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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

Even, William R. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, David J. (Livermore, CA); Irvin, Jennifer A. (Livermore, CA); Tarver, Edward E. (Livermore, CA); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Wang, James C. F. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The many faces of ion-exchange resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion-exchange resins have been used commercially for over 60 years. Softening and demineralization of water for boiler feed and process use were then, and continue to be, the most familiar and widespread applications of ion-exchange resins throughout the chemical process industries (CPI). Several types of membrane-based technologies, such as electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and, more recently, electrodeionization are recognized as alternative methods for water treatment. Yet, modern versions of ion-exchange resins remain a major player in water treatment. In addition, these versatile materials can be found performing a wide range of tasks in both aqueous and nonaqueous environments. Some of these diverse applications include: acid or base catalysis; manufacture of high-purity solvents and reagent chemicals; separation of by-products of fermentation processes; deacidification of organic solvents; high-purity water production for semiconductor manufacture; recovery of valuable waste from dilute process effluents; controlled release of pharmaceutical products; and chromatography, both on the analytical and the industrial scale. The key to understanding the potential of ion-exchange resins is to look beyond their exchange and adsorptive characteristics, and to see their fundamental nature. In other words, it`s necessary to first consider them as spherical, particulate reactive polymers that perform chemical reactions.

McNutty, J.T. [Rohm and Haas Co., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Investigating the Use of Ion Exchange Resins for Processing Biodiesel Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion exchange resins, commonly used in water treatment, demonstrate promise for the production of biodiesel from biomass feedstocks. The goal of this presented PhD research is to investigate novel uses of ion exchange resins for processing biodiesel...

Jamal, Yousuf 1973-

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, regeneration, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; food processing; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Methods are included for the processing of spent ion exchange resins and for protecting ion exchange resins from oxidation and chemical degradation. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ion exchange resins. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment, chemical recovery, separation, purification, catalysis, desalination, and ore treatment. Regeneration and disposal of ion exchange resins are also covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

18

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

Veazey, G.W. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Ames, R.L. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modification of Malonamide Ion-Exchange/Chelating Resins Using the Fields–Kabatschnik Reaction and Their Application to Metal Ion Removal from Aqueous Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A resin containing 2-aminoethyl-substituted amides of malonic acid was modified in the Fields–Kabatschnik reaction using diethyl phosphite. The resultant ion-exchange/chelating resins have aminomethylphosphona...

Andrzej W. Trochimczuk; Julia Jezierska

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below 100 C. In addition, the calculation results demonstrate that the cooling tube system external to an air-filled column is not highly effective at reducing the maximum temperature, but the baseline design using a central cooling tube inside the column provides sufficient cooling to maintain the maximum temperature near the assumed safety limit.

Lee, S.; King, W.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Using Process Knowledge to Manage Disposal Classification of Ion-Exchange Resin - 13566  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been previously shown by EPRI [1] that Class B and C resins represent a small portion by volume of the overall generation of radioactively contaminated resins. In fact, if all of the resins were taken together the overall classification would meet Class A disposal requirements. Lowering the classification of the ion exchange resins as they are presented for disposal provides a path for minimizing the amount of waste stored. Currently there are commercial options for blending wastes from various generators for Class A disposal in development. The NRC may have by this time introduced changes and clarifications to the Branch Technical Position (BTP) on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation [2] that may ultimately add more flexibility to what can be done at the plant level. The BTP has always maintained that mixtures of resins that are combined for ALARA purposes or operational efficiency can be classified on the basis of the mixture. This is a point often misinterpreted and misapplied. This paper will address options that can be exercised by the generator that can limit B and C waste generation by more rigorous tracking of generation and taking advantage of the normal mix of wastes. This can be achieved through the monitoring of reactor coolant chemistry data and coupled with our knowledge of radionuclide production mechanisms. This knowledge can be used to determine the overall accumulation of activity in ion-exchange resins and provides a 'real-time' waste classification determination of the resin and thereby provide a mechanism to reduce the production of waste that exceeds class A limits. It should be noted that this alternative approach, although rarely used in a nuclear power plant setting, is acknowledged in the original BTP on classification [3] as a viable option for determining radionuclide inventories for classification of waste. Also included is a discussion of an examination performed at the Byron plant to estimate radionuclide content in the final waste stream from upstream sampling of reactor coolant and fuel pool water. (authors)

Bohnsack, Jonathan N.; James, David W. [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)] [DW James Consulting, LLC 855 Village Center Drive No. 330 North Oaks, MN 55127 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Investigation of the ion exchange equilibrium between NA+, Ca++, Mg++, and a sulfonated polystyrene resin at various concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATiON OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN Na , Ca++, Mg++, AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN AT VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS A THESIS BY WILLIAM FRANKLIN McILHENNY Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical... College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1958 MaJor Subject: Chemical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE ION EXCHANGE EQUILIBRIUM BFTWEEN Na+, Ca++ Mg++ AND A SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE RESIN...

McIlhenny, William Franklin

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste with sRF resin and the tests clearly demonstrated cesium decontamination for actual waste. The results of the column tests were similar for both the simulated and the actual waste and demonstrated Cs removal with sRF from both wastes. For a flowrate of 1.4 bed volumes (BV)/hour at 25 C those results with sRF resin were: (1) Simulant and actual waste results are equivalent; (2) Cs breakthrough began between 200 and 250 BV; (3) Cs breakthrough reached 100% at around 400 BV; (4) Cs breakthrough curve from 5% to 100% is approximately linear; (5) Cs elution with 0.5 M HNO3 starts at 2 BV and ends at 6BV; (6) Most, if not all, of Cs adsorbed during treatment is released during elution; (7) At 100% breakthrough of Cs the resin bed adsorbs approximately 85% of full capacity before detection in the effluent; the remaining 15% is adsorbed at saturation; (8) Approximately 90% of resin bed changes (color and volume) are complete by 6 BV; and (9) During elution the resin shrinks to about 80% of its fully working (sodium form) BV.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radioactive wastewater treatment using a mixture of TANNIX sorbent and VARION mixed bed ion exchange resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wastewater treatment system has been developed by using a mixture of ammonium-insoluble tannin (TANNIX, this is the trademark of an adsorbent made by Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd) and mixed (strong acid cation exchanger and strong base anion exchanger) ion exchange resin (MIX) for the selective separation of transuranium isotopes, including Pu, Am, Cm, and U, as well as fission and radioactive corrosion products from boric acid solution (pH ? 4.1). The equilibrium and fixed bed sorption experiments resulted in Kd values of 104â??105 ml/g, and decontamination factors of 1,000, with a breakthrough point between 1500 BV and 5000 BV of accumulated volume.

G. Patzay; P. Tilky; J. Schunk; T. Pinter; F. Feil; K. Hamaguchi; L. Weiser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Continuous alpha-amylase production using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens adsorbed on an ion exchange resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the continuous production of extracellular alpha amylase by surface immobilized cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens...NRC 2147 has been developed. A large-pore, macroreticular anionic exchange resin ...

Carl A. Groom; Andrew J. Daugulis…

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural efficiently catalyzed by acidic ion-exchange resin in ionic liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficient dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was developed in ionic liquids (ILs) with acidic ion-exchange resins as catalyst. By screening different resins and \\{ILs\\} respectively, it was found that the structure of resins and \\{ILs\\} had a prominent effect on the dehydration of fructose. In 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl), D001-cc resin showed a high activity. And then the effects of reaction temperatures, dosages of D001-cc, and different initial fructose loadings on the dehydration of fructose were studied in detail. The system of D001-cc resin and [Bmim]Cl exhibited a constant activity at 75 °C for 20 min and a 86.2% yield of HMF was obtained after seven recycles. At 75 °C for 20 min, a 93.0% yield of HMF from the dehydration of fructose was obtained.

Yuan Li; Hui Liu; Changhua Song; Xiaomin Gu; Huaming Li; Wenshuai Zhu; Sheng Yin; Changri Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Eco-friendly preparation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from sucrose using ion-exchange resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An efficient preparation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from sucrose, a renewable resource, is reported herein, following a sequence of four steps catalyzed by reusable cation- and anion-exchange resins: hydrolysis, dehydration, glucose/fructose isomerisation and dehydration. The title compound, a key building block in current industrial chemistry, was isolated in its pure form without chromatographic purification in an overall yield of 50%.

Javier Pérez-Maqueda; Irene Arenas-Ligioiz; Óscar López; José G. Fernández-Bolaños

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation, and return of resin for regeneration.

Nesham, Dean O. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ivarson, Kristine A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, James P. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Charles W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Meyers, P. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Jaschke, Naomi M. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

Arora, Michelle B. (Woodridge, IL); Hestekin, Jamie A. (Morton Grove, IL); Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); St. Martin, Edward J. (Libertyville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Selective Conversion of D-Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Ion-Exchange Resin in Acetone/Dimethyl sulfoxide Solvent Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective Conversion of D-Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Ion-Exchange Resin in Acetone/Dimethyl sulfoxide Solvent Mixtures ... Catalytic dehydration of D-fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in acetone/dimethyl sulfoxide solvent mixtures was studied in the presence of a strong acidic cation-exchange resin catalyst (DOWEX 50WX8?100) by microwave heating. ... For example, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), which is used in plastics, pharmaceuticals, and fine chemicals, is presently derived from petrochemicals but could be substituted by its biomass-derived counterpart. ...

Xinhua Qi; Masaru Watanabe; Taku M. Aida; Richard Lee Smith, Jr.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

Hamm, L.L.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Optimization of Cesium Removal from Hanford Envelope A Simulant with SuperLig 639 Ion Exchange Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford RadioactiveWaste materials have been categorized into four envelopes labeled A through D as specified in the Tank Waste Remediation Contract between BNFL and DOE. 1 Envelopes A, B and C contain only solubilized species and are specified as Low-Activity Waste (LAW). Each envelope is defined based on compositional maximums of chemical and radioactive constituents. Envelopes A and B contain low concentrations of organic species and the primary form of technetium is pertechnetate (TcO4-). Envelope C contains higher levels of organic species and technetium which is primarily in the nonpertechnetate form (presumably complexed TcO2). Envelope D is sludge which has been separated from the supernate and is referred to as High Activity Waste. The current plant design utilizes SuperLig ion exchange resins to remove cesium and technetium (the primary radioactive constituents) from the Hanford LAW. The process is designed to produce a decontaminated waste stream and a concentrated eluate waste stream for vitrification into low and high activity glasses, respectively.

King, W.D.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

Maya, L.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM 99 FROM THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) BASIN 44 USING PUROLITE A-530E & REILLEX HPQ & SYBRON IONAC SR-7 ION EXCHANGE RESINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP-20407. The overall goal of this task was to evaluate and compare candidate anion exchange resins for their capacity to remove Technetium-99 from Basin 44 Reverse Osmosis reject stream. The candidate resins evaluated were Purolite A-530E, Reillex HPQ, and Sybron IONAC SR-7.

DUNCAN JB

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the loss of barium be correlated with the resin's ability to selectively complex sulfate, then maintaining even the current limited resin characteristics for sulfate complexation over multiple cycles becomes questionable.

DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fractionation of NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 brines with a polyfunctional ion exchange resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

softening, demineralizat1on, or sim1lar processes in which the objective is to remove undesirable 1ons. Ion exchange as a separation technique, that 1s, the recovery of two or more 1ons, has become 1ncreas1ngly important. Mayer and Tompk1ns (12.... Phys. 20, 1657 (1952). 11. McIlhenny, W. F. , M. S. Thesis, Texas A. and M. College (1958). 12 . Mayer, S. W. , Tompkins, E. R. , J. Am. Chem. Soc . 69, 2866 ( 1947) 1$. Nachod, F. C. , Schubert, J. , Ion Exchange Technolo Academic Press, N ew York...

Baker, Albert Byre

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

Laurinat, J

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ion exchange polymers for anion separations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ion exchange polymers for anion separations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Marsh, S. Fredric (Los Alamos, NM); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A kinetic model for ion exchange between cesium and sodium using silico-titanates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over this entire range of pH. This unique characteristic makes the TAMS material desirable. Two other available organic ion exchangers (carboxylic acid based resin and resorcinol formaldehyde resin) show some capability for cesium removal; however... et al. (1947) used this method successfully to predict their data with the phenol-formaldehyde resinous exchanger, Amberlite IR-1. Similarly, Nachod and Wood (1944) and Turse and Rieman (1961) found their data fitted quite well on both zeolites...

Nguyen, Luan Thanh

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Copper Removal from A-01 Outfall by Ion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chelex100, a commercially available ion exchange resin, has been identified in this study as having a significant affinity for copper and zinc in the A-01 outfall water. Removal of copper and zinc from A-01 outfall water will ensure that the outfall meets the state of South Carolina's limit on these heavy metals.

Oji, L.N.

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ion Exchange Media for Reduction of Liquid Radwaste in Commercial Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange resins currently make up as much as one-half of all radioactive waste generated by commercial nuclear power plants. A major challenge is reduction of the quantity of ion exchange media requiring disposal. Although the amount of spent ion exchange resins disposed has decreased year after year, a new urgency has arisen with the pending closure of a major disposal site in 2008. This paper explores whether ion exchange resins also can be used to potentially reduce radioactive liquid waste volumes and / or limit them to Class A wastes only. Source term reduction and minimization of manpower exposure to radioactivity are other important goals. Specialty ion exchange products may help to achieve source term reduction of certain radionuclides. Some established operations, data, and process concepts are presented to address these critical issues encountered in liquid radwaste management. (authors)

Yarnell, P.A. [Graver Technologies, LLC, Glasgow, DE (United Kingdom); Tavares, A. [Graver Technologies, LLC, Newark, NJ (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

REMOVING RADIUM-226 ION EXCHANGE RESINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. M. R. Collins Department of Civil Engineering - University of New Hampshire Funded by: United States for Radionuclides · 1962 US Public Health Services DWS ­ 3 pCi/L Radium 226 · 1977 USEPA National Interim Prim. DWS Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center (WTTAC

58

Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Morphology of Ion Exchange Membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the HjO,- treatment of the ion exchange...and rinsed with water. After drying...Determined in sea water at 25 C by electrodialysis. Fig. 2. Neosepta...with deionized water, treated with...prepared by the treatment of the cation......

Yoshikazu HORI; Toru NAKATANI; Yukio MIZUTANI

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Ion exchange technology in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater at Fernald  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using pump and treat methodology, uranium contaminated groundwater is being removed from the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) per the FEMP Record of Decision (ROD) that defines groundwater cleanup. Standard extraction wells pump about 3900 gallons-per-minute (gpm) from the aquifer through five ion exchange treatment systems. The largest treatment system k the Advanced Wastewater Treatment (AWWT) Expansion System with a capacity of 1800 gpm, which consists of three trains of two vessels. The trains operate in parallel treating 600 gpm each, The two vessels in each train operate in series, one in lead and one in lag. Treated groundwater is either reinfected back into the aquifer to speed up the aquifer cleanup processor discharged to the Great Miami River. The uranium regulatory ROD limit for discharge to the river is 20 parts per billion (ppb), and the FEMP uranium administrative action level for reinfection is 10 ppb. Spent (i.e., a resin that no longer adsorbs uranium) ion exchange resins must either be replaced or regenerated. The regeneration of spent ion exchange resins is considerably more cost effective than their replacement. Therefore, a project was undertaken to learn how best to regenerate the resins in the groundwater vessels. At the outset of this project, considerable uncertainty existed as to whether a spent resin could be regenerated successfully enough so that it performed as well as new resin relative to achieving very low uranium concentrations in the effluent. A second major uncertain y was whether the operational lifetime of a regenerated resin would be similar to that of a new resin with respect to uranium loading capacity and effluent concentration behavior. The project was successful in that a method for regenerating resins has been developed that is operationally efficient, that results in regenerated resins yielding uranium concentrations much lower than regulatory limits, and that results in regenerated resins with operational lifetimes comparable to new resins.

Chris Sutton; Cathy Glassmeyer; Steve Bozich

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ion exchange purification of scandium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nanoparticle-crosslinked hydrogels as a class of efficient materials for separation and ion exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dye from a mixture of cationic and anionic dyes. These ion-exchange properties are driven the gel matrix. A comparison of the nanostructured gel with a typical cation-exchange resin (polystyrene the shrinking property of NIPA gels when heated. Additionally, we demonstrate the disassembly of Laponite

Raghavan, Srinivasa

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - anion-exchange resin technique Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Chemistry 39 9 Treatment of Metal-Bearing Effluents: Removal and Summary: anions are called anion exchangers. The ion exchange function of a...

64

Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

B. Widman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene spacer between the two sites. Here the authors examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatives with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

Marsh, S.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bartsch, R.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Discovery and Early Development of Non-Suppressed Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contained resins that were...significantly lower exchange capacity than the older ion exchangers...tional resins of that time...needed. In addition, the extent...was a vivid demonstration of the value...Although the XAD resins were neutral...derivatized to form ion exchangers...of varying exchange capacity......

James S. Fritz; Douglas T. Gjerde

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Literature Review of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde for Cesium Ion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current report summarizes work performed throughout the scientific community and DOE complex as reported in the open literature and DOE-sponsored reports to evaluate the Cs+ ion exchange (CIX) characteristics of SRF resin. King (2007) completed a similar literature review in support of material selection for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project. Josephson et al. (2010) and Sams et al. (2009) provided a similar brief review of SRF CIX for the near-tank Cs+ removal (NTCR) project. Thorson (2008a) documented the basis for recommending SRF over SuperLigTM 644 as the primary CIX resin in the WTP. The current review expands on previous work, summarizes additional work completed to date, and provides a broad view of the literature without focusing on a specific column system. Although the focus of the current review is the SRF resin, many cited references include multiple materials such as the non-spherical GGRF and SuperLigTM 644 organic resins and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IONSIVTM IE-911, a non-elutable inorganic material. This report summarizes relevant information provided in the literature.

Brown, Garrett N.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Anion Exchange Resins for the Selective Separation of Technetium from Uranium in Carbonate Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(8) The recovered 99Tc can subsequently be converted to metal or into other waste forms suitable for long-term storage or geological disposal. ... Anion exchange resins have been shown to be viable candidates for removing TcO4– from acidic solutions, from groundwater, and also from caustic solutions such as Hanford tank wastes (where the U has been largely removed using the PUREX process). ... The 1st 4 terms describe the contribution to retention from neutral components of solutes, and the 5th term represents the contribution to retention from solute's ionization. ...

Kristy M. Long; George S. Goff; Stuart D. Ware; Gordon D. Jarvinen; Wolfgang H. Runde

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

Continuous biodiesel production from acidic oil using a combination of cation- and anion-exchange resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A continuous process was developed to produce biodiesel from acidic oil containing soybean oil and oleic acid, which combined esterification by cation-exchange resin NKC-9, online separation and transesterification by anion-exchange resin D261. The esterification was carried out with soybean oil/oleic acid weight ratio of 5/5, methanol to oleic acid weight ratio of 1.5/1, reaction temperature of 338 K and residence time of 126.6 min. After the reaction, the mixture was settled to online separate into two layers, and the methanol–water–oleic acid mixture at the top layer was reclaimed. The bottom layer, mainly containing soybean oil and methyl oleate, was transesterified under methanol/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/3 and n-hexane/soybean oil weight ratio of 1/2 at 323 K for the residence time of 112.0 min. The high conversions of oleic acid (above 98%) and soybean oil (92.3%) were achieved. The yield of biodiesel in this process reached up to 95.1%. The main parameters of the product met the Chinese Standard of biodiesel.

Benqiao He; Yixuan Shao; Yanbiao Ren; Jianxin Li; Yu Cheng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

New ion exchangers and solvent extractants for pre-analysis separation of actinides. Annual report, June 1982-May 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to radiochemical determination of actinide elements such as uranium, neptunium and plutonium, an ion exchange or solvent extraction method is often employed to separate these from themselves and other interfering elements. In order to improve the separation efficiency and reduce time, cost, and liquid waste of analytical separation methods, new and better ion exchangers and solvent extractants are under evaluation. New microreticular and macroreticular anion exchange resins and bifunctional organophosphorus solvent extractants have been evaluated for uranium, neptunium and plutonium separations. Previous work comparing numerous anion exchange resins has shown the macroreticular Amberlite IRA-938 resin as having the highest actinide capacity and best elution kinetics. Recent studies have confirmed the resin has advantages over others for Pu-U separations. Work at Rocky Flats on bifunctional organophosphorus solvent extractants for the recovery and purification of actinides has led to the identification of several new separation systems applicable for radiochemical analysis. Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP), its dibutyl analog DBDECMP, and DHDECMP-tributylphosphate (TBP) using liquid-liquid or extraction chromatography techniques are applicable for plutonium-americium and plutonium separations. Both DHDECMP and DBDECMP extract actinides strongly, extract lanthanides, iron, gallium, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, zirconium partially, and do not extract most other elements from 5 to 7M nitric acid. With the DHDECMP-TBP and DBDECMP-TBP systems, synergistic effects have been observed for both plutonium and americium. The chemistry and application for pre-analysis separations of these solvent extraction systems are described. 11 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

Navratil, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Organosilicon ion-exchange and complexing adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the ion-exchange and complexing organosilicon adsorbents published during the last 10–12 years, including the results of systematic research of the authors, are summarized and analyzed. The following types of substances are considered: silicas with covalently grafted modifiers, silicas and aluminosilicates with non-covalently grafted modifiers and carbofunctional polyorganylsilsesquioxanes prepared by polycondensation of appropriate organosilicon monomers. Adsorbents of these types find extensive practical use, in particular, as analytical reagents for determination of metals in natural and artificial specimens, agents for isolation of valuable elements from industrial wastes and agents for removal of especially hazardous components from wastes and effluents. The bibliography includes 109 references.

N N Vlasova; E N Oborina; O Yu Grigoryeva; Mikhail G Voronkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, may serve as a means for purifying industrial wastewaters that contain toxic heavy metal ions heavy metals often through ion exchange. This biosorption can be used for purification of metalModeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption S I L K E S C H I E W E R A N D B O H U M I L V O

Volesky, Bohumil

78

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Heavy metals removal from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this research, ion exchange textiles were used for the first time for the removal of heavy metals from oil sludge. The target metals which… (more)

Muslat, Ziyad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Weakly-Basic Anion Exchange Resin Scavenges Impurities in Ionic Liquid Synthesized from Trialkyloxonium Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lewis acidic parts of these impurities, that is, H+ and BF3, were demonstrated to be able to transfer to dimethylamino groups of the weakly basic anion exchange resin (DOWEX MARATHON WBA) in aqueous solutions, releasing 1-methylimidazole (mim). ... Although intense reddish brown color was given to the residual oil of [emim]BF4, further purification and decolorization have been achieved by using silica-gel column chromatography (eluent: acetone) and treatment with activated carbon in water. ... The detection and determination of [emim]+, mim, [Hmim]+, [BF3(mim)], and BF4– in the recovered oils and collected volatiles from each batch were performed by using chemical shifts and peak integrals in the 1H and 19F NMR spectra. ...

Koichiro Takao; Taro Tsubomura

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid exchange resins Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 38 2114 J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2114-2180 FKN mechanism of the BZ reaction (expanded "Oregonator") Summary: resin. A thin layer of ferroin-loaded resin beads covered...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic ion exchange Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gina M. Canfield,a Summary: and other zeolites tend to exchange hydronium ions from hydro- lyzed water or from acidic hydrated metal... Sodalite ion exchange in polyethylene...

83

Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes and method for preparing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes include a microporous polymeric support film interpenetrated by an ion exchange polymer and are produced by absorbing and polymerizing monomers within the support film. The ion exchange polymer provides ion exchange ligands at the surface of and throughout the support film which have sufficient ligand mobility to extract and transport ions across the membrane.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Danesi, Pier R. (Vienna, AT); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ion exchange as a tertiary treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that these treatment methods are capable of removing an appreciable amount of objection? able dissolved organic and inorganic materi aJ s from the final effluent. Color and turbidity were greatly reduced and an appreciable amount of the suspended solids were... Demand Re Resin A General Anion mg. /1. MLVSS psi gpm Milligrams per I. iter Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids Pounds per Square Inch Gallons per Minute. mm Mi llimeters kgr meq ml Kilogram Milliequilavent Millimeter S. S. BV...

Westervelt, Ronald David

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Inorganic ion exchange evaluation and design: Silicotitanate ion exchange waste conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange materials are being evaluated for removing Cs, SR from tank waste. Thermal conversion of a variety of compositions within the Cs{sub 2}O-TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} phase diagram yielded both glass and crystalline materials, some of which show low leach rates and negligible Cs losses during heat treatment. A new material, CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}, with a structure isomorphous to pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}) has been identified. This material represents a new class of crystalline zeolite materials which contain large amounts of titanium. Direct conversion of Cs loaded silicotitanate ion exchangers to CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is an excellent alternative to dissolving the Cs-loaded or Cs-eluted exchangers in borosilicate glass because: CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed using a simple, one step heat treatment. The unique crystalline pollucite-like structure of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} traps Cs, and exhibits extremely low Cs leach rates. CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is converted to solid waste at a low processing temperature of 700 to 800 C (nominal melter operating temperatures are 1150 C). CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6} concentrates the waste, thus generating lower volumes of expensive HLW. Cs losses due to volatilization during processing of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} are extremely low.

Balmer, M.L.; Bunker, B.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and bounding results for the maximum temperatures achievable using the current baseline column design. This information will assist in SCIX design and facility maintenance.

Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Desalination of brackish waters using ion-exchange media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of around 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x}+2yAl{sub x}Si{sub 1}-xO{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of around to 2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = similar to 11 000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, J.D.; Philips, M.L.F.; Voigt, J.A.; Moore, D.; Axness, M.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Nenoff, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Desalination of brackish waters using ion exchange media.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of {approx} 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x+2y}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of {approx}2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = {approx}11,000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, Jason D.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ion exchange phase transitions in "doped" water--filled channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion transport through narrow water--filled channels is impeded by a high electrostatic barrier. The latter originates from the large ratio of the dielectric constants of the water and a surrounding media. We show that ``doping'', i.e. immobile charges attached to the walls of the channel, substantially reduces the barrier. This explains why most of the biological ion channels are ``doped''. We show that at rather generic conditions the channels may undergo ion exchange phase transitions (typically of the first order). Upon such a transition a finite latent concentration of ions may either enter or leave the channel, or be exchanged between the ions of different valences. We discuss possible implications of these transitions for the Ca-vs.-Na selectivity of biological Ca channels. We also show that transport of divalent Ca ions is assisted by their fractionalization into two separate excitations.

J. Zhang; A. Kamenev; B. I. Shklovskii

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Radiation effects on a zeolite ion exchanger and a pollucite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cation exchange capacity and selective Cs and Sr ion sorption measurements were found to be too insensitive to detect radiation effects on irradiated Ionsiv-IE-95 zeolite. However, leaching the zeolite while under ..gamma..-irradiation caused a modest increase in the desorption of exchangeable ions. Gamma-irradiation and subsequent leaching of a natural pollucite also slightly enhanced the leachability of this material. The increased desorption of ions from the zeolite and the enhanced leachability of the pollucite are apparently caused by a decrease in pH due to the generation of acidic species during irradiation.

Komarneni, S.; Palau, G.L.; Pillay, K.K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ION EXCHANGE PERFORMANCE OF TITANOSILICATES, GERMANATES AND CARBON NANOTUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of testing the affinity of titanosilicates (TSP), germanium-substituted titanosilicates (Ge-TSP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solution. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable to concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions. This technical report serves as the deliverable documenting completion of the FY13 research milestone, M4FT-13SR0303061 – measure actinide and lanthanide distribution values in nitric acid solutions with sodium and potassium titanosilicate materials.

Alsobrook, A.; Hobbs, D.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ion exchange performance of commercial crystalline silicotitanates for cesium removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na{sup +}. The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. Together, the high selectivity and stability of the CSTs made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia National Laboratories and UOP have teamed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by the Sandia and Texas A&M team consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications.

Braun, R.; Dangieri, T.J.; Fennelly, D.J. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Microsoft Word - Nano-sized Ion Exchange Particles.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential AIKEN, S.C. (January 30, 2012) - Sometimes bigger isn't better. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory have successfully shown that they can replace useful little particles of monosodium titanate (MST) with even tinier nano-sized particles, making them even more useful for a variety of applications. MST is an ion exchange material used to decontaminate radioactive and industrial wastewater solutions, and has been shown to be an effective way to deliver metals into living cells for some types of medical treatment. Typically, MST, and a modified form known as mMST developed by SRNL and Sandia National Laboratories, are in the form of fine powders, spherically-shaped particles about 1 to 10 microns in diameter

94

CO adsorption on ion-exchanged Ru zeolite catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO adsorption on ion-exchanged Ru zeolite catalysts, studied by IR spectroscopy, revealed the existence of three types of ruthenium which adsorbed the carbon monoxide into three different states. The ruthenium types were atomically or highly dispersed ruthenium, ruthenium clusters which formed ruthenium carbonyl, and larger (> 1 nm) particles, probably on the outer zeolite surfaces.

Goodwin, J.G. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Naccache, G.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ion Exchange Membrane Cathodes for Scalable Microbial Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ion Exchange Membrane Cathodes for Scalable Microbial Fuel Cells ... The optimum amount of graphite fibers needed for these brush electrodes has not yet been optimized, and the cathode remains the greatest challenge for MFC designs. ... Different catalyst locations (inside versus outside) and loadings, specific surface areas, and solution chemistry (solution conductivity) were examined to optimize performance. ...

Yi Zuo; Shaoan Cheng; Bruce E. Logan

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

96

The adsorption and desorption of picloram, trifluralin, and paraquat by ionic and nonionic exchange resins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!'i?i mi ried by r 1 nsing the ! reat- i ii res lies is i J. . h var Locis . -; 0 lvent s . Where l 1'ice cheer os exi. sted bct . veen Lhe r csin encl herbicide, small amounts of herbicide were adsorbed and where unlike charges were involved..., relatively l. arge amounts &&ere adsorbed. Also, where no cou- lo& rb ic 6 oz!. . er; z!!ere presenL on tin& part of 1 izc-. 1 e sizz 01 her bi& i de, rein&. i v ly 1 arge a!nount s were ads!? bc d. '1'he aniozzic resin (Cl -for&a) adsorbed 375, 0. 08...

McCall, Homer Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electrodeposition of microparticles on polarized ion exchange membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of ion exchange membranes to extract microparticles from an aqueous solution is considered. The efficiency of removing negatively charged aerosil particles depends substantially on the nature of the membrane located at the anode. It has been established that besides an increase in the electric field intensity the principal factor ensuring an increase in the efficiency of purifying a solution by electrodeposition of microparticles on a membrane surface is a reduction in the flowrate relative to the membrane surface.

Verbich, S.V.; Ponomarev, M.I.; Grebenyuk, V.D.; Dukhin, S.S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ion-Exchange Membranes in the Chemical Process Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Other applications of ion-exchange membranes are still in an early state of their development, such as the redox flow battery. ... (40) More recently, interest in electrodialysis as a flow battery has increased and will be briefly discussed in the following. ... One is based on a reversal of regular electrodialysis and is referred to as “concentration flow battery”,(40) and the other is based on reversal of electrodialysis with bipolar membranes and is referred to as “neutralization flow battery”. ...

Heiner Strathmann; Andrej Grabowski; Gerhart Eigenberger

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

Separation and Detection of Sulfur-Containing Anions Using Single-Column Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......derivatized. With the resin-based column...states or complex ions. Sulfide is...Systems with resin-based anion exchange (RBAX) columns...for which ion-exchange H...detectors. In addition to electrical...since its early demonstration. It has been......

Richard E. Poulson; Harry M. Borg

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced Resin Cleaning System (ARCS) at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam generation system in-core components can undergo serious material degradation by a variety of corrosion-related phenomena. These phenomena are largely controlled by boiler water (i.e. reactor water) chemistry which is strongly impacted by the performance of the condensate system mixed bed ion exchange units. In Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), the mixed bed ion exchange units not only provide protection from ionic contaminants, but also remove insoluble corrosion products by filtration/adsorption. These insoluble corrosion products removed by the ion exchange units must then be periodically cleaned from the resin bed by some process external to the BWR primary water loop. A unique resin cleaning process called the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} (ARCS) was developed in the late 1980`s by members of CENTEC-XXI, located in Santa Clara, CA. This system, which has been successfully operated for several years at a Pressurized Water Reactor is highly efficient for removal of both insoluble corrosion products and anion/cation resin fines, and generates significantly less waste water than other cleaning methods. The ARCS was considered the most attractive method for meeting the demanding and costly resin cleaning needs of a BWR. A {open_quotes}Tailored Collaboration{close_quotes} project was initiated between EPRI, Entergy Operations (Grand Gulf Station), and CENTEC-XXI to demonstrate the {open_quotes}Advanced Resin Cleaning System{close_quotes} in a BWR.

Asay, R.H.; Earls, J.E.; Naughton, M.D. [Centec 21, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electrically switched cesium ion exchange. FY 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrochemical method for metal ion separations, called Electrically Switched Ion Exchange, is described. Direct oxidation and reduction of an electroactive film attached to an electrode surface is used to load and unload the film with alkali metal cations. The electroactive films under investigation are Ni hexacyanoferrates, which are deposited on the surface by applying an anodic potential to a Ni electrode in a solution containing the ferricyanide anion. Reported film preparation procedures were modified to produce films with improved capacity and stability. Electrochemical behavior of the derivatized electrodes were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The films show selectivity for Cs in concentrated sodium solutions. Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in oxidation state of the film and imaging experiments have demonstrated that the redox reactions are spatially homogenous across the film. Requirements for a bench scale unit were identified.

Lilga, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Sukamto, J.P.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schwartz, D.T.; Haight, S.M. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Genders, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Water softening by single-bowl ion exchange filter efficiency estimate and improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The article presents results of experimental investigations of the water softener in a laboratory installation of uninterruptible countercurrent ion exchange filter, which has a movable layer of ion exchange material. The installation provides for two simultaneous processes: counter ion sorption and regeneration of the sorbent with the processing capability of the sorbent in the regeneration zone by ultrasonic radiation.

Kostygin, V A; Kochetov, G M; Tugay, A M; Vashchenko, V N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Technology Innovation and Development Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development November 11, 2011 Small Column Ion Exchange Program Technology Readiness Assessment Page 2 of 112 This page intentionally left blank November 11, 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development Small Column Ion Exchange Program Technology Readiness Assessment Page 3 of 112 APPROVALS ________________________ _ Harry D. Harmon Date

106

Sodalite ion exchange in polyethylene oxide oligomer solvents Gina M. Canfield,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodalite ion exchange in polyethylene oxide oligomer solvents Gina M. Canfield,a Michael Bizimisb and rare earth ions. Ethylene oxide-based oligomers (polyethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol methyl ether

Latturner, Susan

107

Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Final purification of synthetic olive oil mill wastewater treated by chemical oxidation using ion exchange: Study of operating parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research work, ion exchange (IE) is presented as a suitable option for purification of olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) previously treated by means of a secondary treatment (OMWST). This pretreatment consisted in Fenton-like oxidation process, followed by coagulation–flocculation and filtration through olive stones. The parametric requirements for drinking water production or at least for public waterways discharge were achieved using a combination of two IE columns working in series at bench scale. The IE resins used in this study were Dowex Marathon C and Amberlite IRA-67. The effect of contact time, operating temperature and flow rate on simultaneous removal of sodium, total iron, chloride and phenols (the major pollutant species in OMWST) were investigated. Removal percentages of sodium, chloride and total iron increased with incrementing the contact time. Equilibrium was obtained in about 30 min for all ions and ion concentrations values determined were lower than the maximum levels for drinking water standards. On the other hand, adsorption efficiencies of sodium, total iron and chloride ions were found to be not considerably affected by the operating temperature. The highest phenols removal percentage (around 100%) was obtained in the first minutes for 298 K and 10 L/h.

M.D. Víctor-Ortega; J.M. Ochando-Pulido; G. Hodaifa; A. Martinez-Ferez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of an spFRET method to measure structure changes in ion exchange proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transporter, major facilitator superfamily, membrane transport, membrane transporter, OxlT, single molecule, spFRET, transport protein. Tightly coupled ion exchangers, such as the AE anion exchange systems only take place at an appreciable rate if a suitable substrate ion is bound to the transport site

Novotny, Lukas

110

Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 17 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

King, W.D.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange tests have been completed at the Savannah River Technology Center for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Inc. as part of the Hanford River Protection Project. Radioactive cesium and technetium (pertechnetate form only) were removed by ion exchange from a sample of Envelope C salt solution from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 (sample volume: approximately 18 L at 4.8 M Na plus). The original sample was diluted and subjected to strontium/transuranics (Sr/TRU) precipitation and filtration processes before ion exchange processing was performed. Batch contact and column tests for the ion exchange removal of cesium and technetium were then completed on the Sr/TRU-decontaminated product. Previous ion exchange tests were conducted on a smaller portion (0.5 L) of the Tank 241-AN-102 supernate sample, which had been similarly pretreated, and the results were reported in a separate document.

King, W.D.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sorption of heavy metals by modified chelating ion exchangers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory sorption capacity towards heavy metals of several physically modified chelating resins at low pH is reported. It was found that the linear sorption isotherms are the most appropriate for describing the sorption of Ni and Pb. The data obtained revealed that the chelating resins studied are able to remove selectively copper from a complex synthetic solution containing Fe, Mn and Pb. The regeneration of Lewatit TP 208 by 10% H2SO4 in batch conditions proved to be effective through three consecutive runs of loading-regeneration.

Valentin Nenov; Bogdan Bonev

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Journal of Membrane Science 239 (2004) 1726 Highly conductive ordered heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the matrix required for reasonable ion transport through the membrane is 50­70 wt.% [2Journal of Membrane Science 239 (2004) 17­26 Highly conductive ordered heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes are used in electrodialysis (ED) as ion-selective membranes and in power sources (such as fuel

Freger, Viatcheslav "Slava"

115

Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS?) and determined to have high affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibited low, but measureable affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solutions (pH 3 and 6). The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable in concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may be candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions.

Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Applications of Highly Cross Linked Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Resins in Biodiesel Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reach 11% of the domestic market by 2010 [13]. In order to increase future demand while also increasing the amount of diesel vehicles, the US market is currently attempting to double its biodiesel production. Today in the US there are 148 biodiesel... the Business, Analytical Methodologies, second ed., Biodiesel Basics, United States, 2006. [3]A. Srivastava, R. Prasad, Triglycerides-based diesel fuels, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 4 (2000) 111-133. [4]Y. Zhang, M.A. Dub?, D. D. McLean, M...

Jamal, Yousuf

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ion exchange kinetics of cesium for various reaction designs using crystalline silicotitanate, UOP IONSIV IE-911  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the major component of CST, slowly dissolved at hydrogen peroxide concentrations greater than 1 M. A simple and novel experimental apparatus for a single-layer ion exchange column was developed to generate experimental data for estimation...

Kim, Sung Hyun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radiochemical analysis of the polar agrochemicals validamycin and the metabolite melamine by ion-exchange chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Suitable analytical methods to determine the radiochemical purity of validamycin and melamine are not described in the literature. High performance ion-exchange chromatography for the detection of underivatize...

A. Fredenhagen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system being developed for deployment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a supplementary salt waste processing technology that, if implemented, will augment the baseline Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) capability. An opportunity exists to shorten the SRS radioactive waste system lifecycle by 6 years, and significantly reduce life cycle costs, by accelerating salt processing to earlier completion, simultaneous with sludge vitrification. As described in the Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy, which is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Roadmap - EM Journey to Excellence,

120

Discovery and Early Development of Non-Suppressed Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......charge on cation-exchange materials caused a mixture of the resins...Then the chloromethylated materials were converted into ion exchangers...few months later that year, Bill Rich, the Vice President of...stress corrosion cracking of turbine blades. Ion chromatography......

James S. Fritz; Douglas T. Gjerde

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Equilibrium Model for Ion Exchange Between Multivalent Cations and Zeolite-A in a Molten Salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-site equilibrium model that previously only accommodated monovalent cations has been extended to include divalent and trivalent cations for ion exchange between zeolite-A and molten chloride salts, a process being considered for concentrating nuclear fission products into high level waste forms. Equilibrium constants were determined by fitting the model to equilibrium data sets for ion exchange between zeolite-A and Cs ternary salt (CsCl-LiCl-KCl), Rb ternary salt (RbCl-LiCl-KCl), Na ternary salt (NaCl-LiCl-KCl), Sr ternary salt (SrCl2-LiCl-KCl), and U ternary salt (UCl3-LiCl-KCl). The results reveal a good fit between the experimental data sets and the model. The two ion exchange sites, framework sites and occluded sites, demonstrate different relative selectivities for the cations. It was found that Sr2_ is the preferred cation in the ion exchange site, and Cs_ is the preferred cation in the occlusion site. Meanwhile, Li_ has the highest combined selectivity when both ion exchange and occlusion sites are considered. Interestingly, divalent and trivalent species are more preferred in the ion exchange site than the monovalent species with the exception of Li_.

Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael Simpson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Quantifying exchange coupling in f-ion pairs using the diamagnetic substitution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the challenges in the chemistry of actinide and lanthanide (f-ion) is quantifying exchange coupling between f-ions. While qualitative information about exchange coupling may be readily obtained using the diamagnetic substitution approach, obtaining quantitative information is much more difficult. This article describes how exchange coupling may be quantified using the susceptibility of a magnetically isolated analog, as in the diamagnetic substitution approach, along with the anisotropy of the ground state as determined by EPR spectroscopy. Several examples are used to illustrate and test this approach.

Lukens, Wayne W.; Walter, Marc D.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation process. It was possible to correlate it with the final amount of non-degraded resins. These results show that these conditions were favorable to destroy the resins, indicating to be the AOP an effective technique to reduce the volume of the waste. (authors)

Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ion exchange phase transitions in water-filled channels with charged walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ion transport through narrow water-filled channels is impeded by a high electrostatic barrier. The latter originates from the large ratio of the dielectric constants of the water and the surrounding media. We show that “doping,” i.e., immobile charges attached to the walls of the channel, substantially reduces the barrier. This explains why most of the biological ion channels are “doped.” We show that at rather generic conditions the channels may undergo ion exchange phase transitions (typically of the first order). Upon such a transition a finite latent concentration of ions may either enter or leave the channel, or be exchanged between the ions of different valences. We discuss possible implications of these transitions for the Ca-vs-Na selectivity of biological Ca channels. We also show that transport of divalent Ca ions is assisted by their fractionalization into two separate excitations.

J. Zhang; A. Kamenev; B. I. Shklovskii

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Injection Solvent Effect on Peak Height in Ion Exchange HPLC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2. To further evaluate the effect of the injection volume only...injection volume were varied. Effect of weak injection solvent There...same eluent ion strength. The effect of eluent ion strength. Figure...nitrate in the mobile phase. 418 ship of the peak height of phenylacetate......

Hyunjoo Kim Lee; Norman E. Hoffman

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Small Column Ion Exchange Testing of Superlig 644 for Removal of 137Cs from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (Tank 241-AN-107)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford high-level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for removing {sup 137}Cs from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The Superlig materials applicable to cesium removal include the cesium-selective Superlig 632and Superlig 644. These materials have been developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, Utah. This report describes the testing of the Superlig 644 ion exchange material in a small dual-column system. The bed volume of the lead column was 18.6 mL (L/D = 7), and the bed volume of the lag column was 15.9 mL (L/D = 6) during the loading phase. The sample processed was approximately 1.6 L of diluted waste ([Na{sup +}] = 4.84 M) from Tank 241-AN-107 (Envelope C). This sample had been previously treated for removal of Sr/transuranic (TRU) values and clarified in a single tube cross-flow filtration unit. All ion exchange process steps were tested, including resin-bed preparation, loading, feed displacement, water rinse, elution, eluant rinse, and resin regeneration. A summary of performance measures for both columns is shown in Table S1. The Cs {lambda} values represent a measure of the effective capacity of the SL-644 resin. The Cs {lambda} of 20 for the lead column is much lower than the estimated 150 obtained by the Savannah River Technology Center during Phase 1A testing. Equilibrium data obtained with batch contacts using the AN-107 Cs IX feed predicts a Cs {lambda} of 183. A Cs {lambda} for the lag column could not be determined due to insufficient breakthrough, but it appeared to work well and removed nearly all of the cesium not removed by the lead column. The low value for the lead column indicates that it did not perform as expected. This may have been due to air or gas in the bed that caused fluid channeling or blinding of the resin. The maximum decontamination factor (DF) for {sup 137}Cs listed in Table S1 is based on {sup 137}Cs concentration in the first samples collected from each column and the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the feed. The composite DF for {sup 137}Cs was 1,760, which provided an effluent with a {sup 137}Cs concentration of 8.7E-02 Ci/m{sup 3}. The {sup 137}Cs concentration is below the basis of design limit and is 7.2% of the contract limit for {sup 137}Cs.

DE Kurath; DL Blanchard; JR Bontha

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiolytic effects on ion exchangers during the storage of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiolytic effects on ion exchangers are being recognized as a significant problem in the processing and storage of high-specific-activity radioactive waste forms. Two major literature surveys and a series of scoping experiments conducted during this investigation indicate that radiation decomposition of ion exchange materials has the potential for a variety of undesirable consequences. These include the ready dispersion of adsorbed radionuclides to the environment, corrosion and pressurization of waste canisters, and generation of flammable and explosive gases, as well as agglomeration of ion exchangers to a rigid monolith with the partitioning of a liquid phase. Some of the highlights of the literature surveys and the major findings of the experimental studies are reported here.

Pillay, K.K.S.; Palau, G.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Direct vitrification of Fermi 2 bead resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants produce large quantities of spent ion exchange resins from primary and secondary side water treatment systems. Detroit Edison`s experience with vitrification of bead resin was conducted at Catholic University with the objective of using the DuraMelter{trademark} vitrification technology to perform both for volume reduction and to create a stable glass waste form. Detroit Edison had been without disposal capability since November 1990, and very minimal progress had been made in Michigan to build a radioactive disposal site. Encouraging results from non-radioactive tests conducted on a DuraMelter{trademark} 10 system in January and February 1995 by Duratek aided in our decision to use this process. Our experience is the subject of this report.

Weber, B.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear quantum effects in water exchange around lithium and fluoride ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ classical and ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of nuclear quantum fluctuations on the structure and the water exchange dynamics of aqueous solutions of lithium and fluoride ions. While we obtain reasonably good agreement with experimental data for solutions of lithium by augmenting the Coulombic interactions between the ion and the water molecules with a standard Lennard-Jones ion-oxygen potential, the same is not true for solutions of fluoride, for which we find that a potential with a softer repulsive wall gives much better agreement. A small degree of destabilization of the first hydration shell is found in quantum simulations of both ions when compared with classical simulations, with the shell becoming less sharply defined and the mean residence time of the water molecules in the shell decreasing. In line with these modest differences, we find that the mechanisms of the exchange processes are unaffected by quantization, so a classical description of these reaction...

Wilkins, David M; Dang, Liem X

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Patterned ion exchange membranes for improved power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterned ion exchange membranes for improved power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis August 2014 Keywords: Microbial reverse electrodialysis cell Patterned membranes Integrated spacer Internal resistance a b s t r a c t Power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells (MRCs) can

133

A new class of non-zeolitic sorbents for air separations: Lithium ion exchanged pillared clays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zeolites are the only known sorbents that adsorb N{sub 2} selectively over O{sub 2}, and are used for industrial air separation. Pillared clays (PILCs) have a high Broensted acidity (k.e., high proton density). It is found in this study that when the protons are exchanged by alkali metal ions, in particular Li{sup +}, the ion exchanged pillared clays can exhibit a high N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} adsorption selectivity that rivals that of the zeolites. The first result shows a pure-component adsorption ratio of N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} = 3.2 (at 25 C and 1 atm) for Li{sup +}-exchanged PILC. The N{sub 2} capacity, however, is only 20% that of the zeolite, and remains to be improved. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effects of three factors on the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity: (1) starting clays (tetrahedral vs octahedral isomorphous substitution and clays with different charge densities), (2) different metal oxides as pillars, and (3) different ion exchange alkali metal cations (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}). The highest N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivities are achieved by using clays with the highest charge densities, metal oxides forming pillars with the narrowest gallery spaces, and ion exchange cations with the smallest ionic radii. Effects by all three factors are qualitatively understood. The high N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity on the Li{sup +} exchanged PILC is the result of the small ionic radius (and hence high polarizing power) of Li{sup +} and the strong quadrupole moment of the N{sub 2} molecule. Moreover, a technique is developed with which the amount of the exchanged cations can exceed that allowed by the original cation exchange capacity of the clay by using a high pH value in the ion exchange solution.

Cheng, L.S.; Yang, R.T. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Influence of energy exchange of electrons and ions on the long-wavelength thermal instability in magnetized astrophysical objects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Papers Influence of energy exchange of electrons and ions...are different and include the energy exchange in thermal equations...Vazquez-Semadeni Gazol 2002; Audit Hennebelle 2005; Stiele, Lesch...does not take into account an energy exchange between species in......

Anatoly K. Nekrasov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alternate Methods For Eluting Cesium From Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST) an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The standard method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15-20 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO3). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks, and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid generated by the standard elution method exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing conditions in the glass melt. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M nitric acid are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the standard elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. The resin was loaded with 9.5 g Cs/L of resin prior to elution, which is the maximum expected loading for RF resin treating the actual dissolved salt waste at SRS. For the baseline elution method, 465 g of nitrate is used per liter of resin, and >99.9999% of the cesium is removed from the resin. An alternative method that used 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M HNO3 followed by 11 bed volumes of 0.05 M HNO3, used 158 g of nitrate per liter of resin (66% less nitrate than used for the standard elution) and removed >99.998% of the cesium. A staccato flow mode using 0.5 M HNO3 (1 hr on at 1 BV/hr, followed by 3 hrs off) after the resin had been titrated using a continuous flow of acid at 1 BV/hr removed 99.9998% of the cesium while using 12 BV of acid (20% less than the baseline). Formic acid was slightly less efficient than nitric acid for eluting the resin, but 20 BV of 0.5 M HCOOH removed 99.98% of the cesium from the resin.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nanocomposite reverse electrodialysis (RED) ion-exchange membranes for salinity gradient power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite the important role of ion-exchange membranes (IEMs) in reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems, the current absence of proper ion-exchange membranes delays the sustainable development of the RED process for salinity gradient power generation. This research presents the preparation of a new type of organic–inorganic nanocomposite cation exchange membrane and its performance characteristics. The combination of functionalized iron (III) oxide ( Fe 2 O 3 - SO 4 2 ? ) as an inorganic filler with the sulfonated poly (2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (sPPO) polymer matrix proved to have great potential for power generation by RED. The results showed that an optimal amount of Fe 2 O 3 - SO 4 2 ? (0.5–0.7 wt%) enhanced the key electrochemical properties of the ion-exchange membranes including a permselectivity up to 87.65% and an area resistance of 0.87 ? cm2. The nanocomposite membrane containing 0.7 wt% ( Fe 2 O 3 - SO 4 2 ? ) achieved a maximum power density (amount of power per unit membrane area) of 1.3 W m?2, which is relatively higher than that of the commercially available CSO (SelemionTM, Japan) membranes. The goal of the present work is to maximize the salinity gradient power generation by developing RED-specific nanocomposite IEMs. The results show the potential of the new design of the nanocomposite \\{IEMs\\} for viable energy generation by RED.

Jin Gi Hong; Yongsheng Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of the plasma ion temperature at the T-10 tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) based on a diagnostic neutral beam has been developed at the T-10 tokamak. The diagnostics allows one to measure the ion temperature profile in the cross section of the plasma column. In T-10 experiments, the measurement technique was adjusted and the elements of the CXRS diagnostics for ITER were tested. The used spectroscopic equipment makes it possible to reliably determine the ion temperature from the Doppler broadening of impurity lines (helium, carbon), as well as of the spectral lines of the working gas. The profiles of the plasma ion temperature in deuterium and helium discharges were measured at different plasma currents and densities, including with the use of active Doppler measurements of lines of different elements. The validity and reliability of ion temperature measurements performed by means of the developed CXRS diagnostics are analyzed.

Krupin, V. A., E-mail: vkrupin@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Tugarinov, S. N. [Project Center ITER (Russian Federation)] [Project Center ITER (Russian Federation); Barsukov, A. G.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Korobov, K. V.; Krasnyanskii, S. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Naumenko, N. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus)] [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus); Nemets, A. R.; Sushkov, A. V.; Tilinin, G. N. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Disease-associated changes in the expression of ion channels, ion receptors, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in heart hypertrophy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular pathology of cardiac hypertrophy is multifactorial with transcript regulation of ion channels, ion exchangers and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins being speculative. We therefore investigated disease-associated changes in gene expression of various ion channels and their receptors as well as ion exchangers, cytoskeletal proteins and Ca{sup 2+}-handling proteins in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. We also compared experimental findings with results from hypertrophic human hearts, previously published (Borlak, J., and Thum, T., 2003. Hallmarks of ion channel gene expression in end-stage heart failure. FASEB J. 17, 1592-1608). We observed significant (P < 0.05) induction in transcript level of ATP-driven ion exchangers (Atp1A1, NCX-1, SERCA2a), ion channels (L-type Ca{sup 2+}-channel, K{sub ir}3.4, Na{sub v}1.5) and RyR-2 in hypertrophic hearts, while gene expression was repressed in diseased human hearts. Further, the genes coding for calreticulin and calmodulin, PMCA 1 and 4 as well as {alpha}-skeletal actin were significantly (P < 0.05) changed in hypertrophic human heart, but were unchanged in hypertrophic left ventricles of the rat heart. Notably, transcript level of {alpha}- and {beta}-MHC, calsequestrin, K{sub ir}6.1 (in the right ventricle only), phospholamban as well as troponin T were repressed in both diseased human and rat hearts. Our study enabled an identification of disease-associated candidate genes. Their regulation is likely to be the result of an imbalance between pressure load/stretch force and vascular tonus and the observed changes may provide a rational for the rhythm disturbances observed in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

Zwadlo, Carolin [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Center for Drug Research and Medical Biotechnology, Hannover (Germany); Borlak, Juergen [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Center for Drug Research and Medical Biotechnology, Hannover (Germany)]. E-mail: borlak@item.fraunhofer.de

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

Clary, R.; Smirnov, A.; Dettrick, S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Ruskov, E. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

Cabasso, Israel (131 Buckingham Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210); Korngold, Emmanuel (P.O. Box 1025, Beer-Sheva 84110, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The effects of amine additives and flow rate on the performance of mixed-bed ion exchange at ultralow concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data were obtained to evaluate the effects of amine additives for pH control of solution and the ... performance of mixed-bed ion exchange for the removal of ionic impurities in solution. The experim...

Byeong Il Noh; Gang Choon Lee; Tae Kyung Yoon

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Metal nanoparticles in catalytic polymer membranes and ion-exchange systems for advanced purification of water from molecular oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods of synthesis of metal nanoparticles and metal/polymer nanocomposites including ion-exchange materials are considered. The effect of the composition and size of nanoparticles on their catalytic activity is analyzed. Attention is focused on the composites used in catalytic processes, namely, catalytic membranes and ion-exchange systems. The problems associated with the removal of dissolved oxygen from water by means of such composites are discussed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

V V Volkov; T A Kravchenko; Vyacheslav I Roldughin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Measurement of charge exchange cross sections for highly charged xenon and thorium ions with molecular hydrogen in a Penning Ion Trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly charged xenon (35+ to 46+) and thorium (72+ to 79+) ions were produced in an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The ions were extracted from EBIT in a short pulse. Ions of one charge state were selected using an electromagnet. The ions were recaptured at low energy in a cryogenic Penning trap (RETRAP). As the ions captured electrons from molecular hydrogen, populations of the various charge states were obtained by measuring the image currents induced by the ions on the electrodes of the trap. Data on the number of ions in each charge state vs. time were compared to theoretical rate equations in order to determine the average charge exchange rates. These rates were compared to charge exchange rates of an ion with a known charge exchange cross section (Ar{sup 11+}) measured in a similar manner in order to determine the average charge exchange cross sections for the highly charged ions. The energy of interaction between the highly charged ions and hydrogen was estimated to be 4 eV in the center of mass frame. The mean charge exchange cross sections were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 2} for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 46+} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2} for Th{sup 73+} to Th{sup 79+}. Double capture was approximately 20--25% of the total for both xenon and thorium. A fit indicated that the cross sections were approximately proportional to q. This is consistent with a linear dependence of cross section on q within the measurement uncertainties.

Weinberg, G.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Perchlorate Degradation Using Partially Oxidized Titanium Ions and Ion Exchange Membrane Hybrid System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To enhance the overall rate of reaction, high concentrations of acid and Ti(III) are needed, but transport of hydrogen ions through the anion permeable membrane was observed and would be greater at higher acid concentrations. The proposed mathematical model...

Park, Sung Hyuk

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ETR ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat olids/liquid sepa ). The objectiv ty of the SCIX ess of the proc n, and to provid g towards deta To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive Small Column Exchange/SCIX Feb. 2011 Departmen ll Colum E-EM Did This rocess Diagram on Exchange (S

148

Pd and Pd–Ag Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pd and Pd–Ag Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid Decomposition ... Palladium nanoparticles were immobilized within the pores of metal organic frameworks MIL-125 and amine-functionalized NH2-MIL-125 using photoassisted and ion exchange deposition methods. ...

Kohsuke Mori; Masahiro Dojo; Hiromi Yamashita

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Level Waste System Impacts from Small Column Ion Exchange Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify potential waste streams that could be treated with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) and perform an initial assessment of the impact of doing so on the High-Level Waste (HLW) system. Design of the SCIX system has been performed as a backup technology for decontamination of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX consists of three modules which can be placed in risers inside underground HLW storage tanks. The pump and filter module and the ion exchange module are used to filter and decontaminate the aqueous tank wastes for disposition in Saltstone. The ion exchange module contains Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST in its engineered granular form is referred to as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911), and is selective for removal of cesium ions. After the IE-911 is loaded with Cs-137, it is removed and the column is refilled with a fresh batch. The grinder module is used to size-reduce the cesium-loaded IE-911 to make it compatible with the sludge vitrification system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). If installed at the SRS, this SCIX would need to operate within the current constraints of the larger HLW storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal system. Although the equipment has been physically designed to comply with system requirements, there is also a need to identify which waste streams could be treated, how it could be implemented in the tank farms, and when this system could be incorporated into the HLW flowsheet and planning. This document summarizes a preliminary examination of the tentative HLW retrieval plans, facility schedules, decontamination factor targets, and vitrified waste form compatibility, with recommendations for a more detailed study later. The examination was based upon four batches of salt solution from the currently planned disposition pathway to treatment in the SCIX. Because of differences in capabilities between the SRS baseline and SCIX, these four batches were combined into three batches for a total of about 3.2 million gallons of liquid waste. The chemical and radiological composition of these batches was estimated from the SpaceMan Plus{trademark} model using the same data set and assumptions as the baseline plans.

McCabe, D. J.; Hamm, L. L.; Aleman, S. E.; Peeler, D. K.; Herman, C. C.; Edwards, T. B.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

In situ ion exchange preparation of Pt/carbon nanotubes electrode: Effect of two-step oxidation of carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) supported Pt electrode is prepared by in-situ ion exchange method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms that compared with the only electrochemical oxidation or chemical oxidation treatment, more carboxylic acid groups are produced on the surface of MWNTs treated by dual-oxidation, which involves both electrochemical oxidation and chemical oxidation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that Pt nanoparticles deposited via in-situ ion exchange are highly dispersed on the MWNTs surface. Electrochemical measurements show that the resultant Pt/MWNTs electrode treated by dual-oxidation exhibits the largest electrochemical surface area and the highest activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) among the investigated electrodes. This can be attributed to the fact that dual-oxidation treatment produces more carboxylic acid groups at the electroactive sites on MWNTs surface, which results in loading more Pt nanoparticles in the following ion exchange process.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Gao, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangyu; Lin, Yuehe; Yin, Geping

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Influence of earth gravity on reaction engineering of tubular reactor for high concentration tungsten ion-exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of gravity on the reaction engineering of tubular reactor is studied by analyzing the residence time distribution curves. The results show that upflow-feeding mode is more beneficial compared with downflow-feeding mode, since the flow pattern of the fluid in the reactor is closer to plug flow. The result of dynamic experiment conducted in ion-exchange of tungsten metallurgy is as good as that in reaction engineering of ion-exchange column. Whether downflow-feeding or upflow-feeding mode is adopted, breakthrough time decreases when solution concentration increases. Upflow-feeding mode has longer breakthrough time and greater improvement in adsorption capacity especially with high WO3 concentration in ion-exchange.

Zhong-wei ZHAO; Lu-ping XIAO; Chi-hao GUO; Xing-yu CHEN; Ai-liang CHEN; Guang-sheng HUO; Hong-gui LI

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum bounding cesium loading considered possible based on current knowledge regarding CST media and the anticipated feed compositions. Since this cesium loading was considerably higher than the nominal loading conditions in SRS waste, cases with lower loading were also evaluated. Modeling parameters were the same as those used previously unless otherwise indicated. The current model does not capture multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. This feature is conservative in the sense that it does not account for the large cooling effects associated with phase transfer. However, the potential transfer of heat to the plenum region associated with vertical bubble ascension through the column during boiling is also neglected. Thermal modeling calculations were also performed for the entire waste storage tank for the case where loaded and ground CST was transferred to the tank. The modeling domain used for the in-tank calculations is provided in Figure 2. The in-tank domain is based on SRS Tank 41, which is a Type-IIIA tank. Temperature distributions were evaluated for cylindrical, ground CST mounds located on the tank floor. Media grinding is required prior to vitrification processing of the CST in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The location of the heat source region on the tank floor due to the accumulation of CST material was assumed to be just under the grinder. The shape of the CST mound was assumed to be cylindrical. This shape is believed to be most representative of the actual mound shape formed in the tank, given that submersible mixing pumps will be available for media dispersion. Alternative configurations involving other geometrical shapes for the CST mound were evaluated in the previous work. Sensitivity analysis for the in-tank region was performed for different amounts of CST media. As was the case for the in-column model, the in-tank model does not include multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. The in-column and the in-tank evaluations incorporated recently updated maximum cesi

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program described in this report studies the suitability of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) to treat aqueous streams containing heavy metals and radioactive cations in a solution containing sodium and nitrates. The goal of the program was to produce a cation stream containing sodium, heavy metals, and radioactive cations; an anion stream of nitric acid free of heavy metals and radioactive cations; and a product stream that meets discharge criteria. The experimental results, described in detail, indicated that EDIX was not a suitable process for treating wastes containing metals that formed insoluble hydroxides in a basic solution; the metals precipitate in the catholyte and feed compartments, and in the cathode membrane. The test program was therefore terminated prior to completion of all planned activities. 2 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

Harrison, J.L.; Baroch, C.J.; Litz, J.

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Nucleon exchange mechanism in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleon drift and diffusion mechanisms in central collisions of asymmetric heavy ions at near-barrier energies are investigated in the framework of a stochastic mean-field approach. Expressions for diffusion and drift coefficients for nucleon transfer deduced from the stochastic mean-field approach in the semiclassical approximation have similar forms familiar from the phenomenological nucleon exchange model. The variance of fragment mass distribution agrees with the empirical formula {sigma}{sub AA}{sup 2}(t)=N{sub exc}(t). The comparison with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations shows that below barrier energies, the drift coefficient in the semiclassical approximation underestimates the mean number of nucleon transfer obtained in the quantal framework. Motion of the window in the dinuclear system has a significant effect on the nucleon transfer in asymmetric collisions.

Yilmaz, B. [Physics Department, Ankara University, Tandogan 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Ayik, S. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Lacroix, D. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Washiyama, K. [PNTPM, CP 229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Synthesis and Characterization of the Microporosity of Ion-Exchanged Al2O3-Pillared Clays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although most PILC studies have focused on their use for catalytic application, there has also been other work in which PILCs have been studied as potential sorbents for gas separation applications. ... We have chosen Al2O3-pillared clay for this study because of the small pore size and interlayer spacing of this material compared with other types of pillared clays (e.g., TiO2-PILC, SiO2-PILC).1 ... The samples and analytical results are identified by the following convention:? the sample Li+?PILC represents Al2O3-pillared clay which has undergone postsynthesis ion exchange with the Li+ cation (in a solution of LiCl as described earlier). ...

Nick D. Hutson; Donald J. Gualdoni; Ralph T. Yang

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Standard practice for The separation of americium from plutonium by ion exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice describes the use of an ion exchange technique to separate plutonium from solutions containing low concentrations of americium prior to measurement of the 241Am by gamma counting. 1.2 This practice covers the removal of plutonium, but not all the other radioactive isotopes that may interfere in the determination of 241Am. 1.3 This practice can be used when 241Am is to be determined in samples in which the plutonium is in the form of metal, oxide, or other solid provided that the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved (See Test Methods C758, C759, and C1168). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Modelling Zn (II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model Tertre E.1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling Zn (II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model Tertre E.1.tertre@univ-poitiers.fr Keywords: ion exchange theory, zinc, clayey sediments, geochemical modelling, sorption and desorption the behaviour of these contaminants and, in particular, the sorption reactions on mineral surfaces. In this way

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Envelope B Hanford Tank 241-AZ-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pretreatment process for the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to provide decontaminated Low-Activity Waste and concentrated elute streams for vitrification into low- and high-activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, strontium, transuranics, cesium, and technetium.

King, W.D.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002135 High Gas Sorption and Metal-Ion Exchange of Microporous MetalOrganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002135 High Gas Sorption and Metal-Ion Exchange of Microporous Metal nanoparticles in the MOF.[1,2f,3] Gas sorption properties also depend on pore volume and ligand structures] but sorption properties for other gases have been less well explored.[6] In addition, the tetracarboxylate

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

162

Cesium removal from liquid acidic wastes with the primary focus on ammonium molybdophosphate as an ion exchanger: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many articles have been written concerning the selective removal of cesium from both acidic and alkaline defense wastes. The majority of the work performed for cesium removal from defense wastes involves alkaline feed solutions. Several different techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions have been evaluated such as precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion exchange. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review various techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions. The main focus of the review will be on ion exchange techniques, particularly those involving ammonium molybdophosphate as the exchanger. The pertinent literature sources are condensed into a single document for quick reference. The information contained in this document was used as an aid in determining techniques to evaluate cesium removal from the acidic Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste matrices. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

Miller, C.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Permeation of ethylene and ethane through sulfonated polysulfones and sulfonated poly(phenylene oxide) ion exchange membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permeation of ethylene and ethane is sulfonated poly(phenylene oxide), sulfonated bisphenol A polyarylethersulfone and sulfonated hexafluorobisphenol A polyarylethersulfone (6F-SPS) exchanged with Ag{sup +} ions were measured as a function of degree of sulfonation, temperature and trans membrane differential pressure. The data were compared with the permeation results for these membranes in acid form and alkaline metal salt form. Membranes exchanged with Ag{sup +} ions displayed enhanced etylene permeability and ethylene-ethane separation factors. The enhancement in transport of ethylene in ion exchange membranes is apparently related to an increase in ethylene solubility affected by complexation of ethylene with immobilized Ag{sup +} ions. A substantial increase in ethylene permeation rate and separation factor was observed when the feed gas was saturated with water vapors. Enhanced permeation/separation were attributed to an increase in the mobility of silver ions in water plasticized membranes. Membranes plasticized with glycerol exhibited high ethylene permeation rate and ethylene/ethane separation factors in dry feed gas streams that were comparable with permeation rates in water plasticized membranes.

Yurkovetsky, A.; Watterson, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States); Bikson, B. [Innovative Membrane Systems, Inc., Norwood, MA (United States); Kharas, G.B. [DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Combining reverse osmosis and ion-exchange allows beet distillery condensates to be recycled as fermentable dilution water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combinations of physical purification processes, i.e. anion-exchange, adsorption, and reverse osmosis were evaluated and compared with single ones for their ability to remove target inhibitory compounds from distillery condensates with the purpose of reusing condensates as fermentation water. Performances of the treatments were evaluated through analyses of residual target compounds and batch and continuous fermentation experiments. Reverse osmosis on BW30 membrane (Dow Chemical) at 25 bar transmembrane pressure and volume reduction ratio (VRR) = 8 followed by anion-exchange (weak Amberlite FPA 51 resin, Dow) was the most efficient process to decrease all inhibitory target compounds (formic, acetic, propanoic, butanoic acids and 2-phenethyl alcohol) present in a distillery condensate below their detection or quantification limit. Water recovery was 87.5%. Such treated condensate proved convenient for reuse as fermentation water. Fermentation tests run in a multistage device exhibited yeast viability and ethanol production performances (concentration and global productivity) equivalent to the blank for a final ethanol concentration of 80 g L? 1 close to practical value encountered in distilleries.

Marie-Laure Lameloise; Marjorie Gavach; Marielle Bouix; Claire Fargues

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustment ion exchange Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Institut fr Experimentalphysik, Universitt Innsbruck Collection: Physics 14 ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OC TUPOLE J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott Summary: ion...

168

RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST, CST, and simulated sludge that sat at indicated temperatures for up to 13 weeks. A previous SRNL report described preliminary rheology data of slurries containing MST and sludge. Preliminary results of the irradiation tests are also presented in this report, though additional data are still being collected. Rheology of the long term settling samples (6, 12, and 24 months) and additional irradiation test results will be reported at a later date. Conclusions from this analysis are as follows: (1) Slurries containing MST and unground CST have the largest shear strength. Due to the high shear strengths measured in slurries containing unground CST, evaluations of specific tank contents and mixing capability should be performed prior to any addition of this material into a waste tank. Experimentally determined shear strengths indicate mixing could be problematic in mixtures containing unground CST. (2) Increasing the ground CST fraction in the slurry increases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) Increasing the sludge fraction in the slurry decreases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (4) Slurries containing VSL ground CST have larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than slurries containing SRNL ground CST. (5) The effects of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength are slurry dependent. (6) No effects of settling time and temperature on slurry yield stress or consistency were observed. (7) Radiation up to 100 MRad does not appear to affect properties of shear strength, yield stress, or consistency of process feeds.

Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

SCALING SOLID RESUSPENSION AND SORPTION FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing 1.3 million gallon waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending Monosodium Titanate (MST), Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. In addition, SRNL will also be conducting pilot-scale tests to determine the mixing requirements for the strontium and actinide sorption. As part of this task, the results from the pilot-scale tests must be scaled up to a full-scale waste tank. This document describes the scaling approach. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scale model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX Program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). MST additions are through Riser E1, the proposed MST addition riser in Tank 41H. To determine the approach to scaling the results from the pilot-scale tank to Tank 41H, the authors took the following approach. They reviewed the technical literature for methods to scale mixing with jets and suspension of solid particles with jets, and the technical literature on mass transfer from a liquid to a solid particle to develop approaches to scaling the test data. SRNL assembled a team of internal experts to review the scaling approach and to identify alternative approaches that should be considered.

Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K. [Lafayette College, Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

The synthesis and characterization of Zirconium p-Phenylbis(phosphonate) Phosphate and other Zirconium Arylbis(phosphonates) for the application of ion exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These materials showed promise for many uses, of greatest interest were of catalysis and ion exchange. Zirconium p-Phenylbis(phosphonate) Phosphate was synthesized by several routes to investigate the inherent structural characteristics as they applied...

Bellinghausen, Paul Christian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Exchange-bias instability in a bilayer with an ion-beam imprinted stripe pattern of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the magnetization arrangement in an in-plane stripe pattern with alternating exchange-bias domains. The stripe pattern was produced by ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning, which changed locally the exchange-bias direction at the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface, but not the magnetic or antiferromagnetic properties of the Co{sub 70}Fe{sub 30} and Mn{sub 83}Ir{sub 17} layers, respectively. For the analysis of the magnetic domain structure evolution along the hysteresis loop we used a combination of experimental techniques: magneto-optical Kerr effect, Kerr microscopy, polarized neutron reflectometry, and off-specular scattering of polarized neutrons with polarization analysis. Instead of a perfect antiparallel alignment we found that the magnetization in neighboring stripes is periodically canted with respect to the stripe axis so that the net magnetization of the ferromagnetic film turns almost perpendicular to the stripes. At the same time the projection of the magnetization vector onto the stripe axis has a periodically alternating sign. The experimental observations are explained and quantitatively described within the frame of a phenomenological model, taking into account interfacial exchange bias, intralayer exchange energy, and uniaxial anisotropy. The model defines conditions which can be used for tailoring nano- and micro-patterned exchange-bias systems with different types of magnetic order.

Theis-Broehl, Katharina; Wolff, Maximilian; Westphalen, Andreas; Zabel, Hartmut; McCord, Jeffrey; Hoeink, Volker; Schmalhorst, Jan; Reiss, Guenther; Weis, Tanja; Engel, Dieter; Ehresmann, Arno; Ruecker, Ulrich; Toperverg, Boris P. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01169 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University Bielefeld, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Institute of Physics and Centre for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Strasse 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany, Institut Laue Langevin, Boite Postale 156, Grenoble 38000, France, and Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. This process adds monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution (and entrained sludge solids). While the process is operating, the solid particles will begin to settle at temperatures up to 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods (i.e., 1-61 days) at elevated temperatures (i.e., 23-80 C) can develop large shear strengths which could make them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors are conducting rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge, MST, and crystalline silicotitanate (CST, ground and unground) that have been aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally heated to 30, 45, or 60 C. Additional tests are being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of settling time and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST and simulated sludge that sat at elevated temperatures (i.e., up to 60 C) for up to 13 weeks. Rheology of CST-containing slurries, as well as results of the long term settling (6, 12, and 24 months) and irradiation tests (10 and 100 MRad), will be reported later. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) MST only slurries that sat at elevated temperatures had larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than MST plus sludge slurries that settled at elevated temperatures. (2) The addition of sludge to an MST slurry reduces the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) The impact of settling time and temperature on slurry rheology is inconclusive at this time. The authors are collecting additional data to attempt to determine the impact of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency.

Poirier, M.; Ferguson, C.; Koopman, D.

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Up to know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes of temperature, chemical composition and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals that gradually fill the discharge volume. Sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant when ions impact with near-normal angle of incidence, and ions have low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the near-cathode discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account.

Anders, Andre

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

Variations in K{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange depth in commercial and experimental float glass compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the results of ion-exchange experiments conducted on 17 commercial soda-lime-silicate (SLS) float glass and 8 experimental SLS glass compositions. A significant variation in the depth of K{sup +} penetration with relatively small changes in composition was observed. The data were fit to a multiple regression model in which the major oxides are the independent variables and depth of K{sup +} is the dependent variable. The model indicates that increased depth of exchange (increased interdiffusion coefficient) correlates predominantly with increased K{sub 2}O and/or Na{sub 2}O content of the glass, with a decreased total alkaline earth content and with the ratio of CaO/MgO.

Sinton, C.W.; LaCourse, W.C.; O'Connell, M.J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and CST were added to the feed. These reductions in melt rate are consistent with previous studies that showed a negative impact of increased TiO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of melting. The impact of agitating the melt pool via bubbling was not studied as part of this work, but may be of interest for further testing. It is recommended that additional melt rate testing be performed should a potential reduction in melt rate of 10-15% be considered an issue of concern, or should the anticipated composition of the glass with the addition of material from salt waste processing be modified significantly from the current projections, either due to changes in sludge batch preparation or changes in the composition or volume of SCIX and SWPF material.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Analysis of spent ion exchange media: Superlig 639 and Superlig 644  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford High-Level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for the removal of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 99}Tc from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The cesium-selective Superlig{reg_sign} 644 (SL-644) and the technetium-selective Superlig{reg_sign} 639 (SL-639) have been evaluated in tests with actual waste samples. These materials have a finite processing lifetime in the plant and will need to be disposed of. The composition and level of residual radionuclide contamination is important for assessing various disposal pathways for the Superlig{reg_sign} materials. This report contains the results of analyses of subsamples of the SL-639 and SL 644 materials that have been used in small column testing of actual waste samples at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory. The wastes that have been tested include samples from Tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-107. The analyses of the spent resins include inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for metals, cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) spectroscopy for mercury, gamma energy analysis (GEA) for radionuclides and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for selected metals and radionuclides. While these results provide an indication of the analyte concentrations that may be left on the spent resin, they do not fully represent the concentrations that may be found after extended plant processing with additional load/elute cycles and different waste compositions. BNFL estimates that the SL-644 may last for 100 load/elute cycles with Envelope A and C wastes and 20 cycles with Envelope B wastes. The number of useable load/elute cycles for the SL-639 is not well defined, but is likely on the order of hundreds.

DE Kurath; JJ Wagner

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Salt-Zeolite Ion Exchange Equilibrium Studies for Complete Set of Fission Products in Molten LiCl-KCl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results on LiCl-KCl based molten salts/zeolite-A contact experiments and the associated equilibrium ion exchange model. Experiments examine the contact behaviors of various ternary salts (LiCl-KCl-YCl3, LiCl-KCl-LaCl3, and LiCl-KCl-PrCl3) and quaternary salts (LiCl-KCl-CsCl-NdCl3 and LiCl-KCl-CsCl-SrCl2) with the zeolite-A. The developed equilibrium model assumes that there are ion exchange and occlusion sites, both of which are in equilibrium with the molten salt phase. A systematic approach in estimating total occlusion capacity of the zeolite-A is developed. The parameters of the model, including the total occlusion capacity of the zeolite-A, were determined from fitting experimental data collected via multiple independent studies including the ones reported in this paper. Experiments involving ternary salts were used for estimating the parameters of the model, while those involving quaternary salts were used to validate the model.

Tae-Sic Yoo; Steven M. Frank; Michael F. Simpson; Paula A. Hahn; Terry J. Battisti; Supathorn Phongikaroon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sequential separation of actinide elements from highly radioactive Hanford waste by ion exchange methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple, rapid method has been developed for the sequential separation of actinide elements from samples with high salt content such as these resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements in 9M HC1 solution are introduced into an anion exchange column. U(VI), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) are retained on the column while Am(III) passes through. Plutonium is eluted first, reductively; after which neptunium and then uranium are eluted with mixtures of HC1 and HF. The Am(III) is purified by cation exchange in a nitric acid system. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.; Kozelisky, A.E.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ultra-fast charge exchange spectroscopy for turbulent ion temperature fluctuation measurements on the DIII-D tokamak (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel two-channel, high throughput, high efficiency spectrometer system has been developed to measure impurity ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations associated with long-wavelength turbulence and other plasma instabilities. The spectrometer observes the emission of the n= 8-7 hydrogenic transition of C{sup +5} ions ({lambda}{sub air}= 529.06 nm) resulting from charge exchange reactions between deuterium heating beams and intrinsic carbon. Novel features include a large, prism-coupled high-dispersion, volume-phase-holographic transmission grating and high-quantum efficiency, high-gain, low-noise avalanche photodiode detectors that sample emission at 1 MHz. This new diagnostic offers an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to earlier ion thermal turbulence measurements. Increased sensitivity is crucial for obtaining enough photon statistics from plasmas with much less impurity content. The irreducible noise floor set by photon statistics sets the ultimate sensitivity to plasma fluctuations. Based on the measured photon flux levels for the entire spectral line, photon noise levels for T(tilde sign){sub i}/T{sub i} and V(tilde sign){sub i}/V{sub i} of {approx}1% are expected, while statistical averaging over long data records enables reduction in the detectable plasma fluctuation levels to values less than that. Broadband ion temperature fluctuations are observed to near 200 kHz in an L-mode discharge. Cross-correlation with the local beam emission spectroscopy measurements demonstrates a strong coupling of the density and temperature fields, and enables the cross-phase measurements between density and ion temperature fluctuations.

Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

A NEW EXTRACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY RESIN CONTAINING KLÄUI LIGANDS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 1 wt% L on Amberlite® XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am(III) and Pu(IV). The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is...

184

Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-phase H/D ion molecule reactions that alkali adducted species exchange slower and to a lesser extent than protonated species in the tyrosine- and arginine-containing peptides. Experimental and computational results are discussed in terms of peptide ion...

Sawyer, Holly Ann

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

185

Exchange interaction in binuclear complexes with rare-earth and copper ions: A many-body model study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a many-body model Hamiltonian to study the nature of the magnetic ground state of heterobinuclear complexes involving rare-earth and copper ions. We have taken into account all diagonal repulsions involving the rare-earth 4f and 5d orbitals and the copper 3d orbital. In addition, we have included direct exchange interaction, crystal field splitting of the rare-earth atomic levels and spin-orbit interaction in the 4f orbitals. We have identified the interorbital 4f repulsion Uff and crystal field parameter ?f as the key parameters involved in controlling the type of exchange interaction between the rare earth 4f and copper 3d spins. We have explored the nature of the ground state in the parameter space of Uff, ?f, spin-orbit interaction strength ?, and the 4f filling nf. We find that these systems show low-spin or high-spin ground state depending on the filling of the 4f levels of the rare-earth ion and ground state spin is critically dependent on Uff and ?f. In case of half filling [Gd(III)] we find a reentrant low-spin state as Uff is increased, for small values of ?f, which explains the recently reported apparent anomalous antiferromagnetic behavior of Gd(III)-radical complexes. By varying Uff we also observe a switch over in the ground state spin for other fillings. We have introduced a spin-orbit coupling scheme which goes beyond the L-S or j-j coupling scheme and we find that spin-orbit coupling does not significantly alter the basic picture.

Indranil Rudra; C. Raghu; S. Ramasesha

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are presented for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, J.P.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, Jane P. (813 E. Rollingwood Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

DSM BUYS RESINS UNIT OF AVECIA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM BUYS RESINS UNIT OF AVECIA ... DSM HAS AGREED TO ACQUIRE Avecia's NeoResins coating resins business for almost $680 million. ... The unit will be known as DSM NeoResins and will become part of DSM Coating Resins. ...

PATRICIA SHORT

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The virucidal properties of silver ion-exchange resins and metal-based nanoparticles and their potential use in water purification.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Contamination of water with various disease causing agents such as bacteria and viruses leads to 4 billion cases of diarrheal disease and 1.8 million deaths… (more)

Scott, Greg Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SORPTION BY MST AND MMST UNDER CONDITIONS REVELANT TO THE SMALL COLUMN ION-EXCHANGE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of tests were performed to examine the kinetics of Sr and actinide removal by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) under mixing conditions similar to what will be provided in the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program. Similar removal kinetics were seen for two different mixing energies, indicating that under these conditions bulk solution transport is not the rate limiting step for Sr and actinide removal. Sr removal was found to be rapid for both MST and mMST, reaching steady-state conditions within six hours. In contrast, at least six weeks is necessary to reach steady-state conditions for Pu with MST. For mMST, steady-state conditions for Pu were achieved within two weeks. The actual contact time required for the SCIX process will depend on starting sorbate concentrations as well as the requirements for the decontaminated salt solution. During testing leaks occurred in both the MST and mMST tests and evidence of potential desorption was observed. The desorption likely occurred as a result of the change in solids to liquid phase ratio that occurred due to the loss of solution. Based on these results, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommended additional testing to further study the effect of changing phase ratios on desorption. This testing is currently in progress and results will be documented in a separate report.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Poirier, M.

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Condensing Heat Exchangers Optimize Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of fluorocarbon resin covered tubes has advanced to the point where full scale marketing in connection with condensing heat exchangers has begun. Field installations show simple paybacks of one to one and a half years with resulting...

Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, P. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ion-pairing dynamics of Li{sup +} and SCN{sup -} in dimethylformamide solution: Chemical exchange two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy has been proven to be an exceptionally useful method to study chemical exchange processes between different vibrational chromophores under thermal equilibria. Here, we present experimental results on the thermal equilibrium ion pairing dynamics of Li{sup +} and SCN{sup -} ions in N,N-dimethylformamide. Li{sup +} and SCN{sup -} ions can form a contact ion pair (CIP). Varying the relative concentration of Li{sup +} in solution, we could control the equilibrium CIP and free SCN{sup -} concentrations. Since the CN stretch frequency of Li-SCN CIP is blue-shifted by about 16 cm{sup -1} from that of free SCN{sup -} ion, the CN stretch IR spectrum is a doublet. The temperature-dependent IR absorption spectra reveal that the CIP formation is an endothermic (0.57 kJ/mol) process and the CIP state has larger entropy by 3.12 J/(K mol) than the free ion states. Since the two ionic configurations are spectrally distinguishable, this salt solution is ideally suited for nonlinear IR spectroscopic investigations to study ion pair association and dissociation dynamics. Using polarization-controlled IR pump-probe methods, we first measured the lifetimes and orientational relaxation times of these two forms of ionic configurations. The vibrational population relaxation times of both the free ion and CIP are about 32 ps. However, the orientational relaxation time of the CIP, which is {approx}47 ps, is significantly longer than that of the free SCN{sup -}, which is {approx}7.7 ps. This clearly indicates that the effective moment of inertia of the CIP is much larger than that of the free SCN{sup -}. Then, using chemical exchange 2DIR spectroscopy and analyzing the diagonal peak and cross-peak amplitude changes with increasing the waiting time, we determined the contact ion pair association and dissociation time constants that are found to be 165 and 190 ps, respectively. The results presented and discussed in this paper are believed to be important, not only because the ion-pairing dynamics is one of the most fundamental physical chemistry problems but also because such molecular ion-ion interactions are of critical importance in understanding Hofmeister effects on protein stability.

Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwang-Hee; Kwon, Donghyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Son, Hyewon [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungnam; Cho, Minhaeng [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Multidimensional Spectroscopy Laboratory, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

Marini, Joseph Thomas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions using monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST)-laden filter cartridges. Four types of ion exchange cartridge media (CST and MST designed by both 3M and POROX{reg_sign}) were evaluated. In these proof-of-principle tests effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 was observed. However, the experiments were not performed long enough to determine the saturation levels or breakthrough curve for each filter cartridge. POREX{reg_sign} MST cartridges, which by design were based on co-sintering of the active titanates with polyethylene particles, seem to perform as well as the 3M-designed MST cartridges (impregnated filter membrane design) in the uptake of strontium. At low salt simulant conditions (0.29 M Na{sup +}), the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with the 3M-design MST cartridge measured 26, representing the removal of 96% of the Sr-85. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with the POREX{reg_sign} design MST cartridge measured 40 or 98% removal of the Sr-85. Strontium removal with the 3M-design MST and CST cartridges placed in series filter arrangement produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 or 97.6% removal compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 or 99.7% removal of the strontium with the POREX{reg_sign} MST and CST cartridge design placed in series. At high salt simulant conditions (5.6 M Na{sup +}), strontium removal with 3M-designed MST cartridge only and with 3M-designed MST and CST cartridges operated in a series configuration were identical. The instantaneous decontamination factor and the strontium removal efficiency, under the above configuration, averaged 8.6 and 88%, respectively. There were no POREX{reg_sign} cartridge experiments using the higher ionic strength simulant solution. At low salt simulant conditions, the uptake of Cs-137 with POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge out performed the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge, with a Cs-137 instantaneous decontamination factor of 55 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of 98% does meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in the low salt simulant liquor. The Cs-137 removal with 3M-designed CST cartridge produced a decontamination factor of 2 or 49% removal efficiency. The Cs-137 performance graph for the 3M-designed CST cartridge showed an early cessation in the uptake of cesium-137. This behavior was not observed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges. No Cs-137 uptake tests were performed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges at high salt simulant conditions. The 3M-designed CST cartridges, with an instantaneous Cs-137 decontamination factor of less than 3 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of less than 50% failed to meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in both the low and high salt simulant liquors. This poor performance in the uptake of Cs-137 by the 3M CST cartridges may be attributed to fabrication flaws for the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The reduced number of CST membrane wraps per cartridge during the cartridge design phase, from 3-whole wraps to about 1.5, may have contributed to Cs-137 laden simulant channeling/by-pass which led to the poor performance in terms of Cs-137 sorption characteristics for the 3M designed CST cartridges. The grinding of CST ion exchange materials, to reduce the particle size distribution and thus enhance their easy incorporation into the filter membranes and the co-sintering of MST with polyethylene particles, did not adversely affect the sorption kinetics of both CST and MST in the uptake of Cs-137 and Sr-85, respectively. In general, the POREX{reg_sign} based cartridges showed more resistance to simulant flow through the filter cartridges as evidenced by higher pressure differences across the cartridges. Based on these findings they conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into filter membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium a

Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); St. Martin, Edward (Libertyville, IL); Arora, Michelle (Woodridge, IL); de la Garza, Linda (Woodridge, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

CdS and CdS/CdSe sensitized ZnO nanorod array solar cells prepared by a solution ions exchange process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS and CdS/CdSe quantum dots are assembled on ZnO nanorods by ion exchange process. • The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO effectively extends the absorption spectrum. • The performance of ZnO/CdS/CdSe cell is improved by extending absorption spectrum. - Abstract: In this paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and cadmium sulfide/cadmium selenide (CdS/CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) are assembled onto ZnO nanorod arrays by a solution ion exchange process for QD-sensitized solar cell application. The morphology, composition and absorption properties of different photoanodes were characterized with scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum and Raman spectrum in detail. It is shown that conformal and uniform CdS and CdS/CdSe shells can grow on ZnO nanorod cores. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells based on ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS/CdSe nanocable arrays were assembled with gold counter electrode and polysulfide electrolyte solution. The CdS/CdSe sensitization of ZnO can effectively extend the absorption spectrum up to 650 nm, which has a remarkable impact on the performance of a photovoltaic device by extending the absorption spectrum. Preliminary results show one fourth improvement in solar cell efficiency.

Chen, Ling; Gong, Haibo; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jun [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials in Universities of Shandong, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Yang, Shikuan [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States); Cao, Bingqiang, E-mail: mse_caobq@ujn.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials in Universities of Shandong, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Calcite dissolution and Ca/Na ion-exchange reactions in columns with different flow rates through high ESR soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leaching of a Na?-affected calcareous soil with water results in two concurrent recesses: (i) CaCO? dissolution, and (ii) replacement of Na? on the cation-exchange complex by Ca²?. In the current study, Woodward soil (coarse-silty, mixed...

Navarre, Audrey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8 through SB17), MST additions, CST additions to Tank 40 or to a sludge batch preparation tank (Tank 42 or Tank 51, referred to generically as Tank 51 in this report), streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and two canister production rates. A wide array of potential glass frit compositions was used to support this assessment. The sludge and frit combinations were evaluated using the predictive models in the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The results were evaluated based on the number of frit compositions available for a particular sludge composition scenario. A large number of candidate frit compositions (e.g., several dozen to several hundred) is typically a good indicator of a sludge composition for which there is flexibility in forming an acceptable waste glass and meeting canister production rate commitments. The MST and CST streams will significantly increase the concentrations of certain components in glass, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}, to levels much higher than have been previously processed at DWPF. Therefore, several important assumptions, described in detail in the report, had to be made in performing the evaluations. The results of the paper studies, which must be applied carefully given the assumptions made concerning the impact of higher Ti, Zr, and Nb concentrations on model validity, provided several observations: (1) There was difficulty in identifying a reasonable number of candidate frits (and in some cases an inability to identify any candidate frits) when a waste loading of 40% is targeted for Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17, regardless of the addition of SCIX or SWPF streams. This indicates that the blending strategy for these sludge batches should be reevaluated by Savannah River Remediation (SRR). (2) In general, candidate frits were available to accommodate CST additions to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. A larger number of candidate frits were typically available for the sludge batches when CST is added to Tank 51 rather than Tank 40, meaning that more compositional flexibility would be available for frit selection and DWPF operation. Note however that for SB8 and SB17, no candidate frits were available to accommodate CST going to Tank 40 with and without SWPF streams. The addition of SWPF streams generally improves the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. (3) The change in production rate from 40 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) batches per year (i.e., the current production rate) to 75 SRAT batches per year, without SWPF streams included, had varied results in terms of the number of candidate frits available for processing of a given sludge batch. Therefore, this variable is not of much concern in terms of incorporating the SCIX streams. Note that the evaluation at 75 SRAT batches per year (approximately equivalent to 325 canisters per year) is more conservative in terms of the impact of SCIX streams as compared to a production rate of 400 canisters per year. Overall, the outcome of this paper study shows no major issues with the ability to identify an acceptable glass processing window when CST from the SCIX process is transferred to either Tank 40 or Tank 51. The assumptions used and the model limitations identified in this report must be addressed through further experimental studies, which are currently being performed. As changes occur to the planned additions of MST and CST, or to the sludge batch preparation strategy, additional evaluations will be performed to determine the potential impacts. As stated above, the issues with Sludge Batches 8, 16, and 17 should be further evaluated by SRR. A

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Stone, M.; Koopman, D.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Selective metal ion extraction for multiple ion liquid-liquid exchange reactions. Progress report, DE-AS02-79ER 10406. A001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of selecting a model binary system to study was completed. The system selected is Cu(II), Fe(III) acid sulfate solutions extracted by ..beta..-alkenyl 8-hydroxy quinoline (Kelex 100) in xylene. Maximum copper extraction occurs in less than 5 minutes at 30 to 50/sup 0/C. Thermodynamic chemical equilibrium studies with the Fe(III) ion indicate that the ionic charge of the extracted ion is +3 over a limited pH and concentration range. A simplified equilibrium model did not fit the experimental data. A chemical equilibrium model for the aqueous phase was developed. Kinetic studies on the liquid jet recycle reactor are underway. The model proposed to analyze simultaneous extraction of Cu(II) and Fe(III) in a stirred tank extractor was reduced to a set of two nonlinear algebraic equations for idealized kinetic expressions.

Tavlarides, L.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Study by in situ FTIR of the SCR of NO by propene on Cu2+ ion-exchanged Ti-PILC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption on Cu ion-exchanged titanium pillared clay (Cu-Ti-PILC) was investigated by in situ infrared spectroscopy to provide insight into the reaction intermediates present in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by propene in the presence of oxygen. The NO/O2 adsorption produced different nitrate species due to the presence of terminal and bridged Cu2+–OH groups. These nitrates evolved into N2 and N2O in small amounts once the NO catalytic cycle was finished. It can be concluded that the Cu2+–OH groups reacted with the nitro group, thus forming nitrates. C3H6 adsorption was higher and stronger than NO adsorption on the active sites of the catalyst. C3H6 reacted in the active site producing hydrocarbon intermediates (an organic nitro compound and acetate), which were responsible for the NO reduction.

J.L. Valverde; A. de Lucas; F. Dorado; A. Romero; P.B. García

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Experimental data and analysis to support the design of an ion-exchange process for the treatment of Hanford tank waste supernatant liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks contain a mixture of sludge, salt cake, and alkaline supernatant liquids. Disposal options for these wastes are high-level waste (HLW) glass for disposal in a repository or low-level waste (LLW) glass for onsite disposal. Systems-engineering studies show that economic and environmental considerations preclude disposal of these wastes without further treatment. Difficulties inherent in transportation and disposal of relatively large volumes of HLW make it impossible to vitrify all of the tank waste as HLW. Potential environmental impacts make direct disposal of all of the tank waste as LLW glass unacceptable. Although the pretreatment and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include retrieval of the aqueous liquids, dissolution of the salt cakes, and washing of the sludges to remove soluble components. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids, which are the focus of this report on cesium removal by ion exchange. The main objectives of the ion-exchange process are removing cesium from the bulk of the tank waste (i.e., decontamination) and concentrating the separated cesium for vitrification. Because exact requirements for removal of {sup 137}Cs have not yet been defined, a range of removal requirements will be considered. This study addresses requirements to achieve {sup 137}Cs levels in LLW glass between (1) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Class C (10 CFR 61) limit of 4600 Ci/m{sup 3} and (2) 1/10th of the NRC Class A limit of 1 Ci/m{sup 3} i.e., 0.1/m{sup 3}. The required degrees of separation of cesium from other waste components is a complex function involving interactions between the design of the vitrification process, waste form considerations, and other HLW stream components that are to be vitrified.

Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Brown, G.N.; Bryan, S.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kim, A.Y.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nonlinear ion concentration polarization : fundamentals and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion exchange membrane (IEM) is a functional material that has a permselectivity of ions. Two types of IEMs - anion exchange membrane (AEM) and cation exchange membrane (CEM) - are used in a variety of electrochemical ...

Kwak, Rhokyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Retrofit for Plastic Resin Driers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETROFIT FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have... installation of dew point meters and a programmable controller to tailor the regeneration cycle to the required dew point temperature. Background It was estimated that there are about 450 plastic processors in the Southern California Edison service...

Joseph, B.; Thuro, G.

206

Guayule resin separation and purification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraction and reducing the presence of these terpenes to practically non-detectable levels in the polar fraction. A single component, as identified by gas chromatograph (GC) was also effectively extracted from the Texas A&M resins. Saponification..., using an FID Solvent fractionation of the Firestone resin between methanol and hexane was also apparently effective in separating the low molecular weight rubber. Figure 16 and Figure 17 show the gas chromatographs of the bottom phase (fraction "a...

Bajwa, Mohinder P.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gasification characteristics to 14CO2 of 14C radionuclide desorbed from spent resin by phosphate solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The removal characteristics of H14CO3 ? ions from IRN-150 mixed resin contaminated with 14C radionuclide and the gasification effects of 14C radionuclide on 14CO2 are investigated in this study. T...

Ho-Yeon Yang; Ji-Hoon Lee; Jung-Jin Lee

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Intermediate-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Technetium from Savannah River Site Tank 44 F Supernate Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford River Protection Project waste Treatment facility design contracted to BNFL, Inc., a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 4 F waste solution was treated for the removal of technetium (as pertechnetate ion). Interest in treating the SRS sample for Tc removal resulted from the similarity between the Tank 44 F supernate composition and Hanford Envelope A supernate solutions. The Tank 44 F sample was available as a by-product of tests already conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as part of the Alternative Salt Disposition Program for treatment of SRS wastes. Testing of the SRS sample resulted in considerable cost-savings since it was not necessary to ship a sample of Hanford supernate to SRS.

King, W.D.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ion exchange characteristics of enhanced oil recovery systems (miscibility studies). Sesquiannual report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the period of this report, studies of the hydrotropic properties of organic alkylbenzenesulfonates and particularly of alkylbenzenecarboxylates were extended; the effects of several different alcohols on miscibility between aqueous protosurfactant solutions and aliphatic and aromatic alkanes were investigated; hydrotropic properties of an alicylic carboxylate were determined; the equivalent weight of the organic salts studied was extended into the surfactant range; solubilities of protosurfactants and surfactants in salt solution were measured; and investigations of the adsorption of protosurfactants on minerals as a function of salinity were started. Pseudo three-component representations of hydrocarbon/alcohol/aqueous protosurfactant solutions (constant ratio of organic salt to water) have now been studied extensively, particularly in the case of toluene/1-butanol/aqueous sodium 2,5-diisopropylbenzenesulfonate. Measurements include establishment of the phase behavior in the limiting three-component systems, the effect of protosurfactant concentration in the four-component systems, and determination of the compositions in a limited number of cases of the coexisting phases. In extension of the equivalent weight of organic salts into the recognized surfactant regime, some were found to give miscibiity patterns which appeared to be reasonable extrapolations of the protosurfactants systems and some were quite different. Solubilities of surfactants restrict investigation to compositions having asymmetric boundaries. In these, it appears that protosurfactants are more effective in promoting miscibility than surfactants. Solubilities of organic salts in NaCl solutions, both of protosurfactants and surfactants, decline much more sharply with NaCl concentration than a constant product of the sodium ion concentration times the organic ion concentration would predict.

Ho, P.C.; Kraus, K.A.; Bender, T.M.; Ogden, S.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modification of Resin-Type Adsorbents for Ethane/Ethylene Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modification of Resin-Type Adsorbents for Ethane/Ethylene Separation ... On Ag+-exchanged Amberlyst 35 (36.5% exchange) at 25 °C and 1 atm, the equilibrium adsorbed amount for C2H4 is 1.48 mmol/g, and the equilibrium adsorption ratio for C2H4/C2H6 is 6.4. ... The complexation agents can be classified into three forms:? solution, solid adsorbent, and membrane. ...

Zhongbiao Wu; Sang-Sup Han; Soon-Haeng Cho; Jong-Nam Kim; Kuck-Tack Chue; Ralph T. Yang

1997-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

Enhancement of exchange bias and training effect in ion-beam sputtered Fe{sub 46}Mn{sub 54}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a remarkable enhancement by 300% of the exchange-bias field at room temperature, without affecting the coercivity value, via optimum magnetic annealing (250?°C/3 kOe) in ion-beam sputtered FeMn(30?nm)/NiFe(10?nm) bilayers. This specific behavior has been attributed to a higher degree of ?-FeMn(111) orientation that offers more interfacial FeMn moments to get pinned with the moments of the adjacent NiFe layer. Unlike the absence of training effect at room temperature, a pronounced training effect and an accompanying magnetization reversal asymmetry are evidenced upon field cooling below 50?K due to the presence of biaxial exchange induced anisotropy across the interdiffused FeMn/NiFe interface. The present findings not only have technological significance but also are of relevance to the understanding of interfacial spin disorder and frustration in these exchange-biased systems.

Fulara, Himanshu; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in; Kashyap, Subhash C. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Granville, Simon [Callaghan Innovation, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Anion exchange membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Charge-Exchange Collisions Between Hydrogen Ions and Cesium Vapor in the Energy Range 0.5-20 keV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Charge-exchange collisions have been studied when H+ ions and ground state H0 atoms are incident on Cs vapor. Measurements of the positive, neutral, and negative beam components after passage through the target were made as a function of the Cs target thickness at several energies between 0.5 and 20 keV. All three beam components were found to approach charge equilibrium monotonically. The maximum H- equilibrium yield is (21 ± 4)%, which occurs at an H+ energy of 0.75 keV. The H- yield decreases with increasing energy, and is 0.4% at 20 keV. At energies below 4 keV the H+ equilibrium yield is very small compared with the yield of H0 and H-. For energies greater than 10 kev the H- equilibrium yield is very small compared with the yield of H0 and H+. The cross sections ?+0, ?+-, ?0+, and ?0- were measured. The subscripts + and - refer to the H+ and H- ions, 0 as an initial subscript refers to a ground-state H0 atom, and 0 as a final subscript refers to an H0 atom in the particular states produced. The cross section ?+0 decreases with increasing energy, and ranges from (9.4 ± 2.0) × 10-15 cm2 at 1 keV to (7.5 ± 1.1) × 10-16 cm2 at 15 keV. The cross section ?+- decreases with increasing energy in the range 2-15 keV, and has the value (2.1 ± 0.6) × 10-17 cm2 at 5 keV. The cross section ?0+ increases with increasing energy, having the value (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10-17 cm2 at 2 keV, and (1.74 ± 0.26) × 10-16 cm2 at 15 keV. The cross section ?0- decreases with increasing energy, having the value (1.5 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm2 at 2 keV and (1.4 ± 0.2) × 10-17 cm2 at 15 keV.

A. S. Schlachter; P. J. Bjorkholm; D. H. Loyd; L. W. Anderson; W. Haeberli

1969-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both strontium-85 and cesium-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor for strontium-85 with monosodium titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% strontium-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the strontium-85 instantaneous decontamination factor with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the monosodium titanate impregnated membrane cartridges and crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges and co-sintered active crystalline silicotitanate cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of cesium-137 with co-sintered crystalline silicotitanate cartridges. Tests results with crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges for cesium-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semicontinuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with MST impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% Sr-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with co-sintered active MST cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the MST impregnated membrane cartridges and CST impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active MST cartridges and co-sintered active CST cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of Cs-137 with co-sintered CST cartridges. Tests results with CST impregnated membrane cartridges for Cs-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

DIVALENT ION EXCHANGE WITH ALKALI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery and Improved Drilling Hethods,on Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery and Im- proved Drilling

Bunge, A.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation of gamma induced degradation of Amberlite 200 cation resin by mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, provisions were made for collecting samples of any gas produced. The irradiated resin was exposed to total 7 8 8 accumulations of 1. 0129X10 , 1. 0215XIO , and 5. 0168X10 Rads in three separate runs. It should be noted that the same amount of demineral.... (December 1977) Albert Antonio Freitag, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James 8. Smathers Amberlite 200 cation exchange resin was irradiated by gamma 7 8 radiation to doses of 10 to 5X10 Rads. Results of the analysis...

Freitag, Albert Antonio

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

492 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B/Vol. 5,No. 2/February 1988 Nonlinear-optical effects in ion-exchanged  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nonlinearity together with a fast response time.'-7 SDG consists of nano- crystallites of CdS-exchanged semiconductor-doped glass waveguides C. N. Ironside, T. J.Cullen, B.S. Bhumbra, and J.Bell Department-exchanged channel waveguides fabricated in semiconductor- doped glass. The nonlinearity is manifested as optically

220

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

Carper, J.D. (Hercules Inc., Wilmington, DE (US))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coupling of porous filtration and ion-exchange membranes in an electrodialysis stack and impact on cation selectivity: A novel approach for sea water demineralization and the production of physiological water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional electrodialysis (ED) and electrodialysis with ultrafiltration (EDUF) or nanofiltration (EDNF) membrane treatments were carried-out for partial desalination of sea water and to evaluate their potential for the production of physiological water. A demineralization rate of 10.6% was obtained with the EDNF and of 40.25% with EDUF and conventional ED processes. The nanofiltration membrane, due to its high electrical resistance, slowed down the migrations of ions. Moreover, the use of an ultrafiltration membrane had no significant effect on the demineralization rate of sea water and the electrodialytic parameters in comparison with the use of conventional ED membranes. A demineralization rate between 20.5 and 30.1% was obtained for each cation analyzed following EDNF treatments and between 43.3 and 64.4% when conventional ED or EDUF was used. Moreover, the decrease in the concentration of monovalent ions was slightly larger than for divalent ions in the case of ED and EDUF while for EDNF, the higher decrease was observed for calcium ion. This means that the replacement of a cation-exchange membrane by an ultrafiltration membrane would not change the selectivity of the process for ion separation but with a nanofiltration membrane a cation-selectivity appears.

Laurent Bazinet; Marianne Moalic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ortho-ortho aramatic bis maleimide-diamine resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

APO-BMI is a chain-extended with certain diamines to provide thermosetting resins retaining the improved properties of APO-BMI resins, but having increased toughness in the cured resins.

Zupancic, J.J.; Swedo, R.J.; Jamieson, D.R.; Schumacher, E.F.; Buehler, A.J.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

223

Initial cost analysis of a desalination process utilizing hydrotalcite and permutite for ion sequestration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An initial cost analysis of a proposed desalination process was performed. The proposed process utilizes tailored inorganic ion exchangers, hydrotalcite and permutite, to sequester anions and cations from a brackish water solution. Three different process scenarios were considered: (1) disposal of the spent exchangers as dry waste (2) conventional chemical regeneration, and (3) acid regeneration of permutite coupled with thermal (550 C) regeneration of hydrotalcite. Disposal of the resin and conventional regeneration are not viable options from an economic standpoint. Applying limited data and optimistic assumptions to the third scenario yielded an estimate of $2.34/kgal of product water. Published values for applying conventional reverse osmosis to similar water streams range from $0.70 to $2.65/kgal. Consistent with these baseline values, the Water Treatment Estimation Routine, WaTER, developed by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation produced a cost estimate of $1.16/kgal for brackish water reverse osmosis.

Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NON-ISOTHERMAL INJECTION MOULDING WITH RESIN CURE AND PREFORM DEFORMABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transfer Molding), SRIM (Structural Resin Injection Molding), SCRIMP (Seeman Com- posite Resin Infusion

Preziosi, Luigi

225

Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy ... Current status of ion exchange membranes for power generation from salinity gradients ...

Geoffrey M. Geise; Michael A. Hickner; Bruce E. Logan

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Simulant Liquid Ion Exchange Column Test Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Ion Exchange testing using the "HTWOS" salt simulant and Superlig resin will test removal...

227

Section C  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

established for the ILAW melter system. The Cs removal process shall use an elutable ion exchange resin. Resin selection shall consider technical acceptability and life cycle...

228

Photo Gallery - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

resin, columbia river Official Building Numbers: 100-HX Area: 100-H Description: This photo shows tanks filled with an ion exchange resin inside the 100-HX groundwater treatment...

229

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

230

Simultaneous removal of organic matter and salt ions from saline wastewater in bioelectrochemical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in physical and chemical separation processes such as ion-exchange, electrodialysis, or reverse osmosis [1

231

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were not successful in preventing the formation of iron titanate crystals in the KT09-series glasses. Increased K{sub 2}O concentrations were successful in hindering the formation of iron titanates in some of the glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. However, this result did not apply to all of the CCC versions of the glasses, indicating a compositional dependence of this effect. In addition, high concentrations of K{sub 2}O have been shown to hinder the ability of the DWPF durability and viscosity models to predict the performance of these glasses. The usefulness of increased K{sub 2}O concentrations in preventing the formation of iron titanates may therefore be limited. Further characterization was not performed for the KT09-series glasses since the type of crystallization formed was the characteristic of interest for these compositions. All of the KT10-series glasses were XRD amorphous, regardless of heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements showed that the glasses met the targeted concentrations for each oxide. In general, the measured PCT responses of the KT10-series glasses were well predicted by the DWPF models. The measured, normalized release values for silicon for some of the glasses fell above the 95% confidence interval for the predicted values; however, the PCT responses for these glasses remain considerably lower than that of the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The viscosities of the KT10-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. The next step in this study will be to compile all of the data developed and further compare the measured properties and performance with those predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. Recommendations will then be made as to which models, if any, may need to be modified in order to accommodate the material from SCIX into DWPF

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Ion-exchanged pillared clays: A new class of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons and by ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH{sub 3} is presently performed with vanadia-based catalysts for flue gas applications. Hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). SCR of NO by hydrocarbons can also find important applications for lean-burn (i.e., O{sub 2}-rich) gasoline and diesel engines where the noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective in the presence of excess oxygen. Pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) have been studied extensively for a number of catalyzed reactions. We have found high activities of PILCs for SCR of NO by NH{sub 3} (26.28). Pillared clays have considerable Bronsted acidity (27, 28), and the protons can be exchanged with metal cations. The Bronsted acidity of TiO{sub 2}-PILC, in particular, remains high after heat treatment at temperatures as high as 400{degrees}C (27-29). In this note, we report first results on the activities of cation-exchanged pillared clays for SCR of NO by both hydrocarbon and NH{sub 3}. 37 refs., 3 figs.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Catalytic Modification of Polymers: Hydrogenation Routes to Amine Functional Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water treatment Hair care products Ion exchange resin Paper sizing Motor oil additives Applications including ion exchange resin, waste water treatment, paper sizing cosmetic products, pharmaceutical and polyvinylpyrimidines are water soluble and highly hygroscopic. Block copolymers possessing vinylpyridine segments were

234

Use of EIChroM`s TRU resin in the determination of americium, plutonium and uranium in air filter and water samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TRU Resin, an extraction chromatographic material (octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphene oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP)) manufactured by EIChroM Industries, was tested for its actinide sorption and desorption characteristics. A study was initiated to demonstrate the effectiveness of extracting plutonium, americium and uranium from water and air filter samples from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Quality Assessment Program (QAP), and the effectiveness of subsequent desorption of one chemical species at a time in order to prepare each of them for a spectrometry. Crossover of plutonium into the americium fraction with the TRU Resin was observed and could not be eliminated while using TRU Resin only. However, prior extraction of plutonium using an anion exchange resin can overcome this problem. A method for the determination of americium is proposed which combines the extraction of plutonium onto Bio-Rad AG 1-X8 anion exchange resin with the extraction of americium using the TRU Resin. This method was tested on three triplicate sets of QAP air filters and two triplicate sets of QAP water samples. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 90 percent, and the results were identical to those obtained by the existing methods. The time required to perform the analysis for americium was shortened from 5 weeks to 1 week.

Berne, A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

r- and p-space electron densities and related kinetic and exchange energies in terms of s states alone for the leading term in the 1/Z expansion for nonrelativistic closed-shell atomic ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a step towards constructing nonlocal energy density functionals, the leading term in the so-called 1/Z expansion for closed-shell atomic ions is the focus here. This term is characterized by the properties of the bare Coulomb potential (-Ze2/r), and for an arbitrary number of closed shells it is known that ??(r)/?r=-(2Z/a0)?s(r), where ?(r) is the ground-state electron density while ?s(r) is the s-state (l=0) contribution to ?(r). Here, the kinetic-energy density t(r) is also derived as a double integral in terms of ?s(r) and Z. Although the exchange energy density ?x(r) is more complex than t(r), a proof is given that, in the Coulomb limit system, ?x is indeed also determined by s-state properties alone. The same is shown to be true for the momentum density n(p), which here is obtained explicitly for an arbitrary number of closed shells. Finally, numerical results are presented that include (a) ten-electron atomic ions (K+L shells), (b) the limit as the number of closed shells tends to infinity, where an appeal is made to the analytical r-space study of Heilmann and Lieb [Phys. Rev. A 52, 3628 (1995)], and (c) momentum density and Compton line shape for an arbitrary number of closed shells.

I. A. Howard; N. H. March; V. E. Van Doren

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chloride anion exchange coprocessing for recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical residues and Cs sub 2 PuCl sub 6 filtrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing studies of plutonium recovery from direct oxide reduction (DOR) and electrorefining (ER) pyrochemical process residues show that chloride anion exchange coprocessing is useful and effective. Coprocessing utilizes DOR residue salt as a reagent to supply the bulk of chloride ion needed for the chloride anion exchange process and to improve ER residue salt solubility. ER residue salt and ER scrapeout can be successfully treated, either alone or together, using coprocessing. In addition, chloride anion exchange at 2.0M acidity results in improved process performance by greatly reducing disproportionation of plutonium(IV), eliminating restrictions on oxidation time compared to operation at 1.0M acidity. Laboratory-scale experiments show that below-discard effluent plutonium losses are obtained. Resin capacity was 30 g Pu/{ell} or greater. Furthermore, it is feasible to perform chloride anion exchange recovery of plutonium from filtrate resulting from precipitation of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs{sub 2}PuCl{sub 6}, an oxidant salt to be used in the molten salt extraction process) and integration of its preparation with recovery of DOR salts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Killion, M.E.

1990-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of extractants and chelating resins in polishing actinide-contaminated waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, the trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remaining in the effluent require additional processing. We are doing research to develop a secondary unit operation that can directly polish the effluent so that actinide levels are reduced to below the maximum allowed for facility discharge. We selected solvent extraction, the only unit operation that can meet the stringent process requirements imposed; several carbonyl and phosphoryl extractants were evaluated and their performance characterized. We also investigated various engineering approaches for solvent extraction; the most promising was a chelating resin loaded with extractant. Our research now focuses on the synthesis of malonamides, and our goal is to bond these extractants to a resin matrix. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Yarbro, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Resin-assisted enrichment of thios as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC?MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

Guo, Jia; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Wastewater and water treatment: Anion exchange. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the theory and methods of anion exchange in the treatment of potable water and wastewaters. Citations discuss anion exchange resins and membranes, desalination techniques, and process evaluations. Methods for anion analysis using chromatographic techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 74 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wastewater and water treatment: Anion exchange. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the theory and methods of anion exchange in the treatment of potable water and wastewaters. Citations discuss anion exchange resins and membranes, desalination techniques, and process evaluations. Methods for anion analysis using chromatographic techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 74 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effects of Pyrimidine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Inhibitors on Hepatic Fluoropyrimidine Elimination in the Rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Louis, MO). Ion-exchange resins were obtained...min before the addition of the fluoropyrimidine...sequential cation-exchange and anion- exchange...rat liver. The demonstration that 2,4-DHP...Separation by ion exchange chromatography...

Frank P. LaCreta; Barbour S. Warren; and Walter M. Williams

1989-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Separation scheme for selective and quantitative isolation of cobalt from neutron-irradiated biological materials by ion exchange and extraction chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly reliable radiochemical separation scheme for selective and quantitative isolation of trace amounts of cobalt from neutron-irradiated biological materials was elaborated. The method consists in wet-ashing of the sample with HNO{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} (1:1) mixture plus vanadium salt (oxidation catalyst), removal of silica by evaporation with HF and separation of cobalt from accompanying ions successively on 3 columns with Dowex 1-X8[Cl{sup -}] from 0.5 M HCl, Dowex 1-X8[Cl{sup -}] from 8 M HCl + 2 M MgCl{sub 2} and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) supported on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer, from 7 M HCl solution, respectively. Cobalt of very high radiochemical purity is finally recovered in 1.2 M HCl solution with practically 100% yield. The separation scheme is universally applicable, to biological samples of both animal and plant origin and was devised to become an integral part of the very accurate ({open_quotes}definitive{close_quotes}) method of cobalt determination by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Preliminary results on Co determination by NAA in some certified reference materials confirmed high reliability of the devised separation scheme.

Dybczynski, R.; Danko, B.; Maleszewska, H. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Optical pumping of ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiofrequency spectroscopy has been extended to positive ions with S ground states by means of optical pumping. The ions are stored in buffer gases or ion traps and are polarized directly by optical pumping or indirectly by spin exchange, change exchange, or Penning ionization with optically pumped atoms. The applied methods are described. The experiments can be divided into two categories: Collisional interactions of the polarized ions are investigated, like the exchange processes mentioned above, spin exchange with free electrons, spin depolarization and hyperfine density shifts in rare gases. For the two latter effects drastic differences are observed between atomic and ionic 2S12 states the explanations of which reveal the influence of the ionic charge on the interactions. The comparison of equivalent processes involving isoelectronic 2S or 2P configurations of atoms and ions provides a test of current collision theories. Precision rf spectroscopy of ionic ground states yields the 2S12 hyperfine structure splittings of 3He+ and group II ions with relative accuracies of up to 10?9, with further improvement possible. Direct and indirect optical pumping of 1S0 ions is used to determine nuclear magnetic moments, diamagnetic shielding coefficients, and chemical shifts. Applications and further developments of the present methods are discussed.

E.W. Weber

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Resin infusion analysis of nanoclay filled glass fiber laminates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on the resin flow characteristics of nanoclay filled glass fiber laminates processed by Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Molding (VARIM). Laminates with varying quantities of nanoclays (0–5 wt.%) were prepared and the effect of these nanoclays on the epoxy resin flow characteristics was studied. It was found that the flow rate of resin continuously decreased as nanoclay content continuously increased. The reduction in the flow rate was attributed to the rate of change of curing and the subsequent change in viscosity of the nanoclay filled resin. Analysis of infusion process by Darcy’s law show that the permeability of the fiber decreased in the nanoclay filled resin system. Nanoclay filled laminates show improved static and dynamic mechanical properties than that of unfilled resin composites.

K. Kanny; T.P. Mohan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, P.J.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

Bower, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Weeks, Donald R. (Saratoga, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Psychology on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psychology on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram Psychology majors are welcome to apply Honours, you need to take into account the advice from the Department of Psychology (http://sydney.edu.au/ current_students/student_exchange/forms_downloads.shtml). Timing To meet Australian Psychology

Viglas, Anastasios

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - acp resin composites Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RTM, Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer... Molding (VARTM), Seemann Composites Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMP), has emerged as an important... 1 Experimental...

254

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Asphaltenes and Resins, and Dipole Moment in Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual Earth Science, Palo Alto, CA 94306 A petroleum fluid can be di®ided into three types of species: asphaltenes, resins or mildly polar. The interaction among these species strongly affect asphaltene precipitation from petroleum

Firoozabadi, Abbas

255

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens Michel Chapuisat1,*, Anne Oppliger2. Wood ants, Formica paralugubris, commonly bring back pieces of solidified coniferous resin of larvae exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. These results show that wood ants

Lehmann, Laurent

256

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

258

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

259

Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resin’s property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for air–cooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800 kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; A. Eslamian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A New Hybrid Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells-Battery Power System with Efficiencies Considered  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid systems, based on lead-acid or lithium-ion batteries and proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), give the possibility of ... results show that the combination of lead-acid batteries or lithium-ion batteries

Chung-Hsing Chao; Jenn-Jong Shieh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Anodes Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for...

262

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Optimized Anion Exchange Membranes for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

vanadium redox flow battery; anion exchange membrane; ion exchange capacity; cycling performance; power density ... All electrochemical measurements were conducted using a fully automated redox flow battery testing system (Scribner 857 Redox Flow Cell System). ... Characteristics of a new all-vanadium redox flow battery ...

Dongyang Chen; Michael A. Hickner; Ertan Agar; E. Caglan Kumbur

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front; Liquid Resin Infusion. #12;2 1. Introduction Recently, Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes have been

Boyer, Edmond

266

Intracellular Sequestration of Sodium by a Novel Na /H Exchanger in Yeast Is Enhanced by Mutations in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane Na /K -ATPase, a P-type ion pump, that drives Na ions out of the cell in exchange for K ions (1). The resultant Na gradient serves as the primary energy source for the transport of other ions and metabolites threat to agricultural production worldwide (4, 5). Because of a basic similarity in ion transport

Rao, Rajini

267

Cesium and Strontium Specific Exchangers for Nuclear Waste Effluent Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 50 years, nuclear defense activities have produced large quantities of nuclear waste that now require safe and permanent disposal. The general procedure to be implemented involves the removal of cesium and strontium from the waste solutions for disposal in permanently vitrified media. This requires highly selective sorbents or ion exchangers. Further, at the high radiation doses present in the solution, organic exchangers or sequestrants are likely to decompose over time. Inorganic ion exchangers are resistant to radiation damage and can exhibit remarkably high selectivities. We have synthesized three families of tunnel-type ion exchangers. The crystal structures of these compounds as well as their protonated phases, coupled with ion exchange titrations, were determined and this information was used to develop an understanding of their ion exchange behavior. The ion exchange selectivities of these phases could be regulated by isomorphous replacement of the framework metals by larger or smaller radius metals. In the realm of layered compounds, we prepared alumina, silica, and zirconia pillared clays and sodium micas. The pillared clays yielded very high Kd values for Cs+ and were very effective in removing Cs+ from groundwaters. The sodium micas also had a high affinity for Cs+ but an even greater attraction for S42+. They also possess the property of trapping these ions permanently as the layers slowly decrease their interlayer distance as loading occurs. Sodium nonatitanate exhibited extremely high Kd values for Sr2+ in alkaline tank wastes and should be considered for removal of Sr2+ in such cases. For tank wastes containing complexing agents, we have found that adding Ca2+ to the solution releases the complexed Sr2+ which may then be removed with the CST exchanger.

A. Clearfield; A. I. Bortun; L. A. Bortun; E. A. Bhlume; P. Sylvester; G. M. Graziano

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Potassium-Calcium Exchange in a Multireactive Soil System: II. Thermodynamics1 P. M. JARDINE ANDD. L. SPARKS2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ions and sup- ports the hypothesis of the multireactive natureof the soil. Although K was selectively energy of ex- change, enthalpy of exchange, entropy of exchange. Jardine, P.M., and D.L. Sparks. 1984

Sparks, Donald L.

269

Nalco and Argonne reach licensing agreement covering resin wafer technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the USA, Nalco Co has reached a licensing agreement with the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, covering its resin wafer electrodeionisation (RW-EDI) technology.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scratch resistance of different silica filled resins for obturation materials B. Bilyeu1,2 , W have scratch resistance values in the range appropriate for applications as obturation materials. Keywords: Obturation materials, Polymerzsilica, Hybrids, Polymer tribology, Scratch resistance Introduction

North Texas, University of

271

A resin-buffered nutrient solution for controlling metal speciation in the algal bottle assay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal speciation in solution is uncontrolled during algal growth in the traditional algal bottle assay. A resin-buffered nutrient solution was developed to overcome this problem and this was applied to test the effect of chloride (Cl?) on cadmium (Cd) uptake. Standard nutrient solution was enriched with 40 mM of either NaNO3 or NaCl, and was prepared to contain equal Cd2+ but varying dissolved Cd due to the presence of CdCln2?n complexes. Both solutions were subsequently used in an algal assay in 100 mL beakers that contained only the solution (designated “?R”) or contained the solution together with a cation exchange sulfonate resin (2 g L?1, designated “+R”) as a deposit on the bottom of the beaker. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was grown for 72 h (1.4 × 105–1.4 × 106 cells mL?1) in stagnant solution and shaken three times a day. Growth was unaffected by the presence of the resin (p > 0.05). The Cd concentrations in solution of the ?R devices decreased with 50–58% of initial values due to Cd uptake. No such changes were found in the +R devices or in abiotic controls. Cd uptake was unaffected by either NaNO3 or NaCl treatment in the +R device, confirming that Cd2+ is the preferred Cd species in line with the general concept of metal bioavailability. In contrast, Cd uptake in the ?R devices was two-fold larger in the NaCl treatment than in the NaNO3 treatment (p < 0.001), suggesting that CdCln2?n complexes are bioavailable in this traditional set-up. However this bioavailability is partially, but not completely, an apparent one, because of the considerable depletion of solution 109Cd in this set-up. Resin-buffered solutions are advocated in the algal bottle assay to control trace metal supply and to better identify the role of metal complexes on bioavailability.

L. Verheyen; R. Merckx; E. Smolders

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effects of nanoclay on the thermal and rheological properties of a vartm (vacuum assisted resin transfer molding) epoxy resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three types of commercially available organophilic Montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B, 25A and 15A) were used to prepare VARTM epoxy resin nanocomposites in order to study the effect of the nanoclay organophilic modif...

Roberta Peila; J. C. Seferis; T. Karaki…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

Ponnampalam; Elankovan (Okemos, MI)

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

VOLUME 76, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 JANUARY 1996 First Study of Heavy-Ion Mirror Charge Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are nuclear reaction studies with mirror nuclear pairs, since only one member of a mirror pair can be stable accessible excitation energy range. Charge-exchange p, n reactions at energies above 100 MeV have long been, since they involve the detection of rather low-energy neutrons. Furthermore, experiments in the b1

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

275

Highly Polarized Ion Sources for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of the RHIC facility at BNL and the Electron Ion Colliders (EIC) under development at Jefferson Laboratory and BNL need high brightness ion beams with the highest polarization. Charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron and Siberian snakes have the potential to handle the needed polarized beam currents, but first the ion sources must create beams with the highest possible polarization to maximize collider productivity, which is proportional to a high power of the polarization. We are developing one universal H-/D- ion source design which will synthesize the most advanced developments in the field of polarized ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, ion beams with greater than 90% polarization, good lifetime, high reliability, and good power efficiency. The new source will be an advanced version of an atomic beam polarized ion source (ABPIS) with resonant charge exchange ionization by negative ions. An integrated ABPIS design will be prepared based on new materials and an optimized magnetic focusing system. Polarized atomic and ion beam formation, extraction, and transport for the new source will be computer simulated.

V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Homogenization of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations for Ion Transport in Charged Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations are derived for macroscopic ion transport in charged porous media under periodic fluid flow by an asymptotic multi-scale expansion with drift. The microscopic setting is a two-component periodic composite consisting of a dilute electrolyte continuum (described by standard PNP equations) and a continuous dielectric matrix, which is impermeable to the ions and carries a given surface charge. Four new features arise in the upscaled equations: (i) the effective ionic diffusivities and mobilities become tensors, related to the microstructure; (ii) the effective permittivity is also a tensor, depending on the electrolyte/matrix permittivity ratio and the ratio of the Debye screening length to the macroscopic length of the porous medium; (iii) the microscopic fluidic convection is replaced by a diffusion-dispersion correction in the effective diffusion tensor; and (iv) the surface charge per volume appears as a continuous "background charge density", as in classical membrane models. The coefficient tensors in the upscaled PNP equations can be calculated from periodic reference cell problems. For an insulating solid matrix, all gradients are corrected by the same tensor, and the Einstein relation holds at the macroscopic scale, which is not generally the case for a polarizable matrix, unless the permittivity and electric field are suitably defined. In the limit of thin double layers, Poisson's equation is replaced by macroscopic electroneutrality (balancing ionic and surface charges). The general form of the macroscopic PNP equations may also hold for concentrated solution theories, based on the local-density and mean-field approximations. These results have broad applicability to ion transport in porous electrodes, separators, membranes, ion-exchange resins, soils, porous rocks, and biological tissues.

Markus Schmuck; Martin Z. Bazant

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - anion-exchange resins omega-3 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 2 Merck KGaA Life Science Products Darmstadt Germany 11 processing@merck.de www.merck-lsp.de Summary: .merck-lsp.de 1.10316 Fractogel...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic cation-exchange resin Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 7 2114 J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2114-2180 FKN mechanism of the BZ reaction (expanded "Oregonator") Summary: -Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction in which the ferroin catalyst...

279

Ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

High-resolution studies of charge exchange in supernova remnants with Magellan, XMM-Newton, and Micro-X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charge exchange, the semi-resonant transfer of an electron from a neutral atom to an excited state in an energetic ion, can occur in plasmas where energetic ions are incident on a cold, at least partially neutral gas. ...

Heine, Sarah Nicole Trowbridge

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Innovative Resin Transfer and Disposition at Indian Point Unit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of sites have both operating and shuttered nuclear facilities. Reducing dose to the caretakers can have beneficial effects for other site personnel who may work or pass near the shuttered facility. Furthermore, disposition of waste can have a positive effect on NRC required regular reporting of, and plans for the disposition of on-site wastes. Entergy's Indian Point Energy Center recently reduced the on-site curie load by working with RWE NUKEM and WMG, Inc. to innovatively free and ship nearly 1,000 cubic feet and nearly 600 curies of 30 year old resin and sludge from Unit 1. Old drawings, operations logs, were consulted and transfer lines were remotely checked. The tank selection sequence was primarily based on dose rates. System modifications to facilitate resin transfer were made on the lowest dose tanks first to gain current operating experience. Resin transfers were performed in accordance with the procedures developed, into waiting cask with appropriate waste containers. Decomposed resin of varying consistency could clog discharge lines and operational changes were made to mitigate against flow interruptions. Hydrogen buildup in the tanks was carefully addressed while solidified resin remains a challenge to be overcome. (authors)

Posivak, E.J.; Freitag, A.A.; Miller, R.J. [WMG, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

283

P – Goldschmidt Abstracts 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...purification by ion exchange chromatography...AG1X8 100-200 resin. Samples are...water column. In addition, intermediate...area (SSA) or ion exchange capacity. These...and conclusive demonstration of their role...

284

Email Template  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion exchange, and are doing an investigation to see if they are using the right ion exchange and resin feed. Jim said they will also look at in- situ treatment with ferrous...

285

Fe isotope fractionation during the precipitation of ferrihydrite and transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...purification by ion exchange using AG MP1 macroporous resin based on a procedure...through the same ion exchange procedure. The...ferrihydrite upon the addition of KOH, thereby...M.S. (2001) Demonstration of significant abiotic...

R. E. Clayton; K. A. Hudson-Edwards; D. Malinovsky; P. Andersson

286

Two studies in process modelling: injection moulding and resin film infusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......line to any desired shape. When this is accomplished, many car components and machine components generally will be produced...residual resin film [ INJECTION MOULDING AND RESIN FILM INFUSION defective but [ impregnated ply 35 FIG. 6. Section through centre of......

David Blest; Brian R. Duffy; Sean McKee; Murilo F. Tomé

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced resin cleaning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new composite... at this world-class research center is the Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System or ComPRIS (patent pending... ) that employs applied pressure to infuse resin...

288

Uranium from seawater research : final progress report, FY 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the FY '82 campaign 14 new ion exchange resin formulations, prepared by the Rohm & Haas Company, were tested by MIT at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The best of these chelating resins was again of the ...

Borzekowski, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

CHRONOLOGY AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LARGE MAMMAL BONES IN PIT 91, RANCHO LA BREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...most striking demonstrations of the uniqueness...matrix. In addition, for a small...1986). In addition, carnivores...depth. In addition, dates were...over the XAD resin. The gelatin...acid from an ion-exchange resin. This...

ANTHONY R. FRISCIA; BLAIRE VAN VALKENBURGH; LILLIAN SPENCER; JOHN HARRIS

290

MODELING AND SIMULATION OF SOLID FLUIDIZATION IN A RESIN COLUMN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present work is to model the resin particles within the column during fluidization and sedimentation processes using computation fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The calculated results will help interpret experimental results, and they will assist in providing guidance on specific details of testing design and establishing a basic understanding of particle’s hydraulic characteristics within the column. The model is benchmarked against the literature data and the test data (2003) conducted at Savannah River Site (SRS). The paper presents the benchmarking results and the modeling predictions of the SRS resin column using the improved literature correlations applicable for liquid-solid granular flow.

Lee, S.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes in the purification of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF ULTRAFILTRATlON hfEMBRANES IN TEIE PURIFICATION OF GUAYULE RESIN A Thesi" bv RANJIT S. JEYASEELAN Submitted to the Office of Gra. duate Studies of Texas ARM Ilniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Safety Engineering EVALUATION OF' ULTRAF'ILTRATION MEMBRANES IN THE PURIFICATION OF GUAYULE RESIN A Thesis by RANJIT S. JEYASEELAN Appr ed as to style and content by John P. Wagn ( ' air of the Committee...

Jeyaseelan, Ranjit S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

REPORT NT-14-1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

through an ion exchange resin bed for purification before being transferred to holding tanks. The principal sources of radioactivity in liquid effluents are trace amounts of...

293

Architecture on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Previous students have attended: · McMaster University, Canada · Malmö University, Sweden · University of Leeds, United Kingdom · Northeastern University, USA · Purdue University, USA · University of California on page 2 5 International Office Study Abroad and Exchange Program Level 4, Jane Foss Russell Building (G

Viglas, Anastasios

294

Agriculture on Exchange InternationalExchangeProgram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wide exchange destinations for Agriculture majors include: Canada....................McGill University, Faculty of Arts (AgEc only) (www.umanitoba.ca) United Kingdom.....University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment (www.leeds.ac.uk) .................................University of Nottingham, School of Biosciences

Viglas, Anastasios

295

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

Firoozabadi, Abbas

297

Comparing the Degree of Exothermic Polymerization in Commonly Used Acrylic and Provisional Composite Resins for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Resins for Intraoral Appliances CA Rice, DVM; Jessica Riehl, DVM;Karl Broman, PhD;Jason W. Soukup, DVM; William R. Gengler, DVM Summary: The use ofdental acrylics and composite resins in veteri- naryylics and composite resins produce an exothermic reaction during the polymerization ptvcess. The aim q

Broman, Karl W.

298

Terebinth resin in antiquity: possible uses in the Late Bronze Age Aegean region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The remains of an estimated one metric ton of terebinth resin, the yellowish, semi-fluid, aromatic resin of a Pistacia tree, were recently discovered on the Late Bronze Age shipwreck site at Uluburun, Turkey. The resin was carried in an estimated...

Peachey, Claire Patricia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Aluminum Activated by pH Change and Electrochemically Induced Pitting Corrosion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for separation are ion exchange, adsorption on granular activated carbon, cationic-substance coated material, membrane filtration, capacitive deionization/carbon aerogel (Sellers 2007). Of the above mentioned processes only ion exchange resins, granular... for separation are ion exchange, adsorption on granular activated carbon, cationic-substance coated material, membrane filtration, capacitive deionization/carbon aerogel (Sellers 2007). Of the above mentioned processes only ion exchange resins, granular...

Raut Desai, Aditya B.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

Duval, B. P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant...

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.; Lonergan, R.; Wimer, J.

302

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Green Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exchange Place: New York, New York Zip: NY 10282 Product: String representation "The Green Excha ... es marketplace." is too long. References: Green Exchange1 This article is a...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium ions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Otty, Mass and heat transfer in ion-exchange membranes (1996) 7. Belinda Flem, Peltier... heats in cryolite melts with alumina (1996) 8. Ellen Marie Hansen, Modelling of...

307

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Technology Performance Exchange  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem: Perceived fiscal risk associated with the installation of unfamiliar technologies impedes adoption rates for cost-effective, energy-saving products. Impact of Project: Enable end users to quickly and

309

SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial SiC materials are much lower due to phonon scattering by impurities (e.g., sintering aids located at the grain boundaries of these materials). The thermal conductivity of our SiC was determined using the laser flash method and it is 214 W/mK at 373 K and 64 W/mK at 1273 K. These values are very close to those of pure SiC and are much higher than those of SiC materials made by industrial processes. This SiC made by our LSI process meets the thermal properties required for use in high temperature heat exchanger. Cellulose and phenolic resin carbons lack the well-defined atomic structures associated with common carbon allotropes. Atomic-scale structure was studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), nitrogen gas adsorption and helium gas pycnometry. These studies revealed that cellulose carbon exhibits a very high degree of atomic disorder and angstrom-scale porosity. It has a density of only 93% of that of pure graphite, with primarily sp2 bonding character and a low concentration of graphene clusters. Phenolic resin carbon shows more structural order and substantially less angstrom-scale porosity. Its density is 98% of that of pure graphite, and Fourier transform analysis of its TEM micrographs has revealed high concentrations of sp3 diamond and sp2 graphene nano-clusters. This is the first time that diamond nano-clusters have been observed in carbons produced from phenolic resin. AC and DC electrical measurements were made to follow the thermal conversion of microcrystalline cellulose to carbon. This study identifies five regions of electrical conductivity that can be directly correlated to the chemical decomposition and microstructural evolution during carbonization. In Region I, a decrease in overall AC conductivity occurs due to the initial loss of the polar groups from cellulose molecules. In Region II, the AC conductivity starts to increase with heat treatment temperature due to the formation and growth of conducting carbon clusters. In Region III, a further increase of AC conductivity with increasing heat treatment temperature is obs

DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60 to 150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17) % in helium, 22.1(13) % in neon, and 17.0(10) % in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

P. Dendooven; S. Purushothaman; K. Gloos

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ion collection by a conducting sphere in a magnetized or drifting collisional plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion collection by dust grains and probes in plasmas with a neutral background is of interest in the study of both space and terrestrial plasmas, where charge-exchange collisions can play an important role in ion collection. ...

Haakonsen, Christian Bernt, 1985-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Material properties of cation exchange membranes for chloralkali electrolysis, water electrolysis and fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to the development of perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes, the application of the membranes in electrochemical cells has advanced greatly, especially in chloralkali electrolysis. Material properties of pe...

T. Asawa

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A GC/FT-IR Analysis of Commercial Divinyl Benzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......As a demonstration of the utility...make cation exchange resins. Wiley and...absorptions. In addition, some novel...specific ion chromatogram...M + l)+ ion^ Identification...41) + ions were also...avoided. In addition, the analysis......

J.D. Witt; M.K. Gabriel; R.L. Julian

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Silane discharge ion chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silane dc, rf, and dc proximity discharges have been studied using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. Qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges have been developed from experimental measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane have been measured and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He , Ne , and Ar with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane have been measured as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. A detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge has been developed by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that have been gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

Chatham, R.H. III

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Rheology Analysis of Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compacting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGR-1 and AGR-2 overcoating and compacting method utilized a wet mixing process where liquid resin (Hexion Durite SC-1008) was blended with natural and synthetic graphite to produce a graphite/resin matrix for overcoating. The matrix production method specified in the scale-up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered resin and graphite are fed at the same time into a jet mill. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC-1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. Also, attempts to dry out matrix made with SC-1008 for use in the overcoating process at B&W had mixed results. The SC-1008 resin became tacky when dried which caused the matrix to build up inside the overcoater. The scale- up jet milling/mixing and overcoating processes required that a suite of solid or powdered resins be identified. Suitable resins candidates were down selected to two resins, specifically Plenco 14838 and Hexion SD-1708. These resins are referred to as novolac or “two-stage” resins because they require the addition of a curing agent such as hexamethylenetetramine (Hexa) to promote an increased level of cross linking. The overcoating matrix is made of 3 components; natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and resin. The most influential component of the compacting process is the resin component and how it behaves with regards to time, temperature, and pressure. The selected scale-up resins are considered fast curing which means that the increase in molecular weight (curing) occurs over a relatively short period of time, ranging from a few seconds to several minutes depending on the temperature. To find the optimal compacting conditions it is useful to quantify this behavior. In this report, rheology is used to investigate viscosity as a function of time at specific temperatures for the previously mentioned resins.

Trammell, Michael P. [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Event Media Links Event Media Links Session 1: Technical Exchange Opening Topic Speaker PDF Podcast S01-01 Welcome T. Michalske, SRNL N/A Podcast S01-03 Introductions G. Flowers, SRNS N/A Podcast S01-04 Opening Remarks I. Triay, DOE-EM Presentation PDF Podcast S01-05 Status of Waste Processing Technology Development S. Schneider, DOE-EM Presentation PDF Podcast S01-06 Hanford/SRS Tank Waste Path Forward K. Subramanian/ T. Sams, SRR/WRPS Presentation PDF Podcast S01-07 Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Overview B. Mason, TTT Presentation PDF Podcast S01-08 Next Generation Cesium Solvent B.Moyer/S. Fink/M. Geeting, ORNL/SRNL/SRR Presentation PDF Podcast S01-09 Rotary Microfilter Development/Small Column Ion Exchange D. Herman/ R. Edwards, SRNL/SRR Presentation PDF Podcast Session 2: Increased Waste Loading - Improved Current Processing

317

Characterization and fractionation by ultrafiltration of guayule resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rubber Production. 2. Solute Flow Through GPC Column. 3. Comparison of UF, MF, and RO Processes. 4. Pressure Gradient in Tubular Membrane. 5. Flow Pattern for Hollow Tube Asymmetric UF Membranes. 6. Structure of an Asymmetric Tubular Membrane. 7... information from the GPC analysis, indicates which compounds were present in each fraction. Identification and separation of potentially valuable fractions in the resin would increase the overall market value of the guayule shrub. Ultrafiltration (UF...

Daly, Monica Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Evaluating guayule resin fractions for mutagenicity and toxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the production of guayule rubber becoming more economically viable. At Texas A&M University and elsewhere research is currently being conducted to develop such commercial coproducts from the guayule resin (a byproduct of the extraction process) . Some... of the southeast Asian rubber supplies were cut off by the Japanese, guayule crop development and research was again revived in the U. S. , with the enactment of Public Law 473 initiating the Emergency Rubber Project(4) . As a result, domestic production...

Avirett, Donald Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 684688 Experimental evaluation of the isotopic exchange equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the ion-exchange separation of boron isotopes. Bulletin of Chemical Society of Japan 50, 158­163]. Since strengths. r 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Boron isotopes; Boron isotopic exchange. Introduction The boron isotopic composition of marine carbonates constitutes a promising tracer of the paleo

Kaufman, Alan Jay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oligoacetic Acid Characterization by Isocratic and Linear Salt Gradient Anion-Exchange Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ion-exchange Gibbs free energy (Gexchange) was calcu...constant increment in the energy of exchange for the addition...as the increment per car- boxylic acid group...oligomers provided an alternative and convenient method...calculation of the Gibbs free energy of adsorption for biomolecules......

Hong Li; Costas S. Patrickios

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Charge-exchange collisions in interpenetrating laser-produced magnesium plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charge-exchange collisions in interpenetrating laser-produced magnesium plasmas S.S. HARILAL,1 C charge-exchange collisions between highly charged Mg ions in colliding laser-produced magnesium plasmas magnesium plasmas. 1. INTRODUCTION Several applications of laser-produced plasmas involve an experimental

Harilal, S. S.

323

Ion Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Fischer, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Production of Lignin-Based Phenolic Resins Using De-Polymerized Kraft Lignin and Process Optimization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercialization of Lignin-based phenol formaldehyde resins (LPF) has been limited due to the increase in curing temperatures and decrease in adhesive strength of LPF compared… (more)

Siddiqui, Homaira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced thermoplastic resins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of pounds, dry weight basis) Major... selected thermoplastic resins: Low-Density Polyethylene Polyvinyl Chloride Linear-Low-Density Polyethylene... -Acrylonitrile Polystyrene...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesive resin cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, Orono, ME E-Mail: goodell@umit.maine.edu Abstract The Composites Pressure Resin Infusion System (Com Source: Lopez-Anido, Roberto - Advanced Engineered Wood Composites Center...

328

An Additive Resin Reaction Product, a Method of Treating a Wood...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Additive Resin Reaction Product, a Method of Treating a Wood Product, and a Wood Product Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary...

329

Ultracytochemical Demonstration of Ca2+ -ATPase Activity in the Rat Saphenous Artery and Its Innervated Nerve Terminal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Ultracytochemical Demonstration of Ca2...sides. In addition, Ca2 + -ATPase...Na+ -Ca2+ exchange system41 and...embedded in epoxy resin.26 ' Ultrathin...sodium/calcium exchange. Eur J Biochem...External calcium ions are required...low-viscosity epoxy resin embedding medium...artery calcium ion dependent adenosine......

Fumio Nasu; Kenichirou Inomata

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Water uptake, ionic conductivity and swelling properties of anion-exchange membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurs with negative excess volume of mixing. Percolative nature of the ion transport has been is reduced at the cathode to produce OHÃ? , which transports through the anion-exchange membrane (AEM membrane, AEM can conduct ions only in the presence of water. In addition, water is one of the reactants

331

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

332

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold Lithium or Rubidium atom and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Mireille Aymar; Romain Guérout; Olivier Dulieu

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, UPR3321, Ba circumflex t. 505, Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guerout, R. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, CNRS, ENS, Univ Pierre et Marie Curie case 74, Campus Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold Lithium or Rubidium atom and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

G – Goldschmidt Abstracts 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...denitrification, in addition to temperature-driven...energies for ion pairing and...Recently, the demonstration that these...through rapid exchange. The evolution...what extent resins and their fossil...counterpart amber, exchange hydrogen isotopes...angiosperm resins have an average...metabolic D exchange of 4.63...

336

Thermoelectric heat exchange element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Incorporation of Glycine-2-C14 into Acid-soluble Nucleotide Purines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduced by the addition of unlabeled...known sample on ion exchange resins and paper chromatograms...studied. The demonstration of glycine incorpora...success of such a demonstration. Also, the...V. R. Anion Exchange Chromatography...

Mary P. Edmonds and G. A. LePage

1955-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Identification and Partial Characterization of a Low-Molecular-Weight Inhibitor of Leukotaxis from Fibrosarcoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...antichemotactic activity to ion-exchange resins Five IDsoSof...activity. In addition, nonactive materials...from anion-exchange chromatography...proteins). In addition, since we have...Pert, C. B. Demonstration of a receptor...

H. Warabi; K. Venkat; V. Geetha; L. A. Liotta; M. Brownstein; and E. Schiffmann

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

340

Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Lithium-Ion Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Griffith 4/2004 Small Scale His Tag Enzyme Purification with TALON Affinity Column Resin Overview: This is a small scale method for purifying a His-tagged protein using commercial affinity resin. Materials: TALON rotor, at 18 K rpm) at 4 °C. 7. Save supernatant fraction for column purification. Supernatant can

Doering, Tamara

343

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Particle diagnostics of ion cyclotron resonance plasma heating in the Globus-M tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic experimental results on cyclotron heating of the ion plasma component in the Globus-M spherical tokamak obtained by means of the ACORD-12 charge-exchange ion analyzer are presented. A procedure for determining the maximum energy of fast ions confined in the plasma is described. The procedure was applied to estimate the limiting energy of hydrogen minority ions accelerated during ion cyclotron heating in the Globus-M tokamak. The experimental evaluation of the maximum hydrogen ion energy is confirmed by simulations of ion orbits. Recommendations for optimizing experiments on ion cyclotron heating in the Globus-M tokamak are formulated.

Chernyshev, F. V.; Ayushin, B. B.; Gusev, V. K.; D'yachenko, V. V.; Minaev, V. B.; Mironov, M. I.; Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Sakharov, N. V.; Khitrov, S. A.; Shcherbinin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches are considered in this work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches in manufacturing ultrapure water for nuclear power plants. Resins allow the removal of ionic impurities to subparts-per-million. Thereby in nuclear power plants, resins contribute to guarantee personnel safety, to control feed system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Curing Properties of Epoxy Resins for Use to Abandon Wells Destroyed by Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ........................................................................................................... 18 2.5 Use pipet to put the resin sample into the vials. ........................................... 21 3.1 Viscosity of the BPA resin system 1 decreases with increasing temperature.... ................................................................................................. 24 3.2 The viscosity change of the BPA system a during the curing process at 96.5?C. ......................................................................................................... 25 3.3 The pot life of the BPA resin cured...

Gao, Suining

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

UreaFormaldehyde-Resin Gel Time As Affected by the pH Value, Solid Content, and Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urea­Formaldehyde-Resin Gel Time As Affected by the pH Value, Solid Content, and Catalyst Cheng to investigate the effects of the resin solid content, catalyst content, and pH value obtained by the addition of two kinds of catalysts on the gel time of a urea­formaldehyde (UF) resin. Upon the addition

Wang, Siqun

348

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V.E. Verijenko b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of cavitation during resin ®lm infusion process I. Sevostianov a,*, V ®lm infusion (RFI) process. An analytical model is developed to describe the cavitation conditions formation; Resin ®lm infusion 1. Introduction The resin ®lm infusion (RFI) method of producing composite

Sevostianov, Igor

349

Sources of polarized ions and atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation we discuss methods of producing large quantities of polarized atoms and ions (Stern-Gerlach separation, optical pumping, and spin-exchange) as well as experimental methods of measuring the degree of polarization of atomic systems. The usefulness of polarized atoms in probing the microscopic magnetic surface properties of materials will also be discussed. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Cornelius, W.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ion temperatures in Ormak from Doppler broadening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid-scanning spectrometric techniques have permitted the determination of ion temperatures in ORMAK as a function of time during the discharge pulse for ORMAK plasma currents up to 180 kA. Emission spectra of hydrogen atoms are Doppler-broadened in the line wings, characteristic of the initial proton motions prior to charge exchange, and give ion "temperatures" generally less than kT+ ~ 300 eV. Impurity spectra of C III and O V, as well as the spectra of He II in helium discharges, lead to somewhat higher ion temperatures ranging up to a maximum of kT+ ~ 700 eV.

J. Rand McNally Jr.; R.V. Neidigh

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heat exchanger-accumulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ion Cyclotron-Resonance Heating in a Toroidal Octupole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

rf power near the ion cyclotron-resonance frequency has been used to produce a hundredfold increase (from ? 1 to ? 100 eV) in the ion temperature in a toroidal octupole device. The heating produces no noticeable instabilities or other deleterious effects except for a high reflux of neutrals from the walls. The heating rate is consistent with theory and the limiting ion temperature is determined by charge-exchange losses.

J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott

1975-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

threatening heavy metals because of its high toxicity and some radioactivity. Excessive amounts of uranium seaweed biomass was used to remove the heavy metal uranium from the aqueous solution. Uranium biosorption the heavy metal uptake performance of different biosorbents.LangmuirandFreundlichmodelsoftengenerally fit

Volesky, Bohumil

354

Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

Kim, Yu Seung (Los Alamos, NM); Lee, Kwan-Soo (Blacksburg, VA); Rockward, Tommy Q. T. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ion Exchange for the Recycling of Wastewater Constituents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling or the constituents of wastewater requires efficient and cheap separation methods. Pollutants ... removed in a concentrated form to facilitate their recycling. Similarly, the raw water must be ... has a...

Brian Bolto; Lucjan Pawlowski

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Parametric Ion-Exchange Processes (Parametric Pumping and Allied Techniques)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term “parametric pumping” implies the idea of pumping, that is of transport of material (in our case, ionic species) up along some potential scale (in our case, chemical potential), at the cost of degradat...

D. Tondeur; G. Grevillot

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Dynamics of Platinum Precipitation in an Ion Exchange Membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microscopy of polymer electrolyte membranes that have undergone operation under fuel cell conditions, have revealed a well defined band of platinum in the membrane. Here, we propose a physics based model that captures the mechanism of platinum precipitation in the polymer electrolyte membrane. While platinum is observed throughout the membrane, the preferential growth of platinum at the band of platinum is dependent on the electrochemical potential distribution in the membrane. In this paper, the location of the platinum band is calculated as a function of the gas concentration at the cathode and anode, gas diffusion coefficients and solubility constants of the gases in the membrane, which are functions of relative humidity. Under H2/N2 conditions the platinum band is located near the cathode-membrane interface, as the oxygen concentration in the cathode gas stream increases and/or the hydrogen concentration in the anode gas stream decreases, the band moves towards the anode. The model developed in this paper...

Burlatsky, S F; Atrazhev, V V; Dmitriev, D V; Kuzminyh, N Y; Erikhman, N S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Charge Transport through a Novel Zeolite Y Membrane by a Self-Exchange Process Hyunjung Lee and Prabir K. Dutta*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charge Transport through a Novel Zeolite Y Membrane by a Self-Exchange Process Hyunjung Lee-photoresist-coated membranes were found. Accessibility of the intrazeolitic volume was examined by ion exchange and for optimally illuminated membranes was comparable to uncoated membranes. Charge transport through the membrane

Dutta, Prabir K.

359

basic exchange telecommunications radio service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A service that extends telecommunications service to rural, outlying, and remote...Common abbreviation BETRS. Note: In the basic exchange telecommunications radio service (BETRS), the (a)....

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fatigue behaviour of nanoclay reinforced epoxy resin composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoparticle filling is a feasible way to increase the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. Abundant research work has been published in the last number of years concerning the enhancement of the mechanical properties of nanoparticle filled polymers, but only a reduced number of studies have been done focusing on the fatigue behaviour. This work analyses the influence of nanoclay reinforcement and water presence on the fatigue behaviour of epoxy matrices. The nanoparticles were dispersed into the epoxy resin using a direct mixing method. The dispersion and exfoliation of nanoparticles was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fatigue strength decreased with the nanoclay incorporation into the matrix. Fatigue life of nanoclay filled composites was significantly reduced by the notch effect and by the immersion in water.

J.A.M. Ferreira; L.P. Borrego; J.D.M. Costa; C. Capela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Na K -pump ligands modulate gating of palytoxin-induced ion channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell membranes, they traditionally have been viewed as very to the extracellular surface. The 3Na 2K -exchange transport cycle is completed when two extracellular K ions bind ensure the vectorial nature of net transport. The occluded-ion conformations, with binding sites

Gadsby, David

363

RESEARCH PAPER The face value of ion fluxes: the challenge of determining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the membrane-transport parameter of greatest interest to most researchers in the field of plant ion transport physiology. Key words: Barley, cellular ion exchange, efflux, high-affinity transport, influx, low-affinity transport, potassium. Introduction The unidirectional influx of nutrient ions into the plant cell

Britto, Dev T.

364

ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OC TUPOLE J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN A TOROIDAL OC TUPOLE J. D. Barter and J. C. Sprott February 1975;ION CYCLOTRON HEAT ING IN A TOROIDAL OCTUPOLE J. ,D. Barter and J. C. Sprott University of Wisconsin ion temperature is determined by charge exchange losses. #12;· 19n cyclotron resonance heating has

Sprott, Julien Clinton

365

A Target Factor Analytical Model for Solute-Sorbent Interactions Using Retention Indices for Hydrocarbons on Cation-Exchange Resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......factor analyzed data for 40 hydrocarbons on seven ionic...tests for the heat of combustion and for cyclic...chromatographic data, the latter...r s Solute* Heat of combustion Cyclic uniqueness...reproduced the data with an rms......

Darryl G. Howery; Joseph M. Soroka

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Neutron-Proton Exchange Demonstrated  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron-Proton Exchange Demonstrated ... EVIDENCE of the exchange of charge between protons and neutrons has recently been obtained from studies in the high power cyclotron, according to Ernest O. Lawrence, professor of physics at the University of California a* Berkeley. ...

1947-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Gas Exchange, Partial Pressure Gradients,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Exchange, Partial Pressure Gradients, and the Oxygen Window Johnny E. Brian, Jr., M of circulatory and gas transport physiology, and the best place to start is with normobaric physiology. LIFE affect the precise gas exchange occurring in individual areas of the lungs and body tissues. To make

Riba Sagarra, Jaume

369

Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 March 1922 research-article Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals William A. Bone A. R. Pearson E. Sinkinson W. E. Stockings The Royal Society is...

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A comparative study of dispersion techniques for nanocomposite made with nanoclays and an unsaturated polyester resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the last few years, polymer/clay nanocomposites have been an area of intensive research due to their capacity to improve the properties of the polymer resin. These nanocharged polymers exhibit a complex rheological behavior due to their dispersed ...

Farida Bensadoun; Nadir Kchit; Catherine Billotte; François Trochu; Edu Ruiz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic resin denture Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

denture Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acrylic resin denture Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 OTHER ACCIDENT?24. ANY PERSON WHO...

372

3D printed tooling for vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is widely considered to be one of the low-cost additive manufacturing (AM) processes. In this paper, the suitability of 3DP for making tooling for the vacuum-assisted resin tra...

Dawid Jacobus Dippenaar; Kristiaan Schreve

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

BPA from dental resin material: where are we going with restorative and preventive dental biomaterials?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since a number of years, the question of the impact of BPA released from dental resins and/or sealants ... reaction. The monomers are mainly urethane dimethacrylate, BPA glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), its eth...

Michel Goldberg; Sasha Dimitrova-Nakov; Gottfried Schmalz

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Foamed epoxy resin composite waterproofing and heat insulation in hydraulic construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory and field tests and work on an experimental-industrial scale confimed the feasibility of using foamed epoxy resin heat insulation and waterproofing for protecting hydraulic engineering structures...

V. I. Sakharov

1969-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyd-amino resins based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 11 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary:...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted resin transfer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy 3 Mathematical model of stress formation during vacuum resin infusion I.B. Sevostianov, V.E. Verijenko*, C.J. von Klemperer, B. Chevallereau1 Summary: on...

377

Self-Indicating Resins:? Sensor Beads and in Situ Reaction Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid-phase organic synthesis and solution-phase parallel synthesis assisted by polymer-supported reagents, or scavenger resins, enable painstaking purifications to be avoided during synthesis. This concept was applied to reaction monitoring through the ...

Jin K. Cho; Peter D. White; Wolfgang Klute; Tony W. Dean; Mark Bradley

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES the guidance and direction provided by my advisors: Dr. Mandell, Dr. Cairns and Dr. Larsen. I would also like

379

FAST ION STUDIES OF ION CYCLOTRON HEATING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FAST ION STUDIES OF ION CYCLOTRON HEATING IN THE PLT TOKAMAK Gregory Wayne Hammett;@1986 Gregory Wayne Hammett ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;Abstract Fast Ion Studies of Ion Cyclotron Heating about the physics of wave heating. Previous experiments have demonstrated that ion cyclotron heating

Hammett, Greg

380

Measurement and modeling of uranium and strategic element sorption by amidoxime resins in natural seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEAMATER A Thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA-JORDAN Submitted to the Graduate College oi' Texas A&M University in partial I...'ulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE December i985 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF URANIUM AND STRATEGIC ELEMENT SORPTION BY AMIDOXIME RESINS IN NATURAL SEANATER A thesis by JOSE GREGORIO PINA...

Pina-Jordan, Jose Gregorio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis Dy RONALD NELSON COHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Mlajor Subject: Interdisciplinary Enqi neeri ng EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by RONALD NELSON COHEN Approved as to style and content by: (N. L. Bradley, Cha man) (R. A...

Cohen, Ronald Nelson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

The effect of molecular architecture on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis by GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF EPOXY RESIN SYSTEMS A Thesis bY GALE ANTRUS HOLMES Approved as to style an content by: Alan Let. ton...

Holmes, Gale Antrus

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Set of Acidic Resin Catalysts To Correlate Structure and Reactivity in Fructose Conversion to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Set of Acidic Resin Catalysts To Correlate Structure and Reactivity in Fructose Conversion to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural ... With this set of model catalysts, the cross-linker content of the resin was found to be the most influential factor for the liquid phase dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. ... Materials containing either Brønsted(8-10) or Lewis acid sites(11) were proven to be suitable catalysts for the selective dehydration of carbohydrate feedstocks into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatile platform molecule. ...

Felix H. Richter; Kristina Pupovac; Regina Palkovits; Ferdi Schüth

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

Giardina, Angelo R. [Marple Township, Delaware County, PA

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

385

secondary ion detection | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion detection secondary ion detection Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

386

Worldwide 'Power exchanges' | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indian government is attempting to set-up power exchang, where one can buysell electrical power (just like stock exchange). Please let me know: If power exchange exists in...

387

Heat exchanger with ceramic elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Sodium Natrolite Thursday, October 31, 2013 Structural changes leading to disordering of the cation-water arrangement within the pores of zeolite natrolite while exchanging sodium (Na+) with potassium (K+) have been investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). cation in zeolite sodium natrolite fig1 Figure 1) Artistic representation of the natrolite channel, which opens progressively as a function of the exchanging cation's size. The small golf ball represents ordered sodium cations in a closed elliptical channel, whereas the large baseball represents a disordered cesium cation in an open circular channel. The most fundamental chemical property of zeolites is ion exchange. A

389

Influence of the electron-exchange and quantum shielding on the bremsstrahlung spectrum in degenerate quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of the electron-exchange and quantum shielding on the bremsstrahlung spectrum is investigated in degenerate quantum plasmas. The impact-parameter analysis with the Shukla-Eliasson potential is applied to obtain the electron-ion bremsstrahlung radiation cross section as a function of the impact parameter, photon energy, projectile energy, electron-exchange parameter, Fermi energy, and plasmon energy. The result shows that the electron-exchange effect strongly enhances the bremsstrahlung radiation spectrum in degenerate quantum plasmas. It is also shown that the influence of the electron-exchange broadens the photon emission range in the electron-ion bremsstrahlung process. It is found that the electron-exchange effect focuses the bremsstrahlung photon energy in the soft photon domain. In addition, it is found that the bremsstrahlung radiation cross section increases with an increase of the Fermi energy and, however, decreases with increasing plasmon energy.

Jung, Young-Dae [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407, USA and Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407, USA and Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy Efficiency Exchange 2015 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Exchange 2015 Energy Efficiency Exchange 2015 As the nation's largest energy consumer, the federal government has a tremendous opportunity and clear...

391

Materials - Micro heat exchangers ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials - Micro heat exchangers ... Heat exchanger components fabricated with 3-D printing and analyzed with neutron imaging create a world of opportunities for electronic...

392

Integrated Module Heat Exchanger | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Module Heat Exchanger Integrated Module Heat Exchanger 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

393

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar September 11, 2014 7:00PM to 8:3...

394

Ion-Molecular Reactions in Plasma Containment Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate ion-molecule charge exchange followed by dissociative electron recombination with molecular ions due to the presence of common impurities in a plasma-containment device. For a He+ plasma with N2 impurity, the ionic constituency of plasmas is changed from He+ to nitrogen ions with a time constant ?* given by ?*P(N2)?24 msec ? Torr. However, those ion-molecular recombination processes are not responsible for the enhanced plasma loss in the Princeton spherator at the best vacuum condition.

B. H. Ripin; M. Okabayashi; J. Schmidt; V. Voitsenja; V. Yoshikawa

1972-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Jute fiber composites from coal, super clean coal, and petroleum vacuum residue-modified phenolic resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jute fiber composites were prepared with novolac and coal, phenolated-oxidized super clean coal (POS), petroleum vacuum residue (XVR)-modified phenol-formaldehyde (novolac) resin. Five different type of resins, i.e., coal, POS, and XVR-modified resins were used by replacing (10% to 50%) with coal, POS, and XVR. The composites thus prepared have been characterized by tensile strength, hardness, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transfer infrared (FT-IR), water absorption, steam absorption, and thickness swelling studies. Twenty percent POS-modified novolac composites showed almost the same tensile strength as that of pure novolac composites. After 30% POS incorporation, the tensile strength decreased to 25.84MPa from 33.96MPa in the case of pure novolac resin composites. However, after 50% POS incorporation, the percent retention of tensile strength was appreciable, i.e., 50.80% retention of tensile strength to that of pure novolac jute composites. The tensile strength of coal and XVR-rnodified composites showed a trend similar to that shown by POS-modified novolac resin composites. However, composites prepared from coal and XVR-modified resin with 50% phenol replacement showed 25.4% and 42% tensile strength retention, respectively, compared to that of pure novolac jute composites. It was found that the hardness of the modified composites slightly decreased with an increase in coal, POS, and XVR incorporation in the resin. The XVR-modified composites showed comparatively lower steam absorption than did coal or POS-modified composites. The thermal stability of the POS-modified composites was the highest among the composites studied. The detailed results obtained are being reported.

Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Center of Energy Studies

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube composites to shock wave loading  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We investigate with nonreactive molecular dynamics simulations the dynamic response of phenolic resin and its carbon-nanotube (CNT) composites to shock wave compression. For phenolic resin, our simulations yield shock states in agreement with experiments on similar polymers except the “phase change” observed in experiments, indicating that such phase change is chemical in nature. The elastic–plastic transition is characterized by shear stress relaxation and atomic-level slip, and phenolic resin shows strong strain hardening. Shock loading of the CNT-resin composites is applied parallel or perpendicular to the CNT axis, and the composites demonstrate anisotropy in wave propagation, yield and CNT deformation. The CNTs induce stress concentrations in the composites and may increase the yield strength. Our simulations suggest that the bulk shock response of the composites depends on the volume fraction, length ratio, impact cross-section, and geometry of the CNT components; the short CNTs in current simulations have insignificant effect on the bulk response of resin polymer.

Arman, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); An, Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) and California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States); Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desai, T. G. [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States); Tonks, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cagin, T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Goddard III, W. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasedena, CA (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

398

Vacancy association energy in scandium doped ceria: 45Sc MAS NMR and 2D exchange spectroscopy study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oxygen vacancy exchange between Sc ions in 0.5% Sc-doped ceria Sc0.005Ce0.995O0.9975 is investigated by means of 2D exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). 45Sc NMR spectrum of Sc-doped ceria contains two peaks—one corresponding to Sc ions coupled with an oxygen vacancy (Sc-7), and the other corresponding to Sc ions in a regular lattice site surrounded by eight oxygen ions (Sc-8). The vacancy exchange between these two Sc sites generates the cross-peaks in the EXSY spectrum. Relative amplitudes of the cross-peaks provide direct values of the exchange frequency at a given temperature. Arrhenius analysis of the exchange frequency gives the activation energy Ea = 1.18 eV for the vacancy hopping between Sc sites. Most of this energy barrier is due to association energy which binds the vacancy to Sc3 +. Large dopant–vacancy association energy in Sc doped ceria is demonstrated by 45Sc NMR spectrum of La/Sc doubly doped sample, ScxLaxCe1 ? 2xO2 ? x, x = 0.005, where the only line of Sc-7 site shows that all vacancies are bound by Sc3 + ions.

Reio Põder; Juhan Subbi; Helgi Kooskora; Ivo Heinmaa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer compositions, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes. The multi-block architecture has defined, controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. These improved membranes have better ion transport (proton conductivity) and water swelling properties.

Fujimoto, Cy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Hibbs, Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Ambrosini, Andrea (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten-Exchanged Weiping Ding, George D. Meitzner, David O. Marler,| and Enrique Iglesia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchanged W/H-ZSM5. 1. Introduction Transition metal ions (e.g., Mo, W, V, Fe, Cr) loaded onto several between oxides or carbides of Mo and W. The synthesis of exchanged WOx precursors and their subsequent. They detected carbidic carbon on Mo/H-ZSM5 and showed that MoOx species reduce almost to Mo0 during reaction.10

Iglesia, Enrique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high ..beta../sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R/sub 0/ + a indicate the presence of a non-..mu..-conserving acceleration mechanism.

Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

403

Comparative laboratory evaluation of resin-grouted roof bolt elements. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory testing, the Bureau of Mines established criteria by which common resin-grouted roof-bolting systems can be evaluated and compared. Ultimate strength and stiffness were determined for nontensioned full-column, point-anchor, tensioned full-column, and debondable resin-grouted bolts, and for variations on full-column bolts. Bolt performances were compared using the performance of the 3/4-in full-column resin-grouted bolt as the standard. New and innovative systems can also be qualitatively compared against this standard. Various host mediums were used in the testing: sandstone, concrete, simulated coal, simulated shale, and plaster. Bolt performances expected in other mediums can be inferred from the response patterns obtained in these mediums.

Bartels, J.R.; Pappas, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Literature search on the use of resins for treatment of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 100 commercial providers with mixed-waste treatability capabilities exist in the US. The maturity level of these technologies varies from a bench scale to a pilot or a commercial scale. The techniques include deactivation, chemical oxidation, recovery of metals, stabilization, vitrification, incineration, biodegradation, and chemical extraction. This report focuses on the use of resins to remove actinides and heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Only the literature that described resins with high removing efficiency are presented here. The majority of the literature reviewed are proceedings and national or international reports ordered through the Berkeley Lab Library. Some of the reports that the authors requested have not yet arrived. Only a few papers were found in the open literature (journals or magazines). Although this report does not include all existing references, it provides an accurate assessment of efficient resins to be considered for waste minimization procedures. 70 refs.

AlMahamid, I.; Smith, B.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Li, T.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Softhard exchange-coupled layered structures with modulated exchange coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0209 Received 8 April 2003; accepted 28 June 2003 Magnetically soft/hard exchange-coupled for high performance permanent magnets in the past decades and much progress has been made in improving permanent mag- netic properties. A figure of merit of permanent magnetic materials is the maximum magnetic

Garmestani, Hamid

407

Study of the simultaneous effects of MMT nanoclay and hydrophobically modified ethoxylated urethane (HEUR) on viscoelastic and steady shear properties of water-based acrylic resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The storage stability of montmorillonite/acrylic resin was studied via rheological characterizations. The Na+–MMT nanoclay and a water-based acrylic resin were ... . The results showed that adding the montmorillo...

Mohsen Sarrafi; Babak Kaffashi…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modification of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI) with an allyl-terminated hyperbranched polyimide (AT-PAEKI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modification of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI) with an allyl as a modifier of bisphenol-A based bismaleimide resin (BPA-BMI). This was pursued in anticipation

Mather, Patrick T.

409

Heat Pump Cycle with Solution Circuit and Internal Heat Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-stage cycle, the heat transfer area required on the refrigerant side will increase by 10~ compared to the ammonia cycl e. CONCLUSIONS The hea t p1llllp cycl e employ ing one sol ut ion circuit and absorber/de sorber heat exchange has a more sophisticated... when a two-stage version fed into the same compressor. While ammonia of this cycl e is used. In this paper. another evaporate s out of an ammonia-water sol ution on C version of such cycles will be discussed which the composition. X. of this solution...

Radermacher, R.

410

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

Color Test for Selective Detection of Secondary Amines on Resin and in Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Color Test for Selective Detection of Secondary Amines on Resin and in Solution ... Furthermore, the acetaldehyde/Fmoc amino acid method can be used as a selective colorimetric test for secondary amines in solution. ... Experimental details on synthesis and analysis on selected resin bound substrates; experimental details and results on the following: Measurements of the test sensitivity on solid-phase and in solution; the use of 9-methylfluorene versus Fmoc amino acid; experimental procedures on the preparation and isolation of colored dye precipitates together with MS and IR spectra on isolated colored dye precipitates from exposure of N-benzylmethyl amine to the acetaldehyde/Fmoc-amino acid test solution. ...

Ulrik Boas; Sahar Mirsharghi

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ion Monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Primer on nuclear exchange models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic physics is applied to nuclear force exchange models between two nations. Ultimately, this scenario approach can be used to try and answer the age old question of 'how much is enough?' This work is based on Chapter 2 of Physics of Societal Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007 and 2014)

Hafemeister, David [Physics Department, Cal Poly University, San Luis Obispo, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

ion microprobe | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microprobe ion microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

416

EMSL - secondary ion detection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

secondary-ion-detection en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-struc...

417

(K4Li4)Al8Ge8O32·8H2O: an Li+-exchanged potassium aluminogermanate with the zeolite gismondine (GIS) topology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The title microporous material, (K,Li)-(Al,Ge)-GIS, namely lithium potassium dialuminium digermanium octaoxide dihydrate, is the result of a 50% Li+ exchange into the K-(Al,Ge)-GIS structure. A structural change occurs due to disordering of K+ ions with Li+ ions along [001] and ordering of water molecules along [101].

Celestian, A.J.

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes...

Peterson, G. R.

419

Design of dual column water purification system for industrial gamma irradiator based of PUROLITE® resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract When gamma irradiators are not in use, they have to be stored in nuclear grade water pool. This water serves as shielding and the medium for the removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage to the gamma source and other equipment a purification system controls the water quality. Also, this system serves as the make-up water system for supplies and maintains the de-ionized water level in the gamma source storage pool. In this paper, the design of the dual system for purification and make-up water for optimal water supply and its chemical parameters in the gamma source storage pool is presented. For this purpose, the characteristics of activated carbon purifier, anionic and cationic demineralizers have been determined. “Aerb Safety Standard”, “Purolite Ion Exchange Design Code” and “Canadian Water Refining Company Manual” have been used to design IR-136 gamma irradiator storage pool purification and make-up water system. The main objective of the design is to maintain water purity throughout the storage time.

Reza Gholizadeh Aghoyeh; Hossein Khalafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges More Documents & Publications SPR Annual Reports to Congress...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Composition and structure of resins in lube distillates from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the lower contents of lube components in the crudes being processed today, along with a steady increase of demand for high-quality oils and solid hydrocarbons, as well as the trend toward processing crudes with unregulated composition, it has become necessary to develop new technology for the manufacture of lube stocks, along with the use of additives for various purposes. The effectiveness of additives is determined by their properties and also by the chemical composition of the raw material in each stage of oil production. Resins are important components of raw lube stocks. These resins are complex in composition, and vary in the nature and number of heteroatoms in the molecule and in the structure of the hydrocarbon part of the molecule. The hydrocarbon radicals may include aromatic and naphthenic rings, as well as chains with various configurations. Depending on the structural features of the resin molecules, they may vary in their effects on processes of selective solvent treating, dewaxing, and deoiling with the use of additives. The authors have investigated the resins present in the intermediate and final products of lube oil production.

Kazakova, L.P.; Gundyrev, A.A.; Litvin, N.I.; Shubina, E.S.; Mukhin, M.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum ...

Cruz J. R.; Shah C. H.; Postyn A. S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

An Investigation of the Oncogenic Activity of Two Representative Epoxy Resins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...95,1955. 16. Suoxua SMITH,W. E.; and SUNDERL@ND,D. A. Ex perimental Production of Carcinoma in Rhesus Monkeys. Cancer Research, 16:951 "55,1956. 17. WA.us,T. A. Epoxy Resins. Tappi, 37: 129A "134A,1954.

C. H. Hine; R. J. Guzman; M. M. Coursey; J. S. Wellington; H. H. Anderson

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermohydraulic Simulation of Heat Exchanger Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The determination of network temperatures is carried out together with the evaluation of flow rates and pressures along the network, considering head losses in heat exchangers and associated piping. ... The HEN responsible to distribute cooling water in an industrial unit is composed by three heat exchangers in parallel. ... However, the cooling water distribution among the three exchangers presents a considerable unbalance, where heat exchanger E-101 receives much less cooling water than the design specification. ...

Viviane B. G. Tavares; Eduardo M. Queiroz; Andre? L. H. Costa

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

SHILLER, ALAN M., LUNJIN MAO, AND JERAMÉ CRAMER ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Therefore, we decided to modify the. BGL-bromate method by adding an additional activator and .... unsegmented continuous-flow analysis demonstrating high- ... ion-exchange resin containing the 8-hydroxyquinoline func- tional group. Anal.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Derivative Formation in the Chromatographic Analysis of Food Additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......formed by the addition of bromine...more recent demonstration of the carcinogenicity...acetate. An ion-exchange clean-up...Trimethylsilylation. In addition to acylation...and guaiac resin in food extracts...before. In addition, the more......

H.B.S. Conacher; B.D. Page

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Metabolism of Plasma Glycoproteins: II. Studies on the Rate of Incorporation of Glucosamine-1-14C into Protein-bound Hexosamine in the Rat Bearing Walker 256 Carcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...labeled compound in addition to glucosamine. It...view of the recent demonstration of a qualitative...glycoprotein as well as the demonstration of its biologic function...Separation on Dowex-50 Ion Exchange Resin of Glueosamine and...

J. G. Bekesi; R. A. L. Macbeth; and S. Bice

1966-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chromatin Phospholipids in Normal and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Lymphocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been confirmed by the demonstration of their associa tion...immunofluomescence demonstration of surface membrane...on purification with ion exchange resins. On the other hand...enhanced in vitro by the addition of sphingomyelin at...

Francesco Antonio Manzoli; Nadir Mario Maraldi; Lucio Cocco; Silvano Capitani; and Andrea Facchini

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Complement-dependent Effect of Normal Rabbit Serum on Trypan Blue Staining, Morphology, and Viability of Cultured Walker 256 Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...followed by the addition of 0.~ ml...presence of GKN. In addition, aliquots of...the repeated demonstration that the "incomplete...from serum by an ion- exchange resin (IRC-50...restored by the addition of Ca ++ and...

Robert L. Tuttle and J. H. Smith Foushee

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Microsoft Word - M-2 Section B -Conformed thru 333.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Startup 081015 2015 1,667,000 PTF-22 1GPC2CFM22 Start Up Demonstration of Resin Addition to Ion Exchange Columns 101915 2015 1,667,000 PTF-20 1GPC0CFM20 Construction...

431

Delayed neutron assay to test sorbers for uranium-from-seawater applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delayed Fission Neutron (DFN) assay has been applied to the measurement of uranium content in sorbers exposed to natural seawater for the purpose of evaluating advanced ion exchange resins. DFN assay was found to be ...

Nitta, Cynthia K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

LANDING, WILLIAM M., WILLIAM C. BURNETT, W. BERRY LYONS ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

nesian Mariculture Demonstration Center in Koror,. Palau, for making ... This exchange must be small below .... dard additions was applied to correct for matrix effects, and ... M HC1) samples by ion chromatography .... top of the resin bed.

2000-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Linkage Between Separation of Cu2+, Co2+, and Ni2+ on TLC and Crystal Field Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......polarities. In addition, these solvents...chromatographically. In addition, the posi- tions...Selectivity of Cation Exchange Resins In Various Conditions...pigments: a rapid demonstration. J. Chem. Edu...and silver (I) ions with nickel dithiocarbamate......

Soner Ergül

434

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 13, 1977 ... addition of 1.0 ml of pH 9.0 buffer with- ... resin (Bio-Rad) were prepared .... on AG l-X8 ion exchange was 96-102%, .... 4A), demonstrating the.

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN NATURAL WATERS BY THE ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NOTES AND COMMENT. 799 and a suspension of resin in water poured into an ion exchange column ( 8 x 0.5 cm),. After settling, it was washed with three.

2000-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capture from atmospheric air—Thermodynamic...thermal energy recovery from the...Not reported. Recovery cycle only...ion-exchange resin. Condensation of water and heat from...compression of CO2 to atmospheric pressure included...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Temporal Development of Ion Beam Mean Charge State in PulsedVacuum Arc Ion Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum arc ion sources, commonly also known as "Mevva" ionsources, are used to generate intense pulsed metal ion beams. It is knownthat the mean charge state of the ion beam lies between 1 and 4,depending on cathode material, arc current, arc pulse duration, presenceor absence of magnetic field at the cathode, as well background gaspressure. A characteristic of the vacuum arc ion beam is a significantdecrease in ion charge state throughout the pulse. This decrease can beobserved up to a few milliseconds, until a "noisy" steady-state value isestablished. Since the extraction voltage is constant, a decrease in theion charge state has a proportional impact on the average ion beamenergy. This paper presents results of detailed investigations of theinfluence of arc parameters on the temporal development of the ion beammean charge state for a wide range of cathode materials. It is shown thatfor fixed pulse duration, the charge state decrease can be reduced bylower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate, and reduction of thedistance between cathode and extraction region. The latter effect may beassociated with charge exchange processes in the dischargeplasma.

Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

THE EXCHANGE RATE-INVESTMENT NEXUS AND EXCHANGE RATE INSTABILITY: ANOTHER REASON FOR `FEAR OF FLOATING'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EXCHANGE RATE-INVESTMENT NEXUS AND EXCHANGE RATE INSTABILITY: ANOTHER REASON FOR `FEAR repercussion comes through the reaction of firms to changed asset prices and the firms' decisions to invest: F31, F32 *Corresponding author 1 #12;THE EXCHANGE RATE-INVESTMENT NEXUS AND EXCHANGE RATE

Ahmad, Sajjad

439

Experimental evidence of charge-exchange recombination of highly ionized iron and titanium in Princeton large torus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observed behavior of the emissivitives of boronlike Fe xxii, lithiumlike Fe xxiv and Ti xx, and the heliumlike Fe xxv ions in the Princeton large torus tokamak during high-power neutral (H0 or D0) beam heating is described. A substantial lowering of the dominant ionization state in the center of the discharge, while the electron temperature is rising, is attributed primarily to increased recombination rate of the ions through charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. This interpretation is supported by the different space and time behavior or the lithiumlike and boronlike ions of comparable ionization potentials, and by comparisons of neutral beam heating of the plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating, which does not appreciably change the neutral hydrogen concentration. The observations are compared with approximate zero-dimensional model calculations, using experimental plasma conditions and estimated charge-exchange rates.

S. Suckewer; E. Hinnov; M. Bitter; R. Hulse; D. Post

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

EXCHANGE:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Automatic Sampler A 7-page brochure describes the Shimadzu AOC-6, a syringe-type automatic sampler designed to automate...sampling, measurement, and injection, A system composed of an AOC-6 GC and an integrator provides completely automated GC. Features......

Exchange

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

Sellin, I.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

Sakai, Shigeki, E-mail: sakai-shigeki@nissin.co.jp; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)] [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electron Beam Ion Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

Zschornacka, G; Thorn, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Accurate...

446

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanoscale Heterostructures and Thermoplastic Resin Binders: Novel Li-ion Anode Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of Pittsburgh at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanoscale...

447

An experimental investigation of thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites as a function of interface pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A FUNCTION OF INTERFACE PRESSURE A Thesis by MICHAEL EVERETT RHOADES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A...

Rhoades, Michael Everett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Identification of Small Molecule Binding Molecules by Affinity Purification Using a Specific Ligand Immobilized on PEGA Resin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A synthetic ligand for FK506-binding protein 12 (SLF) was immobilized on various resins, and the binding assays between the SLF-immobilized resins and FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12) were performed. ... This matrix enabled the isolation of FKBP12 from a cell lysate, and the identification of SLF-binding peptides from a phage cDNA library. ... We confirmed the interaction between SLF and these peptides using a cuvette type quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) apparatus. ...

Kouji Kuramochi; Yuka Miyano; Yoshihiro Enomoto; Ryo Takeuchi; Kazutomo Ishi; Yoichi Takakusagi; Takeki Saitoh; Keishi Fukudome; Daisuke Manita; Yoshifumi Takeda; Susumu Kobayashi; Kengo Sakaguchi; Fumio Sugawara

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

Wilber Yaote Lio

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Analytical calculation of detailed model parameters of cast resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of cast resin dry-type transformers make them suitable for different kind of usages. This paper presents an analytical method of how to obtain parameters of detailed model of these transformers. The calculated parameters are compared and verified with the corresponding FEM results and if it was necessary, correction factors are introduced for modification of the analytical solutions. Transient voltages under full and chopped test impulses are calculated using the obtained detailed model. In order to validate the model, a setup was constructed for testing on high-voltage winding of cast resin dry-type transformer. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from FRA and impulse tests.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; S.H. Hosseinian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport phenomena in an ion-exchange membrane containing both H+ and K+ are described using multicomponent diffusion equations (Stefan-Maxwell). A model is developed for transport through a Nafion 112 membrane in a hydrogen-pump setup. The model results are analyzed to quantify the impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It is shown that limiting current densities can result due to a decrease in proton concentration caused by the build-up of contaminant ions. An average cation concentration of 30 to 40 percent is required for appreciable effects to be noticed under typical steady-state operating conditions.

Weber, Adam; Delacourt, Charles

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ionization, charge exchange, and excitation in F + Ar and F + Kr collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured projectile and target x-ray cross sections for F + Ar and F + Kr collisions using fluorine beams of charge states 7 +, 8 +, and 9+ with energies from 20 to 76 MeV. Pronounced enhancements for the Ar K and Kr L vacancy cross sections using F9+ ions compared to those for the 7+ projectile can be explained by charge exchange as described by an empirically scaled Brinkman-Kramers theory. The Ar L, Kr K and Kr M cross sections are found to exhibit features expected for Coulomb ionization. The projectile K x-ray production for the 9+ ion is accounted for by charge exchange processes. Predictions of the first Born approximation for direct single-step excitation to bound states by the target nucleus overestimate the observed cross sections for F7+ and F8+.

Forrest Hopkins; Rudiger Brenn; Anthony R. Whittemore; Nelson Cue; Vince Dutkiewicz; R. P. Chaturvedi

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

Culver, G.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Exchange Fluctuation Theorem for correlated quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the Exchange Fluctuation Theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the non-equilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semi-classical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations.

Sania Jevtic; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph; Yuji Hirono; Shojun Nakayama; Mio Murao

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chapter 4 - Detailed accounts of thermoset resins for moulding and composite matrices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Polyurethanes are obtained by the reaction between polyols and isocyanates, which are of diverse chemical natures and applications. Polyureas, obtained by the reaction of amines, and isocyanates, also cover the whole range of hardnesses and are, generally, more resistant to water. Unsaturated polyesters are obtained by the reaction among di-acids or anhydrides containing a proportion of double bonds, and a diol or glycol. Phenolic resins are obtained by the reaction of tri-phenols and formaldehyde, melamines are obtained by the reaction of melamine and formaldehyde, urea formaldehydes are obtained by reaction of urea and formaldehyde, and epoxy resins are obtained by reaction of a multi epoxy monomer and a diamine or anhydride hardener. The polyimide resins are obtained in two ways: BMI or aminobismaleimides or addition polyimides, which is a reaction of a diamine and bismaleimide to make a prepolymer that is then cured by an excess of diamine, and condensation of polyimides or SP-polyimides. Despite the thermoplastic form, they are infusible, and generally insoluble. Silicones are obtained by hydrolysis of chlorosilanes, and cyanate ester are obtained from aromatic prepolymers containing highly reactive cyanate functional groups that cyclotrimerize exothermically to form triazine ring structures, which result in a tightly crosslinked structure.

Michel Biron

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

NETL's Energy Data eXchange  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A brief tour around NETL's Energy Data Exchange site, where researchers can upload data or look at data from another researcher.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR CONDENSATION APPLICATIONS: YESTERDAY...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

or allow other to do so, for U. S. Government purposes, i I ABSTRACT Compact heat exchangers are being increasinglyconsidered for condensationapplications in the...

458

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

"Heat Exchange Enhancing Insert" Inventors .--.. Andrei Khodak...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat Exchange Enhancing Insert" Inventors .--.. Andrei Khodak, Michael A. Jaworski A new shape of the heat enhancing insert is proposed. This device creates an impinging jet...

460

Technology Performance Exchange | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Exchange Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange A collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program Office and the Building Technologies Office, the Technology Performance Exchange will establish a Web-based portal and accompanying database that allows technology suppliers to submit product performance data that private and public sector end users can use to make fact-based procurement decisions. Suppliers will populate the database with technologies that affect building activities, including construction, commissioning, maintenance, monitoring, equipment, and verification. This project will help the U.S. energy efficiency technology market by providing objective product performance data to building engineers and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.