. The LMO/CNT nanocomposite shows excellent power performance and good structural reversibility as an electrode material in energy storage systems, such as lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. This synthetic strategy opens a new avenue for the effective and facile synthesis of lithium transition metal oxide/CNT nanocomposite.

  5. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/NanoLett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000­00

  6. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  7. New nano-mechanical plasmonic phase modulator offers electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, has demonstrated a nano-mechanical plasmon phase modulator that can control and manipulate the flow of plasmons at the nanoscale...

  8. Nano-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process, a critical step in the manufacture of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, undesirable nano-scale scratches are formed on the surfaces being ...

  9. Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Chu

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional integral equation is developed in order to compute water adsorption onto aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles. The integral equation is derived from molecular density functional theory, with a weighted density...

  10. The robust assembly of small symmetric nano-shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jef Wagner; Roya Zandi

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly symmetric nano-shells are found in many biological systems, such as clathrin cages and viral shells. Several studies have shown that symmetric shells appear in nature as a result of the free energy minimization of a generic interaction between their constituent subunits. We examine the physical basis for the formation of symmetric shells, and using a minimal model we demonstrate that these structures can readily grow from identical subunits under non equilibrium conditions. Our model of nano-shell assembly shows that the spontaneous curvature regulates the size of the shell while the mechanical properties of the subunit determines the symmetry of the assembled structure. Understanding the minimum requirements for the formation of closed nano-shells is a necessary step towards engineering of nano-containers, which will have far reaching impact in both material science and medicine.

  11. Optical Nano-Imaging of Graphene and Beyond | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Nano-Imaging of Graphene and Beyond April 6, 2015 4:00PM to 5:00PM Presenter Zhe Fei, CNM Location Building 241 Type Seminar Series Integrated Imaging Initiative Seminar...

  12. In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying...

  13. Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano Scale Zerovalent Iron to E. coli Z H. Here we assess the effect that adsorbed synthetic polymers and natural organic matter

  14. Latent heat fluxes through nano-engineered porous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traum, Matthew J. (Matthew Jason), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro- and nano-scale truss architectures provide mechanical strength, light weight, and breatheability in polymer barriers. Liquid evaporation and transport of resulting vapor through truss voids (pores) cools surfaces ...

  15. Development of Micromachined Probes for Bio-Nano Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapici, Murat K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of providing very fine, micro/nano scale interaction with matter; along with a broad range of applications made possible by incorporating MEMS sensing and actuation techniques. Micromachined probes consist of a well-defined tip structure that determines...

  16. A New Route to Nano Self-Assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Nano Self-Assembly Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 If the promise of nanotechnology is to be fulfilled, nanoparticles will have to be able to make something of...

  17. Tenfold enhancement of MeV Proton generation by a moderate ultra-short laser interaction with H2O nano-wire targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zigler, A; Bruner, N; Schleifer, E; Eisenmann, S; Henis, Z; Botton, M; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Y; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact sources of high energy protons (50-500MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications. Particularly promising is the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser. In general, laser intensity exceeding 10^18 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Enhancing the energy of generated protons using compact laser sources is very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions. Here we report on the first generation of 5.5-7.5MeV protons by modest laser intensities (4.5 x 10^17 W/cm2) interacting with H2O nano-wires (snow) deposited on a Sapphire substrate. In this setup, the plasma near the tip of the nano-wire is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and confined charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. Nano-wire engine...

  18. On the sol-gel synthesis of strontium-titanate thin films and the prospects of their use in electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohrabi Anaraki, H.; Gaponenko, N. V., E-mail: nik@nano.bsuir.edu.by; Rudenko, M. V.; Guk, A. F.; Zavadskij, S. M.; Golosov, D. A.; Kolosnitsyn, B. S. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Kolos, V. V.; Pyatlitskij, A. N.; Turtsevich, A. S. [Integral Enterprise (Belarus)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-titanate films obtained by the sol-gel technique are deposited onto silicon and silicon/oxide titanium/platinum substrates. The strontium-titanate phase is detected by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis after heat treatment at temperatures of 750 and 800°C. The thickness of the films obtained by the spin-on method increases from 50 to 250 nm as the number of deposited layers is increased and is accompanied with an increase in the grain size in the films. Prospects of the development of the sol-gel technique for the formation of film components of electronic devices based on SrTiO{sub 3} xerogels are discussed.

  19. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ruault, M.-O.; Henry, S.; Kaietasov, O. [CSNSM, Bat. 104, Orsay Campus (France); Trouslard, Ph. [INSTN, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM.

  20. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  1. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  2. FIRST STEP IN THEORETICAL APPROACH IN STUDY OF MARS AND TITAN ATMOSPHERES WITH AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA TORCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the titan atmosphere (CH4-N2) unlike the Mars atmosphere (CO2-N2). We observe the creation of solid], one can obtain the molar fraction versus temperature. The composition of Mars is assumed to be 97% CO22, CO2 - , N2O, N2O3, N2O4, N2O5, N2O+, N3, NCN, NO2, NO2 - , NO3, O3 and the electrons

  3. Ion Beam Deposition of Thin Films: Growth Processes and Nanostructure Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofsaess, Hans C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam deposition is a process far from thermodynamic equilibrium and is in particular suited to grow metastable thin films with diamond-like properties, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN). In this contribution the atomistic description of the deposition and growth processes are reviewed and compared to experimental results, obtained from mass selected ion beam deposition. The focus will be set to the nucleation and growth processes of boron nitride as a model system for ion based thin film formation. Furthermore, recent examples for nanostructure formation in ion deposited compound thin films will be presented. Ion beam deposited metal-carbon nano-composite thin films exhibit a variety of different morphologies such as rather homogeneous nanocluster distributions embedded in an a-C matrix, but also the self-organized formation of nanoscale multilayer structures.

  4. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  5. NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Zhu, Zihua; Wei, Wei

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a major benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.

  6. Supramolecular NanoStamping (SuNS) : fabricating nano/bio devices using DNA as a movable type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Arum Amy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a useful device is developed, it always requires a mass-production technique to industrialize it. In the era of nano/biotechnology, the development of printing techniques has not followed the speed of the inventions ...

  7. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Thompson

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  8. Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathanael, Rhesa

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

  9. 'Nano'tubes, Surface Area & NanoSolar Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage#AskEnergySaver: LEDEDTSaving'Nano'tubes,

  10. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C. (MesoCoat, Inc.)

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  12. Hybrid Rocket Burning Rate Enhancement by Nano-Scale Additives in HTPB Fuel Grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James C

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Low regression rates in hybrid rockets limit their use and capability, but additive aluminum nano-particles represent a possible solution to this problem. In this thesis, aluminum nano-particles were characterized and added to hybrid motor grains...

  13. Formation of nano-crystalline todorokite from biogenic Mn Xiong Han Feng a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Formation of nano-crystalline todorokite from biogenic Mn oxides Xiong Han Feng a,1 , Mengqiang Zhu oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano

  14. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4-) By Nano Zerovalent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4-) By Nano Zerovalent Iron (nZVI) Transformed By Abiotic Sulfide. Reductive Sequestration Of Pertechnetate (99TcO4-) By Nano Zerovalent Iron...

  15. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3-? through oxidization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures....

  16. Photothermal nano-cavities for ultra-sensitive chem-bio detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Juejun

    Nano-cavity photothermal spectroscopy is a novel technique for ultra-sensitive chem-bio detection. We illustrate that through simultaneous localization of optical and thermal interactions in a planar nano-cavity, detection ...

  17. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Single-chain Nanoparticles: Synthesis of Nano-scale Architectures:00 AM, IMS Room 20 Recent efforts by our lab to fold single polymer chains into nano

  18. Nature of Nano-Sized Plutonium Particles in Soils at the Hanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano-Sized Plutonium Particles in Soils at the Hanford Site. Nature of Nano-Sized Plutonium Particles in Soils at the Hanford Site. Abstract: The occurrence of plutonium dioxide...

  19. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its...

  20. Symposium: Micro & Nano Fluidics 2014 Nanotech 2014 (17th) Conference History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Kwang W.

    | Photonic Materials & Devices | Soft Matter and Colloids | Bio Nano Materials | Nanostructured Coatings Infrastructure | Modeling & Simulation at the Nanoscale | Carbon Nano Structures & Devices Advanced Materials & NEMS Devices & Applications | Organic, Flexible and Printed Electronics | Photonic Materials & Devices

  1. Hybrid Rocket Burning Rate Enhancement by Nano-Scale Additives in HTPB Fuel Grains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James C

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Low regression rates in hybrid rockets limit their use and capability, but additive aluminum nano-particles represent a possible solution to this problem. In this thesis, aluminum nano-particles were characterized and added to hybrid motor grains...

  2. Received 21 Dec 2012 | Accepted 26 Apr 2013 | Published 4 Jun 2013 Stable Li-ion battery anodes by in-situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill processes, mostly through nanos- tructured material design. Here we report incorporation of a conducting-ion batteries with high- energy density and long cycle life is of critical importance to address the ever

  3. [11] Cui L, Hu L, Choi JW, Cui Y. Light-weight free-standing carbon nanotube-silicon films for anodes of lithium ion batteries.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for anodes of lithium ion batteries. ACS Nano 2010;4:3671­8. [12] Krivchenko VA, Pilevsky AA, Rakhimov AT, Seleznev BV, Suetin NV, Timofeyev MA, et al. Nanocrystalline graphite: promising material for high current-band Raman intensity of graphitic materials as a function of laser energy and crystallite size. Chem Phys

  4. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lee, Sung Min [ORNL; Wang, James L [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10^8 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and the fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.

  5. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

  6. Single Ion Implantation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  7. Single Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  8. Lithium Ion Production NDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

  9. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  10. Nonlinear viscoelastic dynamics of nano-confined water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai-De Li; Elisa Riedo

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscoelastic dynamics of nano-confined water is studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We observe a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior remarkably similar to that widely observed in metastable complex fluids. We show that the origin of the measured nonlinear viscoelasticity in nano-confined water is a strain rate dependent relaxation time and slow dynamics. By measuring the viscoelastic modulus at different frequencies and strains, we find that the intrinsic relaxation time of nano-confined water is in the range 0.1-0.0001 s, orders of magnitude longer than that of bulk water, and comparable to the dielectric relaxation time measured in supercooled water at 170-210 K.

  11. Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

  12. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of works of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano (sub- micro) scale, e

  13. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

  14. NANO CENTER Annual Conference 2014 Wednesday April 23, 2014 Thursday April 24, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    NANO CENTER Annual Conference 2014 Wednesday April 23, 2014 Thursday April 24, 2014 Royal Rimonim Transport in Single DNA-Based Molecules Yehonadav Bekenstein, Chem & Phys Nano Prize Winner Patterned Research Development of Novel Nano Delivery Systems of Hydrophilic Biomacromolecules for Improved Therapy

  15. Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

  16. PERSPECTIVES Nano-to-Microscale Mechanical Switches and Fuses Mediate Adhesive Contacts between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Volkmar

    PERSPECTIVES Nano-to-Microscale Mechanical Switches and Fuses Mediate Adhesive Contacts between to their molecular origins. The present work focuses on nano-to-microscale regulatory aspects that mediate and that they had to be primarily mechanical. Accordingly, our experimental approach was to study in vitro the nano

  17. Nano-criticality in small CoO particles To Kenneth Wilson, Cornell, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano-criticality in small CoO particles To Kenneth Wilson, Cornell, USA "for his theory a neutron scattering study of CoO bulk and nano-powders, we have measured the critical magnetic scattering), and theC -n magnetic coherence length xµ(-e) . We have found a bof 0.31 and 0.35 for bulk and nano

  18. DNA "Nano-Claw": Logic-Based Autonomous Cancer Targeting and Mingxu You,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    DNA "Nano-Claw": Logic-Based Autonomous Cancer Targeting and Therapy Mingxu You,, Lu Peng, Na Shao for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Shands Cancer Center, UF Genetics Institute, McKnight Brain Institute a DNA- based device, called "Nano-Claw". Combining the special structure-switching properties of DNA

  19. The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano scale, e.g., molecular and atomic scales

  20. Elastic properties of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond measured by GHz-ultrasonic interferometry and resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    Elastic properties of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond measured by GHz-ultrasonic interferometry Sphere resonance Nano-polycrystalline diamond NPD Elastic properties Superhard materials a b s t r a c t The sound velocities and elastic moduli of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) have

  1. Nano Res 1 Construction of two-dimensional hydrogen clusters on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Nano Res 1 Construction of two-dimensional hydrogen clusters on Au(111) directed by phthalocyanine molecules Kai Yang, Wende Xiao, Liwei Liu, Xiangmin Fei, Hui Chen, Shixuan Du and Hong-Jun Gao () Nano Res. Nano Research DOI 10.1007/s1227401303734 #12;1 TABLE OF CONTENTS (TOC) Construction of Two

  2. NANO EXPRESS Open Access Resonant frequency of gold/polycarbonate hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    NANO EXPRESS Open Access Resonant frequency of gold/polycarbonate hybrid nano resonators fabricated,3 , Teng Li1,4* Abstract We report the fabrication of gold/polycarbonate (Au/PC) hybrid nano resonators [20], graphene TFTs [16,21], and inductors. In this arti- cle, we report the fabrication of gold/polycarbonate

  3. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  4. Mechanical, Electrical, and Environmental Evaluation of Nano-Miniature Connectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilton, J.W.

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their small size (0.025-inch spacing), nano-miniature connectors have been chosen for JTA telemetry applications. At the time they were chosen, extensive testing had not been done to determine the mechanical, electrical, and environmental characteristics of these connectors at the levels required for use by weapon systems. Since nano-miniature connectors use some unique plating and wire crimping processes not used in most design agency connectors, it was decided that these properties should be tested thoroughly. This report describes the results of that testing.

  5. Nanoconstriction-based spin-Hall nano-oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demidov, V. E., E-mail: demidov@uni-muenster.de [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science, University of Muenster, Corrensstr. 2-4, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Urazhdin, S.; Zholud, A. [Department of Physics, Emory University, 400 Dowman Dr., Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sadovnikov, A. V. [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science, University of Muenster, Corrensstr. 2-4, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Saratov State University, 83 Astrakhanskaya str., Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Demokritov, S. O. [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science, University of Muenster, Corrensstr. 2-4, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division of RAS, Yekaterinburg 620041 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate magnetic nano-oscillators driven by pure spin current produced by the spin Hall effect in a bow tie-shaped nanoconstriction. These devices exhibit single-mode auto-oscillation and generate highly-coherent electronic microwave signals with a significant power and the spectral linewidth as low as 6.2?MHz at room temperature. The proposed simple and flexible device geometry is amenable to straightforward implementation of advanced spintronic structures such as chains of mutually coupled spin-Hall nano-oscillators.

  6. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  7. Nano tech Silicon India Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar05ZipNandanNanjingNanoNano

  8. Stabilized Spinels and Nano Olivines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpring O&M Users GroupStabilitySpinel and NanoNano

  9. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  11. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  12. Ion irradiation-induced amorphization and nano-crystal formation in garnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    .M. Wang a , S. Yudintsev b , R.C. Ewing a,c,* a Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological and in digital display systems [7]. The radiation susceptibility of nuclear waste form garnet requires systematic Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1906 Cooley Building 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard

  13. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  14. ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

  15. PATENT/DISCLOSURE LIST (1) A. Bindal, "Sidewall Lithography for Growing Horizontal Carbon Nano Tubes and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    Tubes and a Process Flow for Complementary Carbon Nano Tube Field Effect Transistor (CCFET) FabricationPATENT/DISCLOSURE LIST (1) A. Bindal, "Sidewall Lithography for Growing Horizontal Carbon Nano for Manufacturing Nano-Interconnects and Catalyst Islands for Growing Carbon Nano Tubes", provisional patent

  16. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  17. Information Nano-Technologies: Transition from Classical to Quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Yu. Vlasov

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this presentation are discussed some problems, relevant with application of information technologies in nano-scale systems and devices. Some methods already developed in quantum information technologies may be very useful here. Here are considered two illustrative models: representation of data by quantum bits and transfer of signals in quantum wires.

  18. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 is an important phenomenon in many biological systems. Assembly of virus coat proteins into capsids [1 diseases. This approach to studying the kinetics of nanoparticle self-assembly may also provide a valuable

  19. Supramolecular Chemistry@PoliMI: Where Nano meets Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supramolecular Chemistry@PoliMI: Where Nano meets Biology 28-29 June, 2012 Aula De Donato Piazza:30-12:15 Jonathan W. Steed, Durhan University, United Kingdom Responsive Supramolecular gels 12:15-12:45 Alberto-assembly for Biomedical Applications 14:45-15:15 Markus Linder, VTT-Technical Research Centre of Finland Materials by self

  20. A neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and regions containing oxidized chain-like structures. The neutron scattering pair distribution function is heterogeneous, the total neutron scattering data presented in this paper gives a statistically averagedA neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide J.A. Johnsona,b,*, C.J. Benmoreb , S

  1. NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    , such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless areas, such as photonic band-gap materials [1], high dense data storage [2], and photonic devices [3NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

  2. NANO EXPRESS Open Access Multiscale investigation of graphene layers on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NANO EXPRESS Open Access Multiscale investigation of graphene layers on 6H-SiC(000-1) Antoine , Cecile Naud2 , Jean-Yves Veuillen2* Abstract In this article, a multiscale investigation of few graphene, the authors show that the UHV growth yields few layer graphene (FLG) with an average thickness given by Auger

  3. Center for Nano and Micro Manufacturing Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Center for Nano and Micro Manufacturing Chemical Hygiene Plan Vers. 12/13 Page 1 Chemical Hygiene have a written Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Chemical Hygiene Plan includes laboratory-specific hazards. If you have any questions about this Chemical Hygiene Plan, please email Corey Wolin at cdwolin

  4. From Nano-Electronics and Photonics to Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smy, Tom

    From Nano-Electronics and Photonics to Renewable Energy Tom Smy Department of Electronics, Carleton University Questions are welcome! #12;OUTLINE ·Introduction: to EE and Engineering Physics ·Renewable Energy and Renewable Energy Engineering #12;B.Eng. In Engineering Physics · A focused education which is suitable

  5. Hosts: Sponsors: NorTex Nano Summit: Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Communications, NTNU Pawel Sikorski Professor of Physics, NTNU Nano Energy 1 ­ Oil & Gas Session Chairs: Mc William W. Akers Professor in Chemical Engineering, Associate Dean for Energy in the School of Engineering permitting Poster Session: Students ­ 3:30 Mingling, with wine & cheese Martel Prizes Awarded ­ 5:00 All

  6. Nano Res (2010) 3: 452458452 Aqueous Supercapacitors on Conductive Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Nano Res (2010) 3: 452­458452 Aqueous Supercapacitors on Conductive Cotton Mauro Pasta1,2 , Fabio the fabrication of wearable supercapacitors using cotton fabric as an essential component. Carbon nanotubes in the supercapacitor. Aqueous lithium sulfate is used as the electrolyte in the devices, because it presents no safety

  7. NANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum- dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells their efficiencies more practical. Now the third-generation solar cells, such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCsNANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures Kehan Yu Ã? Junhong Chen

  8. Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    (IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

  9. Superconducting Wires Enabled by Nanodots wins Nano50TM Award

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes nanoscale columns of non-superconducting material embedded within the superconductorSuperconducting Wires Enabled by Nanodots wins Nano50TM Award HTS Wires Enabled via 3D Self-Assembly of Insulating Nanodots Background · For most large-scale applications of high-temperature superconducting (HTS

  10. Development of Standards for NanoSIMS Analyses of Biological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davission, M L; Weber, P K; Pett-Ridge, J; Singer, S

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NanoSIMS is a powerful analytical technique for investigating element distributions at the nanometer scale, but quantifying elemental abundances requires appropriate standards, which are not readily available for biological materials. Standards for trace element analyses have been extensively developed for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the semiconductor industry and in the geological sciences. The three primary approaches for generating standards for SIMS are: (1) ion implantation (2) using previously characterized natural materials, and (3) preparing synthetic substances. Ion implantation is a reliable method for generating trace element standards, but it is expensive, which limits investigation of the analytical issues discussed above. It also requires low background levels of the elements of interest. Finding or making standard materials has the potential to provide more flexibility than ion implantation, but realizing homogeneity at the nano-scale is in itself a significant challenge. In this study, we experiment with all three approaches, but with an emphasis toward synthetic organic polymers in order to reduce costs, increase flexibility, and achieve a wide dynamic concentration range. This emphasis serves to meet the major challenge for biological samples of identifying matrix matched, homogeneous material. Biological samples themselves are typically heterogeneous at the scale of microns to 100s of microns, and therefore they are poor SIMS standards. Therefore, we focused on identifying 'biological-like' materials--either natural or synthetic--that can be used for standards. The primary criterion is that the material be as compositionally similar to biological samples as possible (primarily C, H, O, and N). For natural material we adsorbed organic colloids consisting of peptidoglycan (i.e., amino sugars), activated charcoal, and humic acids. Experiments conducted with Si on peptidoglycan showed low affinity as SiO{sub 2}, yet its distribution in the matrix was similar to that observed in spores. In experiments with Mo on humic acid, homogeneity was achieved and a sensitivity factor relative to C was determined. For synthetic material, we successfully prepared polyacrylic acid containing complexed elements of Mo, Ca, Sr, and Ba at low abundance. These were prepared as aqueous mixtures of dissolved elements and polyacrylic resin, followed by thin film drying. The Mo was homogeneously distributed and yielded a relative sensitivity factor nearly identical to that calculated for humic acid. This approach shows great promise for most water soluble metals. Poly(methacrylate) thin films were prepared that contained different low-level concentrations of Si introduced as a silane compound. Although homogeneity was not fully achieved, the analytical results did validate our previous quantitative methodology for Si. In addition, Commercial plastics were also examined for suitability for F and Cl. We found food-grade polyvinyl tubing produced high precision Cl determinations. For ion implantation, we used epoxy as the substrate and successfully extracted depth profiles and sensitivity factors for F and Cu.

  11. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  12. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  13. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  14. Collection of ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide an improved technique for detecting ions as the area from which ions are attracted to a detector is increased, consequently increasing the number of ions detected. This is achieved by providing the outer electrodes of the detector connected to the electrical potential, together with alternate intermediate electrodes. The other intermediate electrodes and preferably the housing are grounded. The technique renders such detection techniques more sensitive and gives them a lower threshold at which they can function.

  15. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  16. Radiocarbon on Titan RALPH D. LORENZ1*, A. J. TIMOTHY JULL2, TIMOTHY D. SWINDLE1 AND JONATHAN I. LUNINE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    's atmosphere is thick enough that cosmic-ray flux limits the production of 14C: absence of a strong magnetic will be measured by the Huygens probe. Measurements with simple detectors on future missions could place useful as a measure of age. Titan, to be the object of close scrutiny of the NASA­ESA Cassini­Huygens mission

  17. SU-E-T-120: Dosimetric Characteristics Study of NanoDotâ,,¢ for In-Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, A; Wasaye, A; Gohar, R; Rehman, L [Department of Oncology, Aga Khan Univesity Hospital (AKUH), Karachi (Pakistan); Hussein, S [Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to analyze the dosimetric characteristics (energy dependence, reproducibility and dose linearity) of nanoDot™ optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and validate their potential use during in-vivo dosimetry, specifically TBI. The manufacturer stated accuracy is ±10% for standard nanoDot™. Methods: At AKUH, the InLight microStar OSL dosimetry system for patient in-vivo dosimetry is in use since 2012. Twenty-five standard nanoDot™ were used in the analysis. Sensitivity and reproducibility was tested in the first part with 6MV and 18 MV Varian x-ray beams. Each OSLD was irradiated to 100cGy dose at nominal SSD (100 cm). All the OSLDs were read 3 times for average reading. Dose linearity and calibration were also performed with same beams in common clinical dose range of 0 - 500 cGy. In addition, verification of TBI absolute dose at extended SSD (500cm) was also performed. Results: The reproducibility observed with the OSLD was better than the manufacturer stated limits. Measured doses vary less than ±2% in 19(76%) OSLDs, whereas less than ±3% in 6(24%) OSLDs. Their sensitivity was approximately 525 counts per cGy. Better agreement was observed between measurements, with a standard deviation of 1.8%. A linear dose response was observed with OSLDs for both 6 and 18MV beams in 0 - 500 cGy dose range. TBI measured doses at 500 cm SSD were also confirmed to be within ±0.5% and ±1.3% of the ion chamber measured doses for 6 and 18MV beams respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetric results demonstrate that nanoDot™ can be potentially used for in-vivo dosimetry verification in various clinical situations, with a high degree of accuracy and precision. In addition OSLDs exhibit better dose reproducibility with standard deviation of 1.8%. There was no significant difference in their response to 6 and 18MV beams. The dose response was also linear.

  18. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the right chamber (ion chamber) are confined in their ownwatts and that on the ion chamber is 50 watts. A permanent-column and the ion source chamber. The simulation is

  19. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

  20. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  1. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  2. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  3. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  4. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  5. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  6. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  7. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  8. High frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Santos, E; Nguyen, D T; Hease, W; Lemaître, A; Ducci, S; Leo, G; Favero, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrating nano- and micromechanical resonators have been the subject of research aiming at ultrasensitive mass sensors for mass spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits diminish dramatically in liquids due to dissipative mechanisms like viscosity and acoustic losses. A push towards faster and lighter miniaturized nanodevices would enable improved performances, provided dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to efficiently drive and read-out their minute displacement. Here we report on a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine mechanical motion at high frequency above the GHz, ultra-low mass of a few picograms, and moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow to direct resolve their thermally driven Brownian vibrations, even in the most dissipative liquids. Thanks to this novel technique, we experimentally, numerically and analytically...

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of two coupled nano-electromechanical resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chotorlishvili; A. Ugulava; G. Mchedlishvili; A. Komnik; S. Wimberger; J. Berakdar

    2011-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    As a model of coupled nano-electromechanical resonantors we study two nonlinear driven oscillators with an arbitrary coupling strength between them. Analytical expressions are derived for the oscillation amplitudes as a function of the driving frequency and for the energy transfer rate between the two oscillators. The nonlinear restoring forces induce the expected nonlinear resonance structures in the amplitude-frequency characteristics with asymmetric resonance peaks. The corresponding multistable behavior is shown to be an efficient tool to control the energy transfer arising from the sensitive response to small changes in the driving frequency. Our results imply that the nonlinear response can be exploited to design precise sensors for mass or force detection experiments based on nano-electromechanical resonators.

  10. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  11. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  12. Multi mode nano scale Raman echo quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Moiseev; E. S. Moiseev

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low loss magnetic surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes characterized by enhanced electrical field component and subwavelength confinement on the dielectric and negative-index metamaterial interface are presented. We demonstrate a possibility of storage and perfect retrieval of the low loss magnetic SPP fields by using a photon echo quantum memory on Raman atomic transition. We describe specific properties of the proposed technique which opens a possibility for efficient nano scale multi-mode quantum memory.

  13. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard Lee (Livermore, CA); Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  14. In Conversation with Jim Schuck: Nano-optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jim Schuck and Alice Egan

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Sponsored by Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD), "In Conversation with" is a next generation science seminar series. Host Alice Egan is the assistant to MSD Director Miquel Salmeron. Alice conducts a fun and informative interview, touching on the lives and work of the guest. The first In Conversation With took place July 9 with Jim Schuck, a staff scientist in the Molecular Foundry's Imaging and Manipulation Facility as our first guest. He discussed the world of Nano-optics.

  15. New York Nano-Bio Molecular Information Technology (NYNBIT) Incubator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Digendra K

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project presents the outcome of an effort made by a consortium of six universities in the State of New York to develop a Center for Advanced technology (CAT) in the emerging field of Nano-Bio-Molecular Information Technology. The effort consists of activities such as organization of the NYNBIT incubator, collaborative research projects, development of courses, an educational program for high schools, and commercial start-up programs.

  16. A review of nano-optics in metamaterial hybrid heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mahi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London N6G 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review for the nonlinear nano-optics in quantum dots doped in a metamaterial heterostructure. The heterostructure is formed by depositing a metamaterial on a dielectric substrate and ensemble of noninteracting quantum dots are doped near the heterostructure interface. It is shown that there is enhancement of the second harmonic generation due to the surface plasmon polaritons field present at the interface.

  17. Improved Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conry, Thomas Edward

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow, porous, or dense particles can be produced with very narrow size distributions, spanning the nano

  18. Complex Dynamics of Nano-Mechanical Membrane in Cavity Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammad Javed Akram; Farhan Saif

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical analysis of a suspended nano-mechanical membrane subject to an optical driving field in cavity optomechanics is presented, which is confirmed through numerical simulations. In the presence of an optical field between its mirrors a high finesse nano-mechanical resonator acts as an oscillator driven by radiation pressure force. The periodic nature of the radiation pressure force makes the nano-mechanical membrane in the optomechanical system as kicked harmonic oscillator. Mathematically the physical system displays a stochastic web map that helps to understand several properties of the kicked membrane in classical phase space. We find that our web map is area preserving, and displays quasi-periodic symmetrical structures in phase space which we express as q-fold symmetry. It is shown that under appropriate control of certain parameters, namely the frequency ratio (q) and the kicking strength (K), the dynamics of kicked membrane exhibits chaotic dynamics. We provide the stability analysis by means of Lyapunov exponent and survival probability.

  19. Modelling nano-particle agglomeration using local interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gizem Inci; Axel Arnold; Andreas Kronenburg; Rudolf Weeber

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-particle agglomeration plays an important role in processes such as spray drying and particle flame synthesis. These processes have in common that nano-particles collide at low concentrations and get irreversibly linked at the point of contact due to plastic deformation. In this paper, we investigate several models of irreversible connections, which require only local interactions between the colliding nano-particles and thus allow for scalable simulations. The models investigated here connect the particles upon collision by non-bonded strongly attractive interactions, bonded interactions or by binding agents placed at the point of contact. Models using spherically symmetric interactions form compact agglomerates and are therefore unsuitable to study agglomeration. In contrast, models that are either based on both central and angular potentials (type one) or on binding agents (type two) efficiently prevent restructuring of the agglomerates, and are therefore useful for modeling contacts formed by plastic deformation. Moreover, both types of models allow to control the rigidity and by that the degree of restructuring. The first type of model is computationally more efficient at low fractional dimensions of the aggregates, while the second gives easy access to local shear forces, which is important when breaking of agglomerates is to be considered. As example applications, we reproduce the well-known diffusion-limited agglomeration (DLA) and report results on soot aggregation.

  20. Influence of attrition milling on nano-grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawers, J.; Cook, D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured materials have a relatively large proportion of their atoms associated with the grain boundary, and the method used to develop the nano-grains has a strong influence on the resulting grain boundary structure. In this study, attrition milling iron powders and blends of iron powders produced micron-size particles composed of nano-size grains. Mechanical cold-working powder resulted in dislocation generation, multiplication, and congealing that produced grain refinement. As the grain size approached nano-dimensions, dislocations were no longer sustained within the grain and once generated, rapidly diffused to the grain boundary. Dislocations on the grain boundary strained the local lattice structure which, as the grain size decreased, became the entire grain. Mechanical alloying of substitutional aluminium atoms into iron powder resulted in the aluminium atoms substituting for iron atoms in the grain boundary cells and providing a grain boundary structure similar to that of the iron powder processed in argon. Attrition milling iron powder in nitrogen gas resulted in nitrogen atoms being adsorbed onto the particle surface. Continued mechanical milling infused the nitrogen atoms into interstitial lattice sites on the grain boundary which also contributed to expanding and straining the local lattice.

  1. Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son , R.A. Yetter, V. Yang, and B: Supplemental materials submitted #12;2 Combustion of Nano-Aluminum and Liquid Water G.A. Risha, S.F. Son, R of nano-aluminum (nAl) and liquid water has been conducted. In particular, linear and mass-burning rates

  2. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  3. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational...

  4. al-zral3 nano structured: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observed in a family of viral envelope proteins Mavroidis, Constantinos 208 Alanine-shaving Mutagenesis to Determine Key Interfacial ResiduesGoverningtheAssemblyof a Nano-cage...

  5. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nanotubes as High-Energy Density Solar Thermal Fuels,” Nano

  6. Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    characterize the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers Approach * Explore Si and carbon based nano-composite electrodes - Explore novel low cost approaches to generate...

  7. Dilution-Free Analysis from Picoliter Droplets by Nano-Electrospray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Nano-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: The expanding role of microfluidics for chemical and biochemical analysis is due to factors including the favorable...

  8. Physical properties and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rotundu, Costel R.; Jiang, Shan; Deng, Xiaoyu; Qian, Yiting; Khan, Saeed; Hawthorn, David G.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Ni, Ni

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure, transport, thermodynamic properties, x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide, Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11), are reported. It is a paramagnetic poor metal with hole carriers dominating the transport. Fermi liquid behavior appears at low temperature. The oxidization state of Ti obtained by the XAS is consistent with the metallic Ti²? state. Local density approximation band structure calculations reveal the material is near the Van Hove singularity. The pseudogap behavior in the Ti-d band and the strong hybridization between the Ti-d and O-p orbitals reflect the characteristics of the building blocks of themore »Ti?? semi-cluster and the TiO? quasi-squares, respectively.« less

  9. Physical properties and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rotundu, Costel R. [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jiang, Shan [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Deng, Xiaoyu [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)] (ORCID:0000000178020966); Qian, Yiting [Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)] (ORCID:0000000250175517); Khan, Saeed [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hawthorn, David G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)] (ORCID:0000000270020416); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Ni, Ni [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure, transport, thermodynamic properties, x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide, Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11), are reported. It is a paramagnetic poor metal with hole carriers dominating the transport. Fermi liquid behavior appears at low temperature. The oxidization state of Ti obtained by the XAS is consistent with the metallic Ti²? state. Local density approximation band structure calculations reveal the material is near the Van Hove singularity. The pseudogap behavior in the Ti-d band and the strong hybridization between the Ti-d and O-p orbitals reflect the characteristics of the building blocks of the Ti?? semi-cluster and the TiO? quasi-squares, respectively.

  10. One-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase titanate/titania Nanoparticles and their adsorption and photocatalytic Performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin; Ho, Jeffery Weng Chye; Tay, Yee Yan; Lau, Wei Siew; Wijaya, Olivia; Lim, Jiexiang; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles undergo phase transformation gradually with the increase of solvothermal synthesis temperature from 100 °C to 200 °C, and eventually are fully transformed into anatase TiO{sub 2}. The crystal structure change results in the changes of optical absorption, sensitizer/dopant formation and surface area of the materials which finally affect the overall dye removal ability. Reactions under dark and light have been conducted to distinguish the contributions of surface adsorption from photocatalytic degradation. The sample synthesized at 160 °C (S160) shows the best performances for both adsorption under dark and photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The adsorption mechanism for S160 is determined as monolayer adsorption based on the adsorption isotherm test under dark condition, and an impressive adsorption capacity of 162.19 mg/g is achieved. For the photocatalytic application, this sample at 0.1 g/L loading is also able to degrade 20 ppm MB within 6 hours under the visible light (>420 nm) condition. - Graphical abstract: The effect of solvothermal synthesis temperature on the formation and dye removal performance of dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles was unveiled and optimized. - Highlights: • Low temperature one-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase photocatalysts. • Correlation of the synthesis temperature is made with the phase composition. • Adsorption isotherm, kinetics, photocatalytic degradation were studied. • Synthesis at 160 °C yields the best material for adsorption of MB in dark. • The same sample also shows the best visible light degradation of MB.

  11. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method 3). Performance testing with simulated and actual waste solutions indicated that the material performs as well as or better than batches of modified MST prepared at the laboratory-scale. Particle size data of the vendor-prepared modified MST indicates a broader distribution centered at a larger particle size and microscopy shows more irregular particle morphology compared to the baseline MST and laboratory prepared modified MST. Stirred-cell (i.e., dead-end) filter testing revealed similar filtration rates relative to the baseline MST for both the laboratory and vendor-prepared modified MST materials. Crossflow filtration testing indicated that with MST-only slurries, the baseline MST produced between 30-100% higher flux than the vendor-prepared modified MST at lower solids loadings and comparable flux at higher solids loadings. With sludge-MST slurries, the modified MST produced 1.5-2.2 times higher flux than the baseline MST at all solids loadings. Based on these findings we conclude that the modified MST represents a much improved sorbent for the separation of strontium and actinides from alkaline waste solutions and recommend continued development of the material as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  12. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, James W. (Canoga Park, CA); Schlanger, Herbert (Simi Valley, CA); McNulty, Jr., Hugh (Santa Monica, CA); Parker, Norman W. (Camarillo, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  13. Ion sensing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  14. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  15. Ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  16. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  17. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  18. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  19. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  20. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  1. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  2. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE, AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR PRETREATMENT OF HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal, and sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results from the development of an improved titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and effective capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  3. 4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

  4. Modulational instability of ion acoustic wave with warm ions in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Siddiqui, Sadiya [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Jehan, Nusrat [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of ion acoustic wave is studied in the presence of warm ions in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas. The Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky (KBM) method is used to derive the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The dispersive and nonlinear coefficients are obtained which depends on the ion temperature and positron density in electron-positron-ion plasmas. The modulationally stable and unstable regions are studied numerically for a wide range of wave number. It is found that both ion temperature and positron density play a significant role in the formation of bright and dark envelope solitons in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  5. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  6. A Scalable Soft Spot Analysis Methodology for Compound Noise Effects in Nano-meter Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    A Scalable Soft Spot Analysis Methodology for Compound Noise Effects in Nano-meter Circuits Chong methodology to study the vulnerability of digital ICs exposed to nano-meter noise and transient soft errors. First, we define "softness" as an important characteristic to gauge system vulnerability. Then several

  7. Thin-Film Active Nano-PWAS for Structural Health Monitoring , Victor Giurgiutiu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Thin-Film Active Nano-PWAS for Structural Health Monitoring Bin Lin1 , Victor Giurgiutiu1 , Amar S 3 University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 ABSTRACT Structural health monitoring (SHM is to develop the fabrication and optimum design of thin-film nano-PWAS for structural health monitoring

  8. Scattering of terahertz radiation on a graphene-based nano-antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Scattering of terahertz radiation on a graphene-based nano-antenna Ignacio Llatser, , Christian. Scattering of the terahertz radiation on a graphene-based nano-antenna is considered. Different electromagnetic models of graphene are discussed and applied to calculate extinction, scattering and absorption

  9. Characterization of Graphene-based Nano-antennas in the Terahertz Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Characterization of Graphene-based Nano-antennas in the Terahertz Band (Invited Paper) Ignacio and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 16640 Kista, Sweden Email: lemme@kth.se Abstract--Graphene communications at the nanoscale. Indeed, graphene- based nano-antennas just a few micrometers in size have been

  10. A Voltage Controlled Nano Addressing Circuit University of Texas, San Antonio TX 78249, USA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bao

    A Voltage Controlled Nano Addressing Circuit Bao Liu University of Texas, San Antonio TX 78249, USA, Abstract. A voltage controlled nano addressing circuit is proposed, which (1) improves yield and enables aggressive scaling with no require- ment of precise layout design, (2) achieves precision of addressing

  11. NANO-DEVICES FOR ENHANCED C S SCOOLING, STORAGE AND SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    NANO-DEVICES FOR ENHANCED C S SCOOLING, STORAGE AND SENSING Debjyoti Banerjee, Ph device for nano-optics ­ Thermal Management (3 Ph.D., 2 M.S.) · Nanostructures· Nanostructures ­ ONR-On-Chip: ­ AFRL: Portable water quality monitor ­ DARPA/MF3: Micro-Chamber Filling » (1) Vaccine Storage/ Paper

  12. A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials Kechao OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 114901 (2012) A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano 2012) We present a scanning AC nanocalorimetry method that enables calorimetry measurements at heating

  13. Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1 V. Uhlí,2, 1 O walls in Co/Cu/Py spin valve nano-stripes (Py: Permalloy), in which the Co layer is mostly single domain Magneto- Resistance. These stacking are called spin valve for a metal spacer layer, and pseudo spin valve

  14. Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Approach for Polymer Nano-Composites Rubber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Approach for Polymer Nano-Composites Rubber Katsumi dynamics of entangled long- polymer melts and filled polymer rubber by us- ing coarse-grained model. We of a polymer nano-composite of tire rubber can reproduce almost of feature of the reinforcement effect observed

  15. Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without Underfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without nano-structured nickel as the primary interconnection material. Assembly was accomplished materials such as nanostructured copper and nickel, novel bonding and barrier layers to provide both

  16. Interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber H. Qu,1); published August 13, 2014 We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor for sensing the displacement. © 2014 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (060.2370) Fiber optics sensors

  17. Relaxation Times of Nano-Colloid Flocculation Induced by Adsorbing and Non-adsorbing Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    Relaxation Times of Nano-Colloid Flocculation Induced by Adsorbing and Non-adsorbing Polymers Alexander I. Chervanyov and Gert Heinrich Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, D-01069 Dresden nano-colloids mediated by adsorbing and non-adsorbing polymers. By making use of this theory, we have

  18. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  19. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System Ajay Ummat, Constantinos and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as "radiation

  20. A Review Of Recent Progress On Nano/micro Scale Nucleate Boiling Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, J. N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research progress in the area of nano/micro scale nucleate boiling is reviewed and an up-to-date summary is provided with a focus on the advances of fundamental boiling physics. This review examines nano/micro scale ...

  1. Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum Aluminum nanoparticles Microexplosion Particle aggregation a b s t r a c t The burning characteristics of fuel droplets containing nano and micron-sized aluminum particles were investigated. Particle size

  2. G.M. Wright, VLT Highlight, March 28, 2012 Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 G.M. Wright, VLT Highlight, March 28, 2012 Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils in the Alcator C morphology of a tungsten divertor modify into fuzz under Helium bombardment in ITER and reactors?! · Linear fragile nano-tendrils! · Increased unipolar arcing! · Likely higher net erosion and W dust production

  3. Nanotechnology Today 2010: NanoReg & Keller and Heckman Announce Continuation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Nanotechnology Today 2010: NanoReg & Keller and Heckman Announce Continuation of Popular Nanotechnology Webinar Series Building on last year's popular webinars on the regulation of nanotechnology, Keller and Heckman & NanoReg are pleased to announce Nanotechnology Today 2010, a series of four new

  4. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  5. Optimization of Nano-Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Sorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakobson, Boris I [Rice University

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Research undertaken has added to the understanding of several critical areas, by providing both negative answers (and therefore eliminating expensive further studies of unfeasible paths) and positive feasible options for storage. Theoretical evaluation of the early hypothesis of storage on pure carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNT) has been scrutinized with the use of comprehensive computational methods (and experimental tests by the Center partners), and demonstrated that the fundamentally weak binding energy of hydrogen is not sufficiently enhanced by the SWNT curvature or even defects, which renders carbon nanotubes not practical media. More promising direction taken was towards 3-dimensional architectures of high porosity where concurrent attraction of H2 molecule to surrounding walls of nano-scale cavities can double or even triple the binding energy and therefore make hydrogen storage feasible even at ambient or somewhat lower temperatures. An efficient computational tool has been developed for the rapid capacity assessment combining (i) carbon-foam structure generation, (ii) accurate empirical force fields, with quantum corrections for the lightweight H2, and (iii) grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. This made it possible to suggest optimal designs for carbon nanofoams, obtainable via welding techniques from SWNT or by growth on template-zeolites. As a precursor for 3D-foams, we have investigated experimentally the synthesis of VANTA (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays). This can be used for producing nano-foams. On the other hand, fluorination of VANTA did not show promising increase of hydrogen sorption in several tests and may require further investigation and improvements. Another significant result of this project was in developing a fundamental understanding of the elements of hydrogen spillover mechanisms. The benefit of developed models is the ability to foresee possible directions for further improvement of the spillover mechanism.

  6. Particle-size and morphology dependence of the preferred interface orientation in LiFePO4 nano-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Particle-size and morphology dependence of the preferred interface orientation in LiFePO4 nano insights into the equilibrium properties and potential two-phase lithiation mechanisms in LiFePO4 nano, if experimentally-relevant nano-particles were to (de)lithiate under a thermodynamic two-phase mechanism

  7. NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE AIDS DEVELOPMENT OF NEW THERAPEUTICS Horacio D. Espinosa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE AIDS DEVELOPMENT OF NEW THERAPEUTICS Horacio D. Espinosa, Department a novel nanoscale fluid delivery probe, called the Nano Fountain Probe, which enables studies to a dispensing tip. The Nano Fountain Probe has proven capable of delivering a variety of functional materials

  8. 4.3 CURRENT DIVERSE, GLOBALLY-ORIENTED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING WORKFORCE 4.3.1 ALL SCOUT NANO EVENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.3 CURRENT DIVERSE, GLOBALLY-ORIENTED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING WORKFORCE 4.3.1 ALL SCOUT NANO EVENT Zurich, IL, the NSEC hosted the first Boy Scout Nano Event in 2003. In 2005, the annual event with nearly 100 scouts and venturing crew members attended the event. The annual "All Scout Nano Event

  9. Micro-and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXMNEXAFS spectromicroscopy assessment of microbial carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Micro- and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXM­NEXAFS spectromicroscopy- and nano-C sequestration environments, and conduct submicron-level investigation of the compositional chem demonstrated the existence of spatially distinct seemingly terminal micro- and nano-C repository zones, where

  10. Nano/Microfluidics for diagnosis of infectious diseases in developing countries Won Gu Lee a,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirci, Utkan

    Nano/Microfluidics for diagnosis of infectious diseases in developing countries Won Gu Lee a,b,1 history: Received 15 June 2009 Accepted 14 September 2009 Available online 30 November 2009 Keywords: Nano/Microfluidics Infectious diseases HIV/AIDS Point-of-care Diagnostics Global health Nano/Microfluidic technologies

  11. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Brownsboro, AL); Antony, Leo V. M. (Huntsville, AL); O'Dell, Scott (Arab, AL); Power, Chris (Guntersville, AL); Tabor, Terry (Huntsville, AL)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  12. Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tankeshwar, K., E-mail: tankesh@pu.ac.in [Computer Centre, Panjab University Chandigarh,- 160014 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

  13. Nano-Composite Arsenic Sorbent - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNREL inNano

  14. Los Alamos shares Nano 50 award for directed assembly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceedsScientists monitorNano 50 award

  15. NanoBright Technologies Pte Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNance County,WasteNanoBright

  16. NanoMas Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNanceNanoMas Technologies Inc

  17. Stabilized Spinel and Nano Olivine Cathodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpring O&M Users GroupStabilitySpinel and Nano

  18. Thermal conductivity of self-assembled nano-structured ZnO bulk ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yu [Bio-Inspired Materials and Devices Laboraory (BMDL); Yan, Yongke [Bio-Inspired Materials and Devices Laboraory (BMDL); Kumar, Ashok [Bio-Inspired Materials and Devices Laboraory (BMDL); Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we describe the changes in thermal conductivity behavior of ZnO-Al micro- and nano-two-phase self-assembled composites with varying grain sizes. The reduction in thermal conductivity values of micro-composites was limited to {approx}15% for ZnO-4% Al. However, nano-composites exhibited large reduction, by a factor of about three, due to uniform distribution of nano-precipitates (ZnAl2O4) and large grain boundary area. Interestingly, the micro-composites revealed continuous decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in Al substitution while the nano-composites exhibited the lowest magnitudes for 2% Al concentration. Raman spectra indicated that phonon confinement in ZnO-Al nano-composites causes drastic decrease in the value of thermal conductivity.

  19. Radioactive ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  20. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.