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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

Duncan, J.B.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Process for loading weak-acid ion exchange resin with uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for loading ion exchange resins is described. The process comprises contacting a weak acid cation exchange resin in the ammonium form with a uranyl fluoride salt solution.

Notz, Karl J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C.sub.3 or larger.

Lockridge, James E. (Ames, IA); Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA)

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig® 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

MODELING ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL  

SciTech Connect

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig? 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig? 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for highpotassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowestpotassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ?cesium bleed? is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual postelution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C.; Aleman, S.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Impact of Film-Forming Amines on Condensate Polishing Ion-Exchange Resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

 A proprietary film-forming amine, also referred to as a filming amine, was tested in laboratory experimentation to evaluate potential impacts on condensate polisher ion-exchange resins—(Dowex MS 650C (H) and 550A (OH)—and a commercially available resin used for the measurement of online cation conductivity. The properties of filming amines to coat surfaces within the steam cycle of a power plant can also block ionic mass transport or have chemical interactions with ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

Adamson, D

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Investigating the Use of Ion Exchange Resins for Processing Biodiesel Feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion exchange resins, commonly used in water treatment, demonstrate promise for the production of biodiesel from biomass feedstocks. The goal of this presented PhD research is to investigate novel uses of ion exchange resins for processing biodiesel feedstocks. Specifically, this research explored using ion exchange resins to remove free fatty acids (FFA) from soybean and waste cooking oils, catalyze transesterification of soybean oil, and catalyze in-situ conversion of dried algal biomass to biodiesel and other recoverable organics. The effect of temperature, moisture content, mixing rate, and resin drying on deacidification of soybean oil with 5% oleic acid feedstock was explored using Dowex Monosphere MR-450 UPW within a batch reactor. The resins were observed to remove up to 83 +/- 1.3% of FFA from soybean oil with less than 5% moisture content while operated at a 20% resin loading at 50 degrees C while mixing at 550 rpm. Once operation characteristics impacting deacidification were evaluated, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate the use of mixed bed resin to remove FFA from waste cooking oils. An investigation of wash solutions capable of regenerating the resins was also carried out. Using methanol to regenerate the resins resulted in more than 40% FFA removal over three regeneration cycles, highlighting the utility of resin regeneration as a cost saving measure. Transesterification of soybean oil on Amberlyst A26-OH, a basic ion exchange resin, in the presence of excess methanol was carried out to determine the mechanism of the reaction occurring on the surface. A batch reactor approach was used and reactions were carried out with and without FFA present in the soybean oil feed stock at a 20% resin loading at 50 degrees C while mixing at 550 rpm. When FFA was present in the feedstock and methanol is present in excess, the rate constant for methanol consumption increased. Based upon model fitting, the rate constant of methanol consumption was determined to be 2.08 x 10^-7 /sec with FFA absent and 5.39 x 10^-4/sec when FFA is present when the Eley-Rideal model was used to fit the data. In-situ conversion of dried algal biomass to biodiesel and other recoverable organics was investigated using a batch reaction system with 1 gram of algae. The system was operated with 40:60 methanol:hexane as the solvent system operated at 50 degrees C while mixing at 550 rpm over a range of catalyst loadings. The highest observed ester yield, approximately 60% yield (37 mg_ester/g_algae), was observed when air dried algae was reacted with a 20% resin. An evaluation of the reaction products showed a mixture of esters, phytol, alcohols, and ketones; highlighting the complexity of the reactions occurring during in-situ biomass conversion.

Jamal, Yousuf 1973-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of a Primary Amine-Functionalized Ion-Exchange Resin for CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

A primary amine-functionalized polymeric ion-exchange resin (Lewatit VP OC 1065, Lanxess) was evaluated for use in CO{sub 2} capture applications. The polymeric resin was characterized by SEM, DRIFTS-IR, N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms, and packed bed sorption measurements to determine some of the characteristic properties of the resin. Capture capacities ranging from 1.85 to 1.15 mol CO{sub 2}/kg sorbent were obtained in a packed bed reactor exposed to 10 vol % CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at adsorption temperatures ranging from 30 to 70 °C. The capture capacity of the resin was stable over 18 adsorption/regeneration cycles. The resin was evaluated through thermogravimetric analysis to have a low moisture adsorption (1.5 mol H{sub 2}O/kg sorbent). It is possible to completely regenerate the resin under 1 atm of CO{sub 2} at 200 °C.

Alesi, W. Richard; Kitchin, John R.

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Applications of Highly Cross Linked Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Resins in Biodiesel Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels are a promising solution to society's quest for sustainable energy. In the transportation sector, biodiesel is the leading alternative diesel fuel currently in use today. However, the current global and domestic production of biodiesel is far below the petro-diesel consumption and demand. To increase the availability of biodiesel in the market, new methods of biodiesel production must be developed to take advantage of the plentiful low quality waste derived feed stocks that currently present problems to biodiesel production using conventional methods. This research presents one new approach based upon using heterogeneous highly cross linked mixed bed solid phase catalysts to facilitate the production of biodiesel from feed stocks with high concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA). The performance of the heterogeneous mixed bed catalysts method developed in this research was evaluated and optimized for catalyst concentration and reaction duration while the mixing rate, reaction temperature, initial FFA composition of the feed stock and the alcohol-to-oil molar ratio were kept constant. The presented method reduces the FFA content of the starting feed stock while limiting the release of water into the reaction. Through experimentation, it was found that FFA removal with the mixed bed resin is due to ion exchange with the quaternary ammonium functional group and not catalysis to form esters. A model describing the heterogeneous processing method is presented. The outcome of this research is the development of a new processing method that can be used to create biodiesel from poor quality raw feed stock materials.

Jamal, Yousuf

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

Arora, Michelle B. (Woodridge, IL); Hestekin, Jamie A. (Morton Grove, IL); Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); St. Martin, Edward J. (Libertyville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

Maya, L.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

Laurinat, J.E.

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Removal of boron from wastewater of geothermal power plant by selective ion-exchange resins. 1: Batch sorption-elution studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron removal was studied using N-glucamine-type resins Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108. The resin Diaion CRB 02 exhibited a higher sorption capacity for boron removal from 0.01 M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} solution than did Purolite S 108. The presence of calcium, sodium, and chloride ions did not make a large interference on boron removal by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. The sorption behavior of these two chelating resins obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetic tests were performed to find the mass transfer mechanism of the sorption process of boron by Diaion CRB 02 resin. Five kinetic models were applied to fit the kinetic data obtained by using glucamine type-resin Diaion CRB 02. The results showed that the rate-determining step is particle diffusion for boron removal by Diaion CRB 02. The quantitative stripping of boron from both chelating resins was obtained with either 0.05 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 0.1 M HCl solutions. Boron in wastewater of the Kizildere geothermal field was effectively removed by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. Preliminary column tests showed that Diaion CRB 02 is a potential resin for column removal of boron from wastewater of a geothermal power plant.

Badruk, M. [MTA, Izmir (Turkey)] [MTA, Izmir (Turkey); Kabay, N.; Demircioglu, M. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering; Mordogan, H.; Ipekoglu, U. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing dimensions of the cylinder and decreases with increasing photon energy.

Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

CATALYTIC PROMOTION OF THE ADSORPTION OF VANADIUM ON AN ANIONIC EXCHANGE RESIN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the process for the recovery of vanadium from acidic phosphatic solutions is presented. In this process the vanadium is first oxidized to the pentavaleat state, and is then separated by contacting such solutions with an anion exchange resin whereby adsorption of the complexed pentavalent vanadium is effected. The improvement lies in the fact that adsorp tion of the vanadium complex by the anion exchange resin is promoted and improved by providing fiuoride ions in solution to be contacted.

Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ion exchange phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

New anion-exchange resins for improved separations of nuclear materials. Mid-year progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The authors are developing multi-functional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion exchange technology. The overall objective of the research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Their approach uses a thorough determination of the chemical species both in solution and as bound to the resin to determine the characteristics of resin active sites which can actively facilitate specific metal-complex sorption to the resin. The first year milestones were designed to allow us to build off of their extensive expertise with plutonium in nitrate solutions prior to investigating other, less familiar systems. While the principle investigators have successfully developed actinide chelators and ion-exchange materials in the past, the authors were fully aware that integration of this two fields would be challenging, rewarding and, at times, highly frustrating. Relatively small differences in the substrate (cross-linkage, impurities), the active sites (percent substitution, physical accessibility), the actinide solution (oxidation state changes, purity) and the analytical procedures (low detection limits) can produce inconsistent sorption behavior which is difficult to interpret. The potential paybacks for success, however, are enormous. They feel that they have learned a great deal about how to control these numerous variables to produce consistent, reliable analysis of actinide sorption behavior with the new and baseline anion-exchange materials. The four Year 1 (FY97) milestones are listed below along with an update on the progress towards their completion.'

Barr, M.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

EXPERIMENTAL ION EXCHANGE COLUMN WITH SUPERLIG 639 AND SIMULANT FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect

SuperLig®639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

Kennedy, J.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.

CHARLES, NASH

2005-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ion exchange technology in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater at Fernald  

SciTech Connect

Using pump and treat methodology, uranium contaminated groundwater is being removed from the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) per the FEMP Record of Decision (ROD) that defines groundwater cleanup. Standard extraction wells pump about 3900 gallons-per-minute (gpm) from the aquifer through five ion exchange treatment systems. The largest treatment system k the Advanced Wastewater Treatment (AWWT) Expansion System with a capacity of 1800 gpm, which consists of three trains of two vessels. The trains operate in parallel treating 600 gpm each, The two vessels in each train operate in series, one in lead and one in lag. Treated groundwater is either reinfected back into the aquifer to speed up the aquifer cleanup processor discharged to the Great Miami River. The uranium regulatory ROD limit for discharge to the river is 20 parts per billion (ppb), and the FEMP uranium administrative action level for reinfection is 10 ppb. Spent (i.e., a resin that no longer adsorbs uranium) ion exchange resins must either be replaced or regenerated. The regeneration of spent ion exchange resins is considerably more cost effective than their replacement. Therefore, a project was undertaken to learn how best to regenerate the resins in the groundwater vessels. At the outset of this project, considerable uncertainty existed as to whether a spent resin could be regenerated successfully enough so that it performed as well as new resin relative to achieving very low uranium concentrations in the effluent. A second major uncertain y was whether the operational lifetime of a regenerated resin would be similar to that of a new resin with respect to uranium loading capacity and effluent concentration behavior. The project was successful in that a method for regenerating resins has been developed that is operationally efficient, that results in regenerated resins yielding uranium concentrations much lower than regulatory limits, and that results in regenerated resins with operational lifetimes comparable to new resins.

Chris Sutton; Cathy Glassmeyer; Steve Bozich

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of removing perchlorate from the resin. Due to the selectivity of the ion exchange resin, it will also be possible to selectively remove perchlorate from nitrate-contaminated water. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.02 per gallon of water treated. Option 3: Another alternative is to treat both perchlorate and nitrate. A three column unit would be built. The first column would capture perchlorate and the resin would be replaced rather than regenerated. The second and third column would be operated as under Option 1 to treat nitrate. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated.

Burge, S; Halden, R

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ion Concentration and Stress Profile Modifications of Ion Exchanged ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

42

Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

Ebra, Martha A. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

Pollock, Charles W. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Properties of ten synthetic resins used in shell molding...by some of these numbers. (b) Determined by heating a sample of resin on a level plate

45

Use of ion exchange for the treatment of liquids in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The current and future use of ion exchange (demineralization) as a method for treating liquid radioactive streams at nuclear power plants was investigated. Pertinent data were obtained by contacting utility companies, nuclear-steam-supply system vendors, selected AEC-operated facilities, as well as ion exchange resin and equipment manufacturers. Principal emphasis was on obtaining data concerning the decontamination of aqueous solutions characterized by levels of radioactivity that range from 10/sup -7/ to 1 mu Ci/ml. Ion exchange media commonly used in nuclear power plants are synthetic organic resins of polystyrene matrix. They are utilized primarily in the mixed-bed (deep-bed) ion exchange system. Powdered resin (mixed) systems (so-called filter- demineralizer'') are also used in several recent boiling-water-reactor plants. The term decontamination factor (DF), the ratio of the feed to effluent concentration, is widely used and is assumed by designers and operators of the plants to express the ion exchange system performance. In some cases, such DF values may not represent the true system performance. To achieve a desired DF, the feed and effiuent must be sampled for the nuclides of interest and the processing discontinued when the desired effluent concentration is exceeded. Average DF values that can be obtained for various ion-exchange systems and various groups of radionuclides if good engineering practice is used in the design and operation of these systems are listed. These values are based on ion- exchange fundamentals, literature data, laboratory experiments, and plant operating experience. They represent time-average values expected under normal operating conditions rather than maximum values attainable under optimum conditions. (auth)

Lin, K.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M. [Institut De Recherches sur la Catalyse et Laboratoire de Catalyse et Synthese Organique, Villeubanne (France)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Ion exchange separation and mass spectrometric analysis of uranium for solutions containing plutonium  

SciTech Connect

An ion exchange technique separates plutonium from uranium using Dowex-1 resin and a methanol--HCl plutonium elutriant. The method is applicable to both trace uranium determination and uranium isotopic distribution analysis by mass spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for plutonium, and elution curves for uranium and plutonium are shown. For uranium analysis the percent relative standard deviation is 0.8 at 120-2400 micrograms uranium per gram plutonium and 5.0 at 5 micrograms uranium per gram plutonium. (auth)

McBride, K.C.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Glass Ion Exchange: One Century of "Tough" Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ion-exchange to glass components such as pharmaceutical packaging, transparent lightweight armor, transparencies for private vehicles, trains and aircrafts, ...

49

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Charge exchange processes involving iron ions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review and evaluation is given of the experimental data which are available for charge exchange processes involving iron ions and neutral H, H/sub 2/ and He. Appropriate scaling laws are presented, and their accuracy estimated for these systems. A bibliography is given of available data sources, as well as of useful data compilations and review articles. A procedure is recommended for providing single approximate formulae to the fusion community to describe total cross sections for electron capture by partially-stripped Fe/sup q+/ ions in collisions with H, H/sub 2/ and He, based on the scaling relationships suggested by Janev and Hvelplund.

Phaneuf, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Indentation behavior of ion-exchanged glasses  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports indentation fracture mechanics extended to include the effect of a thin layer of residual stress on the indentation strength of brittle materials. The proposed theory was used to predict the residual stress values for an ion-exchanged glass. For flaws placed before the exchange, considerable strengthening was observed, but the value of the surface stress predicted was considerable underestimated. For flaws placed after the exchange, there was no strengthening and the value of the surface stress was predicted to be zero. The failure of the indentation analysis indicates that it has to be modified for accurate stress determination. Thin layers of residual stress were found to retard the initiation of surface damage, but their influence on the strength after damage initiation was minimal.

Tandon, R.; Green, D.J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

B Plant ion exchange feed line leak  

SciTech Connect

>One of the objectives of the Waste Management Program is to separate the long-lived heat emitter /aup 137/Cs from the bulk of the high-level Iiquid wastes. This separation is accomplished by the ion exchange process in the 221-B Building. Interim storage of the cesium is in solution as a nitrate. The feed for the B Plant cesinm ion exchange process is pumped from the lag storage tank, 105-C, through a pipeline and several diversion boxes to the 221-B Building. On December 19, 1969, a leak was discovered near the 241-C-152 diversion box in the section of this line, V-122, from the 105-C tank. Although the leak represented a loss of feed for the processing of /sup 137/Cs, more important was the consequence of environmental contmination to the soil from the line leak. For this reason, an investigation was made to estblish the extent of the radioactivity spread. The results of a well drilling operation undertaken to define the boundary and to estimate the extent of the leak are summarized. (CR)

Tanaka, K.H.

1971-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ion-exchanged MnO2 nanoparticles as cathodes of lithium ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ion-exchanged MnO2 nanoparticles as cathodes of lithium ion batteries at elevated temperatures. Author(s), Dawei Liu, Jasper Wright, Wei ...

55

Ion-Exchanged Glass with High Damage Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

56

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Glass and Optical Materials. Presentation Title, Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

57

Waste treatment by selective mineral ion exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

STMI, subsidiary company of the AREVA Group with over 40 years in the D and D business, has been continuously innovating and developing new decontamination techniques, with the objectives of achieving more efficient decontaminations on a growing spectrum of media. In the field of liquid waste treatment, STMI manufactures uses and commercialises selective inorganic ion exchangers (RAN). These are hydrated synthetic inorganic compounds prepared from very pure raw materials. Different types of RANs (POLYAN, OXTAIN, Fe-Cu, Fe-CoK, Si-Fe-CoK) can be used to trap a large number of radioactive elements in contaminated effluents. Different implementations could be applied depending on technical conditions. STMI's offers consist in building global solution and preliminary design of installation either in dispersed form (batch) or in column (cartridge filtration). Those products are used all over the world not only in the nuclear business (Canada, US, Belgium, France...) but also in other fields. Indeed, it provides competitive solutions to many domains of application especially water pollution control, liquid waste treatment in the nuclear business by decreasing the activity level of waste. The following paper will focus on the theoretical principle of the mineral exchanger, its implementation and the feed back collected by STMI. (author)

Polito, Aurelie [Areva NC - BUA STMI, 1 route de la Noue - 91196 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has been directed to further develop an anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept that has been developed and tested on a limited scope for feasibility. From environmental as well as the economic viewpoints, it is necessary that the soluble sulfates of alkali metal sorbents be desulfurized (regenerated) and recycled to make regenerative flue gas desulfurization and MHD spent seed regeneration options more attractive. In order to achieve this, a low-temperature, low-cost desulfurization process to reactivate spent alkali metal sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange, resin-based concept uses the available technology and is believed to satisfy this requirement. In this DOE-sponsored project, UTSI, will perform the following investigations: Screening of commercially available resins; process variables study and improving resin performance; optimization of resin-regeneration step; evaluation of performance enhancers; development of Best-Process Schematic and related economics, and planning for proof-of-concept (POC) scale testing. The above activities have been grouped into five major tasks and the entire project is expected to take thirty-six months to complete.

Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.; Strevel, S.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Small-Column Cesium Ion Exchange Elution Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate multiple, cesium loading, and elution cycles for small columns containing SRF resin using a simple, high-level waste (HLW) simulant. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a nominal 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs, 0.115 M Al loading solution traced with 134Cs followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with 137Cs. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small ({approx}15.7 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45 C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with 29+ BVs of HNO3 processed at 25 C and at 1.4 BV/h. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium leakage) to help establish acid strength and purity requirements.

Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Field Demonstration of the EPRI Resin Tester: Prototype Development and Initial Field Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an update on development of the EPRI Resin Tester, a device designed to assess ion exchange resin kinetics and for other resin testing procedures. The report includes information on fabrication and initial operational testing of the first working prototype of the tester device.

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Desalination of brackish waters using ion exchange media.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of {approx} 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x+2y}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of {approx}2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = {approx}11,000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, Jason D.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Desalination of brackish waters using ion-exchange media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of around 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x}+2yAl{sub x}Si{sub 1}-xO{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of around to 2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = similar to 11 000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, J.D.; Philips, M.L.F.; Voigt, J.A.; Moore, D.; Axness, M.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Nenoff, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, it has been assumed that the inlet and outlet low activity waste plenums would be designed such that a nearly uniform velocity profile would be maintained at every axial cross-section (i.e., providing nearly 100 percent use of the resin bed). With this proposed design, we see a LAW outlet distributor that results in significant non-axial velocity gradients in the bottom regions of the bed with the potential to reduce the effectiveness'' of the overall resin bed. The magnitude of this efficiency reduction depends upon how far up-gradient of the LAW outlet these non-axial velocities persist and to what extent a ''dead-zone'' is established beneath the LAW outlet. This can impact loading and elution performance of the ion-exchange facility. Currently, no experimental studies are planned. The primary objective of this work was, through modeling, to assess the fluid dynamic impact on ''effective'' resin volume of the full-scale column based on its normal operation using a recently proposed LAW outlet distributor. The analysis effort was limited to 3-D flow only analyses (i.e., no follow on transport analyses) with 3-D particle tracking to approximate the impact that a nonaxial velocity profile would have on bed ''effectiveness''. Additional analyses were performed to estimate under nominal operating conditions the thermal temperature rise across a loaded resin bed and within its particles. Hydrogen bubble formation is not considered in the heat transfer analysis or in the determination of minimum flowrate. All modeling objectives were met.

ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Microsoft Word - Nano-sized Ion Exchange Particles.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential AIKEN, S.C. (January 30, 2012) - Sometimes bigger isn't better. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory have successfully shown that they can replace useful little particles of monosodium titanate (MST) with even tinier nano-sized particles, making them even more useful for a variety of applications. MST is an ion exchange material used to decontaminate radioactive and industrial wastewater solutions, and has been shown to be an effective way to deliver metals into living cells for some types of medical treatment. Typically, MST, and a modified form known as mMST developed by SRNL and Sandia National Laboratories, are in the form of fine powders, spherically-shaped particles about 1 to 10 microns in diameter

67

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge-exchange recombination radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V O L E, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2 Biosorption of uranium metal ions by a nonliving protonated Sargassum fluitans seaweed biomass was used to remove the heavy metal uranium from the aqueous solution. Uranium biosorption

Volesky, Bohumil

71

Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge exchange recombination radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

Lee, S.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ion-Exchange Processes and Mechanisms in Glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Leaching of alkalis from glass is widely recognized as an important mechanism in the initial stages of glass-water interactions. Pioneering experimental studies [1-3] nearly thirty-five years ago established that alkali (designated as M{sup +}) are lost to solution more rapidly than network-forming cations. The overall chemical reaction describing the process can be written as: {triple_bond}Si-O-M + H{sup +} {yields} {triple_bond}Si-OH + M{sup +} (1) or {triple_bond}Si-O-M + H{sub 3}O{sup +} {yields} {triple_bond}Si-OH + M{sup +} + H{sub 2}O. (2) Doremus and coworkers [4-7] fashioned a quantitative model where M{sup +} ions in the glass are exchanged for counter-diffusing H{sub 3}O{sup +} or H{sup +}. Subsequent investigations [8], which have relied heavily on reaction layer analysis, recognized the role of H{sub 2}O molecules in the alkali-exchange process, without minimizing the importance of charged hydrogen species. Beginning in the 1980s, however, interest in M{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange reactions in silicate glasses diminished considerably because important experimental observations showed that network hydrolysis and dissolution rates were principally controlled by the chemical potential difference between the glass and solution (chemical affinity) [9]. For nuclear waste glasses, formation of alteration products or secondary phases that remove important elements from solution, particularly Si, was found to have very large impacts on glass dissolution rates [10,11]. Consequently, recent work on glass/water interactions has focused on understanding this process and incorporating it into models [12]. The ion-exchange process has been largely ignored because it has been thought to be a short duration, secondary or tertiary process that had little or no bearing on long-term corrosion or radionuclide release rates from glasses [13]. The only significant effect identified in the literature that is attributed to alkali ion exchange is an increase in solution pH in static laboratory tests conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratios [14,15]. Renewed interest in alkali ion exchange reactions has come about because of interest in development of durable Na-rich silicate glasses for immobilization of low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford, Washington [16] and high-level wastes in China [17]. In reactive transport simulations of a LAW glass disposed in a shallow subsurface facility, Chen, McGrail, and Engel [18] showed that ion-exchange reactions increased the radionuclide release rate by over two orders of magnitude when compared with simulations where ion exchange was excluded. Sheng, Luo, and Tang [17] conducted static tests in a simulated groundwater and showed that alkali ion exchange was the dominant release mechanism over a large temperature range. Although the significance of alkali ion exchange reactions in long-term disposal system performance has now been recognized, the fundamental processes and mechanisms controlling the exchange reactions are still remarkably poorly understood, especially with regard to how glass structure affects alkali ion exchange kinetics. Experimental studies of Na release from various simple silicate glasses are numerous [19-23]. However, in all previous studies of which we are aware, no attempt was made to distinguish between M{sup +} release through alkali exchange versus matrix dissolution. The release rate of alkali in all of the early work was convoluted by contributions from matrix dissolution, which dominates in dilute solutions. Also, none of the previous studies attempted to define the relationship, if any, between glass structure (composition) and the kinetics of the ion exchange reaction. The motivation behind this Environmental Management Science Project (EMSP) is to develop a better understanding of how glass structure impacts sodium ion exchange so that improved glasses can be developed. Development of low ion-exchange rate glasses may also permit engineers to use higher loadings in nuclear waste glasses, which would result in substantial savings in production and disposal costs.

McGrail, B.P.; Icenhower, J.P.; Darab, J.G.; Shuh, D.k.; Baer, D.R.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Engelhard, M.H.; Steele, J.L.; Rodriguez, E.A.; Liu, P.; Ivanov, K.E.; Booth, C.H.; Nachimuthu, P.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Exploration of Ion-Exchanged Glass for Seals Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the nuclear industry grows around the globe, it brings with it a need for more safeguards and proliferation resistant technologies. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) depends on effective containment and surveillance (C/S) technologies and methods for maintaining continuity of knowledge over nuclear assets. Tags and seals, a subset of C/S technologies, are an area where innovation has been relatively stagnant for the past fifteen years. It is necessary to investigate technologies not previously used in this field in order to defend against emerging threats and methods of defeat. Based on a gap analysis of tags and seals currently being used by the IAEA, completed with the input of several subject matter experts, the technology selected for investigation was ion-exchanged glass. Ion-exchanged glass is relatively inexpensive, has high strength, and can be used in a variety of applications. If identical pieces of glass are exchanged under the same conditions and subjected to the same point load, the fracture patterns produced can be compared and used as a verification measure. This technology has the potential to be used in passive seal applications. Each image was categorized depending on its fracture as a "3 leaf" or "4 leaf" pattern. These two populations were separately analyzed and evaluated. Several methods used to analyze the fracture patterns involve the use of image analysis software such as ImageJ and the MATLAB Control Point Selection Tool. The statistical analysis software Minitab was used to validate the use of facture pattern analysis as verification tool. The analysis yielded a 60% verified comparison for samples demonstrating a "3 leaf" fracture pattern and a 78% verified comparison for samples with a "4 leaf" fracture pattern. This preliminary analysis provides a strong indication of the plausibility for the use of ion-exchanged glass as a verification measure for C/S measures and specifically tags and seals.

Ghanbari, Roushan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Charge exchange spectroscopy as a fast ion diagnostic on TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect

An upgraded charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic has been taken into operation at the TEXTOR tokamak. The angles of the viewing lines with the toroidal magnetic field are close to the pitch angles at birth of fast ions injected by one of the neutral beam injectors. Using another neutral beam for active spectroscopy, injected counter the direction in which fast ions injected by the first beam are circulating, we can simultaneously measure a fast ion tail on the blue wing of the D{sub {alpha}} spectrum while the beam emission spectrum is Doppler shifted to the red wing. An analysis combining the two parts of the spectrum offers possibilities to improve the accuracy of the absolute (fast) ion density profiles. Fast beam modulation or passive viewing lines cannot be used for background subtraction on this diagnostic setup and therefore the background has to be modeled and fitted to the data together with a spectral model for the slowing down feature. The analysis of the fast ion D{sub {alpha}} spectrum obtained with the new diagnostic is discussed.

Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Hellermann, M. G. von [FOM-Rijnhuizen, EURATOM-FOM, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nielsen, S. K. [Association EURATOM-Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Marchuk, O. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-FZJ, D-52424 Juelich (Germany)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Data quality objectives for Ion Exchange Module (IXM) disposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Data Quality Objective (DQO) document presents the data needs and accuracy requirements for sampling ion exchange modules at the K Basins, 100 K Area, to determine if there is a hydrogen gas buildup within the modules. This document was produced by PNL, with the assistance of Neptune and Associates, and was partly funded (for facilitator) by DOE-HQ as a demonstration DQO for EM activities. PNL involved a number of PNL, WHC and support contract staff (including external technical consultants) in meetings to define the data needed, along with the necessary accuracy, to resolve issues associated with hydrogen accumulation in Ion Exchange Modules (IXMS) that were generated prior to July 1994 and only have one nuc-fil vent. IXMs generated after July 1994 have multiple nuc-fil vents and do not require sampling. PNL transmitted this DQO to WHC on January 31, 1995. This Supporting Document is to assure that the document is captured into the document retrieval system. WHC review focused on the acceptability of the technical conclusions such that the data collected will meet minimum operational, safety and environmental needs.

Choi, I. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Technology Innovation and Development Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development November 11, 2011 Small Column Ion Exchange Program Technology Readiness Assessment Page 2 of 112 This page intentionally left blank November 11, 2011 U.S. DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development Small Column Ion Exchange Program Technology Readiness Assessment Page 3 of 112 APPROVALS ________________________ _ Harry D. Harmon Date

79

Small Column Ion Exchange Design and Safety Strategy  

SciTech Connect

Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) is a transformational technology originally developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-30) office and is now being deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to significantly increase overall salt processing capacity and accelerate the Liquid Waste System life-cycle. The process combines strontium and actinide removal using Monosodium Titanate (MST), Rotary Microfiltration, and cesium removal using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST, specifically UOP IONSIV{reg_sign}IE-911 ion exchanger) to create a low level waste stream to be disposed in grout and a high level waste stream to be vitrified. The process also includes preparation of the streams for disposal, e.g., grinding of the loaded CST material. These waste processing components are technically mature and flowsheet integration studies are being performed including glass formulations studies, application specific thermal modeling, and mixing studies. The deployment program includes design and fabrication of the Rotary Microfilter (RMF) assembly, ion-exchange columns (IXCs), and grinder module, utilizing an integrated system safety design approach. The design concept is to install the process inside an existing waste tank, Tank 41H. The process consists of a feed pump with a set of four RMFs, two IXCs, a media grinder, three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), and all supporting infrastructure including media receipt and preparation facilities. The design addresses MST mixing to achieve the required strontium and actinide removal and to prevent future retrieval problems. CST achieves very high cesium loadings (up to 1,100 curies per gallon (Ci/gal) bed volume). The design addresses the hazards associated with this material including heat management (in column and in-tank), as detailed in the thermal modeling. The CST must be size reduced for compatibility with downstream processes. The design addresses material transport into and out of the grinder and includes provisions for equipment maintenance including remote handling. The design includes a robust set of nuclear safety controls compliant with DOE Standard (STD)-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. The controls cover explosions, spills, boiling, aerosolization, and criticality. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) including seismic event, tornado/high wind, and wildland fire are considered. In addition, the SCIX process equipment was evaluated for impact to existing facility safety equipment including the waste tank itself. SCIX is an innovative program which leverages DOE's technology development capabilities to provide a basis for a successful field deployment.

Huff, T.; Rios-Armstrong, M.; Edwards, R.; Herman, D.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect

An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen red

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nanomaterials-Enhanced Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our work is to develop an electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) system based on conducting polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites as a new and cost-effective approach for removal of radioactive cesium, chromate, and perchlorate from contaminated groundwater. The ESIX technology combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for the removal of target species from wastewater. In this technique, an electroactive ion exchange layer is deposited on a conducting substrate, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulation of the potential of the layer. ESIX offers the advantages of highly-efficient use of electrical energy combined with no secondary waste generation. Recently, we have improved upon the ESIX process by modifying the conducting substrate with carbon nanotubes prior to the deposition of the electroactive ion exchanger. The nanomaterial-based electroactive ion exchange technology will remove cesium-137, chromate, and perchlorate rapidly from wastewater. The high porosity and high surface area of the electroactive ion exchange nanocomposites results in high loading capacity and minimize interferences for non-target species. Since the ion adsorption/desorption is controlled electrically without generating a secondary waste, this electrically active ion exchange process is a green process technology that will greatly reduce operating costs.

Lin, Yuehe; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Jun; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

SEPARATION OF PROTEINS BY ION EXCHANGE AND MEMBRANE CHROMATOGRAPHY: BUFFER COMPOSITION, INTERFERING IMPURITIES AND FOULING CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient separation of target protein from impurities is crucial in bioseparation for large scale production and purity of the target protein. Two separation process approaches were considered in this study. The first approach focused on identifying major impurity and optimization of solution properties for target protein purification. The second approach consisted of designing an adsorbent that interacted specifically with the target molecule. The first study included modification of protein solution properties (pH, ionic strength, buffer ions) in order to maximize lysozyme purification by a strong cation exchange resin. The interaction of phytic acid, a major impurity, present in transgenic rice extracts, that contributes to decreased lysozyme adsorption capacity on SP Sepharose was evaluated. The target protein was lysozyme, which is used in a purified form as a baby formula additive to reduce gastrointestinal tract infections. At constant ionic strength, lysozyme in pH 4.5 acetate buffer had a higher binding capacity and stronger binding strength than at pH 6.0. Lysozyme in sodium phosphate buffer of pH 6.0 exhibited lower adsorption capacity than in pH 6 Tris buffer. Binding capacity and strength were significantly affected by phytic acid in all studies buffers. The second study consisted of surface modification of microfiltration membranes for protein purification and separation and reduces fouling. This study describes adsorption and fouling of chemically modified microfiltration membranes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Least fouling resulted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) membranes when BSA protein was used. Amine-functionalized membranes showed specific interaction with BSA. There was multi-layer deposition of IgG on amine-functionalized membrane. G3 membrane synthesized to selectively bind IgG seemed a noble option to separate IgG from a protein mixture.

Imam, Tahmina

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system being developed for deployment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a supplementary salt waste processing technology that, if implemented, will augment the baseline Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) capability. An opportunity exists to shorten the SRS radioactive waste system lifecycle by 6 years, and significantly reduce life cycle costs, by accelerating salt processing to earlier completion, simultaneous with sludge vitrification. As described in the Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy, which is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Roadmap - EM Journey to Excellence,

86

Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiation-Induced Degradation in Ion Exchange Resins for a Water Detritiation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium, Safety, and Environment / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

Yasunori Iwai; Toshihiko Yamanishi; Akihiro Hiroki; Masao Tamada

88

Technical note Use of mixed ion exchange resin and the denitrifier method to determine isotopic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or canopy throughfall by sampling aqueous solutions in the field (Hoering, 1957; Moore, 1977; Garten, 1992 followed by either (1) diffusions (Garten, 1992; Downs et al., 1999) or (2) purification of NO3 Ã? as AgNO3

Templer, Pamela

89

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

Improvement in both giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias through hydrogen ion irradiation at low energy  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation of IrMn-based spin valves with 550 eV hydrogen ions increased their giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias by 20% and 60%, respectively. This significant enhancement stems from the strong (111) texture and small mosaic spread of the IrMn antiferromagnet that resulted from the microstructural reconstruction caused by the energy transfer during the bombardment by hydrogen ions, as well as by the narrow dispersion in the exchange bias. Irradiation with the hydrogen ion at low energy can improve the properties of spin valves without resulting in undue degradation in the performance or the microstructure.

Shim, Jaechul; Han, Yoonsung; Lee, Jinwon; Hong, Jongill [Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY  

SciTech Connect

A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ion Exchange Filter Transition Plan for BWRs and PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes an interim review of plant experiences with various cation exchange membranes to determine if new filters are comparable and suitable for nuclear power plant chemistry applications. Gaps in performance and impacts to recommendations in EPRI reports BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines - 2008 Revision (1016579), Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines (1014986) and Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Investigation of ETA Interactions in Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Systems -- Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants use amine pH control agents in the secondary steam cycle. The pH is elevated to reduce corrosion potential induced by hydronium ions throughout the steam cycle. Ethanolamine (ETA) is a popular pH control agent currently used in many plants. However, when ETA is used, some plants have reported fouling of the anion resin resulting in reduced service life. This report presents preliminary analyses of the interaction chemistry of current fouling/degradatio...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Design, optimization, and selectivity of inorganic ion-exchangers for radioactive waste remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes of development of nuclear weapons resulted in accumulation of thousands of curies of high-level radioactive waste. Liquid waste produced in the US has been stored in carbon steel tanks in highly alkaline (1-3 M NaOH, 6 M sodium salts) media for fifty years and leakage has occurred. One of the approaches to the solution of the problem of radioactive waste is to adsorb the nuclides on highly selective ion-exchange material, solidify in a glass matrix and dispose in a geological formation. The use of the ion-exchange technology is limited by the time of the sorbent-solution contact required to reduce the activity of the streams to acceptable levels. Inorganic ion-exchangers are promising materials due to their high radiation stability, extreme selectivity, and compatibility with the glass matrix. The contact time can be reduced by improving selectivities, kinetics, and capacities of the materials towards the target ions. This can be accomplished in part through understanding of the origin of ion-exchange selectivity. Crystalline zeotypes with minerals sitinakite (ideal formula Na2Ti2O3SiO4??2H2O) and pharmacosiderite (HM3(TO)4(GeO4)x(SiO4)3-x M = Cs+, Na+, K+, T=Nb5+, Ge4+, Ti4+) structures are excellent candidates for selectivity studies because of their ion-exchange properties tunable by alterations of synthetic procedures, and isomorphous framework substitution. The Nb-substitution in titanium sites reduces the framework charge, whereas Ge substitution decreases the unit cell size if in titanium sites and increases if it in silicon sites. The compounds were hydrothermally synthesized in Ti/Si, Ti/Nb/Si, Ti/Ge/Si forms and characterized by structural and ion-exchange studies. The 25% Nb substitution in titanosilicate sitinakite resulted in enhanced selectivity for cesium and additional bond formation of cesium within the channel. The selectivity for cesium in germanium substituted pharmacosiderite also was correlated with the coordination environment within the channel. In the advanced stages of this study semi-crystalline (sodium nonatitanate) and amorphous (monosodium titanate) materials also were considered because of their remarkable strontium selectivity. In situ X-ray diffraction techniques revealed that the sodium nonatitanate precedes the formation of the TS phase in hydrothermal synthesis. This knowledge allowed us to design and synthesize material for combined cesium and strontium removal.

Medvedev, Dmitry Gennadievich

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ion exchange behavior among metal trisilicates: probing selectivity, structures, and mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One model system for the investigation of selectivity in inorganic ion exchangers is a group of synthetic analogues of the mineral umbite. Hydrothermally synthesized trisilicates with the general form A2BSi3O9.H2O, where A is a monovalent cation, and B = Ti4+, Zr4+, and Sn4+ have been shown to have ion exchange properties. The extended three dimensional framework structure offers the ability to tune the selectivity based on the size of the cavities and channels. The unit cell volume, and therefore the pore size, can be altered by changing the size of the octahedral metal. The substitution of Ge for Si can also increase the pore size. A variety of cations have been exchanged into the trisilicates including alkali and alkaline earths, lanthanides, and actinides. The reason for the selectivity rests in the pocket of framework oxygens which make up the exchange sites. Close examination of the cation environments shows that the ions with the greatest affinity are those that have the closest contacts to the framework oxygens. For example, among alkali cations, zirconium trisilicate demonstrates the greatest affinity for Rb+ and has the most A-O contact distances approaching the sum of their ionic radii. The origins of selectivity also rely upon the valence of the incoming cation. When cations are of similar ionic radius, a cation of higher charge is always preferred over the lower valence. Ion exchange studies in binary solutions of cations of different valence, but similar size (1.0Å ) have proven the selectivity series to be Th4+ > Gd3+ > Ca2+ > Na+. Through structural characterization, kinetic studies, and use of in situ x-ray diffraction techniques the origins of selectivity in these inorganic ion exchangers has been further elucidated. The principles gleaned from these studies can be applied to other inorganic framework materials. The umbite system has the potential to be altered and tailored for specific separation needs. The trisilicate materials presented in this work are representative of the types of advances in inorganic materials research and prove their potential as applicable compounds useful for solving real world problems.

Fewox, Christopher Sean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

Cabasso, Israel (131 Buckingham Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210); Korngold, Emmanuel (P.O. Box 1025, Beer-Sheva 84110, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cesium Removal from High Conductivity Waste Using Selective Ion Exchange Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a low level liquid processing study conducted for Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). The researchers used column testing to evaluate the performance of selective ion exchange media in the removal of radioactive cesium contamination from spent condensate polisher regenerant solution. The report provides technical details and results of the study and discusses applicability of these materials to the waste processing system at the plant.

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

An exploratory program for using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program is to investigate the potential of hydrous metal oxide (HMO) ion exchangers, invented at Sandia National Laboratories, as Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. Metals known to be active in F-T synthesis (e.g. Fe, Co) were ion exchanged on hydrous metal oxide supports. Although HMO catalysts based on Zr, Nb, and Ta have been investigated in direct coal liquefaction studies, this effect focused on formulations based on the hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) system. The program has the goals of developing a catalyst with (1) high activity, (2) selectively to fuel range or other useful products, and (3) better properties for use in slurry reactors. The program has three main tasks: (1) catalyst synthesis, to develop methods for preparing catalysts having desirable F-T properties, (2) characterization, to investigate catalysts proving to have desirable properties by a variety of analytical techniques to determine correlations between activity and material properties and (3) testing to determine activity and selectivity of catalysts. This paper discussed results of activity testing of Ruhrchemie catalyst and some catalyst formulations prepared using ion exchange on hydrous titanium oxide and precipitation. For example, at 250{degree}C the Ruhrchemie catalyst converts {approximately}50% of the syngas feed to reaction products. In comparison, iron catalysts prepared by ion exchange and precipitation had conversions ranging from 20 to 50% over a temperature range of 250 to 275{degree}C of the syngas feed. In addition, results are Auger surface analysis of Ruhrchemie catalyst are presented. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Lynch, A.W.; Dosch, R.G.; Sault, A.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of a precipitation-ion exchange process for treatment of laundry waste  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate chemical coagulation and ion exchange for decontamination of 2724-W laundry wastewater. Chemical coagulation is accomplished at pH 11 to avoid complexant problems and assure good transuranic radionuclide removals. Clinoptilolite is used to remove cesium and strontium. Results of the pilot plant studies are summarized as follows: Decontamination factors of 70 (strontium) and more than 100 (cesium) were achieved by chemical coagulation and ion exchange. Decontamination factors exceeding 90 were measured for europium by coagulation with a combination of ferric chloride, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride added to the wastewater at pH 11. Coagulation with these three agents in the wastewater at pH 11 was more effective for turbidity removal than coagulation with lime. Addition of up to 1.7 lb of clinoptilolite fines per 1000 gallons of wastewater during coagulation did not substantially increase strontium and cesium removal. Filtration without chemical coagulation reduced suspended solids by only 25%. About 70% of the suspended solids remaining in the filtered wastewater were removed in the zeolite column causing plugging which could not be easily dislodged by backwashing. Plugging of the ion exchange columns by previously clarified wastewater required short periods of limited backwashing to relieve the plug. The plugging is due to CaCO/sub 3/ and is not expected to be a severe problem in a full-scale plant with brief detention times between filtration and ion exchange. A high pressure surface wash should be included in the columns to break up crust or plugs at the surface of the zeolite. Centrifugation of iron sludges for 2 min at 2000 g reduced the sludge volume to about 1% of the total wastewater volume. Wet iron sludges from the sludge storage tank were readily dewatered by vacuum filtration. 14 tables, 9 figures.

Mercer, B.W.; Ames, L.L.

1977-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Preconceptual Design For Separation Of Plutonium And Gallium By Ion Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................. 5 2.0 BACKGROUND.........................................................................5 3.0 PROCESS DESCRIPTION.............................................................6 3.1 Oxidation of Metal...............................................................7 3.2 Dissolution of Oxide............................................................ 8 3.3 Ion Exchange (IX).............................................................. 8 3.4 Plutonium Product Preparation................................................ 10 3.5 Recycle Operations..............................................................10 3.6 Waste Generation................................................................10 4.0 MATERIAL BALANCES...............................................................11 4.1 Dissolution of Oxide............................................................ 11 4.2 IX Feed Pretreatment.............................

Scott Demuth; Scott F. Demuth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hanford Tank Waste Ion Exchange Swelling Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the testing of columns. The columns will be prepared and tested in duplicate. The resin will be retained in the column by means of quartz wool, but will be unobstructed on the top of the resin bed.

McCabe, D.J.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Radioactive Spent Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent ion-exchange media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion-exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion-exchange materials, following to pre-treatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using cement, bitumen, polymer or high integrity containers; - The destruction of the organic compounds by using thermochemical processes or oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal; - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process, followed by a supercompaction of the hot dried resins. At Tihange Nuclear Power Plant, spent ion-exchange resins were conditioned by embedding in a polymer matrix with a mobile processing installation. For safety and cost reasons, Electrabel, the Belgian Utility, decided to investigate by which process the former one should be replaced. To carry out this mission, Electrabel entrusted Tractebel Engineering with the selection of the most suitable process available on the international market. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Supercompaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Supercompaction Process is used to make water free dense homogeneous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process, spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of two 200 l drums. In the oil heated drying and mixing unit, the resins are heated to the necessary process temperature for the structural inner water removal and for the hot pressing step. They are then collected into special metal drums, which are automatically provided with a lid and immediately transferred to a high force compactor. After high force compaction, the pellets are transferred to a measuring unit, where the dose rate, height and weight are automatically measured and recorded. A Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of approximately up to four (depending on the type of resins) is achievable using hot compaction techniques. This paper describes the application of the Resin Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

Centner, B.; Vanderperre, S. [Nuclear Department, Tractebel Engineering, Brussels (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of selected ion exchangers for the removal of cesium from MVST W-25 supernate  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this batch-test equilibration study was to evaluate the effectiveness of certain ion exchangers for removing cesium from supernate taken from tank W-25 of the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These exchangers were selective for removing cesium from alkaline supernatant solutions with high salt concentrations. Since the supernates of evaporator concentrates stored in tanks at the MVST facility have compositions similar to some of those stored in tanks at Hanford, the data generated in this study should prove useful in the overall evaluation of the ion exchangers for applications to Hanford and other US Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. A goal of the waste processing effort at Hanford is to remove enough cesium to ensure that the resulting LLW will meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 CFR 61 class A limit for {sup 137}Cs (1 Ci/m{sup 3} or 1 {mu}Ci/mL). The separated cesium may be concentrated and vitrified for disposal in the high-level waste repository. The decontaminated effluent would be solidified for near-surface disposal.

Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.; Chase, C.W.; Mrochek, J.E.; Bell, J.T.; Jernigan, G.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Highly selective inorganic crystalline ion-exchange material for Sr{sup 2+} in acidic solutions  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel antimony titanate ion exchange material, stable in highly acidic conditions and selective to strontium against competing cations, with possible applications at Defense Waste Sites. Its development was based on good selectivity for Cs and Sr by the CSTs and literature information on the ion exchange properties of antimony compounds. This new material has been tested for the selective removal of parts per million level concentrations of Sr{sup 2+} ions from solutions with a pH in the range of 1 M HNO{sub 3} tO 5.7 M Na{sup +}/0.6 M OH{sup -} (with the most important results in the highly acidic regimes). This doped titanate has been characterized with an array of techniques, including equilibrium distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) determinations over a wide pH range, power X-ray diffraction, TEM, BET, direct-current plasma (DCP), and thermal analyses. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Nenoff, T.M.; Miller, J.E.; Thoma, S.G.; Trudell, D.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat olids/liquid sepa ). The objectiv ty of the SCIX ess of the proc n, and to provid g towards deta To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive Small Column Exchange/SCIX Feb. 2011 Departmen ll Colum E-EM Did This rocess Diagram on Exchange (S

108

Tailoring interfacial exchange coupling with low-energy ion beam bombardment: Tuning the interface roughness  

SciTech Connect

By ascertaining NiO surface roughness in a Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/NiO film system, we were able to correlate the effects of altered interface roughness from low-energy ion-beam bombardment of the NiO layer and the different thermal instabilities in the NiO nanocrystallites. From experiment and by modelling the temperature dependence of the exchange bias field and coercivity, we have found that reducing the interface roughness and changing the interface texture from an irregular to striped conformation enhanced the exchange coupling strength. Our results were in good agreement with recent simulations using the domain state model that incorporated interface mixing.

Lin, K.-W.; Shueh, C.; Huang, H.-R.; Hsu, H.-F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Tiachung 402, Taiwan (China); Mirza, M.; Lierop, J. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

Preparation of polyimide/zinc oxide nanocomposite films via an ion-exchange technique and their photoluminescence properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyimide (PI) composite films with ZnO nanoparticles embedded in the surface layer were prepared by alkali hydrolyzation following ion exchange in Zn(NO3)2 solution and thermal treatment of the zinc ion-doped PI films in air atmosphere. ...

Shuxiang Mu; Dezhen Wu; Shengli Qi; Zhanpeng Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method and apparatus for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes and impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest. An electric potential is applied across electrodes and to cause the migration of ions out of soil area toward the membranes. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area. Once membranes and become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes and is discontinued and membranes and are preferably removed from soil for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, J.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gas generation and bubble formation model for crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange columns  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a transient model to describe the process of gas generation due to radiolysis and bubble formation in crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange (IX) columns using the Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) software package. The model calculates gas concentrations and onset of bubble formation for large CST IX columns. The calculations include cesium loading as a function of time, gas generation as a function of cesium loading, and bubble formation as a function of gas solubility. This report summarizes the model development and predictions.

Hang, T.

2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modulated active charge exchange fast ion diagnostic for the C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic technique for measuring the fast-ion energy distribution in a field-reversed configuration plasma was developed and tested on the C-2 experiment. A deuterium neutral beam modulated at 22 kHz is injected into the plasma, producing a localized charge-exchange target for the confined fast protons. The escaping fast neutrals are detected by a neutral particle analyzer. The target beam transverse size ({approx}15 cm) defines the spatial resolution of the method. The equivalent current density of the target beam is {density ({approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) that highly exceeds the background neutral density in the core of C-2. The deuterium fast-ions due to the target beam (E{approx}27 keV), are not confined in C-2 and thus make a negligible contribution to the measured signals.

Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Clary, R.; Dettrick, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Deichuli, P.; Kondakov, A.; Murakhtin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

The removal of uranium from acidic media using ion exchange and/or extraction chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The separation and purification of uranium from either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid media can be accomplished by using either solvent extraction or ion-exchange. Over the past two years at Los Alamos, emerging programs are focused on recapturing the expertise required to do limited, small-quantity processing of enriched uranium. During this period of time, we have been investigating ion-addition, waste stream polishing is associated with this effort in order to achieve more complete removal of uranium prior to recycle of the acid. Extraction chromatography has been demonstrated to further polish the uranium from both nitric and hydrochloric acid media thus allowing for a more complete recovery of the actinide material and creation of less waste during the processing steps.

FitzPatrick, J.R.; Schake, B.S.; Murphy, J.; Holmes, K; West, M.H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Testing for Cesium Removal from Hanford Tank Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

A new spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin was tested for efficacy of cesium removal from Hanford tank waste. Two spherical RF formulations, prepared by varying curing temperature, were tested. Both resins had a tight particle size distribution and a high degree of sphericity. Small-scale column testing (on {approx}20-mL resin beds) was conducted evaluating the cesium load profile with AZ-102 simulated tank waste and the cesium elution profile using 0.5 M HNO3 eluant. The load and elution profiles were compared in side-by-side testing with ground-gel RF resin and SuperLig? 644, the Waste Treatment Plant baseline ion exchanger. Although capacity was not as high at the other resins tested, the spherical RF resin met plant cesium loading requirements with the AZ-102 simulant matrix. Excellent reproducibility of cesium load and elution was demonstrated over three process cycles with no evidence of degraded performance. Residual cesium on the resin beds after elution was nearly a factor of 10 lower than that of the ground-gel RF and SuperLig? 644.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Blanchard, David L.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Thorson, Murray R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparison of inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from K-basin water  

SciTech Connect

The work presented in this report was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Crosscutting Program (ESP), Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this work was to investigate radionuclide uptake by several newly produced ion exchange materials under actual waste conditions, and to compare the performance of those materials with that of commercially available ion exchangers. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing cesium and strontium from 105-KE Basin water. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion exchange materials under similar operating conditions. Additional flow studies are needed to predict material capacities and to develop complete ion exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 (manufactured by UOP), clinoptilolite (a naturally occurring zeolite), and materials produced on an experimental basis by AlliedSignal (biotites and nonatitanates), 3M (hexacyanoferrates), Selion Technologies, Inc. (hexacyanoferrates and titanates), and Texas A&M University (pharmacosiderites, biotites, and nonatitanates). In all, the performance of 14 ion exchange materials was evaluated at two solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}) using actual 105-KE Basin water. Evaluation consisted of determining cesium and strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Actual 105-KE Basin water was obtained from a sample collected during the sludge dissolution work conducted by PNNL in FY 1996. This sample was taken from the bottom of the basin and contained significantly higher concentrations of the radioactive constituents than do samples taken from the top of the basin.

Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; DesChane, J.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum bounding cesium loading considered possible based on current knowledge regarding CST media and the anticipated feed compositions. Since this cesium loading was considerably higher than the nominal loading conditions in SRS waste, cases with lower loading were also evaluated. Modeling parameters were the same as those used previously unless otherwise indicated. The current model does not capture multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. This feature is conservative in the sense that it does not account for the large cooling effects associated with phase transfer. However, the potential transfer of heat to the plenum region associated with vertical bubble ascension through the column during boiling is also neglected. Thermal modeling calculations were also performed for the entire waste storage tank for the case where loaded and ground CST was transferred to the tank. The modeling domain used for the in-tank calculations is provided in Figure 2. The in-tank domain is based on SRS Tank 41, which is a Type-IIIA tank. Temperature distributions were evaluated for cylindrical, ground CST mounds located on the tank floor. Media grinding is required prior to vitrification processing of the CST in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The location of the heat source region on the tank floor due to the accumulation of CST material was assumed to be just under the grinder. The shape of the CST mound was assumed to be cylindrical. This shape is believed to be most representative of the actual mound shape formed in the tank, given that submersible mixing pumps will be available for media dispersion. Alternative configurations involving other geometrical shapes for the CST mound were evaluated in the previous work. Sensitivity analysis for the in-tank region was performed for different amounts of CST media. As was the case for the in-column model, the in-tank model does not include multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. The in-column and the in-tank evaluations incorporated recently updated maximum cesi

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ion exchange kinetics of cesium for various reaction designs using crystalline silicotitanate, UOP IONSIV IE-911  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through collaborative efforts at Texas A&M University and Sandia National Laboratories, a crystalline silicotitanate (CST), which shows extremely high selectivity for radioactive cesium removal in highly concentrated sodium solutions, was synthesized. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on a CST under cesium ion exchange conditions has been investigated. The experimental results with hydrogen peroxide showed that the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased and the tetragonal phase, the major component of CST, slowly dissolved at hydrogen peroxide concentrations greater than 1 M. A simple and novel experimental apparatus for a single-layer ion exchange column was developed to generate experimental data for estimation of the intraparticle effective diffusivity. A mathematical model is presented for estimation of effective diffusivities for a single-layer column of CST granules. The intraparticle effective diffusivity for Cs was estimated as a parameter in the analytical solution. By using the least square method, the effective diffusivities of 1.56 ± 0.14 x 10-11 m2/s and 0.68 ± 0.09x 10-11 m2/s, respectively, were obtained. The difference in the two values was due to the different viscosities of the solutions. A good fit of the experimental data was obtained which supports the use of the homogeneous model for this system. A counter-current ion exchange (CCIX) process was designed to treat nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site. A numerical method based on the orthogonal collocation method was used to simulate the concentration profile of cesium in the CCIX loaded with CST granules. To maximize cesium loading onto the CST and minimize the volume of CST, two design cases of a moving bed, where the fresh CST is pulsed into the column at certain periods or at certain concentration of cesium, were investigated. Simulation results showed that cesium removal behavior in the pilot-scale test of CCIX experiment, where the column length is 22 ft and the CST is pulsed 1 ft in every 24 hours, was well predicted by using the values of the effective diffusivities of 1.0 to 6.0 × 10-11 m2/s.

Kim, Sung Hyun

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Monte Carlo simulation of ion trajectories in the modified PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved design for the present PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer (MACE) has been proposed by one of the authors, in which the five cylindrical electrostatic plates for mass separation are replaced by a single flat, electrostatic deflection plate. An existihg Monte Carlo code that simulated the passage of ions through the MACE analyzer was modified to examine the feasibility of this change. The resulting calculations were used to optimize detector positions and collimation requirements. The first analyzer to be placed on PDX will be of the old design, similar to the present PLT analyzer. However, if the design reported here is successful on the test stand, the future PDX analyzers will all be of the new, single electrostatic plate variety. A further advantage will be the ability to install as many as ten detectors instead of the current five, thus providing twice as many energy channels for each shot. Also, both mass species (H, D) can be measured concurrently, if desired.

Kaita, R.; Davis, S.L.; Medley, S.S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

Lee, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The use of fuel cell ion exchange membranes in electrolytic cells les membranes echangeuses d'ions des piles a combustibles  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange membranes, previously used in fuel cells, were studied in order to examine their application to water electrolysis. State-of-the-art is reviewed from the bibliography, comparing this process with a classic one. Results show that only the cationic membranes are adequate for electrolytic cell use, being sufficiently resistant to heat and oxidation.

Damien, A.; Sohm, J.C.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Anionic Gallium-Based Metal;#8722;Organic Framework and Its Sorption and Ion-Exchange Properties  

SciTech Connect

A gallium-based metal-organic framework Ga{sub 6}(C{sub 9}H{sub 3}O{sub 6}){sub 8} {center_dot} (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 6}(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 26} [1, Ga{sub 6}(1,3,5-BTC){sub 8} {center_dot} 6DMA {center_dot} 3DMF {center_dot} 26H{sub 2}O], GaMOF-1; BTC = benzenetricarboxylate/trimesic acid and DMA = dimethylamine, with space group I{bar 4}3d, a = 19.611(1) {angstrom}, and V = 7953.4(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}, was synthesized using solvothermal techniques and characterized by synchrotron-based X-ray microcrystal diffraction. Compound 1 contains isolated gallium tetrahedra connected by the organic linker (BTC) forming a 3,4-connected anionic porous network. Disordered positively charged ions and solvent molecules are present in the pore, compensating for the negative charge of the framework. These positively charged molecules could be exchanged with alkali-metal ions, as is evident by an ICP-MS study. The H{sub 2} storage capacity of the parent framework is moderate with a H{sub 2} storage capacity of {approx}0.5 wt % at 77 K and 1 atm.

Banerjee, Debasis; Kim, Sun Jin; Wu, Haohan; Xu, Wenqian; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Li, Jing; Parise, John B. (Kwangju); (Rutgers); (SBU)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange of New Na/Nb/M(4+)/O/H(2)O(M=Ti,Zr) Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the vast diversity of chemical media in which metal separations are executed, a wide range of ion separation materials are employed. This results in an ongoing effort to discover new phases with novel ion exchange properties. We present here the synthesis of a novel class of thermally and chemically stable microporous, niobate-based materials. Ion exchange studies show these new phases are highly selective for Sr2+ and other bivalent metals.

Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May

1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange of New Na/Nb/M(4+)/O/H(2)O(M=Ti,Zr) Phases  

SciTech Connect

Due to the vast diversity of chemical media in which metal separations are executed, a wide range of ion separation materials are employed. This results in an ongoing effort to discover new phases with novel ion exchange properties. We present here the synthesis of a novel class of thermally and chemically stable microporous, niobate-based materials. Ion exchange studies show these new phases are highly selective for Sr2+ and other bivalent metals.

Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May

1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for loading resin beds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H.sup.+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145.degree.-200.degree. C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145.degree. C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO.sub.3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate.

Notz, Karl J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rainey, Robert H. (Knoxville, TN); Greene, Charles W. (Knoxville, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Water Reactor Chemical Volume and Control System and Steam Generator Blowdown Resins and Filters Sourcebook: 2013 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of ion exchange practices within the industry for the removal of soluble and insoluble contaminants and filtration practices for the removal of insoluble contaminants is important for providing insight into beneficial practices as well as conditions to avoid. This report includes information on system descriptions, system operating practices, resins, and filters used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) chemical volume and control, makeup purification, and steam generator blowdown ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST, CST, and simulated sludge that sat at indicated temperatures for up to 13 weeks. A previous SRNL report described preliminary rheology data of slurries containing MST and sludge. Preliminary results of the irradiation tests are also presented in this report, though additional data are still being collected. Rheology of the long term settling samples (6, 12, and 24 months) and additional irradiation test results will be reported at a later date. Conclusions from this analysis are as follows: (1) Slurries containing MST and unground CST have the largest shear strength. Due to the high shear strengths measured in slurries containing unground CST, evaluations of specific tank contents and mixing capability should be performed prior to any addition of this material into a waste tank. Experimentally determined shear strengths indicate mixing could be problematic in mixtures containing unground CST. (2) Increasing the ground CST fraction in the slurry increases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) Increasing the sludge fraction in the slurry decreases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (4) Slurries containing VSL ground CST have larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than slurries containing SRNL ground CST. (5) The effects of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength are slurry dependent. (6) No effects of settling time and temperature on slurry yield stress or consistency were observed. (7) Radiation up to 100 MRad does not appear to affect properties of shear strength, yield stress, or consistency of process feeds.

Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Preconceptual design for separation of plutonium and gallium by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of plutonium from decommissioned nuclear weapons, by incorporation into commercial UO{sub 2}-based nuclear reactor fuel, is a viable means to reduce the potential for theft of excess plutonium. This fuel, which would be a combination of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide, is referred to as a mixed oxide (MOX). Following power generation in commercial reactors with this fuel, the remaining plutonium would become mixed with highly radioactive fission products in a spent fuel assembly. The radioactivity, complex chemical composition, and large size of this spent fuel assembly, would make theft difficult with elaborate chemical processing required for plutonium recovery. In fabricating the MOX fuel, it is important to maintain current commercial fuel purity specifications. While impurities from the weapons plutonium may or may not have a detrimental affect on the fuel fabrication or fuel/cladding performance, certifying the effect as insignificant could be more costly than purification. Two primary concerns have been raised with regard to the gallium impurity: (1) gallium vaporization during fuel sintering may adversely affect the MOX fuel fabrication process, and (2) gallium vaporization during reactor operation may adversely affect the fuel cladding performance. Consequently, processes for the separation of plutonium from gallium are currently being developed and/or designed. In particular, two separation processes are being considered: (1) a developmental, potentially lower cost and lower waste, thermal vaporization process following PuO{sub 2} powder preparation, and (2) an off-the-shelf, potentially higher cost and higher waste, aqueous-based ion exchange (IX) process. While it is planned to use the thermal vaporization process should its development prove successful, IX has been recommended as a backup process. This report presents a preconceptual design with material balances for separation of plutonium from gallium by IX.

DeMuth, S.F.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. This process adds monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution (and entrained sludge solids). While the process is operating, the solid particles will begin to settle at temperatures up to 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods (i.e., 1-61 days) at elevated temperatures (i.e., 23-80 C) can develop large shear strengths which could make them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors are conducting rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge, MST, and crystalline silicotitanate (CST, ground and unground) that have been aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally heated to 30, 45, or 60 C. Additional tests are being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of settling time and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST and simulated sludge that sat at elevated temperatures (i.e., up to 60 C) for up to 13 weeks. Rheology of CST-containing slurries, as well as results of the long term settling (6, 12, and 24 months) and irradiation tests (10 and 100 MRad), will be reported later. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) MST only slurries that sat at elevated temperatures had larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than MST plus sludge slurries that settled at elevated temperatures. (2) The addition of sludge to an MST slurry reduces the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) The impact of settling time and temperature on slurry rheology is inconclusive at this time. The authors are collecting additional data to attempt to determine the impact of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency.

Poirier, M.; Ferguson, C.; Koopman, D.

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

TRIPLICATE SODIUM IODIDE GAMMA RAY MONITORS FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

This technical report contains recommendations from the Analytical Development (AD) organization of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a system of triplicate Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors to be used to monitor Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) content of the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) output of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process. These detectors need to be gain stabilized with respect to temperature shifts since they will be installed on top of Tank 41 at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This will be accomplished using NaI crystals doped with the alpha-emitting isotope, Americium-241({sup 241}Am). Two energy regions of the detector output will be monitored using single-channel analyzers (SCAs), the {sup 137}Cs full-energy {gamma}-ray peak and the {sup 241}Am alpha peak. The count rate in the gamma peak region will be proportional to the {sup 137}Cs content in the DSS output. The constant rate of alpha decay in the NaI crystal will be monitored and used as feedback to adjust the high voltage supply to the detector in response to temperature variation. An analysis of theoretical {sup 137}Cs breakthrough curves was used to estimate the gamma activity expected in the DSS output during a single iteration of the process. Count rates arising from the DSS and background sources were predicted using Microshield modeling software. The current plan for shielding the detectors within an enclosure with four-inch thick steel walls should allow the detectors to operate with the sensitivity required to perform these measurements. Calibration, testing, and maintenance requirements for the detector system are outlined as well. The purpose of SCIX is to remove and concentrate high-level radioisotopes from SRS salt waste resulting in two waste streams. The concentrated high-level waste containing {sup 137}Cs will be sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification and the low-level DSS will be sent to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) to be incorporated into grout.

Couture, A.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

SUMMARY REPORT ON POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a large amount of experimental work completed to identify the potential impacts of material from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) on glass formulation at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The results show no significant issues with the predicted values of chemical durability and viscosity using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models when the SCIX components are added to projected DWPF glass compositions. No modifications to the viscosity and durability models appear to be necessary at this time in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) continue to verify the durability and viscosity models as the projected compositions for DWPF processing evolve. It is also recommended that the data generated thus far be reviewed and a determination be made as to how best to extend the validation ranges of the durability and viscosity models. The liquidus temperatures for the experimental glasses are also reported and discussed in this report. The results show that the measured or estimated (based on measured data) liquidus temperature values for the glasses with SCIX components added are consistently higher than those predicted by the current model. Therefore, the PCCS liquidus temperature model will need to be modified in order to incorporate the SCIX streams at DWPF. It is recommended that SRNL carry out full measurements of the liquidus temperatures for those KT-series glasses where estimates have been made. These data should then be used to support an evaluation of whether a refitting of the liquidus temperature model coefficients will be sufficient to correctly predict the liquidus temperature of glasses containing the SCIX components (particularly higher TiO{sub 2} concentrations), or whether additional modifications to the model are required. While there are prediction issues with the current liquidus temperature model, they are not at this time expected to hamper the incorporation of SCIX streams at DWPF. The estimated liquidus temperatures, while higher than the model predicted values, remain below the current DWPF limit of 1050 C for most of the study glasses. Note that the properties and performance of the glasses in this study are highly dependent on glass composition. Therefore, should significant changes be made to the projected compositions or processing rates for SCIX or DWPF, many of the assessments and experiments may have to be revisited.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Johnson, F.

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and CST were added to the feed. These reductions in melt rate are consistent with previous studies that showed a negative impact of increased TiO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of melting. The impact of agitating the melt pool via bubbling was not studied as part of this work, but may be of interest for further testing. It is recommended that additional melt rate testing be performed should a potential reduction in melt rate of 10-15% be considered an issue of concern, or should the anticipated composition of the glass with the addition of material from salt waste processing be modified significantly from the current projections, either due to changes in sludge batch preparation or changes in the composition or volume of SCIX and SWPF material.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Salt-Zeolite Ion Exchange Equilibrium Studies for Complete Set of Fission Products in Molten LiCl-KCl  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results on LiCl-KCl based molten salts/zeolite-A contact experiments and the associated equilibrium ion exchange model. Experiments examine the contact behaviors of various ternary salts (LiCl-KCl-YCl3, LiCl-KCl-LaCl3, and LiCl-KCl-PrCl3) and quaternary salts (LiCl-KCl-CsCl-NdCl3 and LiCl-KCl-CsCl-SrCl2) with the zeolite-A. The developed equilibrium model assumes that there are ion exchange and occlusion sites, both of which are in equilibrium with the molten salt phase. A systematic approach in estimating total occlusion capacity of the zeolite-A is developed. The parameters of the model, including the total occlusion capacity of the zeolite-A, were determined from fitting experimental data collected via multiple independent studies including the ones reported in this paper. Experiments involving ternary salts were used for estimating the parameters of the model, while those involving quaternary salts were used to validate the model.

Tae-Sic Yoo; Steven M. Frank; Michael F. Simpson; Paula A. Hahn; Terry J. Battisti; Supathorn Phongikaroon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiation effects on resins and zeolites at Three Mile Island Unit II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiation effects on resin and zeolite used in the waste cleanup at Three Mile Island Unit II have been examined both experimentally and in-situ. Hydrogen and organic gases are generated due to absorbed radiation as a function of resin material, curie loading and residual water content. Significant oxygen scavaging was demonstrated in the organic resin liners. Hydrogen and oxygen gases in near stoichiometric quantities are generated from irradiation of residual water in inorganic zeolites. Gas generation was determined to be directly proportional to curie content but correlates poorly with residual water content in zeolite vessels. Results of the gas generation analyses of EPICOR II liners show that vessels with less than 166 curies had almost no hydrogen generated during two years of storage and therefore did not require safety measures for shipment or storage. Experimental measurements done at research laboratories predicted similar results associated with hydrogen gas generation and oxygen depletion. X-ray diffraction examinations and ion exchange capacity measurements indicated no evidence of irradiation effects on the structure or cesium exchange capacity for zeolites exposed to 10/sup 10/ rads. Darkening and damage of organic resin due to radiation has been identified. Breaking and agglomeration of the purification demineralizer resin is believed to be the result of temperature effects. No damage was identified from radiation effects on zeolite. Organic and inorganic sorbents used in the processing of contaminated waters at TMI-2 have been shown to be effective in maintaining long-term stability under high radiation conditions. The effects of radiolytic degradation have been shown by direct measurements and simulation tests and are of use in their general application throughout the industry.

Reilly, J.K.; Grant, P.J.; Quinn, G.J.; Hofstetter, K.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer  

SciTech Connect

Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Removal of arsenic and other contaminants from storm run-off water by flotation, filtration, adsorption and ion exchange. Technical report, September-November 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of removing soluble arsenic (+5) from storm runoff water by dissolved air flotation (Supracell), dissolved air flotation and sand filtration combination (Sandfloat), granular carbon adsorption, and ion exchange processes was experimentally demonstrated. The best pretreatment unit was Sandfloat clarifier consisting of both flotation and filtration. Sandfloat clarifier consistently removed over 90% of arsenic, turbidity, and color, and over 50% of chemical oxygen demand and oil and grease. Using a Sandfloat or a Supracell for pretreatment, and then using either carbon adsorption or ion exchange for second-stage treatment, the soluble arsenic in the storm water can be totally removed.

Krofta, M.; Wang, L.K.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Use of inorganic ion exchangers in the neutron activation determination of arsenic in coal ash  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated coal ssh samples were fused with NaOH, dissolved, and acidified so that the resulting solution was 7M in HNO/sub 3/. From this medium, carrier-free amounts of arsentc were retained on colunms of acid aluminum oxide or hydrated manganese dioxide. The latter is preferred because;t hss a greater load;ng capacity. Low-temperature sshes of six lllinois coals hsve been analyzed with both exchangers. Results compare well with those obtained by an acid dissolution-distillation separation method. (auth)

Santoliquido, P.M.

1973-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, Jane P. (813 E. Rollingwood Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are presented for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, J.P.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Adsorption Behavior of Radionuclides on Ion-Exchange Resin from Cooling Water for the K2K Target and Magnetic Horns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

Hiroshi Matsumura; Norikazu Kinoshita; Akihiro Toyoda; Kazuyoshi Masumoto; Kotaro Bessho; Masayuki Hagiwara; Yutaka Yamanoi

145

EFFECT OF GYPSUM ON AVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS EVALUATED BY MEHLICH-1, ION EXCHANGE RESIN, AND Pi-PAPER IN A BRAZILIAN TROPICAL OXISOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P)Pure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P) bPure gypsum Source average Phosphate Rock (100 mg kg -1 P)

Silva, Rodrigo Coqui da; Chien, Sen Hsuing; Prochnow, Luís Ignácio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The synthesis and characterization of Zirconium p-Phenylbis(phosphonate) Phosphate and other Zirconium Arylbis(phosphonates) for the application of ion exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layered metal phosphonates of general formula Zr(03PR)2, where R = an alkyl or aryl organic radical, have been known since 1978. In the early 1980's, these material systems were extended to include pillared phosphonate compounds, of general formula Zr(03PRP03). Mixed component systems were also investigated, of general formula Zr(03PRP03)x(03POH)2-2x, in which the orthophosphate group served as a spacer between pillaring groups to alleviate crowding and introduce tailored porosity. These materials showed promise for many uses, of greatest interest were of catalysis and ion exchange. Zirconium p-Phenylbis(phosphonate) Phosphate was synthesized by several routes to investigate the inherent structural characteristics as they applied to the crystallinity and ion exchange properties. This class of material was found to possess a crystal structure based on that of a-ZrP, as well as a different conformation in which the phosphonate and phosphate groups bond to zirconium in a different manner. These compounds were also found to be able to incorporate only a small amount of the spacing groups before the introduced defects become too great in which the layer growth terminates. The aromatic component of the pillar was further functionalized with a sulfonic acid group to enhance the ion exchange capacity for several cations. The synthetic routes were further adapted to synthesize Zirconium p,p'-Biphenylbis(phosphonate) Phosphate and Zirconium p,p"-Terphenylbis (phosphonate) Phosphate, in which compounds with a fair amount of crystallinity resulted.

Bellinghausen, Paul Christian

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Small Column Ion Exchange  

for Hanford •Hanford baseline changed to sRF 2007 •MSP was born • High interest in sRF for SRS • CD-0 approved •Project suspended by DOE due to WD 2008 2009

148

Spray solar cell research: CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells by ion exchange-CSD. Quarterly report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the applicability of the Chemical Spray Deposition-Ion Exchange Technique to the formation of high efficiency, low cost Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells has been undertaken. A Chemical Spray Deposition (CSD) apparatus and an Ion Exchange annealing station have been designed, and construction of these facilities is nearing completion. The object is to form films of CdO and Cu/sub 2/O by spraying appropriate solutions onto a heated substrate, and then to convert these oxides into CdS and Cu/sub 2/S through ion exchange by annealing in H/sub 2/S vapor. Such films will then be the basis for fabricating Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. Temporary spray and annealing equipment has been used while the permanent facilities are completed. CdO oxide films with thicknesses of 0.1 to 0.5 microns have been deposited. There is preferred crystal growth in the (111) direction on glass substrates. However, on SnO/sub 2/ coated glass, a (200) preferred orientation is obvious. The crystallite size is 5 to 10 microns, and porous spheres 10 to 20 microns in diameter are visible on the surface. After annealing in H/sub 2/S, the films are converted to CdS, but the reaction is not complete after 2 h. The optical transmission is now characteristic of CdS. The grain size was found to increase to the 100 micron range, but the surface spheres remain. A mixture of CuO and Cu/sub 2/O was formed in a preliminary spraying. The film converted to the digenite and djurleite phases of copper sulfide. Much improved control of the deposition process will result when the permanent facilities come on-line.

Maruska, H.P.; Young, A.R. II

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT05- AND KT06-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. The KT05-series glasses were selected, fabricated, and characterized to further study glass compositions where iron titanate crystals had been previously found to form. The intent was to better understand the mechanisms and compositions that favored the formation of crystals containing titanium. Formation of these crystalline phases was confirmed. Increased Na{sub 2}O concentrations had little if any impact on reducing the propensity for the formation of the iron titanate crystalline phases. Other physical properties of these glasses were not measured since the intent was to focus on crystallization. Additional studies are suggested to investigate the potential impacts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O on crystallization in glasses with high TiO{sub 2} concentrations. The KT06-series glasses were selected, fabricated, and characterized to further study glass compositions that, while broader than the current projections for DWPF feeds with SCIX material, are potential candidates for future processing (i.e., the compositions are acceptable for processing by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) with the exception of the current TiO{sub 2} concentration constraint). The chemical compositions of these glasses matched well with the target values. The chemical durabilities of all the glasses were acceptable relative to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark. Minor crystallization was identified in some of the slowly cooled glasses, although this crystallization did not impact chemical durability. Several of the KT06-series compositions had durability values that, while acceptable, were not accurately predicted by the current durability models. It was shown that for these high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses, relatively high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations combined with relatively high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations led to durabilities that were unpredictable. Several of the KT06-series glasses also had measured viscosity values that were not well predicted by the current model. A statistical partitioning routine showed that the measured viscosities became unpredictable by the current model when the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glasses was less than about 8.2 wt % at the elevated TiO{sub 2} concentrations. The current durability and viscosity models will have to be further evaluated should compositions in these regions become necessary for DWPF processing. Overall, the results presented for the KT06-series glasses show that TiO{sub 2} from the SCIX streams can be incorporated into DWPF-type glasses at concentrations of 6 wt % (in glass) without any detrimental impacts on crystallization or chemical durability that are of practical importance. The measured values for chemical durability and viscosity were acceptable for processing; however, not all of the values were predictable by the current PCCS models. Since the compositions selected for the KT06-series glasses were outside the current projections for DWPF processing with the SCIX streams (in terms of waste components other than TiO{sub 2}), these results help identify compositional regions that, if necessary for processing, would require modifications to the current models. Additional experiments are currently underway. Once completed, all of the measured data will be reviewed and compared to model predictions to better determine whether the validation range of the DWPF process control models can be confidently extended, or whether refitting of the models will be necessary.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on key intergroup and intragroup separations found in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, specifically americium from lanthanides and americium from other actinides, most importantly americium from curium. Our goal is to implement a liquid-solid separation process to reduce waste and risk of contamination by the development of metal(IV) phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials with the ideal formula of M(O6P2C6H4)0.5(O3POA) * nH2O, where M = Zr or Sn, A = H or Na. These materials have previously shown to have high affinity for Ln, this work will expand on the previous studies and provide methods for the above target separation, exploiting oxidation state and ion charge to drive the separation process. The optimum hydrothermal reaction conditions were determined by adjusting parameters such as reaction temperature and time, as well as the phosphonate to phosphate (pillarto-spacer) ligands ratio. Following these results four bulk syntheses were performed and their ion exchange properties were thoroughly examined. Techniques such as inductively coupled mass spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting were used to determine the affinity of the materials towards Na+, Cs+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Ho3+, Yb3+, NpO2+, Pu4+, PuO22+, Am3+, AmO2+, and Cm3+. Separation factors in the thousands have been observed for intergroup separations of the Ln from the alkali, alkaline earth, and low valent transition metals. A new method for Am oxidation was developed, which employed Na2S2O8 as the oxidizing agent and Ca(OCl)2 as the stabilizing agent for AmO2+ synthesis. Separation factors of 30-60 for Nd3+ and Eu3+ from AmO2+, as well as 20 for Cm3+ from AmO2+ were observed at pH 2. The work herein shows that a liquid-solid separation can be carried out for these difficult separations by means of oxidation and ion exchange.

Burns, Jonathan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Decomposition of Rare Earth Loaded Resin Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle R and D (FCR and D) program within the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is evaluating nuclear fuel cycle options, including once-through, modified open, and fully closed cycles. Each of these scenarios may utilize quite different fuel management schemes and variation in fuel types may include high thermal conductivity UO{sub 2}, thoria-based, TRISO, metal, advanced ceramic (nitride, carbide, composite, etc.), and minor actinide (MA) bearing fuels and targets. Researchers from the US, Europe, and japan are investigating methods of fabricating high-specific activity spherical particles for fuel and target applications. The capital, operating, and maintenance costs of such a fuel fabrication facility can be significant, thus fuel synthesis and fabrication processes that minimize waste and process losses, and require less footprint are desired. Investigations have been performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) studying the impact of americium and curium on the fuel fabrication process. proof of concept was demonstrated for fabrication of MA-bearing spherical particles, however additional development will be needed for engineering scale-up. Researchers at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) and the Japan Atomic Energy Association (JAEA) have collaborated on research with ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuels using spherical particles as the ceramic component dispersed in the metal matrix. Recent work at the CEA evaluates the burning of MA in the blanket region of sodium fast reactors. There is also interest in burning MA in Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The fabrication of uranium-MA oxide pellets for a fast reactor blanket or MA-bearing fuel for CANDU reactors may benefit from a low-loss dedicated footprint for producing MA-spherical particles. One method for producing MA-bearing spherical particles is loading the actinide metal on a cation exchange resin. The AG-50W resin is made of sulfonic acid functional groups attached to a styrene divinylbenzene copolymer lattice (long chained hydrocarbon). The metal cation binds to the sulfur group, then during thermal decomposition in air the hydrocarbons will form gaseous species leaving behind a spherical metal-oxide particle. Process development for resin applications with radioactive materials is typically performed using surrogates. For americium and curium, a trivalent metal like neodymium can be used. Thermal decomposition of Nd-loaded resin in air has been studied by Hale. Process conditions were established for resin decomposition and the formation of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The intermediate product compounds were described using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and wet chemistry. Leskela and Niinisto studied the decomposition of rare earth (RE) elements and found results consistent with Hale. Picart et al. demonstrated the viability of using a resin loading process for the fabrication of uranium-actinide mixed oxide microspheres for transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor. For effective transmutation of actinides, it will be desirable to extend the in-reactor burnup and minimize the number of recycles of used actinide materials. Longer burn times increases the chance of Fuel Clad Chemical or Mechanical Interaction (FCCI, FCMI). Sulfur is suspected of contributing to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) thus it is necessary to maximize the removal of sulfur during decomposition of the resin. The present effort extends the previous work by quantifying the removal of sulfur during the decomposition process. Neodymium was selected as a surrogate for trivalent actinide metal cations. As described above Nd was dissolved in nitric acid solution then contacted with the AG-50W resin column. After washing the column, the Nd-resin particles are removed and dried. The Nd-resin, seen in Figure 1 prior to decomposition, is ready to be converted to Nd oxide microspheres.

Voit, Stewart L [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Synthesis, characterization, and ion exchange properties of a sodium nonatitanate, Na4Ti9O20.xH2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the Cold War, the Hanford Weapons Site in Richland, Washington, produced weapons grade plutonium which first needed to be separated from the other products using the PUREX process (plutonium and uranium extraction). As a by product of this process, millions of cubic meters of highly acidic radioactive waste were produced which are now stored in million gallon tanks at the Hanford site. Over the years, some tanks have been known to leak and some are even in danger of exploding. Because of these problems, the waste needs to be removed from these tanks and given permanent, safe storage. The purpose of this research is to produce a more efficient ion exchanger to separate the highly radioactive isotopes (9oSr, 137 Cs and transuranics) from the large quantities of inert salts. The smaller volume of high level waste produced can then be vitrified in glass and stored, while the low level waste can be poured into less expensive cement and glass. In this work, different parameters of the synthesis of the sodium nonatitanate ion exchanger, Na4Ti9O2OoxH20, such as the Na and Ti reactants, the heating time, oven temperature, Na:Ti mole ratio, and heating method, were altered and their effects on Sr2' ion exchange selectivity were examined. For example, the heating time was varied from I day to 2, 3, 7, and 30 days. Although the crystallinity remained the same from the I day to the 2 day sample, as the heating time further increased, the crystallinity improved. The most Sr selective material was the 2 day sample with a Kd (distribution coefficient) of 1.22x 106 MI/g in O.lM Na/ O.OOIM Sr solution. The Kd's steadily decreased as the sample crystallinity increased with a maximum Kd of only 1.6OxlO5 in O.OIM Na/ O.OO I M Sr solution after a heating time of 30 days. However, in a simulated waste such as NCAW, the 2 day sample gave a Kd of only 1.44x 105 MI/g, while the I day sample gave a value of 2.50x 105 . This indicates that the nonatitanate synthesis needs to be uniquely designed to optimize Sr 2+ removal in each specific type of waste to be remediated.

Graziano, Gina Marie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Graphene-Polypyrrole Nanocomposite as a Highly Efficient and Low Cost Electrically Switched Ion Exchanger for Removing ClO4- from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination is now recognized as a widespread concern affecting many water utilities. In this report, graphene is employed as the scaffold to synthesize novel graphene-polypyrrole nanocomposite, which is demonstrated as excellent electrically switched ion exchanger for perchlorate removal. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical measurements showed that the 3D nanostructured graphene/Ppy nanocomposite exhibited the significantly improved uptake capacity for ClO4- compared with Ppy film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the uptake and release process of ClO4- in graphene/Ppy nanocomposite. In addition, the presence of graphene substrate resulted in high stability of graphene/Ppy nanocomposite during potential cycling. The present work provides a promising method for large scale water treatment.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Iihan A.; Lin, Yuehe

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Small-Column Ion-Exchange Alternative to Remove 137Cs from Low-Curie Salt Waste: Summary of Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

A Small-Column Ion-Exchange (SCIX) system is being evaluated for removing cesium from the Type 2 and/or Type 3 dissolved saltcake wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure that the dissolved saltcake meets the waste acceptance criteria at the Saltstone Facility. Both crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and IONSIV{trademark} IE-96 zeolite were evaluated as the ion-exchange media. The accelerated alternative, using CST in the SCIX, could save as much as $3 billion in operating and storage costs and {approx}20 years in processing time compared to the current baseline. With its proven high cesium-loading capacity for the expected dissolved saltcake compositions and temperatures, CST is the preferred sorbent for SCIX. The low-cost alternative sorbent, zeolite, greatly increases the volume of sorbent required because of its much lower cesium-loading capacity. Thus, zeolite greatly increases the cost for the alternative, mainly because of the increased number of Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters required to dispose of the loaded sorbent (potentially over 7000 for zeolite, compared with <500 for CST). The models previously developed for predicting cesium loading on CST compared favorably with laboratory measurements of equilibrium distribution ratios and column loading performance using dissolved saltcake simulants. These models predict that a column of 432 gal of CST can operate at 25 gal/min and treat 100,000 to 900,000 gal of dissolved saltcake, depending on the solution composition. An average value of 300,000 gal per column was used for the cost benefit analysis. Predicted cesium loading on the CST is normally below 300 Ci/L; however, solutions with low salt concentrations could potentially load the CST to 630 Ci/L. Heat transfer calculations predict nonboiling temperatures for the small columns with loadings <100 Ci/L with only natural convection cooling. For the loadings up to the maximum calculated for the tank farm (630 Ci/L), a water cooling system is required to ensure that no boiling occurs in the column if the process flow is stopped. Dose rate calculations indicate that the maximum dose rate above the tank riser is expected to be {approx} 10{sup -2} mrem/h for a column loaded at 300 Ci/L in the riser. The risk analysis indicates a net beneficial impact with no major problems likely to prevent implementation or completion of saltcake treatment.

Walker, JR.,J.F.

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

Morris, J.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT01, KT02, KT03, AND KT04-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect

Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. The KT01 and KT02-series of glasses were chosen to allow for the identification of the influence of the concentrations of major components of the glass on the retention of TiO{sub 2}. The KT03 series of glasses was chosen to allow for the identification of these influences when higher Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ZrO{sub 2} concentrations are included along with TiO2. The KT04 series of glasses was chosen to investigate the properties and performance of glasses based on the best available projections of actual compositions to be processed at the DWPF (i.e., future sludge batches including the SCIX streams).

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Anion exchange membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine structure detail (i.e., cation-? interactions, ?-turns, and charge solvation interactions). IM-MS experiments performed on tyrosine containing tripeptides show that the collision cross-sections of sodiated, potassiated and doubly sodiated species of gly-gly-tyr are smaller than that of the protonated species, while the cesiated and doubly cesiated species are larger. Conversely, all of the alkali-adducted species of try-gly-gly have collision cross-sections that are larger than that of the protonated species. The protonated and alkali metal ion adducted (Na+, K+ and Cs+) species of bradykinin and bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 2-7, 5-9 and 2-9 were also studied using IM-MS and the alkali metal ion adducts of these species were found to have cross-sections very close to those of the protonated species. Additionally, multiple peak features observed in the ATDs of protonated bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6 and 1-7 are conserved upon alkali metal ion adduction. It was observed from gas-phase H/D ion molecule reactions that alkali adducted species exchange slower and to a lesser extent than protonated species in the tyrosine- and arginine-containing peptides. Experimental and computational results are discussed in terms of peptide ion structure, specifically the intra-molecular interactions present how those interactions change upon alkali salt adduction, as well as with the sequence of the peptide. Additionally, IM-MS data suggests the presence of a compact conformation of bradykinin fragment 1-5 (RPPGF) when starting from organic solvent conditions. As water is added stepwise to methanolic solutions, a more extended conformation is populated. When the starting solution is composed of ?90% water, two distinct mobility profiles are observed as well as a shoulder, indicating the presence of three gas-phase conformations for RPPGF. Gas-phase H/D exchange of [M+H]+ ions prepared from aqueous solvents show a bi-exponential decay, whereas samples prepared from organic solvents show a single exponential decay. The effect of solvent on gas-phase peptide ion structure, i.e., solution-phase memory effects, is discussed and gas-phase structures are compared to know solution-phase structures.

Sawyer, Holly Ann

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Resin Wafer Electrodeionization Technology Reduces the ...  

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a resin wafer electrodeionization technology for processing biomass-based feedstocks into biofuels and ...

166

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Association Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AOCS Association Exchange program goal is to create collaborative partnerships and long term business relations with related organizations. Association Exchange Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division

170

Information Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To encourage the exchange of information, NIST holds many workshops, seminars, tours and other events available to the public. ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

Compatibility of PWR gasket and packing materials and resins with organic amines  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this testing program were two-fold: (1) to examine the compatibility of morpholine and five other amines with several synthetic polymeric materials useful for gaskets and seals in pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cycles and (2) to examine the potential chemical degradation of ion exchange (IX) resins by morpholine and ethanolamine. The screening of the polymeric materials in the amines was performed by heating small samples of the materials in the amines for one week to one month. Interaction of the amines with the materials was accelerated by testing at elevated temperatures and at high amine concentrations. Two materials (Kalrez and EPDM) that are potentially useful in high-temperature and high-pressure steam systems were tested in morpholine solutions in sealed bombs at 260{degrees}C (500{degrees}). After heating in the aqueous amine solutions, changes in weight were measured and the samples were visually examined for physical changes, such as swelling or cracking. Selected materials underwent testing for hardness, elongation, and tensile strength after heating in morpholine for one month. This document provides the results of this testing program.

Keneshea, F.J.; Hobart, S.A. (Adams and Hobart Consulting Engineers, Fremont, CA (United States)); Camenzind, M.J. (Balazs Analytical Lab., Mountain View, CA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Technical progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978. [Production of polarized hydrogen ions and atoms and their charge exchange reactions on various gas targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Topics covered include: direct production of polarized D/sup -/ (or H/sup -/) ions; the maximum fraction of fast H/sup 0/ (or D/sup 0/) atoms produced when H/sup -/ (or D/sup -/) is incident on various gas targets; cross sections for charge changing reactions when fast H/sup 0/ atoms and H/sup -/ ions are incident on various gas targets; and the production of H/sup -/ ions in an alkali vapor target. (GHT)

None

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Initial cost analysis of a desalination process utilizing hydrotalcite and permutite for ion sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

An initial cost analysis of a proposed desalination process was performed. The proposed process utilizes tailored inorganic ion exchangers, hydrotalcite and permutite, to sequester anions and cations from a brackish water solution. Three different process scenarios were considered: (1) disposal of the spent exchangers as dry waste (2) conventional chemical regeneration, and (3) acid regeneration of permutite coupled with thermal (550 C) regeneration of hydrotalcite. Disposal of the resin and conventional regeneration are not viable options from an economic standpoint. Applying limited data and optimistic assumptions to the third scenario yielded an estimate of $2.34/kgal of product water. Published values for applying conventional reverse osmosis to similar water streams range from $0.70 to $2.65/kgal. Consistent with these baseline values, the Water Treatment Estimation Routine, WaTER, developed by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation produced a cost estimate of $1.16/kgal for brackish water reverse osmosis.

Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ortho-ortho aramatic bis maleimide-diamine resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

APO-BMI is a chain-extended with certain diamines to provide thermosetting resins retaining the improved properties of APO-BMI resins, but having increased toughness in the cured resins.

Zupancic, Joseph J. (Bensenville, IL); Swedo, Raymond J. (Mt. Prospect, IL); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS); Schumacher, Elaine F. (Arlington Hts., IL); Buehler, Allyson J. (Indiana Hd. Pk., IL)

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were not successful in preventing the formation of iron titanate crystals in the KT09-series glasses. Increased K{sub 2}O concentrations were successful in hindering the formation of iron titanates in some of the glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. However, this result did not apply to all of the CCC versions of the glasses, indicating a compositional dependence of this effect. In addition, high concentrations of K{sub 2}O have been shown to hinder the ability of the DWPF durability and viscosity models to predict the performance of these glasses. The usefulness of increased K{sub 2}O concentrations in preventing the formation of iron titanates may therefore be limited. Further characterization was not performed for the KT09-series glasses since the type of crystallization formed was the characteristic of interest for these compositions. All of the KT10-series glasses were XRD amorphous, regardless of heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements showed that the glasses met the targeted concentrations for each oxide. In general, the measured PCT responses of the KT10-series glasses were well predicted by the DWPF models. The measured, normalized release values for silicon for some of the glasses fell above the 95% confidence interval for the predicted values; however, the PCT responses for these glasses remain considerably lower than that of the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The viscosities of the KT10-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. The next step in this study will be to compile all of the data developed and further compare the measured properties and performance with those predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. Recommendations will then be made as to which models, if any, may need to be modified in order to accommodate the material from SCIX into DWPF

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were not successful in preventing the formation of iron titanate crystals in the KT09-series glasses. Increased K{sub 2}O concentrations were successful in hindering the formation of iron titanates in some of the glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. However, this result did not apply to all of the CCC versions of the glasses, indicating a compositional dependence of this effect. In addition, high concentrations of K{sub 2}O have been shown to hinder the ability of the DWPF durability and viscosity models to predict the performance of these glasses. The usefulness of increased K{sub 2}O concentrations in preventing the formation of iron titanates may therefore be limited. Further characterization was not performed for the KT09-series glasses since the type of crystallization formed was the characteristic of interest for these compositions. All of the KT10-series glasses were XRD amorphous, regardless of heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements showed that the glasses met the targeted concentrations for each oxide. In general, the measured PCT responses of the KT10-series glasses were well predicted by the DWPF models. The measured, normalized release values for silicon for some of the glasses fell above the 95% confidence interval for the predicted values; however, the PCT responses for these glasses remain considerably lower than that of the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The viscosities of the KT10-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. The next step in this study will be to compile all of the data developed and further compare the measured properties and performance with those predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. Recommendations will then be made as to which models, if any, may need to be modified in order to accommodate the material from SCIX into DWPF

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optimization on Compression Strength of Resin Mineral Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Using natural granite particles as aggregate and organic resin as binder, resin mineral composite (RMC) has good vibration damping properties ...

178

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

179

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Exchangeable equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main contribution of this thesis is a new solution concept for symmetric games (of complete information in strategic form), the exchangeable equilibrium. This is an intermediate notion between symmetric Nash and symmetric ...

Stein, Noah D. (Noah Daniel)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

HEAT EXCHANGER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.J.Hunt, "Small Particle Heat Exchangers" Lawrence BerkeleyUtilizing A Small Particle Heat Exchanger ArIon]. Hunt AprilA SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER Arlon J. Hunt Lawrence

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Electrodeionization Technology (EDI)  

This approach enables simultaneous desalination and resin regeneration. In Argonne/EDSEP EDI, the resin (the active component in ion exchange columns) ...

186

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

187

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

Wolowodiuk, Walter (New Providence, NJ)

1976-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of {sup 238}Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from {sup 238}Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain {sup 238}Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed.

Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Ceramic heat exchanger systems...Soaking pit 870â??1230 1600â??2250 Fe, Si, alkalis Solar Turbines â?¦ 4â??8 OD Ã? 180 long (440 tubes) Aluminum melt furnaces 1010 1850 Alkali salts Plate fin GTE 0.6, 1.6 25â??46 Multiple 870â??1370 1600â??2250 Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Coors 0.25, 1.0 30 Ã? 30 Ã? 46 Multiple Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Radiant...

192

Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Condensing Heat Exchangers Optimize Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of fluorocarbon resin covered tubes has advanced to the point where full scale marketing in connection with condensing heat exchangers has begun. Field installations show simple paybacks of one to one and a half years with resulting steam boiler fuel to steam efficiencies in excess of 90%. The studies and evaluations done to date indicate that units of this type will be cost effective in sizes ranging from 10,000 to 300,0000 steam per hour as long as cold makeup water is available for preheating with the waste flue gases.

Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, P. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of extractants and chelating resins in polishing actinide-contaminated waste streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used for recovering plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, the trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remaining in the effluent require additional processing. We are doing research to develop a secondary unit operation that can directly polish the effluent so that actinide levels are reduced to below the maximum allowed for facility discharge. We selected solvent extraction, the only unit operation that can meet the stringent process requirements imposed; several carbonyl and phosphoryl extractants were evaluated and their performance characterized. We also investigated various engineering approaches for solvent extraction; the most promising was a chelating resin loaded with extractant. Our research now focuses on the synthesis of malonamides, and our goal is to bond these extractants to a resin matrix. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Yarbro, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the chemical properties of superheavy elements (SHE) pose interesting challenges due to their short half-lives and low production rates. Chemical systems must have extremely fast kinetics, fast enough kinetics to be able to examine the chemical properties of interest before the SHE decays to another nuclide. To achieve chemistry on such time scales, the chemical system must also be easily automated. Most importantly however, a chemical system must be developed which provides suitable separation and kinetics before an on-line study of a SHE can be performed. Relativistic effects make studying the chemical properties of SHEs interesting due to the impact these effects could have on the SHEs chemical properties. Relativistic effects arise when the velocity of the s orbital electrons approach the speed of light. As this velocity increases, the Bohr radius of the inner electron orbitals decreases and there is an increase in the particles mass. This contraction results in a destabilization of the energy of the outer d and f electron orbitals (5f and 6d in the case of SHE), which can cause these to expand due to their increased shielding from the nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the spin-orbit splitting for p, d, and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. This can lead most interestingly to a possible increased stability of element 114, which due to large spin-orbit splitting of the 7p orbital and the relativistically stabilized 7p{sub 1/2} and 7s orbital gives rise to a closed shell ground state of 7s{sup 2}7p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}. The homologs of element 105, dubnium (Db), Ta and Nb and the pseudo-homolog Pa, are well known to hydrolyze and form both neutral and non-neutral monoatomic and polyatomic species that may cause issues with extraction from a given chemical system. Early ion-exchange and solvent-extraction studies show mixed results for the behavior of Db. Some studies show Db behaving most similar to Ta, while others show it behaving somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent, which separates analytes based on steric interactions between the cavity of the crown ether and electrostatic interac

Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON ~m Small Particle Heat Exchangers Arion J. Hunt June 1978d. LBL 7841 Small Particle Heat Exchangers by Arlon J. Huntgenerally to non-solar heat exchangers. These may be of the

Hunt, A.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Acidic Ion Exchange Membrane - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary In this invention we report the synthesis of a copolymer of vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) and vinyl zirconium phosphorous (VZP) acid has ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Growth of oxide exchange bias layers  

SciTech Connect

An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bia layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200.degree. C., the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 .ANG./sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous.

Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA); Michel, Richard P. (Bloomington, MN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, Roger R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Exchange Rates, Information, and Crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Intervention and Exchange Rate Misalignment 4 Conclusion 5explain the exchange rate determination puzzle? Americanrisk to defend the exchange rate. Universit¨at Trier Working

Fernholz, Ricardo Turrin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Correlation of Structure and Ion Transport Properties in Glassy Ionic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of these glasses depend on the modifier content as well as glass former ratio. ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

209

Negative-ion sources for neutral-beam systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are three main methods now used to produce negative hydrogen ions: charge exchange, volume production, and surface production, and this paper briefly describes these three systems.

Ehlers, K.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

211

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

212

Quantum exchange interaction of spherically symmetric plasmoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nano-sized spherically symmetric plasma structures which are radial nonlinear oscillations of electrons in plasma. The effective interaction of these plasmoids via quantum exchange forces between ions is described. We calculate the energy of this interaction for the case of a dense plasma. The conditions when the exchange interaction is attractive are examined and it is shown that separate plasmoids can form a single object. The application of our results to the theoretical description of stable atmospheric plasma structures is considered.

Maxim Dvornikov

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

Ponnampalam; Elankovan (Okemos, MI)

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technology Performance Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490...

215

Affordable Resins and Adhesives From Optimized Soybean Varieties (ARA Program)  

SciTech Connect

The Mission of the ARA Program was to develop the Corporate Infrastructure to mass-produce new bio-based materials from Soybeans. The resins were integrated with the bio-fuels program. (1) to research, develop, and commercialize low cost adhesives and resins from soy oil and protein, the co-products of the soy bio-diesel process. (2) to study structure-functionality of soy oil and proteins at molecular and genomic levels

Dr. Richard WOol; Dr. X. Susan Sun; Rich Chapas

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Exchanging intensional XML data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XML is becoming the universal format for data exchange between applications. Recently, the emergence of Web services as standard means of publishing and accessing data on the Web introduced a new class of XML documents, which we call intensional ... Keywords: Data exchange, Web services, XML, intensional information, typing

Tova Milo; Serge Abiteboul; Bernd Amann; Omar Benjelloun; Fred Dang Ngoc

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Direct fired heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system  

SciTech Connect

A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Heat and mass exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

"Building Energy Data Exchange Specification"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification" "Version 2.3" "applicationvnd.ms-excel" "Overview:" "This document describes the DOE Building Energy Data Exchange Specification...

225

Green Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Exchange Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Exchange Place New York, New York Zip NY 10282 Product String representation "The Green Excha ... es marketplace." is too...

226

Trade, Interdependence and Exchange Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period is 1971-2000. All inflation rates and predictions areof Goods and Real Exchange Rate Fluc- tuations,” mimeo [5]Between Trade and Exchange Rate Volatility,” mimeo [6

Fitzgerald, Doireann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

Duval, B. P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Exchange Rates and Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near–random walk behavior if fundamentals are I(1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs, inflation, and interest rates provide little help in predicting changes in floating exchange rates. As well, we show that the data do exhibit a related link suggested by standard models—that the exchange rate helps predict these fundamentals. The implication is that exchange rates and fundamentals are linked in a way that is broadly consistent with asset-pricing models of the exchange rate. I.

Charles Engel; Kenneth D. West

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The active microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA); Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Greywater heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect

A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

Holmberg, D.

1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technology Performance Exchange  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem: Perceived fiscal risk associated with the installation of unfamiliar technologies impedes adoption rates for cost-effective, energy-saving products. Impact of Project: Enable end users to quickly and

232

Classical Heat Exchanger Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry methodology for heat exchanger performance and uncertainty analysis has been successful in dealing with the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued in 1989 for safety-related service water systems, but has been found to have several significant limitations. The general objective of this report is to improve the industry performance and uncertainty analysis methodology and guidelines for implementation and analysis of heat exchanger performance. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radial flow heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, and ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.

1986-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

237

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

238

REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Uranium from seawater research : final progress report, FY 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the FY '82 campaign 14 new ion exchange resin formulations, prepared by the Rohm & Haas Company, were tested by MIT at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The best of these chelating resins was again of the ...

Borzekowski, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technetium and Iodine Removal Studies with SuperLig Resin Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina An ion exchange resin, SuperLig 639 by IBC Advanced Technologies, is to be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial SiC materials are much lower due to phonon scattering by impurities (e.g., sintering aids located at the grain boundaries of these materials). The thermal conductivity of our SiC was determined using the laser flash method and it is 214 W/mK at 373 K and 64 W/mK at 1273 K. These values are very close to those of pure SiC and are much higher than those of SiC materials made by industrial processes. This SiC made by our LSI process meets the thermal properties required for use in high temperature heat exchanger. Cellulose and phenolic resin carbons lack the well-defined atomic structures associated with common carbon allotropes. Atomic-scale structure was studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), nitrogen gas adsorption and helium gas pycnometry. These studies revealed that cellulose carbon exhibits a very high degree of atomic disorder and angstrom-scale porosity. It has a density of only 93% of that of pure graphite, with primarily sp2 bonding character and a low concentration of graphene clusters. Phenolic resin carbon shows more structural order and substantially less angstrom-scale porosity. Its density is 98% of that of pure graphite, and Fourier transform analysis of its TEM micrographs has revealed high concentrations of sp3 diamond and sp2 graphene nano-clusters. This is the first time that diamond nano-clusters have been observed in carbons produced from phenolic resin. AC and DC electrical measurements were made to follow the thermal conversion of microcrystalline cellulose to carbon. This study identifies five regions of electrical conductivity that can be directly correlated to the chemical decomposition and microstructural evolution during carbonization. In Region I, a decrease in overall AC conductivity occurs due to the initial loss of the polar groups from cellulose molecules. In Region II, the AC conductivity starts to increase with heat treatment temperature due to the formation and growth of conducting carbon clusters. In Region III, a further increase of AC conductivity with increasing heat treatment temperature is obs

DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-07 Mason DOE EM Waste Processing Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants: Studsvik Processing Facility: Ion exchange resins (45" diameter FBSR) DOE Idaho Integrated Waste Treatment Unit: SBW treatment (48" diameter FBSR) DOE...

243

Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

Janke, Christopher J. (Oliver Springs, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here the laser assisted emittance exchange (LAEE) technique. A laser operating in the transverse mode (TEM10 or TEM01) is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. It is shown that with the LAEE one can generate an electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance, which allows one to significantly bring down the size of an X-ray free electron laser (FEL) and greatly extend the availability of these light sources. The technique can also be used to enhance the performances of X-ray FELs in storage rings. The timing and energy jitter problems for the standard emittance exchange and LAEE techniques are also discussed.

Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

Culver, Donald W. (Poway, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Neural Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "Neural Heat Exchanger" is an alternative, supervised learning method for multi-layer neural nets. It is inspired by the physical heat exchanger. Unlike backprop, it is entirely local. This makes its parallel implementation trivial. It was first presented during occasional talks since 1990, and is closely related to Hinton et. al.'s recent Helmholtz Machine (1995). For the first time, this paper presents the basic ideas in written form. To fully understand the Neural Heat Exchanger's advantages and limitations, however, much theoretical and empirical work remains to be done. 1 Introduction Most conventional supervised algorithms for multi-layer neural nets are not local in space and time. Backprop, for instance, requires a global control mechanism that first propagates activation signals through all successive layers, then waits until the error signals come back, then changes the weights. Many suspect, however, that the brain does use an entirely local algorithm. One advantage of...

Jürgen Schmidhuber

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Use of ionizing radiation for fixing textile resins on wool. [Gamma rays  

SciTech Connect

Ambient-temperature treatments with ionizing radiation can be used as an alternative to conventional thermal/catalytic cure methods of fixing textile resins on wool materials. The effectiveness of the radiation-induced fixation of resins on wool has been demonstrated by machine-wash shrinkage tests on fabrics treated with a variety of commercial polymer resins.

McLaren, K.G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Event Media Links Event Media Links Session 1: Technical Exchange Opening Topic Speaker PDF Podcast S01-01 Welcome T. Michalske, SRNL N/A Podcast S01-03 Introductions G. Flowers, SRNS N/A Podcast S01-04 Opening Remarks I. Triay, DOE-EM Presentation PDF Podcast S01-05 Status of Waste Processing Technology Development S. Schneider, DOE-EM Presentation PDF Podcast S01-06 Hanford/SRS Tank Waste Path Forward K. Subramanian/ T. Sams, SRR/WRPS Presentation PDF Podcast S01-07 Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Overview B. Mason, TTT Presentation PDF Podcast S01-08 Next Generation Cesium Solvent B.Moyer/S. Fink/M. Geeting, ORNL/SRNL/SRR Presentation PDF Podcast S01-09 Rotary Microfilter Development/Small Column Ion Exchange D. Herman/ R. Edwards, SRNL/SRR Presentation PDF Podcast Session 2: Increased Waste Loading - Improved Current Processing

249

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ion collection by a conducting sphere in a magnetized or drifting collisional plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion collection by dust grains and probes in plasmas with a neutral background is of interest in the study of both space and terrestrial plasmas, where charge-exchange collisions can play an important role in ion collection. ...

Haakonsen, Christian Bernt, 1985-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

New Innovations in Highly Ion Specific Media for Recalcitrant Waste stream Radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

Specialty ion specific media were examined and developed for, not only pre- and post-outage waste streams, but also for very difficult outage waste streams. This work was carried out on first surrogate waste streams, then laboratory samples of actual waste streams, and, finally, actual on-site waste streams. This study was particularly focused on PWR wastewaters such as Floor Drain Tank (FDT), Boron Waste Storage Tank (BWST), and Waste Treatment Tank (WTT, or discharge tank). Over the last half decade, or so, treatment technologies have so greatly improved and discharge levels have become so low, that certain particularly problematic isotopes, recalcitrant to current treatment skids, are all that remain prior to discharge. In reality, they have always been present, but overshadowed by the more prevalent and higher activity isotopes. Such recalcitrants include cobalt, especially Co 58 [both ionic/soluble (total dissolved solids, TDS) and colloidal (total suspended solids, TSS)] and antimony (Sb). The former is present in most FDT and BWST wastewaters, while the Sb is primarily present in BWST waste streams. The reasons Co 58 can be elusive to granulated activated carbon (GAC), ultrafiltration (UF) and ion exchange (IX) demineralizers is that it forms submicron colloids as well as has a tendency to form metal complexes with chelating agents (e.g., ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, or EDTA). Such colloids and non-charged complexes will pass through the entire treatment skid. Antimony (Sb) on the other hand, has little or no ionic charge, and will, likewise, pass through both the filtration and de-min skids into the discharge tanks. While the latter will sometimes (the anionic vs. the cationic or neutral species) be removed on the anion bed(s), it will slough off (snow-plow effect) when a higher affinity anion (iodine slugs, etc.) comes along; thus causing effluents not meeting discharge criteria. The answer to these problems found in this study, during an actual Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage cycle and recovery (four months), was the down-select and development of a number of highly ion specific media for the specific removal of such elusive isotopes. Over three dozen media including standard cation and anion ion exchangers, specialty IX, standard carbons, and, finally, chemically doped media (e.g., carbon and alumina substrates). The latter involved doping with iron, manganese, and even metals. The media down-select was carried out on actual plant waste streams so that all possible outage affects were accounted for, and distribution coefficients (Kd's) were determined (vs. decontamination factors, DF's, or percent removals). Such Kd's, in milliliters of solution per gram of media (mug), produce data indicative of the longevity of the media in that particular waste stream. Herein, the down-select is reported in Pareto (decreasing order) tables. Further affects such as the presence of high cobalt concentrations, high boron concentrations, the presence of hydrazine and chelating agents, and extreme pH conditions. Of particular importance here is to avoid the affinity of competing ions (e.g., a Sb specific media having more than a slight affinity for Co). The latter results in the snow-plow effect of sloughing off 3 to 4 times the cobalt into the effluent as was in the feed upon picking up the Sb. The study was quite successful and resulted in the development of and selection of a resin-type and two granular media for antimony removal, and two resin-types and a granular media for cobalt removal. The decontamination factors for both media were hundreds to thousands of times that of the full filtration and de-min. (authors)

Denton, M. S.; Wilson, J.; Ahrendt, M. [RWE NUKEM Corporation (RNC), 800 Oak Ridge Tnpk., Suite A701, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Bostick, W. D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory (MCL), Inc., East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); DeSilva, F.; Meyers, P. [ResinTech, Inc., 1 ResinTech Plaza, 160 Cooper Road, West Berlin, NJ 08091 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Richlen, S.L.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Silane discharge ion chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Silane dc, rf, and dc proximity discharges have been studied using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. Qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges have been developed from experimental measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane have been measured and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He , Ne , and Ar with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane have been measured as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. A detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge has been developed by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that have been gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

Chatham, R.H. III

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Calculation of exchange energies using algebraic perturbation theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algebraic perturbation theory is presented for efficient calculations of localized states and hence of exchange energies, which are the differences between low-lying states of the valence electron of a molecule, formed by the collision of an ion Y{sup +} with an atom X. For the case of a homonuclear molecule these are the gerade and ungerade states and the exchange energy is an exponentially decreasing function of the internuclear distance. For such homonuclear systems the theory is used in conjunction with the Herring-Holstein technique to give accurate exchange energies for a range of intermolecular separations R. Since the perturbation parameter is essentially 1/R, this method is suitable for large R. In particular, exchange energies are calculated for X{sub 2}{sup +} systems, where X is H, Li, Na, K, Rb, or Cs.

Burrows, B. L. [Mathematics Section Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology Staffordshire University, Beaconside, Stafford ST18 0DG (United Kingdom); Dalgarno, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Cohen, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem IL-91904 (Israel)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chicago Climate Exchange CCX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Jump to: navigation, search Name Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60604 Product Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) is aiming at...

258

Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas-side of finned tube heat- exchangers. Journal of Heatsurface interactions in heat exchanger fouling. Journal ofParticle Deposition on Heat Exchangers Epstein, N. , 1988.

Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the collector and heat exchanger (Uc and Uhel · ~Constant tNational Standard, "Solar Heat Exchangers," ANSI/ASME SES 1,connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulation maximum

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Heat exchanger tube mounts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Characterization of phenolic resins with thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an advanced material research program, thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis of a phenolic resin was carried out recently for the study of the curing of the prepolymer, solvent extraction, and carbonization of the polymer at high temperature in inert atmosphere. These steps are critical to the quality of the produced advanced material. In addition to TG-MS, several other complementary techniques were also employed for the analysis of the phenolic resin prepolymer and its curing and thermal degradation products. These techniques include pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, direct insertion probe-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Chang, Cherng; Tackett, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant-Wide Opportunity Assessment Program. Resin manufacturing is a highly energy intensive process. The process needs extensive heating accomplished through steam boilers and thermal oil heaters, and cooling which is accomplished through refrigeration as well as process cooling water systems. Detailed energy assessment of Neville Chemical plants has shown significant energy conservation opportunities. For the less capital-intensive measures, energy cost savings of 20% to 30% with paybacks of less than two years were identified. The identified measures can be easily replicated in similar facilities. In this paper, details of the processes in hydrocarbon resin production from an energy consumption viewpoint will be discussed, current prevalent practices in the industry will be elaborated, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings will be outlined."

Ganji, A. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effects of Resin Particle Size and Solution Temperature on SuperLig(R) 644 Resin Performance with AN-105 Simulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the SuperLig(R) 644 resin loading and elution was evaluated at 25, 35, and 45 degree C using a single-column containing 2.25 g of oven-dry, hydrogen form of SuperLig(R) 664 resin. A simulated Envelope A solution was used to mimic the composition of low-activity waste solution from Tank 241-AN-105 supernate in the Hanford Site waste tank. The simulant was spiked with small quantities of trace metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, and lead) to evaluate the effects of these metals on cesium sorption. The results from column tests performed at 25, 35, and 45 degree C showed that more than 100 BVs of simulated Envelope A solution could be processed at each temperature before 50 percent breakthrough of the cesium occurred.

Nash, C.A.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

O--H charge exchange in cold, dense, hydrogen plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the accidentally resonant charge exchange reaction, O/sup +/ + H/sup 0/ reverse arrows O/sup 0/ + H/sup +/, is an important mechanism for causing the loss of singly charged oxygen ions from oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasmas. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented which show that the fraction of oxygen lost because of charge exchange exceeds /sup 1///sub 3/ when the parameters n/sub e/ approx. 10/sup 13/cm/sup -3/, n/sub H//sup o/ approx. 10/sup 11/cm/sup -3/ and T/sub e/ approx. 3 eV are attained.

Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Heat exchanger-accumulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

UNDERSTANDING CURE INHIBITION IN CARBON FIBER REINFORCED VINYL ESTER RESIN COMPOSITES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of neat and oxidized carbon fiber reinforcements on vinyl ester resin free radical polymerization was investigated. First, the free radical polymerization of neat… (more)

Tweed-Kent, Sean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, I-8: Research on the Influence of Moulding Sand with Furan Resin ... Study of Different metallurgical Waste for Preparation of Glass-Ceramics.

268

Exchange rate determination in Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the options for adopting normative and prescriptive models of exchange rate determination suitable for developed and developing countries. It also develops a… (more)

Rusydi, Mohammad

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Flat plate heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight flat plate heat exchanger comprised of two or more essentially parallel flat plates which are formed and arranged to provide fluid flow passages between the plates. New combinations of plastic plates include the usage of transparent plastic foam and honeycomb structures. Improved shapes of flow passages include the usage of flow nozzles, flow diffusers, and jet pumps to increase fluid flow and heat transfer. The invention includes the usage of transparent plastic foam plates which are shaped to concentrate solar energy onto plastic tubes. Clear plastic tubes containing black heat transfer fluid are included. The invention includes the usage of spiral flow channels within plastic foam plates. Six different embodiments of the invention are included. Five of the embodiments could be used as efficient lightweight solar collectors.

Berringer, R.T.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Small-Scale Testing of Potential Small Column Ion Exchange ...  

Hockmeyer Test Setup - August 2010 • Based (partly) on previous grinding of zeolite at SRS, in Tank 18/19 in 2008 • Batch processing tested with ...

271

Thermal Degradation and Immobilisation of Spent Ion Exchange ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

272

Exchange of Cs Ion in Clay Minerals by Microwave Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Difference between Life and Death of Bacterium against Microwave Power under ... Sintering and Plastic Deformation of Ceramics under Pulsed Electric Current.

273

The Separation of Tungsten and Molybdenum by Ion Exchange ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effect of Process Variables on Current Efficiency, Energy Consumption, and Surface Morphology ... Recovery of Rare Earth Metals form Wasted Magnet.

274

Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Rockward, Tommy Q. T.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sulphide Precipitation and Ion Exchange Technologies for Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... eliminates residual waste sludge, improves water conservation, generates revenues from wastewater, and delivers overall improvements to the environment .

276

Partnership in key exchange protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the notion of partnership as found in security models for key exchange protocols. Several different approaches have been pursued to define partnership, with varying degrees of success. We aim to provide an overview and criticism ... Keywords: key exchange, partnership, session identifier

Kazukuni Kobara; Seonghan Shin; Mario Strefler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

ION SWITCH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

Cook, B.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium activity of each sample was measured by direct alpha counting to quantify the plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE. The alpha spectra from alpha spectroscopy are shown in Figure 3. 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 PLEs had sharp peak with low tailing. 1:2 had an extremely long tail, which is a possible indication that a large amount of ligands caused the film to not form a smooth surface. Also, it can be noted that 1:2 ratio PLE surface was not as rigid as the other ratio PLEs and it was prone to scratching during sample handing. The resolution of alpha spectra was quantified by measuring Full Width at Half of the Maximum (FWHM) using Bortels equation. The tailing component of the peak was also measured along with FWHM. The peak resolutions and tailing measurements for 0.1M nitric solution samples are given in Table 1. The best resolution was achieved with 1:5 PLE and worst was given by 1:2 PLE. The plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE was dependent on both nitric concentration and ligand to polymer ratio. 1:2 PLE consistently had the highest recovery followed by 1:5 as shown in Figure 4. It should be noted that 1:2 ratio PLEs consistently had long tailing and the ROI of the spectrum had to be increased to encompass total counts from the tracer. 1:10 and 1:20 PLEs had close to zero percent recovery in all nitric concentration except for 0.01M. The highest plutonium recovery was observed for 0.1M nitric acid. 1:5 PLE gave the best combination of alpha spectroscopy resolution and plutonium recovery. Radiography image of samples were generated to study the plutonium distribution on the PLE surface. Samples were placed on an imaging plate (Fujifilm BAS-TR 2025) for 24 hours and the plate was scanned using GE Typhoon FLA 7000 system. The radiography image in Figure 5 shows uneven distribution with hot spots along the edge and in the center of the samples. These hot spots may be the result of highly localized concentration of ligands or surface defects that were observed in SEM. This unevenness in distribution may cause inaccurate activity measurement by alpha spectroscopy due to a bias in the

Peterson, Dominic S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armenta, Claudine E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE  

SciTech Connect

This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium activity of each sample was measured by direct alpha counting to quantify the plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE. The alpha spectra from alpha spectroscopy are shown in Figure 3. 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 PLEs had sharp peak with low tailing. 1:2 had an extremely long tail, which is a possible indication that a large amount of ligands caused the film to not form a smooth surface. Also, it can be noted that 1:2 ratio PLE surface was not as rigid as the other ratio PLEs and it was prone to scratching during sample handing. The resolution of alpha spectra was quantified by measuring Full Width at Half of the Maximum (FWHM) using Bortels equation. The tailing component of the peak was also measured along with FWHM. The peak resolutions and tailing measurements for 0.1M nitric solution samples are given in Table 1. The best resolution was achieved with 1:5 PLE and worst was given by 1:2 PLE. The plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE was dependent on both nitric concentration and ligand to polymer ratio. 1:2 PLE consistently had the highest recovery followed by 1:5 as shown in Figure 4. It should be noted that 1:2 ratio PLEs consistently had long tailing and the ROI of the spectrum had to be increased to encompass total counts from the tracer. 1:10 and 1:20 PLEs had close to zero percent recovery in all nitric concentration except for 0.01M. The highest plutonium recovery was observed for 0.1M nitric acid. 1:5 PLE gave the best combination of alpha spectroscopy resolution and plutonium recovery. Radiography image of samples were generated to study the plutonium distribution on the PLE surface. Samples were placed on an imaging plate (Fujifilm BAS-TR 2025) for 24 hours and the plate was scanned using GE Typhoon FLA 7000 system. The radiography image in Figure 5 shows uneven distribution with hot spots along the edge and in the center of the samples. These hot spots may be the result of highly localized concentration of ligands or surface defects that were observed in SEM. This unevenness in distribution may cause inaccurate activity measurement by alpha spectroscopy due to a bias in the

Peterson, Dominic S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armenta, Claudine E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

Janke, Christopher J. (Powell, TN); Lopata, Vincent J. (Manitoba, CA); Havens, Stephen J. (Knoxville, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); Moulton, Richard J. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

Leland, W.T.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Velocity shear-induced effects on electrostatic ion perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear evolution of electrostatic perturbations in an unmagnetized electron{endash}ion plasma shear flow is studied. New physical effects, arising due to the non-normality of linear dynamics are disclosed. A new class of {ital nonperiodic collective mode} with vortical motion of ions, characterized by intense energy exchange with the mean flow, is found. It is also shown that the velocity shear induces extraction of the mean flow energy by ion-sound waves and that during the shear-induced evolution the ion-sound waves turn eventually into ion plasma oscillations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Rogava, A.D. [Department of Physics, Tbilisi State University, and Department of Theoretical Astrophysics, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia)] [Department of Physics, Tbilisi State University, and Department of Theoretical Astrophysics, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia); Chagelishvili, G.D. [Department of Theoretical Astrophysics, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia)] [Department of Theoretical Astrophysics, Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia); [Department of Cosmogeophysics, Space Research Institute, Moscow (Russia); Berezhiani, V.I. [Department of Plasma Physics, Institute of Physics, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia)] [Department of Plasma Physics, Institute of Physics, Tbilisi, Republic of (Georgia)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

Giardina, Angelo R. (Marple Township, Delaware County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

Giardina, A.R.

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

288

Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated a series of studies to mitigate the impact of limited disposal-site access on continued light water reactor operations. A previous EPRI report, Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin: A Feasibility Study (1025303), established that cation and anion resin beads could be separated for the purpose of rendering the anion resin as Class A resin waste, and ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of production methods of volume source by the resinous solution which has hardening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume sources is used for standard sources by radioactive measurement using Ge semiconductor detector of environmental sample, e.g. water, soil and etc. that require large volume. The commercial volume source used in measurement of the water sample is made of agar-agar, and that used in measurement of the soil sample is made of alumina powder. When the plastic receptacles of this two kinds of volume sources were damaged, the leakage contents cause contamination. Moreover, if hermetically sealing performance of volume source made of agar-agar fell, volume decrease due to an evaporation off moisture gives an error to radioactive measurement. Therefore, we developed the two type methods using unsaturated polyester resin, vinilester resin, their hardening agent and acrylicresin. The first type is due to dispersing the hydrochloric acid solution included the radioisotopes uniformly in each resin and hardening the resin. The second is due to dispersing the alumina powder absorbed the radioisotopes in each resin an...

Motoki, R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The character of resonant charge exchange involving highly excited atoms  

SciTech Connect

We study the process of resonant charge exchange involving excited helium atoms with the principal quantum number n = 5 colliding with the helium ion in the ground state in the collision energy range from thermal up to 10 eV. This information may be important for the analysis of planet atmospheres containing helium, in particular, for Jupiter's atmosphere, but our basic interest is the transition from the quantum to classical description of this process, where, due to large cross sections, evaluations of the cross sections are possible. For the chosen process, quantum theory allows determining the cross section as a result of a tunnel electron transition, while classical theory accounts for over-barrier electron transitions. The classical theory additionally requires effective transitions between states with close energies. The analysis of these transitions for helium with n = 5 shows that electron momenta and their projections are mixed for a part of the states, while for other states, the mixing is absent. A simple criterion to separate such states is given. In addition, the main contribution to the cross section of resonant charge exchange follows from tunnel electron transitions. As a result, the quantum theory is better for calculating the cross sections of resonant charge exchange than the classical one and also allows finding the partial cross sections of resonant charge exchange, while the classical approach gives the cross section of resonant charge exchange in a simple manner with the accuracy of 20%.

Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Capitelli, M. [University of Bari, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Laricchiuta, A. [IMIP CNR, Sezione Territoriale di Bari (Italy)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS JA Siegel 1,3 * and WWof fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leadsparticle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a

Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Entanglement Exchange and Bohmian Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the phenomenon of entanglement exchange in Bohm's pilot wave interpretation of quantum mechanics. The interesting feature of the phenomenon is that systems become entangled without causal interaction; hence it is a useful situation for investigating the unique nature of interaction in Bohmian mechanics. The first two sections introduce, respectively, entanglement exchange in the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, and the basic principles of Bohmian mechanics. The next section shows that the Bohmian interpretation makes the same experimental predictions about entanglement exchange as the standard one. The final section draws some conclusions about interactions and entanglement in Bohmian mechanics.

Nick Huggett; Tiziana Vistarini

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Heat exchanger using graphite foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

294

Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of heat integration systems is quantified in terms of the amount of heat that is recovered. This decreases with time due to increased fouling of the heat exchange surface. Using the "Total Fouling Related Expenses (TFRE)" approach, economic incentives for heat exchanger cleaning are evaluated using linear, exponential, and exponential finite decrease models of the heat recovery decay. A mathematical comparison of mechanical and chemical cleaning of heat exchangers has identified the most significant parameters which affect the choice between the two methods.

Siegell, J. H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heat exchanger with ceramic elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells Andrew M. Herring CSM Bryan Pivovar NREL 1 Anion Exchange Membranes (Presented to Parallel Breakout Sessions) * Stability Challenges -...

297

XML for CIM Model Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Organizations responsible for secure power system operations need to model their systems and portions of neighboring systems in support of control and security functions. In the USA, the restructuring of the electric utility industry emphasizes the need to exchange operational system models for Independent System Operators (ISO) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTO). These models need to be node/breaker oriented in order to meet the needs of control center applications. Unfortunately, the existing model exchange formats derive from planning models that are bus/branch oriented and lack detail required for control center operations. To support these data modeling exchange needs, NERC has adopted an approach that uses the semantic data definitions from the EPRI CIM with the syntax of XML to create XML files containing operational power system models. This paper presents the key aspects of XML and the CIM that make them excellent choices for addressing the operational model exchange needs of our industry.

A. Devos; Member Ieee; S. E. Widergren; Sr. Member; Ieee J. Zhu; Member Ieee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Exchange Rates, Information, and Crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equation (5.4). Standard Bayesian inference implies that theAs before, standard Bayesian inference implies that Var 1 [f˜ so that standard Bayesian inference both exchange rate is

Fernholz, Ricardo Turrin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

New Technology in Condensate Polishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using carboxylic acid ion-exchange resins instead of sulfonic acid resins in precoat filters reduces sulfate contamination of feedwater by resins carried into steam generators and boilers. Corrosion is further reduced by precoating condensate polishers with activated carbon, which accelerates low-temperature reaction of oxygen with hydrazine.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Role of Cation-Water Disorder during Cation Exchange in Small-Pore Zeolite Sodium Natrolite Thursday, October 31, 2013 Structural changes leading to disordering of the cation-water arrangement within the pores of zeolite natrolite while exchanging sodium (Na+) with potassium (K+) have been investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). cation in zeolite sodium natrolite fig1 Figure 1) Artistic representation of the natrolite channel, which opens progressively as a function of the exchanging cation's size. The small golf ball represents ordered sodium cations in a closed elliptical channel, whereas the large baseball represents a disordered cesium cation in an open circular channel. The most fundamental chemical property of zeolites is ion exchange. A

302

Anion exchange polymer electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Ft. Collins, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method has been found for treating phenolic resin filter, whereby the filter is solubilized within the filter cartridge housing so the filter material can be removed from the cartridge housing in a remote manner. The invention consists of contacting the filter within the housing with an aqueous solution of about 8 to 12M nitric acid, at a temperature from about 110 to 190{degree}F, maintaining the contact for a period of time sufficient to solubilize the phenolic material within the housing, and removing the solubilized phenolic material from the housing, thereby removing the filter cartridge from the housing. Any hazardous or other waste material can then be separated from the filter material by chemical or other means.

Meikrantz, D.H.; Bourne, G.L.; McFee, J.N.; Burdge, B.G.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Premium Standard Farms Smithfield Foods, Inc. Forest Products Abitibi-Consolidated Aracruz Celulose S Incorporated NewPage Plum Creek Suzano Papel E Celulose SA Tembec Industries Inc. #12;Chicago Climate Exchange

307

Terebinth resin in antiquity: possible uses in the Late Bronze Age Aegean region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The remains of an estimated one metric ton of terebinth resin, the yellowish, semi-fluid, aromatic resin of a Pistacia tree, were recently discovered on the Late Bronze Age shipwreck site at Uluburun, Turkey. The resin was carried in an estimated 130 Canaanite amphoras, as part of a rich and diverse cargo that included eleven metric tons of copper and tin, as well as other raw materials, tools, weapons and luxury goods on a ship journeying to some destination west or south of Uluburun. This is the largest single deposit of terebinth resin from antiquity ever found, and the first to be identified by modern analytical methods. The botanical origin of the resin is thought to be Pistacia atlantica, but the Pistacia genus includes many resin-producing trees, all of which have been well known and economically important from ancient times to the present. The sources and characteristics of modern terebinth resin are described, followed by a discussion of Pistacia trees and their many products--resin, fruits, leaves, bark, wood and galls. Some possible uses of terebinth resin in the Late Bronze Aegean region are then explored, as this area is likely to have been one of the intended destinations of the Uluburun ship. A discussion of the accepted translation of the Linear B word ki-ta-no as the fruits of the terebinth tree demonstrates that the word might refer to any of the products of the terebinth tree, not only fruits or, as was suggested after the discovery of the Uluburun cargo, resin. The ideogram *123 usually associated with ki-ta-no indicates a dry good, and is often considered to signify an "aromatic"; all products of the terebinth tree can be characterized as dry goods, and all have aromatic and astringent properties. The evidence for the use of terebinth resin in the perfumed oil industry and as incense in Late Bronze Age Greece is then briefly surveyed. The Late Bronze Age evidence from the Aegean region is scanty, but parallels from other regions and later periods allow the tentative conclusion that terebinth resin might have been used for both of these purposes. Confirmation requires discovery and analysis of residues.

Peachey, Claire Patricia

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A comparative study of dispersion techniques for nanocomposite made with nanoclays and an unsaturated polyester resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few years, polymer/clay nanocomposites have been an area of intensive research due to their capacity to improve the properties of the polymer resin. These nanocharged polymers exhibit a complex rheological behavior due to their dispersed ...

Farida Bensadoun; Nadir Kchit; Catherine Billotte; François Trochu; Edu Ruiz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Improved ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB2000 is a graphitized petroleum coke. The availability of KRB2000 is perhaps in question, so a replacement synthetic graphite may need to be identified. This report presents data on potential replacements for KRB2000.

Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrates from Western coal. Final fifth quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Fossil resins occurring in the Wasatch Plateau coal field are composed mainly of aliphatic components, partially aromatized multi-cyclic terpenoids and a few oxygen functional groups (such as {minus}OH and {minus}COOH). The solvent extracted resins show the presence of a relatively large number of methyl groups when compared to the methylene groups, and this indicates the presence of extensive tertiary carbon and/or highly branching chains. In contrast coal consists primarily of aromatic ring structures, various oxygen functional groups ({minus}OH, >C=O, {minus}C{minus}O) and few aliphatic chains. The color difference observed among the four resin types is explained by the presence of chromophores (aromatized polyterpenoid) and also by the presence of finely dispersed coal particle inclusions in the resin matrix. The hexane soluble resin fraction has few aromatic compounds when compared to the hexane insoluble but toluene soluble resin fraction.

Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

1994-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Process for separation of zirconium-88, rubidium-83 and yttrium-88  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, passing the first ion-containing solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in the first ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, contacting the first resin with an acid solution capable of stripping adsorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin whereby the adsorbed ions are removed from the first resin to form a second ion-containing solution, evaporating the second ion-containing solution for time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the second ion-containing solution whereby a residue remains, dissolving the residue from the evaporated second-ion containing solution in a dilute acid to form a third ion-containing solution, said third ion-containing solution having an acid molarity adapted to permit said ions to be adsorbed by a cationic exchange resin, passing the third ion-containing solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are adsorbed by the second resin, contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the adsorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin, and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the adsorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. Zirconium, rubidium, and yttrium radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Exchange Server 2010 Unleashed, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Unleashed is the ultimate guide to designing, deploying, managing, troubleshooting, and supporting any Exchange Server 2010 environment, no matter how large or complex. Drawing on their extensive experience with hundreds ...

Rand Morimoto; Michael Noel; Chris Amaris; Andrew Abbate; Mark Weinhardt

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

New Challenges in Multihospital Kidney Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of kidney exchange presents new challenges for the design of kidney exchange clearinghouses. The players now include directors of transplant centers, who see sets of patient-donor pairs, and can choose to reveal ...

Ashlagi, Itai

315

Intelligent predictive control of micro heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intelligent predictive control to temperature control of a micro heat exchanger is addressed. First, the dynamics of the micro heat exchanger is identified using a locally linear model. Then, the predictive control strategy based on this model of ...

Mehdi Galily; Farzad Habibipour Roudsari; Masoum Fardis; Ali Yazdian

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

Compton, R.N.

1990-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 ector connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulationLt total connecting pipe length, m (ft) total number of heat

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EA-179 California Power Exchange Corporation | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 California Power Exchange Corporation EA-179 California Power Exchange Corporation Order authorizing Power Exchange Corporation to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-179...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and...

322

Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness. ASHRAEEngineering Foundation on Heat Exchanger Fouling, UnitedAerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness. ASHRAEEngineering Foundation on Heat Exchanger Fouling, Unitedof HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers, To be published in the

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Freely Floating Exchange Rates Do Not Systematically Overshoot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canadian-U.S. exchange rate, Review of Financial Economics,economy under flexible exchange rates, Journal of Monetary1976, Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics, Journal of

Pippenger, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Globalization, Macroeconomic Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Exchange Rate Movements on U.S. Foreign Debt."Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies*volatility, exchange-rate regimes, institutions,

Obstfeld, Maurice

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

After the Fall: East Asian Exchange Rates Since the Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case for Floating Exchange Rates in Asia. ” In Monetary and2005. “Classifying Exchange Rate Regimes: Deeds vs. Words. ”Ronald I. 2005. Exchange Rates under the East Asian Dollar

Cohen, Benjamin J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integrated Approach to Revamping Heat Exchangers Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heat exchanger network constitutes the core of the plant energy systems interlinking the core process operation and the utility systems. This paper will illustrate an integrated approach for the revamp of a heat exchanger network by bringing together process simulation, pinch analysis and detailed heat exchanger design tools. The paper will illustrate the methodology using a refinery example.

Glass, K. E.; Dhole, V.; Wang, Y.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Verifiable auctions for online ad exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper treats a critical component of the Web ecosystem that has so far received little attention in our community: ad exchanges. Ad exchanges run auctions to sell publishers' inventory-space on Web pages-to advertisers who want to display ads in ... Keywords: ad exchanges, online advertising, verifiable auctions

Sebastian Angel; Michael Walfish

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Science Policy Exchange September 21, 2009 Columbia River Estuary Science-Policy Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Policy Exchange September 21, 2009 Summary 1 Columbia River Estuary Science-Policy Exchange and Conservation Council hosted a science-policy exchange in Astoria, Oregon. The Council supports strategies Science Advisory Board (ISAB) and the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) attended the exchange

330

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EXCHANGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on computer environments: Releasing computer software outside EG G Idaho; Ilford digital photo imager; mandatory upgrade of PC ORPS software; ORPS host computer upgrade; EROB computer users see network change; password expiration notice; big iron still has place in HPC market; handy scripts to copy and move files; more on workstation password expiration; training center course schedule for April 1993; Microsoft Word Version 5.1a- button bar; file attributes can provide you greater flexibility; constructing a personal WordPerfect dictionary; and Windows shortcuts.

Boltz, J.C. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Self-regenerating column chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternation ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multifunction column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multifunction ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins. Applications are to separation of nitrogen and sulfur isotopes.

Park, Woo K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

Talmud, Fred M. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio (Morristown, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Application of self organizing map approach to partial discharge pattern recognition of cast-resin current transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial discharge (PD) measurement and recognition is a significant tool for potential failure diagnosis of a power transformer. This paper proposes the application of self organizing map (SOM) approach to recognize partial discharge patterns of cast-resin ... Keywords: cast-resin current transformer, partial discharge, pattern recognition, self organizing map

Wen-Yeau Chang; Hong-Tzer Yang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

Chum, Helena L. (8448 Allison Ct., Arvada, CO 80005); Black, Stuart K. (4976 Raleigh St., Denver, CO 80212); Diebold, James P. (57 N. Yank Way, Lakewood, CO 80228); Kreibich, Roland E. (4201 S. 344th, Auburn, WA 98001)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Adsorption characteristics of PCBs to resins, whole cells, cell and tissue components, and biomolecules  

SciTech Connect

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been designated hazardous chemicals by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Although PCBs and PCB-containing oils have not been in use since 1977, they persist in the environment. They are known to be absorbed by various aquatic organisms, birds, and mammals. The nature of these affinities is not known. In this study, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) compared the adsorption phenomenon of PCBs on commercial resins, whole bacterial cells, cell and tissue component, and various biomolecules. Adsorption and desorption of PCBs to biomolecules and resins in both aqueous and nonaqueous conditions were examined. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Kelley, R.L.; Conrad, J.; Akin, C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 Ion source for metallic ion beam generation and thin filmnew plasma source for metallic ion beam generation and metal5: Ion source for metallic ion beam generation and thin film

Ji, Lili

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

Culver, G.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microfabricated ion frequency standard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Bismuth generator method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating .sup.213 Bi from a solution of radionuclides wherein the solution contains a concentration of the chloride ions and hydrogen ions adjusted to allow the formation of a chloride complex. The solution is then brought into contact with an anion exchange resin, whereupon .sup.213 Bi is absorbed from the solution and adhered onto the anion exchange resin in the chloride complex. Other non-absorbing radionuclides such as .sup.225 Ra, .sup.225 Ac, and .sup.221 Fr, along with HCl are removed from the anion exchange resin with a scrub solution. The .sup.213 Bi is removed from the anion exchange resin by washing the anion exchange resin with a stripping solution free of chloride ions and with a reduced hydrogen ion concentration which breaks the chloride anionic complex, releasing the .sup.213 Bi as a cation. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the anion exchange resin is provided as a thin membrane, allowing for extremely rapid adherence and stripping of the .sup.213 Bi. A preferred stripping solution for purification of .sup.213 Bi for use in medical applications includes sodium acetate, pH 5.5. A protein conjugated with bifunctional chelating agents in vivo with the NaOAc, to receive the .sup.213 Bi as it is being released from the anion exchange resin.

Bray, Lane Allan (Richland, WA); DesChane, Jaquetta R. (Pasco, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

two batches of Reillex HPQ ion exchange resin in 786-A to prevent chloride stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping during HB-Line processing of MOX feed material....

344

Delayed neutron assay to test sorbers for uranium-from-seawater applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delayed Fission Neutron (DFN) assay has been applied to the measurement of uranium content in sorbers exposed to natural seawater for the purpose of evaluating advanced ion exchange resins. DFN assay was found to be ...

Nitta, Cynthia K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Geothermal shell and tube heat exchanger augmentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat exchangers for a moderate temperature geothermal plant represent a major portion of the plant capital cost. Therefore, reduction in heat exchanger size will significantly improve the electrical power economics. The potential heat exchanger size reduction that could be achieved by reducing any combination heat transfer resistance terms is evaluated. A literature survey of heat transfer augmentation schemes is summarized and equations for evaluating the impact of cleaning frequency on heat exchanger size are presented. Recommendations are made specifically for the Raft River Thermal Loop, however, the techniques are applicable to any other geothermal plant or heat transfer system.

Neill, D.T.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Information: For more EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 information, please contact one of the folowing (click name to email): Bill Wilmarth Rosalind Blocker...

348

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

... Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange ...

349

DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

The Department of Energy is hosting a technical exchange in Denver, CO. Over the past seven years, personnel from the three sites, Savannah ...

350

Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers have special characteristics for both fouling and heat recovery. These are discussed in general then related to two industrial examples.

Cross, P. H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Building Technologies Office: Technology Performance Exchange...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

352

Innovative heat exchangers for solar water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of two innovative collector-loop heat exchangers used in pumped circulation solar water heaters was investigated experimentally and numerically, and TRNSYS simulation models were… (more)

Soo Too, Yen Chean

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modelling of Multistream LNG Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The main goal of this thesis is to find out if a liquefied natural gas multistream heat exchanger numerical model is achievable. This should… (more)

Soler Fossas, Joan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

... Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange recent ...

355

Technology Performance Exchange | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Exchange Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange A collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program Office and the Building Technologies Office, the Technology Performance Exchange will establish a Web-based portal and accompanying database that allows technology suppliers to submit product performance data that private and public sector end users can use to make fact-based procurement decisions. Suppliers will populate the database with technologies that affect building activities, including construction, commissioning, maintenance, monitoring, equipment, and verification. This project will help the U.S. energy efficiency technology market by providing objective product performance data to building engineers and

356

Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum ...

Cruz J. R.; Shah C. H.; Postyn A. S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

2 Oxygen Uptake by Resin (mmol/g) 1 F Experimental Methods ...  

L I N D S A Y R O G E R S O N , K A T H R Y N S H P I K , A N D P . A . T A Y L O R Hydraulic Testing of Spherical RF Resin–Effect of Radiation and Oxygen ...

358

Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Quality Assurance Exchange August 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With the help of dedicated quality With the help of dedicated quality professionals across the complex and beyond, I am pleased to announce that this issue of the Quality Assurance Exchange (QAE) newsletter focuses on hard hitting issues, as well as opportunities to explore abatement methods in regards to our quality assurance (QA) challenges. Within, you will find a brief discussion on the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Quality Council and its Calendar Year 2011 accomplishments; an exploration of Safety Software QA activities including an overview of the annual meeting; an update on the Safety Software Communication Forum; and activities surrounding new and upcoming guides and systems. Also, you will get an inside look on the Differing Professional Opinions Process; read an exclusive interview

360

Mass resolving charge-exchange system on the poloidal divertor experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The charge-exchange system used on the Poloidal Divertor Experiment is comprised of four, ten-channel, mass-resolved, charge-exchange analyzers. Each analyzer is constructed with parallel electric and magnetic fields and is calibrated over an energy range of 0.5--40 keV. The mass rejection between hydrogen and deuterium has been measured as better than 1000 to 1. For Ohmic heated discharges the system can provide single shot radial ion temperature profiles (four point) with 1-ms time resolution. For neutral beam heated discharges, complete radial and temporal profiles can be obtained in two to four shots. The system is also equipped with a vertically aimed diagnostic neutral beam to allow local ion-energy distribution measurements. This report describes the analyzer system and its calibration, and presents results from Ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges.

Davis, S.L.; Mueller, D.; Keane, C.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

Injection to the pick-up ion regime from high energies and induced ion power laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though pick-up ions (PUIs) are a well known phenomenon in the inner heliosphere, their phase-space distribution nevertheless is a theoretically unsettled problem. Especially the question of how pick-up ions form their suprathermal tails, extending to far above their injection energies, still now is unsatistactorily answered. Though Fermi-2 velocity diffusion theories have revealed that such tails are populated, they nevertheless show that resulting population densities are much less than seen in observations showing power-laws with a velocity index of ``-5''. We first investigate here, whether or not observationally suggested power-laws can be the result of a quasi-equilibrium state between suprathermal ions and magnetohydrodynamic turbulences in energy exchange with eachother. We demonstrate that such an equilibrium cannot be established. We furthermore show that Fermi-2 type energy diffusion in the outer heliosphere is too inefficient to determine the shape of the distribution function there. As we can show...

Fahr, H -J; Verscharen, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

Stability analysis of heat exchanger dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the study of vapor compression cycle, momentum balance equation is often ignored in the heat exchanger model. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the momentum balance through a systematic study of the open loop stability of a heat exchanger. ...

Tiejun Zhang; John T. Wen; Juan Catano; Rongliang Zhou

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Circulation and Exchange in Choked Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for the exchange between a rotating, buoyancy-forced marginal sea and an ocean is developed and tested numerically. Cooling over the marginal sea leads to sinking and sets up a two-layer exchange flow, with a warm surface layer entering ...

Larry J. Pratt; Michael A. Spall

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Guidance for an Effective Heat Exchanger Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat exchangers are used extensively in the nuclear power generation industry. Their proper operation is essential for reliable and safe nuclear plant operation. Increased emphasis on heat exchanger reliability at nuclear power plants has resulted in the development of engineering programs or equivalent actions to maintain the required thermal performance and structural integrity.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

Heat Exchanger Thermal Performance Margin Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utility engineers with guidance on how to identify the thermal performance margin that is available in a given heat exchanger by comparing the thermal performance requirement at design limiting conditions to the thermal performance capability of the heat exchanger under those same conditions.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Efficient autonomous signature exchange on ubiquitous networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fair signature exchange in emerging ubiquitous commerce (u-commerce) poses new security challenges. In particular, its operations are highly distributed and autonomous, and typically run on much open, dynamic and resource-diversified ubiquitous networks. ... Keywords: Communication protocol, Fair exchange, Signature, Ubiquitous computing, Verifiable encryption

Q. Shi; N. Zhang; D. Llewellyn-Jones

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Thermodynamic Efficiency of Heat Exchange Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continued rise in the cost of energy 'has it imperative to augment the usual heat flow analyses for power plants, refineries, chemical plants and other energy intensive industries by adding analyses of available energy flow and device irreversibilities. The reclamation of what was formerly 'waste heat' by using additional, or more efficient, equipment has become not only economically feasible, but sometimes essential. A thermodynamic efficiency based on the second law of thermodynamics is defined for heat exchange devices. The efficiency can be simply written in terms of the mean absolute temperature levels of the two fluids exchanging heat, and an appropriate environment temperature. It is also shown that for a given ratio of hot to cold inlet temperatures, the efficiency and effectiveness for particular heat exchange configurations are related. Conclusions regarding the effect of stream temperatures on the efficiency of various types of exchangers are made. The concept is applied to typical heat exchange cases to demonstrate its applicability and sensitivity.

Witte, L. C.; Shamsundar, N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Korea Power Exchange (KPX) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exchange (KPX) Exchange (KPX) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Korea Power Exchange (KPX) Name Korea Power Exchange (KPX) Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Ko Country South Korea Eastern Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/KoreaKpxIit.html Abstract In an agreement signed on March 26, 2007, Argonne National Laboratory and the Illinois Institute of Technology are joining with the Korea Power Exchange to establish a joint training program combining training and research at Argonne with formal academic education at IIT. Argonne-IIT Joint Graduate Program in Electricity Markets: In an agreement signed on March 26, 2007, Argonne National Laboratory and the Illinois

372

Model simulations of continuous ion injection into electron-beam ion source trap with slanted electrostatic mirror  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of trapping ions in an electron-beam ion source (EBIS) is of primary importance for many applications requiring operations with externally produced ions: RIA breeders, ion sources, and traps. At the present time, the most popular method of ion injection is pulsed injection, when short bunches of ions get trapped in a longitudinal trap while traversing the trap region. Continuous trapping is a challenge for EBIS devices because mechanisms which reduce the longitudinal ion energy per charge in a trap (cooling with residual gas, energy exchange with other ions, and ionization) are not very effective, and accumulation of ions is slow. A possible approach to increase trapping efficiency is to slant the mirror at the end of the trap which is opposite to the injection end. A slanted mirror will convert longitudinal motion of ions into transverse motion, and, by reducing their longitudinal velocity, prevent these ions from escaping the trap on their way out. The trade-off for the increased trapping efficiency this way is an increase in the initial transverse energy of the accumulated ions. The slanted mirror can be realized if the ends of two adjacent electrodes, drift tubes, which act as an electrostatic mirror, are machined to produce a slanted gap, rather than an upright one. Applying different voltages to these electrodes will produce a slanted mirror. The results of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computer simulations of the ion injection into an EBIS are presented using simplified models of an EBIS with conical (2D simulations) and slanted (3D simulations) mirror electrodes.

Pikin, A.; Kponou, A.; Alessi, J. G.; Beebe, E. N.; Prelec, K.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Combustion of calcium-exchanged coal. First quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The work performed during this first period includes equipment modification, development of analytical methods, oxidative pretreatment runs and combustion runs. The coal feeding section of an existing furnace was modified for uninterrupted feeding and better control of residence time. Analytical methods for sulfur and calcium in the coal and ash and for gaseous SO/sub 2/ were standardized. Oxidative pretreatment experiments were conducted in a fluidized bed at temperatures about 200/sup 0/C to evaluate the potential of this method for increasing the ion exchange capacity of coals and determine the accompanying loss of heating value. Combustion experiments were carried out at very high particle temperatures (2000/sup 0/K) at which a large fraction of the calcium additive was vaporized while 50 to 80% of the sulfur evolved as sulfur oxide. Continuing combustion experiments will be conducted at lower particle temperatures.

Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.

1984-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

375

Aluminum ION Battery  

•Lower cost because of abundant aluminum resources ... Li-ion battery (LiC 6 - Mn 2 O 4) 106 4.0 424 Al-ion battery (Al - Mn 2 O 4) 400 2.65 1,060

376

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the same time. Capable of accelerating 70 trillion protons with every pulse, and heavy ions such as gold and iron, the AGS receives protons and other ions from the AGS...

377

Negative ion generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

Stinnett, R.W.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Negative ion generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

Stinnett, Regan W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Instrumentation development for coupling ion/ion reactions and ion mobility in biological mass spectrometry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation for novel biological applications, specifically, the development of instrumentation that integrates ion/ion reaction capabilities in an ion trap… (more)

Soyk, Matthew William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Predicting the adsorption of second generation biofuels by polymeric resins with applications for in situ product recovery (ISPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of hydrophobic polymeric resins as solid-phase adsorbent materials for the recovery and purification of prospective second generation biofuel compounds, including ethanol, iso-propanol, n-propanol, iso-butanol, ...

Nielsen, David R.

383

Ion trap simulation tools.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Alexander Siegel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers by Jeffrey Alexander Siegel B.S. (Swarthmore College.......................................................................................xv CHAPTER 1: PARTICULATE FOULING OF HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS ....1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................11 CHAPTER 2: MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

Siegel, Jeffrey

385

Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness, ASHRAEof HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and VanOF HVAC FIN AND TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS Jeffrey Siegel 1,2 and

Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Skew chicane based betatron eigenmode exchange module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A skewed chicane eigenmode exchange module (SCEEM) that combines in a single beamline segment the separate functionalities of a skew quad eigenmode exchange module and a magnetic chicane. This module allows the exchange of independent betatron eigenmodes, alters electron beam orbit geometry, and provides longitudinal parameter control with dispersion management in a single beamline segment with stable betatron behavior. It thus reduces the spatial requirements for multiple beam dynamic functions, reduces required component counts and thus reduces costs, and allows the use of more compact accelerator configurations than prior art design methods.

Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Second Law Optimization of Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for optimizing heat exchangers is developed in this paper. It is based on second law efficiency relationships rather than on the traditional heat exchanger effectiveness concept. The cost of energy is based on its availability level rather than on the simple cost of fuel required to meet the exchanger heat duty. Application of the method to a condensing heater shows that the optimum area based on second law efficiency can be quite different from the optimum area computed by the effectiveness method.

Witte, L. C.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heat Exchanger Technologies for Distillation Columns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we look at the challenges that improvements in energy efficiency of distillation systems presents the heat exchanger designer. We examine each type of exchanger in turn. Heat exchanger size is minimized if the temperature driving force is maximized. The design should therefore seek to minimize the temperature changes during phase change. So, streams that are being condensed are kept as hot as possible. Streams that are being vaporized are kept as cool as possible. With one noted exception, this also leads to maximization of the thermodynamic efficiency and maximizes the scope for use of these streams in integrated systems.

Polley, G. T.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

International information exchange in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed.

Strickler, C.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

Wilber Yaote Lio

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.  

SciTech Connect

Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interim report on the development of an epoxy resin bonded explosive  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work done to date on the development of an epoxy resin bonded explosive (HMX). The original target values have been satisfied and further investigations will be on a semi-pilot plant scale. The following characteristics have been determined on laboratory specimens. Compressive strength, 11-12,000 psi; sensitivity (50 % height) 31 cm; density, 1.81 gm/cc; vacuum stability (cc gas/gm/24 hrs at 100{degrees}C), .42 cc/gm.

Archibald, P.

1957-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

395

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant.… (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Event:Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV': on 20120911...

398

Ion cyclotron resonance cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

Weller, R.R.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ion Sources - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Sources The 88-Inch Cyclotron is fed by three Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) high-charge-state ion sources, the ECR, the AECR, and VENUS, currently the most powerful ECR ion source in the world. Built to answer the demand for intense heavy ion beams, these high performance ion sources enable the 88-Inch Cyclotron to accelerate beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium. The ECR ion sources allow the efficient use of rare isotopes of stable elements, either from natural or enriched sources. A variety of metallic ion beams are routinely produced in our low temperature oven (up to 600°C) and our high temperature oven (up to 2100°C). Furthermore, the ability to produce "cocktails" (mixtures of beams) for the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility adds tremendously to the flexibility of the 88-Inch Cyclotron.

400

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions with...

Hughes, Marcus D; Broersma, Jiddu A; Hensinger, Winfried K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES  

SciTech Connect

We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Environmental Management Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 in Atlanta, GA, November 16 - 18. Over the past eight years, personnel from the three sites, Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange recent results of on-going field operations and technology development. The purpose of this exchange is to provide a forum for discussion of each Site's efforts to accelerate cleanup operations. Keys to success and lessons learned are openly exchanged in a manner to allow for open discussion between operations, engineering and scientists to accelerate transition of technologies from concepts to field implementation.

403

Energy Technology Data Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exchange Exchange Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Technology Data Exchange Name Energy Technology Data Exchange Address P.O. Box 62 Place Oak Ridge, Tennessee Zip 37831 Year founded 1987 Phone number 865 576 1272 Coordinates 36.0103°, -84.2698° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0103,"lon":-84.2698,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Password based key exchange with mutual authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reasonably efficient password based key exchange (KE) protocol with provable security without random oracle was recently proposed by Katz, et al. [17] and later by Gennaro and Lindell [13]. However, these protocols do not support mutual authentication ...

Shaoquan Jiang; Guang Gong

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cooperative update exchange in the Youtopia system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Youtopia is a platform for collaborative management and integration of relational data. At the heart of Youtopia is an update exchange abstraction: changes to the data propagate through the system to satisfy user-specified mappings. We present a novel ...

?ucja Kot; Christoph Koch

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Essays on exchange rates and electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines two important issues in economic development: exchange rates and electricity demand and addresses methodological issues of using time series and panel data analysis to investigate important policy ...

Li, Xiangming, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this hotel at the government per diem rate of 132.00 per night. Please reference the "DOE EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010" when making your reservation to the get...

408

On Modeling Of Heat Exchangers In Modelica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is demonstrated how Modelica TM is used in an application to develop models that are useful when solving real problems. Modelica is a new unified modeling language being developed in an international effort to promote object-oriented and non-causal modeling, and exchange of model libraries. The application is a heat exchanger where the media are liquids, typically water. This type of heat exchangers can be used for district heating of houses and for production of hot tap water. The model developed illustrates very nicely the power of Modelica. The modularization concepts support flexible model components which are easy to use and to adapt when making a model of a real system with heat exchangers. The concept of class parameters support medium parameterization and arrays of model components support discretization. The expressive power of Modelica allows complete listings of the developed model components to be given. The model produces simulation results that agree very well with measured data.

Sven Erik Mattsson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Direct Diagnoses of Stratosphere–Troposphere Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study discusses the direct diagnosis of stratosphere–troposphere exchange. The method introduced by Wei is applied to the Goddard Earth Observation System assimilated dataset. In many respects, the results generally agree with those of other ...

Andrew Gettelman; Adam H. Sobel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental Study of Hybrid Cooled Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test system for a hybrid cooled heat exchanger was designed, and the test facility was constructed based on ASHRAE Standard 41.2-1987. A conventional air-cooled… (more)

Tsao, Han-Chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Metastable hydronium ions in UV-irradiated ice  

SciTech Connect

We show that the irradiation of UV light (10-11 eV) onto an ice film produces metastable hydronium (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions in the ice at low temperatures (53-140 K). Evidence of the presence of metastable hydronium ions was obtained by experiments involving adsorption of methylamine onto UV-irradiated ice films and hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) isotopic exchange reaction. The methylamine adsorption experiments showed that photogenerated H{sub 3}O{sup +} species transferred a proton to the methylamine arriving at the ice surface, thus producing the methyl ammonium ion, which was detected by low energy sputtering method. The H{sub 3}O{sup +} species induced the H/D exchange of water, which was monitored through the detection of water isotopomers on the surface by using the Cs{sup +} reactive ion scattering method. Thermal and temporal stabilities of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and its proton migration activity were examined. The lifetime of the hydronium ions in the amorphized ice was greater than 1 h at {approx}53 K and decreased to {approx}5 min at 140 K. Interestingly, a small portion of hydronium ions survived for an extraordinarily long time in the ice, even at 140 K. The average migration distance of protons released from H{sub 3}O{sup +} in the ice was estimated to be about two water molecules at {approx}54 K and about six molecules at 100 K. These results indicate that UV-generated hydronium ions can be efficiently stabilized in low-temperature ice. Such metastable hydronium ions may play a significant role in the acid-base chemistry of ice particles in interstellar clouds.

Moon, Eui-Seong; Kang, Heon [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING THORIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved ion exchange method is described for recovery of uranium and thorium values as separate functions from an aqueous acidic solution containing less than 10/sup -3/ M thorium ions and between 0.1 and 1 M uranyl ions. The solution is passed through a bed of cation exchange resin in the acid form to adsorb all the thorium ions and a portion of the uranyl ions. The uranium is eluted by means of aqueous 0.1 to 0.4 M sulfuric acid. The thorium may then be stripped from the resin by elution with aqueous 0.5 M oxalic acid.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Schubert, J.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Charge exchange produced K-shell x-ray emission from Ar16+ in a tokamak plasma with neutral beam injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-resolution spectroscopy of hot tokamak plasma seeded with argon ions and interacting with an energetic, short-pulse neutral hydrogen beam was used to obtain the first high-resolution K-shell x-ray spectrum formed solely by charge exchange. The observed K-shell emission of Ar{sup 16+} is dominated by the intercombination and forbidden lines, providing clear signatures of charge exchange. Results from an ab initio atomic cascade model provide excellent agreement, validating a semiclassical approach for calculating charge exchange cross sections.

Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; Marion, M; Olson, R E

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal field tests: heat exchanger evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the heat exchanger tests conducted on a scale model of a heat exchanger that has been designed and fabricated for the Geothermal Test Facility show that this exchanger will lose 60% of its heat transfer capability and fall below design requirements after 92 hours of operation. When the test exchanger was clean and operating as close as possible to design conditions, its overall heat transfer coefficient was 426 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f. when calculating in the fouling factor of .0035 this gave a design coefficient of 171 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f which was reached after less than four days of steady state operation. Thermal shocking of the test heat exchanger once each hour while the exchanger was operating at design conditions had no effect on scale removal or heat transfer. Results of tube cleaning showed that chemical treatment with 30% hydrochloric acid followed by a high pressure water jet (6000 psig), was effective in removing scale from tubes contacted with geothermal brine. After cleaning, the tubes were examined and some pitting was observed throughout the length of one tube.

Felsinger, D.E.

1973-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Production of high brightness H- beam by charge exchange of hydrogen atom beam in sodium jet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of H{sup -} beam for accelerators applications by charge exchange of high brightness hydrogen neutral beam in a sodium jet cell is experimentally studied in joint BNL-BINP experiment. In the experiment, a hydrogen-neutral beam with 3-6 keV energy, equivalent current up to 5 A and 200 microsecond pulse duration is used. The atomic beam is produced by charge exchange of a proton beam in a pulsed hydrogen target. Formation of the proton beam is performed in an ion source by four-electrode multiaperture ion-optical system. To achieve small beam emittance, the apertures in the ion-optical system have small enough size, and the extraction of ions is carried out from the surface of plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of {approx}0.2 eV formed as a result of plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. Developed for the BNL optically pumped polarized ion source, the sodium jet target with recirculation and aperture diameter of 2 cm is used in the experiment. At the first stage of the experiment H{sup -} beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}0.15 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained. To increase H{sup -} beam current ballistically focused hydrogen neutral beam will be applied. The effects of H{sup -} beam space-charge and sodium-jet stability will be studied to determine the basic limitations of this approach.

Davydenko, V.; Zelenski, A.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Pulsed optically-pumped polarized H{sup {minus}} ion source development  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of pulsed optically-pumped polarized H{sup {minus}} ion source (OPPIS) development for high energy accelerators. An atomic hydrogen beam intensity of 2 {times} 10{sup 18} atoms/s within the polarizer acceptance was obtained with an atomic H injector at BINP. A pulsed polarized H{sup {minus}} ion current of about 10--20 mA should be obtainable using this injector. Limitations on beam characteristics due to space-charge were studied. A polarization scheme to avoid space-charge limitations is considered, in which charge-exchange and spin-exchange are combined.

Zelenski, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). INR Moscow; Davydenko, V.I.; Dimov, G.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). BINP Novosibirsk; Levy, C.D.P.; Oers, W.T.H. van; Schmor, P.W.; Wight, G.W.; Dutto, G. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sakae, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Calculation Of Change-Changing Cross Sections Of IONS Or Atoms Colliding With Fast IONS Using The Classical Trajectory Method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of ion-atom charge-changing cross sections is needed for many accelerator applications. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation has been used to calculate ionization and charge exchange cross sections. For benchmarking purposes, an extensive study has been performed for the simple case of hydrogen and helium targets in collisions with various ions. Despite the fact that the simulation only accounts for classical mechanics, the calculations are comparable to experimental results for projectile velocities in the region corresponding to the vicinity of the maximum cross section. Shortcomings of the CTMC method for multielectron target atoms are discussed.

Kaganovich, I. D., Shnidman, Ariel, Mebane, Harrison, Davidson, R.C.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Zhang, Y.Z. [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Negative ion detachment cross sections. Interim progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have measured absolute cross sections for electron detachment and charge exchange for collision of O and S with atomic hydrogen, have investigated the sputtering and photodesorption of negative ions from gas covered surfaces, and have begun an investigation of photon-induced field emission of electrons from exotic structures. Brief descriptions of these activities as well as future plans for these projects are given below.

Champion, R.L.; Doverspike, L.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ion photon emission microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion exchange resins" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

423

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

1960-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

X-ray Emission Measurements following Charge Exchange between C6+ and He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray spectra following charge exchange collisions between C6+ and He are presented for collision energies between 460 eV/u and 32,000 eV/u. Spectra were obtained at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ion-atom merged-beams apparatus, using a microcalorimeter X-ray detector capable of fully resolving the C VI Lyman series lines through Ly-gamma. These line ratios are sensitive to the initial electron l-distribution and test our understanding of the charge exchange process. In addition, these line ratios are important for identifying charge exchange in astrophysical contexts involving the interaction of solar wind ions with neutrals. Our measurements are performed at collision velocities (300 km/s to 2500 km/s) which overlap most of the solar wind range. Additional data of this type can hopefully be combined with computations to provide an extensive set of reliable line ratios and absolute cross sections for the interpretation of a variety of astrophysical situations.

Defay, X [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; McCammon, D [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Wulf, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Andrianarijaona, V. M. [Pacific Union College] [Pacific Union College; Fogle, Jr., M R, [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Seely, D. G. [Albion College] [Albion College; Draganic, Ilija N [ORNL] [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ion Irradiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 17, 2011 ... Materials Science Challenges for Nuclear Applications: Ion Irradiation Effects Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ram ...

429

Electron-Ion Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Since the ions are created and excited with the same beam of electrons, by changing the electron beam energy one can selectively exclude certain ...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Heat Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research

431

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

432

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

433

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

434

The management of foreign exchange risk, Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This edition of this introductory textbook to foreign exchange risk management considers: how to measure risk and accurately forecast exchange rates and use those forecasts; the principal hedging procedures; management approaches to risk including the use of export finance companies and management control and centralization. It is written by a team of corporate and banking practioners. Contents include: Measuring foreign exchange risk; Forecasting exchange rates; Using foreign exchange markets and forecasts; Hedging procedures; Management approaches to risk.

Ensor, R.; Antl, B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435