Sample records for ion dispersion thermochronometry

  1. Electrostatic dispersion lenses and ion beam dispersion methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An EDL includes a case surface and at least one electrode surface. The EDL is configured to receive through the EDL a plurality of ion beams, to generate an electrostatic field between the one electrode surface and either the case surface or another electrode surface, and to increase the separation between the beams using the field. Other than an optional mid-plane intended to contain trajectories of the beams, the electrode surface or surfaces do not exhibit a plane of symmetry through which any beam received through the EDL must pass. In addition or in the alternative, the one electrode surface and either the case surface or the other electrode surface have geometries configured to shape the field to exhibit a less abrupt entrance and/or exit field transition in comparison to another electrostatic field shaped by two nested, one-quarter section, right cylindrical electrode surfaces with a constant gap width.

  2. Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy InformationOpen Energy2004) |Ion

  3. Title of dissertation: Dispersion of ion gyrocenters in models of anisotropic plasma turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: Dispersion of ion gyrocenters in models of anisotropic plasma Department of Physics Turbulent dispersion of ion gyrocenters in a magnetized plasma is studied gradient, the focus is on transport parallel to the shear flow. The prescribed flow produces strongly

  4. Dispersion relation approach to sub-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzin, V.L.M.; Hussein, M.S.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the conditions under which the dispersion relation technique, extensively employed in the context of elastic scattering, can be used in the analysis of heavy-ion fusion reactions. General unitarity defect arguments are used for this purpose. With the aid of an inverse dispersion relation, which gives the imaginary part of the fusion inclusive polarization potential in terms of the principal part integral involving the real part of the inclusive polarization potential, the sub-barrier fusion of heavy ions is discussed. The system /sup 16/O+/sup A/Sm is taken as an example.

  5. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized ? electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-? type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

  6. Energy time dispersion of a new class of magnetospheric ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy time dispersion of a new class of magnetospheric ion events observed near the Earth's bow of several energetic (³35 keV) ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock by the CCE/AMPTE and IMP-7 responsible for the detection of this new type of near bow shock magnetospheric ion events. The new class

  7. Dispersion retrieval from multi-level ultra-deep reactive-ion-etched microstructures for terahertz slow-wave circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baik, Chan-Wook, E-mail: cw.baik@samsung.com; Young Ahn, Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Hee Choi, Jun; Kim, Sunil; Hun Lee, Sang; Min Kim, Jong; Hwang, Sungwoo [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yeon Jun, So; Yu, SeGi [Department of Physics, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lawrence Ives, R. [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, California 94404-1010 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-level microstructure is proposed for terahertz slow-wave circuits, with dispersion relation retrieved by scattering parameter measurements. The measured return loss shows strong resonances above the cutoff with negligible phase shifts compared with finite element analysis. Splitting the circuit into multi levels enables a low aspect ratio configuration that alleviates the loading effect of deep-reactive-ion etching on silicon wafers. This makes it easier to achieve flat-etched bottom and smooth sidewall profiles. The dispersion retrieved from the measurement, therefore, corresponds well to the theoretical estimation. The result provides a straightforward way to the precise determination of dispersions in terahertz vacuum electronics.

  8. The ion experiment onboard the Interball-Aurora satellite; initial results on velocity-dispersed structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The ion experiment onboard the Interball-Aurora satellite; initial results on velocity / Accepted: 10 March 1998 Abstract. The Toulouse ION experiment ¯own on the Russian Interball-Aurora mission perform measurements in the energy range $10 eV±20 000 eV. The Interball- Aurora spacecraft was launched

  9. Stability of nanoclusters in 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened steel under heavy ion-irradiation by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; V. Shutthanandan; Y.Q. Wu

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 C, 450 C, and 600 C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 1023 to 3.6 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  10. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jianchao; Wan, F.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.; Certain, Alicia G.; Shutthanandan, V.; Wu, Yaqiao

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and 600 °C to a damage level of 100 dpa. The stability of Ti–Y–O nanoclusters was investigated by applying atom probe tomography (APT) in voltage mode, of the samples before and after irradiations. The average size and number density of the nanoclusters was determined using the maximum separation method. These techniques allowed for the imaging of nanoclusters to sizes well below the resolution limit of conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques. The most significant changes were observed for samples irradiated at 300 °C where the size (average Guinier radius) and number density of nanoclusters were observed to decrease from 1.1 nm to 0.8 nm and 12 × 1023 to 3.6 × 1023, respectively. In this study, the nanoclusters are more stable at higher temperature.

  11. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The average transverse momentum of kaons in the re- action plane for Au1Au reactions at Pbeam /A5 4 GeV/c ~upper window! and 12 GeV/c ~lower window! at impact parameters less than 4 fm. The open ~filled! circles are the results obtained with ~without... and azimuthal angle distributions. We find that th studying the kaon dispersion relation in dense medium PACS number~s!: 25.75.Ld, 13.75.Jz, 21.65.1f The properties of a kaon in the extremely hot and dense enviroment created in relativistic heavy...

  12. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali and alkaline-earth ions and inert gas atoms with a graphene layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients ($C_3$s) of the alkali ions (Li$^+$, Na$^+$, K$^+$ and Rb$^+$), the alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$ and Ra$^+$) and the inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of Dirac model. For these calculations, we have evaluated the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are, finally, given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at the room temperature.

  13. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites: Inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis and application in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixun, E-mail: qxguo@xmu.edu.cn; Guo, Pengfei; Li, Juntao, E-mail: jtli@xmu.edu.cn; Yin, Hao; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Feilong; Shen, Daoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites with a particle size of ?80 nm have been synthesized through an organic-free hydrothermal synthesis strategy by using Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} as an inorganic dispersant, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Nano-sized and micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} without CNTs have also been prepared for comparison. The cycle performances of the as-obtained Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are highly size-dependent. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites can deliver reversible discharge capacity of ?700 mA h/g at a current density of 50 mA/g after 50 cycles. The discharge capacity of the micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} decreased to 171 mA h/g after 50 cycles. Our work not only provides new insights into the inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxides nanocrystals but also gives guidance for finding new nanocomposites as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared through an inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis strategy, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced performance. - Highlights: • Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} is a good inorganic dispersant for the hydrothermal synthesis of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • The cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode are much better than that of micro Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode. • Compositing CNTs can enhance the cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode.

  14. Nuclear waste treatment - Studying the mixed ion type effects and concentration on the behaviour of oxide dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omokanye, Qanitalillahi; Biggs, Simon [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to gain good control over a particulate dispersion it is necessary to accurately characterise the strength of inter-particle forces that may be operating. Such control is not routinely used, as yet, in the nuclear industry despite the possible benefits. We are investigating the impact of mixed electrolyte systems, for example NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, on the stability of oxide simulant particle dispersions. The electro-acoustic zeta potentials and shear yield stresses for concentrated dispersions have been measured across a range of pH conditions and electrolyte concentrations (0.001 M - 1.0 M). This paper summarizes initial data from these studies showing how the shear yield stress of concentrated aqueous oxide particle dispersions, can be adjusted through regulation of pH and the addition of background electrolytes (salt). The yield stress as a function of pH for these dispersions in mixed electrolytes showed a direct correlation with corresponding measurements of the zeta potential. Changes in the background electrolyte concentration or type were seen to cause a shift in the position of the isoelectric point (iep). Measurements of the shear yield stress showed a maximum at the iep corresponding to the position of maximum instability in the suspension. The consequences of these data for the efficient treatment of solid-liquid systems will be discussed. (authors)

  15. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  16. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  17. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Under Heavy Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion...

  18. Thermochronometry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyo Jump to: navigation,Information

  19. Stability Of Nanoclusters In 14YWT Oxide Dispersion Strengthened...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion-irradiation By Atom Probe Tomography. Abstract: 14YWT oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was irradiated with of 5 MeV Ni2+ ions, at 300 °C, 450 °C, and...

  20. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

  1. Modulational instability of ion acoustic wave with warm ions in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Siddiqui, Sadiya [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Jehan, Nusrat [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 1114, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of ion acoustic wave is studied in the presence of warm ions in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas. The Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky (KBM) method is used to derive the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The dispersive and nonlinear coefficients are obtained which depends on the ion temperature and positron density in electron-positron-ion plasmas. The modulationally stable and unstable regions are studied numerically for a wide range of wave number. It is found that both ion temperature and positron density play a significant role in the formation of bright and dark envelope solitons in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  2. Powder dispersion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorenz, Heather M. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder dispersion method and apparatus comprising an air eductor and a powder dispensing syringe inserted into a suction connection of the air eductor.

  3. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  4. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  5. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  6. Thermorheological properties of nanostructured dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured dispersions, which consist of nanometer-sized particles, tubes, sheets, or droplets that are dispersed in liquids, have exhibited substantially higher thermal conductivities over those of the liquids alone. ...

  7. Dispersive analysis of ?/? ? 3?, ??*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernandez Ramirez, Cesar; Guo, Peng; Mathieu, Vincent; Schott, Diane M.; Shi, Meng; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays ?/? ? 3? are considered in the dispersive framework that is based on the isobar decomposition and subenergy unitarity. The inelastic contributions are parametrized by the power series in a suitably chosen conformal variable that properly accounts for the analytic properties of the amplitude. The Dalitz plot distributions and integrated decay widths are presented. Our results indicate that the final- state interactions may be sizable. As a further application of the formalism we also compute the electromagnetic transition form factors of ?/? ? ???*.

  8. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  9. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  10. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  12. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  13. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  14. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  15. Phonon dispersion in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Falkovsky

    2007-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking into account the constraints imposed by the lattice symmetry, the phonon dispersion is calculated for graphene with interactions between the first and second nearest neighbors in the framework of the Born-von Karman model. Analytical expressions are obtained for the out-of-plane (bending) modes determined only by two force constants as well as for the in-plane modes with four force constants. Values of the force constants are found in fitting to elastic constants and Raman frequencies observed in graphite.

  16. Dispersion Modeling Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit EdisonCity, Arizona, SiteDiscussionDispersion

  17. Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncrieff, John B.

    Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion 1 of 5 Practical ­ Air Pollution Dispersion in the lectures how such models can be used to explain observed concentrations of air pollutants in an area and to test `what-if' scenarios for pollution control and reduction. You will use the Gaussian Plume Model

  18. Fermion dispersion in axion medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of a fermion with the dense axion medium is investigated for the purpose of finding an axion medium effect on the fermion dispersion. It is shown that axion medium influence on the fermion dispersion under astrophysical conditions is negligible small if the correct Lagrangian of the axion-fermion interaction is used.

  19. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  20. Determination of dispersivities from a natural-gradient dispersion test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, Caroline Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of H drolo can be valuable predictive tool s (Wang and Anderson, 1982). Since the late 1800's, mathematical models have been used in problems of groundwater flow. Their appl ication now extends to problems of contaminant transport and migration...DETERMINATION OF DISPERSIVITIES FROM A NATURAL-GRADIENT DISPERSION TEST A Thesis by CAROLINE MARIE HOOVER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  1. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich [University Observatory of the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) (Germany); Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Fisher, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction on Multifunctional Pd Catalysts. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction...

  3. Asphaltene dispersants as demulsification aids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manek, M.B.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Destabilization of petroleum asphaltenes may cause a multitude of problems in crude oil recovery and production. One major problem is their agglomeration at the water-oil interface of crude oil emulsions. Once agglomeration occurs, destabilized asphaltenes can form a thick pad in the dehydration equipment, which significantly reduces the demulsification rate. Certain polymeric dispersants increase asphaltene solubilization in hydrocarbon media, and when used in conjunction with emulsion breakers, facilitate the demulsification process. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how asphaltene dispersants can efficiently inhibit pad formation and help reduce demulsifier dosage. Criteria for dispersant application and selection are discussed, which include the application of a novel laboratory technique to assess asphaltene stabilization in the crude oil. The technique monitors asphaltene agglomeration while undergoing titration with an incompatible solvent (precipitant). The method was used to evaluate stabilization of asphaltenes in the crude oil and to screen asphaltene dispersants.

  4. Neutrino dispersion in magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino dispersion in the charge symmetric magnetized plasma is investigated. We have studied the plasma contribution into the additional energy of neutrino and obtained the simple expression for it. We consider in detail the neutrino self-energy under physical conditions of weak field, moderate field and strong field limits. It is shown that our result for neutrino dispersion in moderate magnetic field differ substantially from the previous one in the literature.

  5. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  6. The rheology of oxide dispersions and the role of concentrated electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, Simon; Tindley, Amy [Leeds University/Nexis Solutions URA in Particle Science and Technology, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability control of particulate dispersions is critical to a wide range of industrial processes. In the UK nuclear industry, significant volumes of waste materials arising from the corrosion products of Magnox fuel rods currently require treatment and storage. The majority of this waste is present as aqueous dispersions of oxide particulates. Treatment of these dispersions will require a variety of unit operations including mobilisation, transport and solid- liquid separation. Typically these processes must operate across a narrow optimal range of pH and the dispersions are, almost without exception, found in complex electrolyte conditions of high overall concentration. Knowledge of the behaviour of oxides in various electrolyte conditions and over a large pH range is essential for the efficient design and control of any waste processing approach. The transport properties of particle dispersions are characterised by the rheological properties. It is well known that particle dispersion rheology is strongly influenced by particle-particle interaction forces, and that particle-particle interactions are strongly influenced by adsorbed ions on the particle surfaces. Here we correlate measurements of the shear yield stress and the particle zeta potentials to provide insight as to the role of ions in moderating particle interactions. The zeta potential of model TiO{sub 2} suspensions were determined (Colloidal Dynamics Zeta Probe) over a range of pH for a series of alkali metal halides and quaternary ammonium halides at a range of solution concentrations (0.001 M - 1 M). The results show some surprising co-ion effects at high electrolyte concentrations (>0.5 M) and indicate that even ions generally considered to be indifferent induce a shift in iso-electric point (i.e.p.) which is inferred as being due to specific adsorption of ions. The shear yield stress values of concentrated titania dispersions were measured using a Bohlin C-VOR stress controlled rheometer. The shear yield stress of a material is defined as the minimum applied shear stress required to induce flow. The yield stress vs. pH curves obtained reflected the shifts in i.e.p. seen in the zeta potential results. Interestingly, specific ion adsorption results in an unexplained increase in the value of the yield stress over that expected for simple systems with no such interfacial ion adsorption. Possible reasons for this effect such as ion-ion correlation effects are discussed. The importance of this increased attraction for the mobilisation of settled solids in an aqueous environment and especially the likely effects on the treatment of Magnox fuel waste materials is discussed. (authors)

  7. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  8. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  9. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kenneth C. (1215 Brewster Dr., El Cerrito, CA 94530)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  10. Ion acoustic shock waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Hafeez Ur-Rehman [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The monotonic and oscillatory ion acoustic shock waves are investigated in electron-positron-ion plasmas (e-p-i) with warm ions (adiabatically heated) and nonthermal kappa distributed electrons and positrons. The dissipation effects are included in the model due to kinematic viscosity of the ions. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived containing dispersion, dissipation, and diffraction effects (due to perturbation in the transverse direction) in e-p-i plasmas. The analytical solution of KPB equation is obtained by employing tangent hyperbolic (Tanh) method. The analytical condition for the propagation of oscillatory and monotonic shock structures are also discussed in detail. The numerical results of two dimensional monotonic shock structures are obtained for graphical representation. The dependence of shock structures on positron equilibrium density, ion temperature, nonthermal spectral index kappa, and the kinematic viscosity of ions are also discussed.

  11. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA)

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  12. Measurement of vehicle emissions and the associated dispersion near roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlavinka, M. W

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air po)lution inodels by collec4ing data, for use in thc verification of these models. This objectives is accomplished through the following ma)or tasks: (l) Collect, ion of a large roadway air pollution data hase on magnetic t, ape so that... correla), iona to calcula4e the dispersion parame- ters. Several authors (Rao, et sl. and I'skridge& et sl. ' ) have suggested that, induced turbulence near roadways due 4o ), he tra)fic may play a larger role in pol)utant disper- sion I, han a4...

  13. Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    and Cell (MAC) method for the governing equations, transport of passive scalars like the pollutantStudy of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments Razvan Corneliu Carbunescu Center head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can

  14. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  15. Gravitational dispersion in a torsional wave machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael de la Madrid; Alejandro Gonzalez; George Irwin

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that mechanical waves traveling in a torsional, mechanical wave machine exhibit dispersion due to gravity and the discreteness of the medium. We also show that although the dispersion due to discreteness is negligible, the dispersion due to gravity can be easily measured, and can be shown to disappear in a zero-gravity environment.

  16. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  17. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surfaceinterface studies using its combined...

  18. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope Bruce Arey discusses the capabilities of EMSL's new helium ion microscope housed in EMSL's Quiet Wing....

  19. Ion reflection, gyration, and dissipation at supercritical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosling, J.T.; Robson, A.E.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief review emphasizes the following points: (1) Ion reflection is the dominant ion dissipation mechanism at nearly perpendicular, supercritical shocks. (2) An increasing fraction of the ions incident on a supercritical shock is reflected as the Mach number increases. The actual fraction reflected can be predicted using the Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relations. (3) The effective temperature associated with the dispersion in velocity space associated with ion reflection accounts for a large fraction of the temperature rise observed across supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shocks.

  20. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  1. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeba, F. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  2. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar[sub xs] Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ([+-]0.6[per thousand]) [mu]m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9[+-]3[degrees]C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ([+-]25[degrees]C) of the measured values of 200[degrees] (Al) and 150[degrees]C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 [mu]m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  3. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar{sub xs} Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ({+-}0.6{per_thousand}) {mu}m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9{+-}3{degrees}C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ({+-}25{degrees}C) of the measured values of 200{degrees} (Al) and 150{degrees}C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 {mu}m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  4. High-Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA)

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  5. Canyon incision and knickpoint propagation recorded by apatite He thermochronometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    low- temperature cooling histories that are consistent with the observed data. Derived cooling, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 27, 14476 Potsdam, Germany b Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge over geological timescales. We analyzed four samples from the Cotahuasi­Ocoña canyon system

  6. Thermochronometry At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoul Jump to:Thermo

  7. Thermochronometry At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoul Jump to:ThermoDate 2010

  8. Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoul Jump to:ThermoDate

  9. Thermochronometry (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyo Jump to: navigation,

  10. Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyo Jump to: navigation,Information At

  11. Thermochronometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyo Jump to: navigation,Information

  12. Mass dispersion in transfer reactions with a stochastic mean-field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouhei Washiyama; Sakir Ayik; Denis Lacroix

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon transfer in symmetric heavy-ion reactions at energies below the Coulomb barrier is investigated in the framework of a microscopic stochastic mean-field theory. While mean-field alone is known to significantly underpredict the dispersion of the fragment mass distribution, a considerable enhancement of the dispersion is obtained in the stochastic mean-field theory. The variance of the fragment mass distribution deduced from the stochastic theory scales with the number of exchanged nucleon. Therefore, the new approach provides the first fully microscopic theory consistent with the phenomenological analysis of the experimental data.

  13. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  14. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  15. Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

  16. Ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  17. High Current Ion Source Development for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing high-current-density high-brightness sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Heavy ion driven inertial fusion requires beams of high brightness in order to achieve high power density at the target for high target gain. At present, there are no existing ion source types that can readily meet all the driver HIF requirements, though sources exist which are adequate for present experiments and which with further development may achieve driver requirements. Our two major efforts have been on alumino-silicate sources and RF plasma sources. Experiments being performed on a 10-cm alumino-silicate source are described. To obtain a compact system for a HIF driver we are studying RF plasma sources where low current beamlets are combined to produce a high current beam. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. The extraction current density was 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We present measurements of the extracted current density as a function of RF power and gas pressure, current density uniformity, emittance, and energy dispersion (due to charge exchange).

  18. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

  19. Dispersion relations for the dust-acoustic wave under experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D., E-mail: suranga-ruhunusiri@uiowa.edu; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust acoustic wave dispersion relation is tested to quantify its sensitivity to many physical processes that are important in laboratory dusty plasmas. It is found that inverse Landau damping and ion-neutral collisions contribute about equally to the growth rate ?{sub i}, pointing to the advantage of using a kinetic model for the instability. The growth rate ?{sub i} increases the most with an increase of dust number density, followed by an increase in ion-drift speed. The quantities that cause ?{sub i} to decrease the most when they are increased are the dust-neutral collision rate followed by the ion-neutral collision rate, ion collection current onto dust particles, and the ion thermal speed. In general, ?{sub i} is affected more than ?{sub r} by the choice of processes that are included. Strong Coulomb-coupling effects can be included in a compressibility term. The susceptibilities derived here can be combined in various ways in a dispersion relation to account for different combinations of physical processes.

  20. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Broadband dispersion extraction using simultaneous sparse penalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saligrama, Venkatesh

    the borehole and thus dispersion analysis is of considerable interest to the geophysical and oilfield services community. A brief survey of borehole acoustic waves and their use in mechanical characterization is a function of frequency. This function characterizes the mode and is referred to as a dispersion curve

  2. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. Axion-medium effect on fermion dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikheev, N. V., E-mail: mikheev@uniyar.ac.ru; Narynskaya, E. N., E-mail: elenan@uniyar.ac.r [Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of fermions with a dense axion medium is considered with the aim of studying the effect of the axionmediumon fermion dispersion. It is shown that, if use is made of a correct Lagrangian for axion-fermion interaction, the effect of a dense axion medium on fermion dispersion is negligible under real astrophysical conditions.

  4. A multifaceted approach to applying dispersants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crain, O.L.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive oil spill response plan has been developed partially to deal with accidental discharges of oil into the Arabian Gulf. The spill response capabilities of contractor companies in the area are fairly limited. The response plan relies on chemical agents and recovery as cleanup tools. The key to effective response is a rapid response and deployment of cleanup equipment. Initially, marine vessels equipped with portable dispersant spray booms patterned after the Warren Springs equipment were used. To improve existing oil spill response, an extensive modernization of dispersant deployment equipment has been developed. The areas of modernization include upgrading the marine vessel equipment, dedicating boats and vessels of opportunity for dispersant application, using helicopters for spill response, using large fixed-wing aircraft for spill response, and establishing dispersant and refueling stockpiles. This paper discusses the use of dispersants in response to an oil spill. It is intended not as a scientific paper but as a paper on a local response capability.

  5. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  6. Dispersion relations in noncommutative theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariz, Tiago; Nascimento, J. R.; Rivelles, Victor O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of plane waves in noncommutative abelian gauge theories. The dispersion relation is deformed from its usual form whenever a constant background electromagnetic field is present and is similar to that of an anisotropic medium with no Faraday rotation nor birefringence. When the noncommutativity is induced by the Moyal product we find that for some values of the background magnetic field no plane waves are allowed when time is noncommutative. In the Seiberg-Witten context no restriction is found. We also derive the energy-momentum tensor in the Seiberg-Witten case. We show that the generalized Poynting vector obtained from the energy-momentum tensor, the group velocity and the wave vector all point in different directions. In the absence of a constant electromagnetic background we find that the superposition of plane waves is allowed in the Moyal case if the momenta are parallel or satisfy a sort of quantization condition. We also discuss the relation between the solutions found in the Seiberg-Witten and Moyal cases showing that they are not equivalent.

  7. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  8. Heavy Ion Event Displays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

  9. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  10. Photon statistics dispersion in excitonic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ya. Slepyan; S. A. Maksimenko

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear media are predicted to exist whose relative permiability is an operator in the space of quantum states of light. Such media are characterized by a photon statistics--dependent refractive index. This indicates a new type of optical dispersion -- the photon statistics dispersion. Interaction of quantum light with such media modifies the photon number distribution and, in particular, the degree of coherence of light. An excitonic composite -- a collection of noninteracting quantum dots -- is considered as a realization of the medium with the photon statistics dispersion. Expressions are derived for generalized plane waves in an excitonic composite and input--output relations for a planar layer of the material. Transformation rules for different photon initial states are analyzed. Utilization of the photon statistics dispersion in potential quantum--optical devices is discussed.

  11. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  13. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  14. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Thompson

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  15. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq, A. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45660 (Pakistan); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Saeed, R.; Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45660 (Pakistan)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  16. Theoretical description based on general and exact nonextensive dispersion relations of plasma oscillation data and verification of new acoustic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, V.; Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, first we represent the differences between spatial and temporal dispersions and their dependence on the measurement techniques for electrostatic waves in unmagnetized collisionless plasma. Then, three different experimental data are compared to the solutions of exact nonextensive dispersion relations for electron-ion and pair plasma. The results confirm the existence of new acoustic plasma waves. Furthermore, these comparisons yield a Maxwellian and a nonextensive plasma with nonextensive parameter q larger than one, and a Maxwellian plasma with some abnormal dispersion properties.

  17. A Tracer Investigation oftheAtmosph^c Dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a sea-breeze. INIS-descriptors: AIR POLLUTION; DILUTION; DISPERSION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GASES

  18. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  19. Hamiltonian dynamics of breathers with third-order dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mookherjea, Shayan; Yariv, Amnon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a nonperturbative analysis of certain dynamical aspects of breathers (dispersion-managed solitons) including the effects of third-order dispersion. The analysis highlights the similarities to and differences from the well-known analogous procedures for second-order dispersion. We discuss in detail the phase-space evolution of breathers in dispersion-managed systems in the presence of third-order dispersion. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  20. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  1. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, Michael V. (Wheaton, IL); Aldred, Anthony T. (Wheaton, IL); Chan, Sai-Kit (Darien, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  2. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  3. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  4. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

  5. Single Ion Implantation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  6. Single Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  7. Lithium Ion Production NDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

  8. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  9. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Aman-ur-Rehman, E-mail: amansadiq@gmail.com [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  10. Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    9th Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION MECHANISMS OF AGGLOMERATED FILLERS (styrene-butadiene rubber). The objective was to determine the role of the intrinsic parameters Carbon black and silica are widely used as reinforcing fillers for rubber compounds in the tire industry

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic spin waves in degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq, A. [TPPD, PINSTECH Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdrah Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Maroof, R.; Ahmad, Zulfiaqr [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, 25000 Peshawar (Pakistan); Qamar, A. [National Center for Physics, Shahdrah Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, 25000 Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency magnetosonic waves are studied in magnetized degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas with spin effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, and spin magnetization energy, a generalized dispersion relation for oblique magnetosonic waves is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. For three different values of angle {theta}, the generalized dispersion relation is reduced to three different relations under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effect of quantum corrections in the presence of positron concentration significantly modifies the dispersive properties of these modes. The importance of the work relevant to compact astrophysical bodies is pointed out.

  12. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  13. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  14. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  15. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  16. Spherical ion oscillations in a positive polarity gridded inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandara, R.; Khachan, J. [Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)] [Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed, positive polarity gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally, using a differential emissive probe and potential traces as primary diagnostics. Large amplitude oscillations in the plasma current and plasma potential were observed within a microsecond of the discharge onset, which are indicative of coherent ion oscillations about a temporarily confined excess of recirculating electron space charge. The magnitude of the depth of the potential well in the established virtual cathode was determined using a differential emissive Langmuir probe, which correlated well to the potential well inferred from the ion oscillation frequency for both hydrogen and argon experiments. It was found that the timescale for ion oscillation dispersion is strongly dependent on the neutral gas density, and weakly dependent on the peak anode voltage. The cessation of the oscillations was found to be due to charge exchange processes converting ions to high velocity neutrals, causing the abrupt de-coherence of the oscillations through an avalanche dispersion in phase space.

  17. Three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Alkharj University, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta-Branch, New Damietta, 34517 Damietta (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta-Branch, New Damietta, 34517 Damietta (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [RUB International Chair, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional ion-acoustic envelope soliton excitations in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas are interpreted. This is accomplished through the derivation of three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation, where the nonlinearity is balancing with the dispersive terms. The latter contains both an external magnetic field besides the usual plasma parameter effects. Based on the balance between the nonlinearity and the dispersion terms, the regions for possible envelope solitons are investigated indicating that new regimes for modulational instability of envelope ion-acoustic waves could be obtained, which cannot exist in the unmagnetized case. This will allow us to establish additional new regimes, different from the usual unmagnetized plasma, for envelope ion-acoustic waves to propagate in multicomponent plasma that may be observed in space or astrophysics.

  18. ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

  19. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  20. Do dispersive waves play a role in collisionless magnetic reconnection?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Daughton, W.; Li, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Karimabadi, H. [SciberQuest, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States) [SciberQuest, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Peter Gary, S. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)] [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we demonstrate that the properly normalized reconnection rate is fast ?0.1 for guide fields up to 80× larger than the reconnecting field and is insensitive to both the system size and the ion to electron mass ratio. These results challenge conventional explanations of reconnection based on fast dispersive waves, which are completely absent for sufficiently strong guide fields. In this regime, the thickness of the diffusion layer is set predominantly by the electron inertial length with an inner sublayer that is controlled by finite gyro-radius effects. As the Alfvén velocity becomes relativistic for very strong guide fields, the displacement current becomes important and strong deviations from charge neutrality occur, resulting in the build-up of intense electric fields which absorb a portion of the magnetic energy release. Over longer time scales, secondary magnetic islands are generated near the active x-line while an electron inertial scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven within the outflow. These secondary instabilities give rise to time variations in the reconnection rate but do not alter the average value.

  1. On the reduction of oxygen from dispersed media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roushdy, Omar H., 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of oxygen from an organic phase dispersed in a concentrated electrolyte is investigated. Dispersed organic phases are used to enhance oxygen transport in fermenters and artificial blood substitutes. This work ...

  2. Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

  3. Geographic dispersion in teams : its history, experience, measurement, and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael Boyer, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis begins with the simple argument that geographic dispersion has gone surprisingly unexamined despite its role as the domain-defining construct for geographically dispersed teams (a.k.a. "virtual teams"). The ...

  4. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  5. Dryout droplet distribution and dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wayne S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling is characterized by liquid-phase droplets entrained in a continuous vapor-phase flow. In a previous work at MIT, a model of dispersed flow heat transfer was developed, called the Local Conditions ...

  6. air pollution dispersal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  7. air pollutant dispersion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of ion-acoustic waves with application to Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, Etienne J. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA), Space Science, Hermanus (South Africa); School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden); Collier, Andrew B.; Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Maharaj, Shimul K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA), Space Science, Hermanus (South Africa)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a particle-in-cell simulation, the dispersion and growth rate of the ion-acoustic mode are investigated for a plasma containing two ion and two electron components. The electron velocities are modelled by a combination of two kappa distributions, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. The ion components consist of adiabatic ions and an ultra-low density ion beam to drive a very weak instability, thereby ensuring observable waves. The ion-acoustic mode is explored for a range of parameter values such as ?, temperature ratio, and density ratio of the two electron components. The phase speed, frequency range, and growth rate of the mode are investigated. Simulations of double-kappa two-temperature plasmas typical of the three regions of Saturn's magnetosphere are also presented and analysed.

  9. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  10. Quantum ratchet transport with minimal dispersion rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Fei; Ponomarev, A V; Hänggi, P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the performance of quantum ratchets by considering the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet loaded into a flashing periodic potential. The directed center-of-mass motion can be initiated by the uniform modulation of the potential height, provided that the modulation protocol breaks all relevant time- and spatial reflection symmetries. A poor performance of quantum ratchet transport is characterized by a slow net motion and a fast diffusive spreading of the wave packet, while the desirable optimal performance is the contrary. By invoking a quantum analog of the classical P\\'eclet number, namely the quotient of the group velocity and the dispersion of the propagating wave packet, we calibrate the transport properties of flashing quantum ratchets and discuss the mechanisms that yield low-dispersive directed transport.

  11. Quantum ratchet transport with minimal dispersion rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Zhan; S. Denisov; A. V. Ponomarev; P. Hänggi

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the performance of quantum ratchets by considering the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet loaded into a flashing periodic potential. The directed center-of-mass motion can be initiated by the uniform modulation of the potential height, provided that the modulation protocol breaks all relevant time- and spatial reflection symmetries. A poor performance of quantum ratchet transport is characterized by a slow net motion and a fast diffusive spreading of the wave packet, while the desirable optimal performance is the contrary. By invoking a quantum analog of the classical P\\'eclet number, namely the quotient of the group velocity and the dispersion of the propagating wave packet, we calibrate the transport properties of flashing quantum ratchets and discuss the mechanisms that yield low-dispersive directed transport.

  12. Some Thermodynamic Properties of Colloidal Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Thier, Pierre

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, some results are derived to describe the out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics of colloidal suspensions. These results are obtained assuming that the properties of the colloids essentially come from their surfaces which are unusually high in comparison to their volume. The dispersion, in the form of a variable, is introduced in such a way as to embody the various changes which could affect those systems. Explicit relations are deduced for the free enthalpy of dispersion which describe two separated phenomena: the peptization/coalescence and the suspension of a colloidal phase. An alternative to the Gibbs' adsorption equation allows to explain how a surface relaxes thanks to adsorptions. Finally, a link between conformational entropy changes and surface entropy production is discussed with the idea to be applied to the well known protein folding problem.

  13. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  14. Spatial Dispersion of Peering Clusters in the European Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ignazio, Alessio; Giovannetti, Emanuele

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ), both showing some degree of dispersion. 6 We would like ti thank Dr Fingleton for helpful suggestions on this topic...

  15. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  16. Determination of Longitudinal Dispersion Coefficient and Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    with a Large-Scale, High Resolution SF6 Tracer Release Experiment D A V I D T . H O , * , P E T E R S C H L O into rivers. In the following, we report results from a large-scale SF6 tracer release experiment conducted in the tidal Hudson River to examine longitudinal dispersion and net advection. SF6 was injected

  17. Dense gas dispersion modeling for aqueous releases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lara, Armando

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DENSE GAS DISPERSION MODELING FOR AQUEOUS RELEASES A Thesis by ARMANDO LARA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University In partial fulfill ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1999 Major... Modeling for Aqueous Releases. (May 1999) Armando Lara, B. S. , University of Houston Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Sam Mannan Production, transportation, and storage of hazardous chemicals represent potential risks to the environment, the public...

  18. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  19. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  20. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  1. Collection of ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide an improved technique for detecting ions as the area from which ions are attracted to a detector is increased, consequently increasing the number of ions detected. This is achieved by providing the outer electrodes of the detector connected to the electrical potential, together with alternate intermediate electrodes. The other intermediate electrodes and preferably the housing are grounded. The technique renders such detection techniques more sensitive and gives them a lower threshold at which they can function.

  2. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  3. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the right chamber (ion chamber) are confined in their ownwatts and that on the ion chamber is 50 watts. A permanent-column and the ion source chamber. The simulation is

  4. Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1 , Arthur Motta1 Laboratory, Argonne, IL 060493, USA INTRODUCTION Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ferritic. EXPERIMENT Material Characterization Prior to Irradiation MA957 ODS alloy (Fe­14Cr­1Ti­0.3Mo­0.25Y2O3

  5. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, QAU Campus, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  6. Origin of ion-cyclotron turbulence in the downward Birkeland current region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Lund, E. J. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Grossbard, N. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis of the electron velocity distributions, which are observed in the FAST satellite measurements in the downward Birkeland current region of the magnetosphere, is presented. The satellite-measured particle (electrons and protons) velocity distributions are fitted with analytic functions and the dispersion relation is derived in terms of the plasma dispersion functions associated with those distribution functions. Numerical solutions of the dispersion relation show that the bump-on-tail structure of the electron velocity distribution can excite electrostatic ion-cyclotron instabilities by the Landau resonance mechanism. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities may explain the observed electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the Birkeland current region. Excitation of other types of instabilities by the fitted electron velocity distributions and their relevance are also discussed.

  7. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  8. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  9. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  10. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  11. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  12. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  13. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  14. Economics of selected WECS dispersed applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An economic analysis for distributed Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) was conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Solar Commercial Readiness Assessment task at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The major objective of the study is to analyze: the cost of electricity generated by selected wind energy systems in residential and agricultural applications; the breakeven cost of wind systems able to compete economically with conventional power sources in dispersed applications; and the impact of major economic factors on the cost performance index.

  15. NYO-7593 LECTIJHES ON DISPERSION THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ON DISPERSION THEORY by

  16. Interesting features of nonlinear shock equations in dissipative pair-ion-electron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masood, W. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Rizvi, H. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two dimensional nonlinear electrostatic waves are studied in unmagnetized, dissipative pair-ion-electron plasmas in the presence of weak transverse perturbation. The dissipation in the system is taken into account by incorporating the kinematic viscosity of both positive and negative ions. In the linear case, a biquadratic dispersion relation is obtained, which yields the fast and slow modes in a pair-ion-electron plasma. It is shown that the limiting cases of electron-ion and pair-ion can be retrieved from the general biquadratic dispersion relation, and the differences in the characters of the waves propagating in both the cases are also highlighted. Using the small amplitude approximation method, the nonlinear Kadomtsev Petviashvili Burgers as well as Burgers-Kadomtsev Petviashvili equations are derived and their applicability for pair-ion-electron plasma is explained in detail. The present study may have relevance to understand the formation of two dimensional electrostatic shocks in laboratory produced pair-ion-electron plasmas.

  17. Fate of commercial disperse dyes in sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, C.P.C.; Perenich, T.A.; Baughman, G.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of disappearance of seven different disperse dyes were determined in compacted sediments at room temperature. The commercial dyes (in dispersed solid form) were representative of nitroazo, anthraquinone, and quinoline structures that are widely used. Reaction rates were found to be first order over at least two half-lives and were different for the three groups of dyes. Half-lives were on the order of hours, days and months for the nitroazobenzene, aminoanthraquinone, and quinoline dyes, respectively. Stability of the latter is consistent with detection of a quinoline dye in treatment plant sludge and in sediment from a water body receiving treated effluent. The azobenzene dyes are degraded by cleavage of the azo group to give anilines and ring-substituted phenylenediamines from the diazo component of the molecule. Products from the other portion (coupling component) of the molecule are unidentified, as yet, but are expected to be N,N-disubstituted phenylenediamines. Products of the anthraquinone dyes were unidentified, except for the case of a nitrated dye on which the nitro group was reduced.

  18. Evaluation of machining dispersions for turning process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaud Lefebvre; Valery Wolff

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we propose to extend the model of simulation of dispersions in turning based on the geometrical specifications. Our study is articulated around two trends of development: the first trend relates to the geometrical model. The geometrical model suggested must allow a follow-up of the geometry of the part during the simulation of machining. It is thus a question of carrying out a systematic treatment of the whole dimensioning and tolerancing process while being based on the principles of the \\DeltaL method. We also planned to integrate this type of specification in the model of simulation of machining suggested. It is more generally a question of extending the traditional model for better taking into account the multi axis specification of coaxiality and perpendicularity on the turned workpieces. The second trend of our study relates to the widening of the field of application of the model. We propose to extend the field of application of the model by taking into account the modifications of several parameters of the manufacturing process plans, likely to involve variations of dispersions.

  19. Theory of waves in pair-ion plasmas: Natural explanation of backward modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kono, M. [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)] [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan); Vranjes, J. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia)] [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Batool, N. [National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Backward waves observed in the experiments by Oohara and Hatakeyama (Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 205005 (2003)) are identified to be ion cyclotron harmonic waves inherent to the kinetic theory. The derived dispersion equation is based on exact solutions of the characteristic equations of the Vlasov equation in a bounded cylindrical coordinate system; it is different from its counterpart in unbounded plasmas, and it provides all the branches of the dispersion relations observed in the experiment. Positive and negative ions respond to a potential in the same time scale and cooperate to expose kinetic orbital behaviors to the macroscopic propagation characteristics. In addition, the experimental setting of the large Larmor radius makes higher harmonic ion cyclotron backward/forward waves observable. The large Larmor radius effects are naturally treated by a kinetic theory.

  20. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (?S) approaches the crossover frequency (?cr), and the parallel wavenumber (k?) is close to the critical wavenumber k? ?(?S = ?cr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ?cr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k? ?#25; k???.

  1. Mode conversion and absorption of fast waves at high ion cyclotron harmonics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Suwon, E-mail: swcho@kgu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Kyonggi-Do 443-760 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Kyonggi-Do 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jong-Gu [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation and absorption of high harmonic fast waves is of interest for non-inductive current drives in fusion experiments. The fast wave can be coupled with the ion Bernstein wave that propagates in the high magnetic field side of an ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layer. This coupling and the absorption are analyzed using the hot plasma dispersion relation and a wave equation that was converted from an approximate dispersion relation for the case where ?{sub i}=k{sub ?}{sup 2}?{sub i}{sup 2}/2?1 (where k{sub ?} is the perpendicular wave number and ?{sub i} is the ion Larmor radius). It is found that both reflection and conversion may occur near the harmonic resonance layer but that they decrease rapidly, giving rise to a sharp increase in the absorption as the parallel wave number increases.

  2. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the scatter- ings of kaons with other hadrons, and the real part of the self-energy is given by the mean-field potential. Although various approaches have been used to evaluate the kaon dis- persion relation in a dense medium ~e.g., @1,13?19#!, we shall... 52, 2037 ~1995!; 53, R22 ~1996!; Nucl. Phys. A601, 457 ~1996!. @10# Q. Li, J.Q. Wu, and C.M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 39, 849 ~1989!. @11# S.J. Wang, B.A. Li, W. Bauer, and J. Randrup, Ann. Phys. ~N.Y.! 209, 251 ~1991!. @12# W. Bauer, Prog. Part. Nucl...

  3. Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy InformationOpen Energy2004) |

  4. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  5. Methane Oxidation to Methanol without CO2 Emission: Catalysis by Atomic Negative Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfamichael, Aron; Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The catalytic activities of the atomic Y-, Ru-, At-, In-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Os- ions have been investigated theoretically using the atomic Au- ion as the benchmark for the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol without CO2 emission. Dispersion-corrected density-functional theory has been used for the investigation. From the energy barrier calculations and the thermodynamics of the reactions, we conclude that the catalytic effect of the atomic Ag-, At-, Ru-, and Os- ions is higher than that of the atomic Au- ion catalysis of CH4 conversion to methanol. By controlling the temperature around 290K (Os-), 300K (Ag-), 310K (At-), 320K (Ru-) and 325K (Au-) methane can be completely oxidized to methanol without the emission of CO2. We conclude by recommending the investigation of the catalytic activities of combinations of the above negative ions for significant enhancement of the selective partial oxidation of methane to methanol.

  6. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, James W. (Canoga Park, CA); Schlanger, Herbert (Simi Valley, CA); McNulty, Jr., Hugh (Santa Monica, CA); Parker, Norman W. (Camarillo, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  7. Ion sensing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  8. Ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  9. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  10. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  11. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  12. Hyper dispersion pulse compressor for chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A grating pulse compressor configuration is introduced for increasing the optical dispersion for a given footprint and to make practical the application for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) to quasi-narrow bandwidth materials, such as Nd:YAG. The grating configurations often use cascaded pairs of gratings to increase angular dispersion an order of magnitude or more. Increased angular dispersion allows for decreased grating separation and a smaller compressor footprint.

  13. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  14. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  15. Effect of the Ligand Shell Composition on the Dispersibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dispersibility-vs-density plots are obtained by following the variation in the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) absorption spectra of the nanoparticles. To better understand the...

  16. Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together More Documents & Publications Update 1 to: A...

  17. Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 More Documents & Publications Attachment A: Modeling...

  18. Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4 The split-step Fourier method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 #12;iv CONTENTS 2

  19. Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash...

  20. Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash...

  1. Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

  2. atmospheric dispersion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 3 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  3. atmospheric dispersion calculations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 4 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  4. atmospheric dispersion experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 2 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  5. Three Dimensioanl Free Electron Laser Dispersion Relation Including Betatron Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Free Electron Laser Dispersion RelationInternational Free Electron Laser Conference, Santa Fe, NM,International Free Electron Laser Conference, held in Santa

  6. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  7. Dispersion compensation in chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse amplification system includes a laser source providing an input laser pulse along an optical path. The input laser pulse is characterized by a first temporal duration. The system also includes a multi-pass pulse stretcher disposed along the optical path. The multi-pass pulse stretcher includes a first set of mirrors operable to receive input light in a first plane and output light in a second plane parallel to the first plane and a first diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher also includes a second set of mirrors operable to receive light diffracted from the first diffraction grating and a second diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher further includes a reflective element operable to reflect light diffracted from the second diffraction grating. The system further includes an amplifier, a pulse compressor, and a passive dispersion compensator disposed along the optical path.

  8. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  9. Characterization of an RF-Driven Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westenskow, G A; Hall, R P; Halaxa, E; Kwan, J W

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We are testing a high-current-density high-brightness Argon-Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. The 100-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. The extraction current density is 100 mA/cm2. We have measured the emittance of the beamlet, and the fraction of Ar{sup ++} ions under several operating conditions. We present measurements of the extracted current density as a function of RF power and gas pressure ({approx} 2 mT), current density uniformity, and energy dispersion (due to charge exchange). We are testing a 80-kV 61-hole multi-beamlet array that will produce a total current > 200 mA. In the current experiments the beamlets are not merged into a single beam. A 500-kV experiment where the beamlets will be merged to a produce 0.5-A beam is being planned.

  10. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  11. FINITE VOLUME SCHEMES FOR DISPERSIVE WAVE PROPAGATION AND RUNUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FINITE VOLUME SCHEMES FOR DISPERSIVE WAVE PROPAGATION AND RUNUP DENYS DUTYKH , THEODOROS KATSAOUNIS to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given require the computation of the wave generation [DD07, KDD07], propagation [TG97], interaction with solid

  12. Atmospheric dispersion index for prescribed burning. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavdas, L.G.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical index that estimates the atmosphere's capacity to disperse smoke from prescribed burning is described. The physical assumptions and mathematical development of the index are given in detail. A preliminary interpretation of dispersion index values is offered. A FORTRAN subroutine package for computing the index is included.

  13. Series evaluation of Tweedie exponential dispersion model densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    of Mathematics and Computing University of Southern Queensland Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia Gordon K. Smyth 3052, Australia smyth@wehi.edu.au 23 February 2005 Abstract Exponential dispersion models, which for generalized linear models. The Tweedie families are those exponential dispersion models with power mean

  14. On a nonlocal dispersive equation modeling particle suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumbrun, Kevin

    On a nonlocal dispersive equation modeling particle suspensions Kevin Zumbrun July, 1996 Abstract: We study a nonlocal, scalar conservation law, u t + ((K a \\Lambda u)u) x = 0, modeling sedimentation, and \\Lambda represents convolution. We show this to be a dispersive regularization of the Hopf equation, u

  15. Radioactive ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  16. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  17. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  18. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  19. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Alexander, Michael L. (Richland, WA); Follansbee, James C. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  20. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  1. Dispersion aspects of silicon carbide gelcasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleier, A.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this research was to increase the solid loading of silicon carbide (SiC) powder, in an appropriate liquid medium, to a level that is useful for gelcasting technology. A number of factors that determine the maximum concentration of silicon carbide that can be incorporated into a pourable ceramic suspension have been identified. The pH of the system is the most critical processing parameter. Its proper adjustment (pH 11 to 13) allows SiC concentrations exceeding 50%, based on volume, to be routinely achieved without the use of additional dispersing agents. The particle size of SiC was also found to affect the maximum, attainable concentration. The surface area of the powder and the presence of free carbon in the powder, though not significantly influencing the suspension properties, determine the concentration of initiator required to induce polymerization and gelation. SiC specimens have been gelcast for powders in the size range of 0.8 to 8.5 {mu}m; the powders employed contain either {approximately} 0 or 19% carbon by weight. Finally, the generation of bubbles, typically encountered by the use of ammonia to adjust pH has been circumvented by the use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

  2. Two-point derivative dispersion relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erasmo Ferreira; Javier Sesma

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new derivation is given for the representation, under certain conditions, of the integral dispersion relations of scattering theory through local forms. The resulting expressions have been obtained through an independent procedure to construct the real part, and consist of new mathematical structures of double infinite summations of derivatives. In this new form the derivatives are calculated at the generic value of the energy $E$ and separately at the reference point $E=m$ that is the lower limit of the integration. This new form may be more interesting in certain circumstances and directly shows the origin of the difficulties in convergence that were present in the old truncated forms called standard-DDR. For all cases in which the reductions of the double to single sums were obtained in our previous work, leading to explicit demonstration of convergence, these new expressions are seen to be identical to the previous ones. We present, as a glossary, the most simplified explicit results for the DDR's in the cases of imaginary amplitudes of forms $(E/m)^\\lambda[\\ln (E/m)]^n$, that cover the cases of practical interest in particle physics phenomenology at high energies. We explicitly study the expressions for the cases with $\\lambda$ negative odd integers, that require identification of cancelation of singularities, and provide the corresponding final results.

  3. Nano-sized Lithium Manganese Oxide Dispersed on Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak, S.B.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-sized lithium manganese oxide (LMO) dispersed on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized successfully via a microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction at 200 C for 30 min using MnO{sub 2}-coated CNT and an aqueous LiOH solution. The initial specific capacity is 99.4 mAh/g at a 1.6 C-rate, and is maintained at 99.1 mAh/g even at a 16 C-rate. The initial specific capacity is also maintained up to the 50th cycle to give 97% capacity retention. The LMO/CNT nanocomposite shows excellent power performance and good structural reversibility as an electrode material in energy storage systems, such as lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. This synthetic strategy opens a new avenue for the effective and facile synthesis of lithium transition metal oxide/CNT nanocomposite.

  4. Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimental data from plastic lithium ion cells. Journal ofelectrolyte additive for lithium-ion batteries. Elec-A. Aging Mechanisms in Lithium-Ion Batteries. Journal of

  5. HEAVY-ION RADIOBIOLOGY: CELLULAR STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    foiled parallel-plate ion chambers filled with pure nitrogenare made with a pair of ion chambers using an interposedbeen used to verify ion chamber dosimetry; (1) comparisons

  6. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company-v3832/Lithium-Ion-Batteries- Outlook-Alternative-Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Marca M. Doeff * , Jordirechargeable sodium ion batteries, particularly for large-

  7. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Identification of a suitabledevelopment of sodium ion batteries, because graphite, theanode for lithium ion batteries, does not undergo sodium

  8. Advances in lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, John B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in Lithium-Ion Batteries Edited by Walter A. vanpuzzling mysteries of lithium ion batteries. The book beginssuch importance to lithium ion batteries one is amazed that

  9. Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power for heavy ions in light targets is highly desired due to the large errors in prediction by the widely used Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. In this study,...

  10. Modelling long-distance seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Tewlsbury, Joshua, J.; Bolker, Benjamin, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Long-distance seed dispersal is difficult to measure, yet key to understanding plant population dynamics and community composition. 2. We used a spatially explicit model to predict the distribution of seeds dispersed long distances by birds into habitat patches of different shapes. All patches were the same type of habitat and size, but varied in shape. They occurred in eight experimental landscapes, each with five patches of four different shapes, 150 m apart in a matrix of mature forest. The model was parameterized with smallscale movement data collected from field observations of birds. In a previous study we validated the model by testing its predictions against observed patterns of seed dispersal in real landscapes with the same types and spatial configuration of patches as in the model. 3. Here we apply the model more broadly, examining how patch shape influences the probability of seed deposition by birds into patches, how dispersal kernels (distributions of dispersal distances) vary with patch shape and starting location, and how movement of seeds between patches is affected by patch shape. 4. The model predicts that patches with corridors or other narrow extensions receive higher numbers of seeds than patches without corridors or extensions. This pattern is explained by edgefollowing behaviour of birds. Dispersal distances are generally shorter in heterogeneous landscapes (containing patchy habitat) than in homogeneous landscapes, suggesting that patches divert the movement of seed dispersers, ‘holding’ them long enough to increase the probability of seed defecation in the patches. Dispersal kernels for seeds in homogeneous landscapes were smooth, whereas those in heterogenous landscapes were irregular. In both cases, long-distance (> 150 m) dispersal was surprisingly common, usually comprising approximately 50% of all dispersal events. 5. Synthesis . Landscape heterogeneity has a large influence on patterns of long-distance seed dispersal. Our results suggest that long-distance dispersal events can be predicted using spatially explicit modelling to scale-up local movements, placing them in a landscape context. Similar techniques are commonly used by landscape ecologists to model other types of movement; they offer much promise to the study of seed dispersal.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Performance of Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ion batteries In current lithium ion battery technology,ion batteries The first commercialized lithium-ion batteryfirst lithium-ion battery. Compared to the other batteries,

  12. On linear stability and dispersion for crystals in the Schroedinger-Poisson model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Komech; Elena Kopylova

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Schr\\"odinger-Poisson-Newton equations as a model of crystals. Our main results are the well posedness and dispersion decay for the linearized dynamics at the ground state. This linearization is a Hamilton system with nonselfadjoint (and even nonsymmetric) generator. We diagonalize this Hamilton generator using our theory of spectral resolution of the Hamilton operators with positive definite energy which is a special version of the M. Krein - H. Langer theory of selfadjoint operators in the Hilbert spaces with indefinite metric. Using this spectral resolution, we establish the well posedness and the dispersion decay of the linearized dynamics with positive energy. The key result of present paper is the energy positivity for the linearized dynamics with small elementary charge $e>0$ under a novel Wiener-type condition on the ions positions and their charge densitities. We give examples of the crystals satisfying this condition. The main difficulty in the proof ofr the positivity is due to the fact that for $e=0$ the minimal spectral point $E_0=0$ is an eigenvalue of infinite multiplicity for the energy operator. To prove the positivity we study the asymptotics of the ground state as $e\\to 0$ and show that the zero eigenvalue $E_0=0$ bifurcates into $E_e\\sim e^2$.

  13. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  14. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Liu, Changle (Midland, MI); Xu, Kang (Montgomery Village, MD); Skotheim, Terje A. (Tucson, AZ)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  15. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, Charles E. (Westmont, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  16. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  17. Ion Runaway in Lightning Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreman, Matt

    Runaway ions can be produced in plasmas with large electric fields, where the accelerating electric force is augmented by the low mean ionic charge due to the imbalance between the number of electrons and ions. Here we ...

  18. Interaction of ion-acoustic solitons with electron beam in warm plasmas with superthermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) is studied using the hydrodynamic equations coupled with the Poisson equation in a warm plasma consisting of adiabatic ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in presence of an electron-beam component. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation for ion-acoustic (IA) waves is obtained by linearizing of basic equations. On the other hand, in the nonlinear analysis, an energy-balance like equation involving Sagdeev's pseudo-potential is derived in order to investigate arbitrary amplitude IA solitons. The Mach number range is determined in which, propagation and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed both parametrically and numerically. The variation of amplitude and width of electrostatic (ES) excitations as a result of superthermality (via) and also the physical parameters (ion temperature, soliton speed, electron-beam density and electron-beam velocity) are examined. A typical interaction between IASWs and the electron-beam in plasma is conf...

  19. Confined zone dispersion project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the performance of the confined zone dispersion (CZD) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system in removing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from flue gas in the coal-fired boiler. The CZD-FGD system, installed at Pennsylvania Electric Company`s (Penelec`s) Seward Power Station, was designed to remove 50% of the SO{sub 2} from one-half of Unit No. 5`s flue gas when the boiler is fired with 1.5% sulfur coal. Section 1 discusses the significance of CZD, the purpose of this report, the history of the project, and the role of DOE in the project, describes the project organization, and lists the six design areas involving proprietary information. Section 2 presents project location, objectives, and phases, and discusses the test program. Section 3 explains the process flow diagram, piping and instrumentation diagrams and operating controls, site plan, equipment layouts, and process equipment. Section 4 provides an integrated discussion of all the test results obtained during the test program, backed by tabulations and graphics. Section 5 describes the testing failures and corrective actions taken. Section 6, reliability/availability/maintainability analysis data of major equipment, covers the following systems: atomizing, sootblowing, lime, flue gas, and controls and instrumentation. Section 7 summarizes the capital cost requirements for the Seward CZD demonstration unit and discusses the capital and operating costs of installing the process at plants with various unit capacities. Section 8 discusses plans to continue the CZD demonstration to achieve longer term continuous operation at SO{sub 2} removals of 50%. Section 9 presents the principal findings of the CZD demonstration and recommends additional testing.

  20. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin [Advanced Ion Beam Technology Inc., 47370 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 (United States)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  1. Photoabsorption by Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, Steven T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of photoabsorption by atoms and ions is presented. Specifically, examples of near-chaotic behavior in photoionization of positive ions, low-energy manifestations of nondipole effects, high-energy breakdown of the single particle picture and new phenomenology uncovered in the inner-shell photoabsorption by negative ions are discussed.

  2. Fiber optic integration in planar ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Elizabeth Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic ion traps are are excellent tools in atomic physics for studying single ions. Accurate measurement of the ion's electronic state in these ion traps is required by both atomic clocks and quantum computation. Quantum ...

  3. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, S., E-mail: SJafari@guilan.ac.ir; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  4. Landau damping effects on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty negative-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barman, Arnab; Misra, A. P., E-mail: apmisra@visva-bharati.ac.in, E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear theory of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) with Landau damping is studied in an unmagnetized dusty negative-ion plasma in the extreme conditions when the free electrons are absent. The cold massive charged dusts are described by fluid equations, whereas the two-species of ions (positive and negative) are described by the kinetic Vlasov equations. A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with Landau damping, governing the dynamics of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive DAWs, is derived following Ott and Sudan [Phys. Fluids 12, 2388 (1969)]. It is shown that for some typical laboratory and space plasmas, the Landau damping (and the nonlinear) effects are more pronounced than the finite Debye length (dispersive) effects for which the KdV soliton theory is not applicable to DAWs in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of the linear phase velocity, solitary wave amplitudes (in presence and absence of the Landau damping) as well as the Landau damping rate are studied with the effects of the positive ion to dust density ratio (?{sub pd}) as well as the ratios of positive to negative ion temperatures (?) and masses (m)

  5. Influence of finite radial geometry on the growth rate of ion-channel free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahmani, Mohammad; Hamzehpour, Hossein [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4416 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4416 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr. Mofateh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr. Mofateh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of finite radial geometry on the instability of a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in an ion-channel in a waveguide is investigated. The instability analysis is based on the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the perturbation about a self-consistent beam equilibrium. With the help of characteristic method the dispersion relation for the TE-mode is derived and analyzed through the numerical solutions. It is found that the positioning of the beam radius R{sub b} relative to the waveguide radius R{sub c}, and the ion-channel frequency can have a large influence on the maximum growth rate and corresponding wave number.

  6. The integration of dispersed asylum seekers in Glasgow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Alexandra

    This thesis is an analysis of the integration of dispersed asylum seekers in Glasgow. It is a qualitative case study that uses data from participant observation with community groups, interviews with asylum seekers and those involved in service...

  7. amplified dispersive optical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from a finite set. John Jeffers 2011-05-16 5 January 15, 2004 Vol. 29, No. 2 OPTICS LETTERS 201 Generation of 14.8-fs pulses in a spatially dispersed amplifier Materials...

  8. Agents of seed dispersal : animal--zoochary / Wind--anemonochory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lysakowski, Lukasz Kamil, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agents of seed dispersal is a project designed to address the increase of environmental degradation, which occurs as a result of the perpetual spread of the asphalt and concrete of the contemporary urban situation. Agents ...

  9. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PG&E 4:00 p.m. Summer Wind Generator Model Wind Array ELCCexpect from an array of wind generators spread over a largean array of dispersed wind generators will be. wind speed

  10. Testing Dispersal Hypotheses in Foraging Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    , population size, geographic distance, natal homing, and ocean currents are hypothesized to affect dispersal, whereas microsatellites uncover similarities to some of the geographically closest populations. Ubatuba and Almofala are mixed stocks, drawn primarily from Ascension, with lesser contributions from Surinam

  11. Colloidal Manipulation of Nanostructures: Stable Dispersion and Self-assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dazhi

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation work addresses two important aspects of nanotechnology - stable dispersion and self-assembly of colloidal nanostructures. Three distinctly different types of nano-scaled materials have been studied: 0-dimensional ZnO quantum dots...

  12. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akiyama, T., E-mail: takiyama@lhd.nifs.ac.jp; Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K. [Chubu University, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai-shi, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup ?3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup ?3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  13. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON METHODOLOGY: FROM WIND POWER FREQUENCY TO LOSS-OF-LOADJ.P. , "Some Aspects of Wind Power Statistics, " J. of Appl.S£CTION Reliability of Wind Power From Dispersed Sites: A Pr

  14. annular dispersed flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model for overland solute transport Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a...

  15. advective dispersive formulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model for overland solute transport Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a...

  16. accentuates transmural dispersion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model for overland solute transport Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a...

  17. Forced-convection, dispersed-flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynek, Scott Josef

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the latest results of an investigation of the characteristics of dispersed flow film boiling. Heat transfer data are presented for vertical upflow of nitrogen in an electrically heated tube, 0.4 in. ...

  18. Dispersion modeling for prediction of emission factors for cattle feedyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, Sarah Elizabeth

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of state air pollution regulatory agencies will require accurate EPA AP-42 emission factors. A protocol was developed so that accurate emission factors can be determined using both source sampling data and dispersion modeling. In this study, an emission...

  19. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  20. A dynamic model for the Lagrangian stochastic dispersion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesmazoglou, I.; Navarro-Martinez, S., E-mail: s.navarro@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kempf, A. M. [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics and Center for Computational Sciences and Simulation, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, 47048 (Germany)] [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics and Center for Computational Sciences and Simulation, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, 47048 (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic sub-grid model is often used to accurately represent particle dispersion in turbulent flows using large eddy simulations. Models of this type have a free parameter, the dispersion coefficient, which is not universal and is strongly grid-dependent. In the present paper, a dynamic model for the evaluation of the coefficient is proposed and validated in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The grid dependence of the static coefficient is investigated in a turbulent mixing layer and compared to the dynamic model. The dynamic model accurately predicts dispersion statistics and resolves the grid-dependence. Dispersion statistics of the dynamically calculated constant are more accurate than any static coefficient choice for a number of grid spacings. Furthermore, the dynamic model produces less numerical artefacts than a static model and exhibits smaller sensitivity in the results predicted for different particle relaxation times.

  1. Computation of seismic attenuation and dispersion due to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    masson@localhost.localdomain (masson)

    2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 23, 2006 ... used to model the poroelastic response within such materials are those of Biot ... for the seismic attenuation and dispersion in the special case where the ..... lens embedded in shaly sediments or a fracture embedded in a ...

  2. altered dispersion relations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our formalism to the parapositronium two-photon decay. G. Lopez Castro; J. Pestieau; C. Smith; S. Trine 2000-06-01 9 Dispersion relation for anisotropic media CERN Preprints...

  3. Performance Analysis of Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    probability of dispersed spectrum cognitive radio systems is derived for two cases: where each channel realization experiences independent and dependent Nakagami-m fading, respectively. In addition, the derivation is extended to include the effects...

  4. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  5. Bayesian Network Analysis of Radiological Dispersal Device Acquisitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hundley, Grant Richard

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    inflict moderate human casualties and significant economic damage. The vast availability of radioactive sources and the nearly limitless methods of dispersing them demand an inclusive study of the acquisition pathways for an RDD. A complete network...

  6. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng, E-mail: mcho@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup ?} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  7. Spatially Dispersive Inhomogeneous Electromagnetic Media with Periodic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratus, Jonathan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially dispersive (also known as non-local) electromagnetic media are considered where the parameters defining the permittivity relation vary periodically. Maxwell's equations give rise to a difference equation corresponding to the Floquet modes. A complete set of approximate solutions is calculated which are valid when the inhomogeneity is small. This is applied to inhomogeneous wire media. A new feature arises when considering spatially dispersive media, that is the existence of coupled modes.

  8. Assessment of gas dispersion in agitated tanks using hydrophones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutter, Terry Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASSESSMENT OF GAS DISPERSION IN AGITATED TANKS USING HYDROPHONES A Thesis by TERRY ALAN SUTTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTFR OF SCIENCE ofay I...!)sfi Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ASSESSMENT OF GAS DISPERSION IN AGITATED TANKS USING HYDROPHONES A Thesis by TERRY ALAN SUTTER Approved as to style and content by: Gary B. Tatterson (Chairinan of Committee) Gerald L. orrison (Xieniber) C...

  9. Silicon Nanoparticles-Graphene Paper Composites for Li Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jeong K.; Smith, Kurt B.; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Harold H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composites of Si nanoparticles highly dispersed between graphene sheets, and supported by a 3-D network of graphite formed by reconstituting regions of graphene stacks exhibit high Li ion storage capacities and cycling stability. An electrode was prepared with a storage capacity >2200 mA h g{sup ?1} after 50 cycles and >1500 mA h g{sup ?1} after 200 cycles that decreased by <0.5% per cycle.

  10. Coupled ion acoustic and drift waves in magnetized superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [National Center for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), 915051-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and nonlinear coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a nonuniform magnetoplasma having kappa distributed electrons and positrons. In the linear regime, the role of kappa distribution and positron content on the dispersion relation has been highlighted; it is found that strong superthermality (low value of ?) and addition of positrons lowers the phase velocity via decreasing the fundamental scalelengths of the plasmas. In the nonlinear regime, first, coherent nonlinear structure in the form of dipoles and monopoles are obtained and the boundary conditions (boundedness) in the context of superthermality and positron concentrations are discussed. Second, in case of scalar nonlinearity, a Korteweg–de Vries-type equation is obtained, which admit solitary wave solution. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons are formed in the present model. The present work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron positron ion plasmas, which exist in astrophysical plasma situations such as those found in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  11. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  12. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along...

  13. A novel planar ion funnel design for miniature ion optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhary, A.; Amerom, Friso H. W. van; Short, R. T. [Space and Marine Technology Laboratory, SRI International, 450 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel planar ion funnel (PIF) design presented in this article emphasizes simple fabrication, assembly, and operation, making it amenable to extreme miniaturization. Simulations performed in SIMION 8.0 indicate that ion focusing can be achieved by using a gradient of electrostatic potentials on concentric metal rings in a plane. A prototype was fabricated on a 35 × 35 mm custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) with a center hole for ions to pass through and a series of concentric circular metal rings of increasing diameter on the front side of the PCB. Metal vias on the PCB electrically connected each metal ring to a resistive potential divider that was soldered on the back of the PCB. The PIF was tested at 5.5 × 10{sup ?6} Torr in a vacuum test setup that was equipped with a broad-beam ion source on the front and a micro channel plate (MCP) ion detector on the back of the PIF. The ion current recorded on the MCP anode during testing indicated a 23× increase in the ion transmission through the PIF when electric potentials were applied to the rings. These preliminary results demonstrate the functionality of a 2D ion funnel design with a much smaller footprint and simpler driving electronics than conventional 3D ion funnels. Future directions to improve the design and a possible micromachining approach to fabrication are discussed in the conclusions.

  14. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  15. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  16. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  17. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  18. Improved ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  19. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  20. Compact ion accelerator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  1. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Shie (Austin, TX); Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos{2.phi.(t)}. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase .phi.(t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of .phi.'(t).

  2. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, S.; Dunham, M.E.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time are disclosed. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos[l brace]2[phi](t)[r brace]. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase [phi](t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of [phi][prime](t). 10 figs.

  3. Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  4. The concentration-velocity dispersion relation in galaxy groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Faltenbacher; William G. Mathews

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on results from cold dark matter N-body simulations we develop a dynamical model for the evolution of subhaloes within host haloes of galaxy groups. Only subhaloes more massive than 5 times 10^8 M_{sol} at the time of accretion are examined because they are massive enough to possibly host luminous galaxies. As they orbit within a growing host potential the subhaloes are subject to tidal stripping and dynamical friction. We consider groups of equal mass (M_{vir} = 3.9 times 10^{13} M_{sol}) at redshift z=0 but with different concentrations associated with different formation times. We investigate the variation of subhaloe (or satellite galaxy) velocity dispersion with host concentration and/or formation time. In agreement with the Jeans equation the velocity dispersion of subhaloes increases with the host concentration. Between concentrations ~5 and ~20 the subhaloe velocity dispersions increase by ~25 per cent. By applying a simplified tidal disruption criterion, i.e. rejection of all subhaloes with a tidal truncation radius below 3 kpc at z=0, the central velocity dispersion of 'surviving' subhaloes increases substantially for all concentrations. The enhanced central velocity dispersion among surviving subhaloes is caused by a lack of slow tangential motions. Additionally, we present a fitting formula for the velocity anisotropy parameter \\beta(r) which does not depend on concentration if the group-centric distances are scaled by r_s, the characteristic radius of the NFW-profile.

  5. Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

  6. RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a ripple, the product of those pre-smash particles flying at relativistic speeds. By examining accelerated ions directly, scientists might clearly identify physics phenomena...

  7. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  8. DIVALENT ION EXCHANGE WITH ALKALI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunge, A.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection for Enhanced Oil Recovery - A Status Report," SPEDOE Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, Apri120-ions is important enhanced oil recovery with chemical addi-

  9. Application of (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as a Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    displaced blocks of Wassuk Range footwall. Constraints on the geometry and thermal evolution of the footwall can better focus exploration efforts therefore lowering the...

  10. Application of (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as a Geothermal Exploration Tool

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda,Anza Electric CoopEnergyin Extensional

  11. Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortis, A.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO{sub 2} seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO{sub 2} seepage dispersion over relatively short distances where density effects are likely to be important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with density dependence in the gravity term. Results for a two-dimensional system show that a density dependence emerges at higher fluxes than prior estimates. A universal scaling relation is derived that allows estimation of the flux from concentrations measured downwind and vice versa.

  12. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E., E-mail: tarasov@theory.sinp.msu.ru [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Departamento de Análisis Matemático, Universidad de La Laguna, 38271 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Trujillo, Juan J., E-mail: jtrujill@ullmat.es [Departamento de Análisis Matemático, Universidad de La Laguna, 38271 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media.

  13. Polydispersity analysis of Taylor dispersion data: the cumulant method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Cipelletti; Jean-Philippe Biron; Michel Martin; Hervé Cottet

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Taylor dispersion analysis is an increasingly popular characterization method that measures the diffusion coefficient, and hence the hydrodynamic radius, of (bio)polymers, nanoparticles or even small molecules. In this work, we describe an extension to current data analysis schemes that allows size polydispersity to be quantified for an arbitrary sample, thereby significantly enhancing the potentiality of Taylor dispersion analysis. The method is based on a cumulant development similar to that used for the analysis of dynamic light scattering data. Specific challenges posed by the cumulant analysis of Taylor dispersion data are discussed, and practical ways to address them are proposed. We successfully test this new method by analyzing both simulated and experimental data for solutions of moderately polydisperse polymers and polymer mixtures.

  14. New ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, M.V.; Aldred, A.T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRBO/sub 4/, where R is a rare-earth element, B if Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  15. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  17. asymmetric ion mobility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both...

  18. Apparatus and method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Ian K.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide is disclosed. A stream of charged ions is supplied to the ion guide. A main RF field is applied to the ion guide to confine the ions through the ion guide. An excitation RF field is applied to one pair of rods of the ion guide. The ions undergo dissociation when the applied excitation RF field is resonant with a secular frequency of the ions. The multipole ion guide is, but not limited to, a quadrupole, a hexapole, and an octopole.

  19. Scattering approach to dispersive atom-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalvit, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Messina, Riccardo [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Maia Neto, Paulo [INSTITUTO DE FISICA UFRJ; Lambrecht, Astrid [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL; Reynaud, Serge [LAB KASTLER BROSSEL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the scattering approach for the dispersive force on a ground state atom on top of a corrugated surface. We present explicit results to first order in the corrugation amplitude. A variety of analytical results are derived in different limiting cases, including the van der Waals and Casimir-Polder regimes. We compute numerically the exact first-order dispersive potential for arbitrary separation distances and corrugation wavelengths, for a Rubidium atom on top of a silicon or gold corrugated surface. We consider in detail the correction to the proximity force approximation, and present a very simple approximation algorithm for computing the potential.

  20. Stellar Velocity Dispersion of the Leo A Dwarf Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Michael J. Kurtz

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the first stellar velocity dispersion of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, \\sigma = 9.3 +- 1.3 km/s. We derive the velocity dispersion from the radial velocities of ten young B supergiants and two HII regions in the central region of Leo A. We estimate a projected mass of 8 +- 2.7 x10^7 solar masses within a radius of 2 arcmin, and a mass to light ratio of at least 20 +- 6 M_sun/L_sun. These results imply Leo A is at least ~80% dark matter by mass.

  1. Fractional Power-Law Spatial Dispersion in Electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb's law and Debye's screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type.

  2. Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ayub, M. K. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyunbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ahmad, Ali [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

  3. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  4. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  5. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  6. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  7. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

  8. Solid lithium-ion electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

  9. Voltage, stability and diffusion barrier differences between sodium-ion and lithium-ion intercalation materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Voltage, stability and diffusion barrier differences between sodium-ion and lithium-ion-ion systems. Introduction Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries1­4 have become a mainstay of the digital), much research has targeted the development and optimization of lithium-ion batteries, in particular

  10. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, Charles E. (Westmont, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  11. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  12. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

  13. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  14. Challenges for Na-ion Negative Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevrier, V. L.

    Na-ion batteries have been proposed as candidates for replacing Li-ion batteries. In this paper we examine the viability of Na-ion negative electrode materials based on Na alloys or hard carbons in terms of volumetric ...

  15. Advances in lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, John B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in Lithium-Ion Batteries Edited by Walter A. vanbook is intended for lithium-ion scientists and engineersof the state of the Lithium-ion art and in this they have

  16. MESON PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnetzer, S.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by (kaon yield)*/*?. Fig. 27 Ion chamber voltage vs. T-Bcoincidences. Fig. ? 8 Ion chamber voltage vs. E tag29 Measured charge on the Ion chamber per beam particle vs.

  17. 4th Generation ECR Ion Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyneis, Claude M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4th Generation ECR Ion Sources Claude M Lyneis, D. Leitner,to developing a 4 th generation ECR ion source with an RFover current 3 rd generation ECR ion sources, which operate

  18. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  19. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  20. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, B. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Grossbard, N. J. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  1. Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    . Additionally, a sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer dispersion test was conducted by releasing SF6 from a line source within the burn and measuring SF6 concentrations at the supertower. Supertower Instrumentation (TGAPS) connected to a CO2 closed path Licor LI-6262 and a SF6 detector (7 inlet locations) ·Cambell CSAT

  2. Distinct spinon and holon dispersions in photoemission spectral functions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES Distinct spinon and holon dispersions in photoemission spectral functions from one particles) called spinons and holons. Experimentalists have long sought to verify this effect. Angle quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon­holon two-peak- like structure. Despite extensive ARPES experiments

  3. Effect of Dispersant on Asphaltene Suspension Dynamics: Aggregation and Sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    processes, most involving scat- tering, either dynamic light scattering, static light scattering, or neutron on this aggregation behavior through the use of dynamic light scattering, showing that both the amount of dispersant asphaltene suspensions. The light scattering results match well with those obtained through the macroscopic

  4. Combined dispersive/interference spectroscopy for producing a vector spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring the spectral properties of broadband waves that combines interferometry with a wavelength disperser having many spectral channels to produce a fringing spectrum. Spectral mapping, Doppler shifts, metrology of angles, distances and secondary effects such as temperature, pressure, and acceleration which change an interferometer cavity length can be measured accurately by a compact instrument using broadband illumination. Broadband illumination avoids the fringe skip ambiguities of monochromatic waves. The interferometer provides arbitrarily high spectral resolution, simple instrument response, compactness, low cost, high field of view and high efficiency. The inclusion of a disperser increases fringe visibility and signal to noise ratio over an interferometer used alone for broadband waves. The fringing spectrum is represented as a wavelength dependent 2-d vector, which describes the fringe amplitude and phase. Vector mathematics such as generalized dot products rapidly computes average broadband phase shifts to high accuracy. A Moire effect between the interferometer's sinusoidal transmission and the illumination heterodynes high resolution spectral detail to low spectral detail, allowing the use of a low resolution disperser. Multiple parallel interferometer cavities of fixed delay allow the instantaneous mapping of a spectrum, with an instrument more compact for the same spectral resolution than a conventional dispersive spectrometer, and not requiring a scanning delay.

  5. High-index-core Bragg fibers: dispersion Juan A. Monsoriu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    . P. Yeh, A. Yariv, and E. Marom, "Theory of Bragg fiber," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1196-1201 (1978). 4. Y. Xu, G.X. Ouyang, R.K. Lee, and A. Yariv, "Asymptotic Matrix Theory of Bragg Fibers," J. LightwaveHigh-index-core Bragg fibers: dispersion properties Juan A. Monsoriu Departamento de Física

  6. Physicalbiological coupling in spore dispersal of kelp forest macroalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    Physical­biological coupling in spore dispersal of kelp forest macroalgae $ Brian Gaylorda produced by macroalgae that reside in kelp forests are complicated and laced with feedbacks. Here we before they contact the seafloor. Morphologies and material properties of canopy forming kelps may also

  7. Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction --Nonlinear stability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ee, Bernard Kuowei

    Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction -- Nonlinear stability analysis Bernard K. Ee hydraulic solutions of the forced Korteweg de-Vries equation is investigated here. For numerical convenience is destabilized by a hydraulic instability in which superexponential growth occurs prior to satura- tion

  8. Development oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniaxial tension creep response is reported for an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Acceptable creep response is obtained at 900{degrees}C.

  9. Electrical properties of dispersions of graphene in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, O. R., E-mail: othon.monteiro@bakerhughes.com [Baker Hughes, 14990 Yorktown Plaza Dr., Houston, Texas 77040 (United States)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersions of graphene in mineral oil have been prepared and electrical conductivity and permittivity have been measured. The direct current (DC) conductivity of the dispersions depends on the surface characteristics of the graphene platelets and followed a percolation model with a percolation threshold ranging from 0.05 to 0.1?wt. %. The difference in DC conductivities can be attributed to different states of aggregation of the graphene platelets and to the inter-particle electron transfer, which is affected by the surface radicals. The frequency-dependent conductivity (?(?)) and permittivity (?(?)) were also measured. The conductivity of dispersions with particle contents much greater than the percolation threshold remains constant and equal to the DC conductivity at low frequencies ? with and followed a power-law ?(?)???{sup s} dependence at very high frequencies with s?0.9. For dispersions with graphene concentration near the percolation threshold, a third regime was displayed at intermediate frequencies indicative of interfacial polarization consistent with Maxwell-Wagner effect typically observed in mixtures of two (or more) phases with very distinct electrical and dielectric properties.

  10. Heavy tailed K distributions imply a fractional advection dispersion equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meerschaert, Mark M.

    Dispersion Equation (FADE) to model contaminant transport in porous media. This equation characterizes, and Particle Jumps Equations of contaminant transport in porous media are based on assumptions about hydraulic governing groundwater flow (e.g., Freeze and Cherry, 1979): h K v - = (1) where v is average velocity

  11. Oxide dispersion strengthening of nickel electrodeposits for microsystem applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janek, Richard P. (Owens Technology Inc., Palo Alto, CA); Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Michael, R. P.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide dispersion strengthened nickel (ODS-Ni) electrodeposits were fabricated to net shape in a nickel sulfamate bath using the LIGA process. A 20 g/l charge of 10 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder was suspended in the bath during electrodeposition to produce specimens containing an approximately 0.001-0.02 volume fraction dispersion of the alumina particulate. Mechanical properties are compared to baseline specimens fabricated using an identical sulfamate bath chemistry without the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder charge. Results reveal that the as-deposited ODS-Ni exhibited significantly higher yield strength and ultimate tensile strength than the baseline material. This increase in as-deposited strength is attributed to Orowan strengthening. The ODS-Ni also showed improved retention of room temperature strength after annealing over a range of temperatures up to 600 C. Microscopy revealed that this resistance to anneal softening was due to an inhibition of grain growth in the presence of the oxide dispersion. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that the properties of the dispersion strengthened deposit were uniform through its thickness, even in narrow, high aspect ratio structures. At elevated temperatures, the strength of the ODS-Ni was approximately three times greater than that of the baseline material although with a significant reduction in hot ductility.

  12. THE EFFECT OF TRANSVERSE MIXING ON TRACER DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Hardware Data Acquisition And Analysis Software Experimental Procedure Analysis Procedure Results: Taylor. The theoretical response for linear Taylor dispersion was matched to the data to determine the non-linear Of Tracer Valve Constant-pressure Reservoir Design Schematic Drawing Of Electrode Circuit Results: Run 16

  13. Refraction of dispersive shock waves , V.V. Khodorovskii 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a dispersive counterpart of the classical gas dynamics problem of the interaction of a shock wave investigations, most notably in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) (see, e.g., [8, 32, 6]), where these waves problem involves complicated analysis of nonlinear multiphase wavetrains (see e.g. [22] for the Kd

  14. air pollution dispersion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution dispersion First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Environmental Pollution Air...

  15. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

  16. Sodium Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Sodium  Ion  Batteries   One   of   the   challenges  of   sodium   ion   batteries   is   identification   of  for   use   in   batteries.   Our   recent   work   has  

  17. Creating a GPS for aluminum ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Released: August 14, 2014 New approach pinpoints locations in simple zeolite catalysts Aluminum EXAFS and zeolite...

  18. An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearnsberger, David Wayne

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    phantom compared favorably to the derived organ absorbed doses measured by the Panasonic thermoluminescence dosimeters and with Monte Carlo �N� Particle modeled results. Additionally, a Victoreen 450P pressurized ion chamber measured...

  19. Permeability and Dispersion Coefficients in Rocks with Fracture Network - 12140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.K.; Htway, M.Z. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow and solute transport are considered for a rock medium with a fracture network with regard to the effective permeability and the dispersion coefficients. To investigate the effects of individual fractures a three-fracture system is chosen in which two are parallel and the third one connects the two at different angles. Specifically the micro-cell boundary-value problems(defined through multiple scale analysis) are solved numerically by using finite elements to calculate the permeability and dispersion coefficients. It is shown that the permeability depends significantly on the pattern of the fracture distribution and the dispersion coefficient is influenced by both the externally imposed pressure gradient (which also reflects the flow field) and the direction of the gradient of solute concentration on the macro-scale. From the calculations of the permeability and dispersion coefficients for solute in a rock medium with a fracture network the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium depends on the primary orientation of the fracture network and is influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The cross permeability, e.g., permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the external pressure gradient is rather insensitive to the orientation of the fracture network. 3. Calculation of permeability is most efficiently achieved with optimal discretization across individual fractures and is rather insensitive to the discretization along the fracture.. 4. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient Dxx of a fractured medium depends on both the macro-scale concentration gradient and the direction of the flow (pressure gradient). Hence both features must be considered when investigating solute transport in a fractured medium. (authors)

  20. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

  1. Multi-source ion funnel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Keqi; Belov, Mikhail B.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for introducing ions generated in a region of relatively high pressure into a region of relatively low pressure by providing at least two electrospray ion sources, providing at least two capillary inlets configured to direct ions generated by the electrospray sources into and through each of the capillary inlets, providing at least two sets of primary elements having apertures, each set of elements having a receiving end and an emitting end, the primary sets of elements configured to receive a ions from the capillary inlets at the receiving ends, and providing a secondary set of elements having apertures having a receiving end and an emitting end, the secondary set of elements configured to receive said ions from the emitting end of the primary sets of elements and emit said ions from said emitting end of the secondary set of elements. The method may further include the step of providing at least one jet disturber positioned within at least one of the sets of primary elements, providing a voltage, such as a dc voltage, in the jet disturber, thereby adjusting the transmission of ions through at least one of the sets of primary elements.

  2. Ion acoustic waves in the plasma with the power-law q-distribution in nonextensive statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liyan, Liu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dispersion relation and Landau damping of ion acoustic waves in the collisionless magnetic-field-free plasma if it is described by the nonextensive q-distributions of Tsallis statistics. We show that the increased numbers of superthermal particles and low velocity particles can explain the strengthened and weakened modes of Landau damping, respectively, with the q-distribution. When the ion temperature is equal to the electron temperature, the weakly damped waves are found to be the distributions with small values of q.

  3. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  4. Ion beam extractor with counterbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing; Standiford, Keith; King, Tsu-Jae; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractor system for a plasma ion source has a single (first) electrode with one or more apertures, or a pair of spaced electrodes, a first or plasma forming electrode and a second or extraction electrode, with one or more aligned apertures. The aperture(s) in the first electrode (or the second electrode or both) have a counterbore on the downstream side (i.e. away from the plasma ion source or facing the second electrode). The counterbored extraction system reduces aberrations and improves focusing. The invention also includes an ion source with the counterbored extraction system, and a method of improving focusing in an extraction system by providing a counterbore.

  5. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  6. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, Barry A. [Isys, 2727 Walsh Ave., Suite 103, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States); Ruffell, John P. [Group 3, LLC, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  7. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  8. Surface trap for ytterbium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jonathan A. (Jonathan Alan)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted an experiment to load a shallow planar ion trap from a cold atom source of Ytterbium using photoionization. The surface trap consisted of a three-rod radio frequency Paul trap fabricated using standard printed ...

  9. amine-terminated water-dispersible fept: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amine-terminated water-dispersible fept First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Water Dispersible Silanes for Wettability Modification of Polysilicon...

  10. Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of...

  11. Stimuli-Tailored Dispersion State of Aqueous Carbon Nanotube Suspensions and Solid Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etika, Krishna

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -controlled dispersion of carbon nanotubes could have a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, sensing, and drug and gene delivery systems. Furthermore, this dissertation also contains a published study focused on controlling the dispersion state of carbon black (CB...

  12. Energy Dispersed Large Data Wave Maps in 2 + 1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterbenz, Jacob; Tataru, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Finite S Norm Wave-Maps and Energy Dispersion 10.1renormalization of large energy wave maps. In: Journées “of Finite S Norm Wave-Maps and Energy Dispersion In this

  13. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes in organic media for polymer:fullerene photovoltaic devices Gwang photovoltaic device are fabricated using homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a polymer. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials promise the production

  14. Heat transfer to impacting drops and post critical heat flux dispersed flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Gail E.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer to drops impacting on a hot surface is examined in context of dispersions of flowing, boiling fluids. The liquid contribution to heat transfer from a hot tube to a two-phase dispersion is formulated in terms ...

  15. Critique of Burnett-Frind dispersion tensor for axisymmetric porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note provides a critique of the Burnett and Frind (1987) dispersion tensor for porous media with axial symmetry based on a previous publication by the authors (Lichtner et aI., 2002). In this work a new approach is used based on unit eigenvectors which simplifies the analysis. It is demonstrated that the Burnett-Frind dispersion tensor, although acceptable for small values of the vertical velocity, produces the incorrect behavior for both longitudinal and transverse dispersivity as the flow velocity varies from parallel to perpendicular to the axis of symmetry. A new form of the dispersion tensor is derived for axially symmetric porous media involving four dispersivity coefficients corresponding to longitudinal and transverse dispersion in horizontal and vertical directions, defined as perpendicular and parallel to the axis of symmetry, respectively. This new dispersion tensor corrects two fundamental problems with the dispersion tensor proposed by Burnett and Frind (1987) for axial symmetric media.

  16. On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV) Spectroscopy On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV) Spectroscopy...

  17. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  18. Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

  19. CFD Simulations of Joint Urban Atmospheric Dispersion Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R; Humphreys III, T; Chan, S

    2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the understanding of urban wind flow and dispersion processes has gained increasing attention over recent years. While many of the simpler dispersion models are based on a set of prescribed meteorology to calculate dispersion, the CFD approach has the ability of coupling the wind field to dispersion processes. This has distinct advantages when very detailed results are required, such as for the case where the releases occur around buildings and within urban areas. CFD also has great flexibility as a testbed for turbulence models, which has important implications for atmospheric dispersion problems. In the spring of 2003, a series of dispersion field experiments (Joint Urban 2003) were conducted at Oklahoma City (Allwine, et. al, 2004). These experiments were complimentary to the URBAN 2000 field studies at Salt Lake City (Shinn, et. al, 2000) in that they will provide a second set of comprehensive field data for evaluation of CFD as well as for other dispersion models. In contrast to the URBAN 2000 experiments that were conducted entirely at night, these new field studies took place during both daytime and nighttime thus including the possibility of convective as well as stable atmospheric conditions. Initially several CFD modeling studies were performed to provide guidance for the experimental team in the selection of release sites and in the deployment of wind and concentration sensors. Also, while meteorological and concentration measurements were taken over the greater Oklahoma City urban area, our CFD calculations were focused on the near field of the release point. The proximity of the source to a large commercial building and to the neighboring buildings several of which have multistories, present a significant challenge even for CFD calculations involving grid resolutions as fine as 1 meter. A total of 10 Intensive Observations Periods (IOP's) were conducted within the 2003 field experiments. SF6 releases in the form of puffs or continuous sources were disseminated over 6 daytime and 4 nighttime episodes. Many wind and concentration sensors were used to provide wind and SF6 data over both long and short time-averaging periods. In addition to the usual near surface measurements, data depicting vertical profiles of wind and concentrations adjacent to the outside walls of several buildings were also taken. Also of interest were observations of the trajectory of balloons that were deployed close to the tracer release area. Many of the balloons released exhibit extremely quick ascents up from ground level to the top of buildings, thus implying highly convective conditions. In this paper we will present some simulations that were performed during the planning of the field experiments. The calculations were based on two possible release sites at the intersections of Sheridan and Robinson, and Broadway and Sheridan. These results provided initial information on flow and dispersion patterns, which could be used to guide optimal placement of sensors at appropriate locations. We will also discuss results of more recent simulations for several releases in which reliable data is available. These simulations will be compared with the near field data taken from the wind sensors as well as the time-averaged data from the concentration sensors. Among the other topics discussed are initial and boundary conditions used in the simulations, adaptation of building GIS data for CFD modeling and analysis of field data.

  20. An Experimental Study of Cold Helium Dispersion in Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Riddone, G

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) presently under construction at CERN, will contain about 100 tons of helium mostly located in the underground tunnel and in caverns. Potential failure modes of the accelerator, which may be followed by helium discharge to the tunnel, have been identified and the corresponding helium flows calculated. To verify the analytical calculations of helium dispersion in the tunnel, a dedicated test set-up has been built. It represents a section of the LHC tunnel at a scale 1:13 and is equipped with a controllable helium relief system enabling the simulation of different scenarios of the LHC cryogenic system failures. Corresponding patterns of cold helium dispersion in air have been observed and analysed with respect to oxygen deficiency hazard. We report on the test set-up and the measurement results, which have been scaled to real LHC conditions.

  1. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  2. Non-Darcian forced convection in porous media with anisotropic dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adnani, P.; Catton, I.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective heat transfer in a particle packed tube is modeled in this paper. Axial and radial dispersion are both included in the governing equations. Results are compared with experimental data, and with previously developed models that did not include axial dispersion. It is shown that heat transfer in the thermally developing region is affected by axial dispersion when Peclet number is smaller than 10. Graphic results are provided to show the importance of axial dispersion for various Peclet numbers. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Simulation of miscible displacement in soils and sensitivity to the dispersion coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smajstrla, Allen George

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the porous media to the magnitude of the dispersion coefficient in the diffusion-type dispersion equation. Three simulation models were developed. One was capable of simulating unsaturated vertical infiltration of water into a homo- geneous, isotropic... porous media. The second simulated saturated dispersion of solutes during the steady state flow of water through homogeneous, isotropic porous media. The third general dispersion simulation model combined the aforementioned two and was capable...

  4. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  5. Electrostatic ion waves in non-Maxwellian pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arshad, Kashif [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shadhra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shadhra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic ion waves are studied for non-Maxwellian or Lorentzian distributed unmagnetized pair-ion plasmas. The Vlasov equation is solved and damping rates are calculated for electrostatic waves in Lorentzian pair-ion plasmas. The damping rates of the electrostatic ion waves are studied for the equal and different ion temperatures of pair-ion species. It is found that the Landau damping rate of the ion plasma wave is increased in Lorentzian plasmas in comparison with Maxwellian pair-ion plasmas. The numerical results are also presented for illustration by taking into account the parameters reported in fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  6. A dispersion curve study of dredged spoil basin inlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Male, Robert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 19 IV. PROCEDURES AND TECHNIOUHS Test Procenures. Interpretation of Dispersion Curves. Data Analysis, 26 26 28 37 V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. VI. DISCUSSION. The Model as a Settling Tank Relationship to Dredging Practice. 58 58 70 VII... all the spoil must be confined. The additional costs to be incurred in that region over ten years vary from $2. 62 million to $12. 87 million according to the confinement scheme. In the USA, most of the dredging projects are under the con- trol...

  7. GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Jeffrey Keith

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . CHAPTER vll I INTRODUCTION. II REVIEW OF PREVIOUS RESEARCH III JUSTIFICATION AND OBJECTIVES. 3. 1 Justification. 3. 2 Project Objectives. IV METHODOLOGY . . . 15 . 15 . . . 17 . . 19 4. 1 The Study Site. 4. 2 Pollution Plume Dispersion Data.... 4. 3 Spatial and Demographic Data. 4. 4 Data Integration. V RESULTS. . . . . 19 . . . 21 . . . 36 . . 45 VI CONCLUSIONS. . . . . 60 6. 1 Conclusions, 6. 2 Room for Improvement. REFERENCES. APPENDIX A: Charts and Data Sheets. 60 . . . 61...

  8. Preliminary assessment of regional dispersivity of the Hanford basalts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaVenue, Arthur Marsh

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ACKNONLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the members of my graduate research committee, Dr. Patrick Domenico, Dr. Earl Hoskins, and Dr. James Russell for their corvaents and discussions during this study. I am thankful to Rockwell International-Hanford Operations... level nuclear waste repository, it is essential that the dispersivities be determined in order to aid in modelling studies that will be needed to characterize the site. GENERAL PHYSICAL NATURE OF HANFORD SITE Regional Setting The United States...

  9. Global regularity of critical Schrödinger maps: subthreshold dispersed energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smith

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy-critical Schroedinger map initial value problem with smooth initial data from R^2 into the sphere S^2. Given sufficiently energy-dispersed data with subthreshold energy, we prove that the system admits a unique global smooth solution. This improves earlier analogous conditional results. The key behind this improvement lies in exploiting estimates on the commutator of the Schroedinger map and harmonic map heat flows.

  10. Hanford atmospheric dispersion data: 1960 through June 1967

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickola, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Glantz, C.S.; Kerns, R.E.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents dispersion and supporting meteorological data from experiments conducted over relatively flat terrain at Hanford, Washington from January 1960 through June 1967. The nature of the experiments, the sampling grids, and the tracer techniques used are described in the narrative portion of the document. Appendices contain the time-integrated concentrations for samplers within the plumes, summaries of the concentration distributions across the plumes, and wind and temperature profile data for each release period. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Estimating dispersion from a tornado vortex and mesocyclone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, A.H.; Hunter, C.H.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling is required to ensure that a postulated breach in radionuclide storage containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from a tornado strike of Fujita-scale intensity F2 or higher will not result in an unacceptable dose to individuals. Fujita-scale tornado descriptions are included in Appendix A of this report. Dispersion models previously used at SRS for estimating dispersion following a tornado strike were developed by D.W. Pepper in 1975 (DP-1387, Dispersion of Small Particles) and H.R. Haynes and D.W. Taylor in 1983 (DPST-82-982, Estimating Doses from Tornado Winds). Research conducted in 1983 on the formation and evolution of tornadic thunderstorms has lead to a more complete understanding of the tornado vortex and associated persistent updraft and downdraft regions within the parent thunderstorm. To ensure that appropriate, contemporary methods are used for safety analysis, the Pepper model and the Haynes and Taylor model were evaluated with respect to current knowledge of circulations within tornadic thunderstorms. Pepper`s model is complex numerically but contains most of the desired physical parameterizations. Haynes and Taylor`s model is used with the Puff-Plume model (an emergency response model on the Weather INformation and Display System at SRS) and has provisions for radionuclide deposition and rainout. Haynes and Taylor assumed heavy rain following the tornado for a period of ten minutes, followed by a lighter rain for another ten minutes, then no rain for the period when the material is transported to 100 km downwind. However, neither model incorporates the effects of a nearby thunderstorm downdraft.

  12. Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dae Hoe

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrode for Sodium Ion Batteries. Chemistry of Materialsnickel fluoride in Li ion batteries. Electrochimica Actafor advanced lithium ion batteries. Materials Science and

  13. Atmospheric dispersion estimates in the vicinity of buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Fosmire, C.J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model describing atmospheric dispersion in the vicinity of buildings was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the late 1980s. That model has recently undergone additional peer review. The reviewers identified four areas of concern related to the model and its application. This report describes revisions to the model in response to the reviewers concerns. Model revision involved incorporation of explicit treatment of enhanced dispersion at low wind speeds in addition to explicit treatment of enhanced dispersion at high speeds resulting from building wakes. Model parameters are evaluated from turbulence data. Experimental diffusion data from seven reactor sites are used for model evaluation. Compared with models recommended in current NRC guidance to licensees, the revised model is less biased and shows more predictive skill. The revised model is also compared with two non-Gaussian models developed to estimate maximum concentrations in building wakes. The revised model concentration predictions are nearly the same as the predictions of the non-Gaussian models. On the basis of these comparisons of the revised model concentration predictions with experimental data and the predictions of other models, the revised model is found to be an appropriate model for estimating concentrations in the vicinity of buildings.

  14. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, P.O. box 155 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  15. HUNTING FOR YOUNG DISPERSING STAR CLUSTERS IN IC 2574

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellerin, Anne [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Meyer, Martin M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, CRAWLEY WA 6009 (Australia); Calzetti, Daniella [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Harris, Jason, E-mail: apellerin@mta.ca, E-mail: martin.meyer@uwa.edu.au, E-mail: calzetti@astro.umass.edu, E-mail: jharris@30doradus.org [Illumina, Inc., 25861 Industrial Blvd, Hayward, CA 94545 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolving stellar groups are very difficult to detect using traditional surface photometry techniques. We have developed a method to find and characterize non-compact stellar systems in galaxies where the young stellar population can be spatially resolved. By carrying out photometry on individual stars, we are able to separate the luminous blue stellar population from the star field background. The locations of these stars are used to identify groups by applying the HOP algorithm, which are then characterized using color-magnitude and stellar density radial profiles to estimate age, size, density, and shape. We test the method on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys archival images of IC 2574 and find 75 dispersed stellar groups. Of these, 20 highly dispersed groups are good candidates for dissolving systems. We find few compact systems with evidence of dissolution, potentially indicating that star formation in this galaxy occurs mostly in unbound clusters or groups. These systems indicate that the dispersion rate of groups and clusters in IC 2574 is at most 0.45 pc Myr{sup -1}. The location of the groups found with HOP correlate well with H I contour map features. However, they do not coincide with H I holes, suggesting that those holes were not created by star-forming regions.

  16. A Dispersive Treatment of $K_{\\ell4}$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Stoffer, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $K_{\\ell4}$ decays offer several reasons of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of $\\pi\\pi$-scattering lengths; they provide the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of ChPT; one form factor is directly related to the chiral anomaly, which can be measured here. We present a dispersive treatment of $K_{\\ell4}$ decays that provides a resummation of $\\pi\\pi$- and $K\\pi$-rescattering effects. The free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. The matching to ChPT at NLO and NNLO enables us to determine the LECs $L_1^r$, $L_2^r$ and $L_3^r$. With recently published data from NA48/2, the LEC $L_9^r$ can be determined as well. In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as a rescattering effect beyond NNLO.

  17. Creation of the model and implementation of the simulation of dispersion of air pollution in urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    Creation of the model and implementation of the simulation of dispersion of air pollution in urban..............................................................................................................1 1.2. Types of models of dispersion of air pollution was creation of the mathematical model and application of the simulation of dispersion of vehicular air

  18. Ion-Acoustic Solitons in Bi-Ion Dusty Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Prudskikh

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of ion-acoustic solitons in a warm dusty plasma containing two ion species is investigated theoretically. Using an approach based on the Korteveg-de-Vries equation, it is shown that the critical value of the negative ion density that separates the domains of existence of compressi- on and rarefaction solitons depends continuously on the dust density. A modified Korteveg-de Vries equation for the critical density is derived in the higher order of the expansion in the small parameter. It is found that the nonlinear coefficient of this equation is positive for any values of the dust density and the masses of positive and negative ions. For the case where the negative ion density is close to its critical value, a soliton solution is found that takes into account both the quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. The propagation of a solitary wave of arbitrary amplitude is investigated by the quasi-potential method. It is shown that the range of the dust densities around the critical value within which solitary waves with positive and negative potentials can exist simultaneously is relatively wide.

  19. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  20. Voltage, Stability and Diffusion Barrier Differences between Sodium-ion and Lithium-ion Intercalation Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Shyue Ping

    To evaluate the potential of Na-ion batteries, we contrast in this work the difference between Na-ion and Li-ion based intercalation chemistries in terms of three key battery properties—voltage, phase stability and diffusion ...

  1. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rechargeable Sodium-Ion Batteries: Potential Alternatives toCurrent Lithium-Ion Batteries. Adv. Energy Mater. 2 (2012):J. , Rojo, T. Na-ion Batteries, Recent Advances and Present

  2. Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

  3. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternatives to Current Lithium-Ion Batteries. Adv. EnergyMaterials for Lithium Ion Batteries. Materials Matters. 7 4.to the Study of Lithium Ion Batteries. J. Solid State

  4. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  5. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, Wei

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  7. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Igor B., E-mail: stepanovib@tpu.ru; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  8. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  9. Trapped-ion Lissajous trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Rossetti; G. D. de Moraes Neto; J. Carlos Egues; M. H. Y. Moussa

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a protocol for generating Lissajous curves with a trapped ion by engineering Rashba- and the Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit interactions in a Paul trap. The unique anisotropic Rashba $\\alpha_{x}$, $\\alpha_{y}$ and Dresselhaus $\\beta_{x}$, $\\beta_{y}$ couplings afforded by our setup also enables us to obtain an "unusual" Zitterbewegung, i.e., the semiconductor analog of the relativistic trembling motion of electrons, with cycloidal trajectories in the absence of magnetic fields. We have also introduced bounded SO interactions, confined to an upper-bound vibrational subspace of the Fock states, as an additional mechanism to manipulate the Lissajous motion of the trapped ion. Finally, we accounted for dissipative effects on the vibrational degrees of freedom of the ion and find that the Lissajous trajectories are still robust and well defined for realistic parameters.

  10. Tachyon Physics with Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tony E; Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been predicted that particles with imaginary mass, called tachyons, would be able to travel faster than the speed of light. So far, there has not been any experimental evidence for tachyons in either natural or engineered systems. Here, we propose how to experimentally simulate Dirac tachyons with trapped ions. Quantum measurement on a Dirac particle simulated by a trapped ion causes it to have an imaginary mass so that it may travel faster than the effective speed of light. We show that a Dirac tachyon must have spinor-motion entanglement in order to be superluminal. We also show that it exhibits significantly more Klein tunneling than a normal Dirac particle. We provide numerical simulations with realistic ion systems and show that our scheme is feasible with current technology.

  11. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  12. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, N. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Hussain, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  13. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangan, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM); Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  14. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  15. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  16. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  17. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  18. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  19. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Abstract: Sodium ion (Na+) batteries...

  20. Proceedings of the 8th High Energy Heavy Ion Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris Ed, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a high pressure ion chamber. Several of the gas modulesenergy measurement in the ion chamber. The calibrations werefield Frisch grid ion chamber, which is operated with

  1. Ion Energy Distribution in Collisionless and Collisional, Capacitive RF Sheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sheath 3 Model of Collisionless Ion Energy Distributions 3.1Ion Energy Distributions in Collisionless and Collisional,Fall 2012 Ion Energy Distributions in Collisionless and

  2. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Abstract: Differential ion...

  3. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Abstract: Traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TW IMS) is a...

  4. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced...

  5. alloy ion source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

  6. ambient ion sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

  7. Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Bradley Keith

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , as shown by Equation 3. f(z) = exp ?, + exp? Y This curve represents the distribution of pollutant in the y-z plane. At any point y, a fraction of the total area of the curve [1] is determined The width of the curve depends on o?, a dispersion... the terminal settling velocity. Equation 6 and 7 are used. C p p dp g 18' where: t-o. ss, 'I C = 1+ ? 2. 514+ 0. 8e d (Eq. 6) (Eq 7) V, = Terminal Settling Velocity [m/s] C = Cunningham's Correction Factor [1/1] p, = density; 1500 [kg/m'] ) = gas...

  8. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  9. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacko, Robert E. (North Huntingdon, PA); Tilbrook, Roger W. (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  10. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Rishikesh, E-mail: rishikesh.yadav62@gmail.com; Pandey, Devendra K., E-mail: devendrakphy@gmail.com [School of Nanotechnology, Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidalaya, Bhopal, M.P. (India); Khare, P. S., E-mail: purnimaswarup@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidalaya, Bhopal M.P. (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8?m to 0.41?m.

  11. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7 Radiation dose was calculated assuming complete release of the building inventory as information was lacking regarding the portion of the building inventory expected to be released. Thus the results are derived using an extremely conservative release as documented in the Preliminary Hazard Screening report.7 To more closely approximate the result of a release, one must estimate the fraction of the total inventory released and multiply the results described above by that fraction. An example of how this calculation is accomplished is provided. Should an actual uncontrolled release occur, the results of this modeling effort could only be used to establish a rough order-of-magnitude for the event.

  12. Dispersion toughened ceramic composites and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Lauf, R.J.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic composites exhibiting increased fracture toughness are produced by the simultaneous codeposition of silicon carbide and titanium disilicide by chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of hydrogen, methyltrichlorosilane and titanium tetrachloride is introduced into a furnace containing a substrate such as graphite or silicon carbide. The thermal decomposition of the methyltrichlorosilane provides a silicon carbide matrix phase and the decomposition of the titanium tetrachloride provides a uniformly dispersed second phase of the intermetallic titanium disilicide within the matrix phase. The fracture toughness of the ceramic composite is in the range of about 6.5 to 7.0 MPa..sqrt..m which represents a significant increase over that of silicon carbide.

  13. Implications of various dispersants on biofilm clean up processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardwood, E.S.; Therrien, J.K.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbiologically fouled industrial cooling water system was investigated utilizing a portable corrosion and fouling monitor according to the NACE RP0189-951 Standard. Baseline data was established and at which time the monitor was subjected to various dispersants (3) typically used for organic and microbiological deposit removal. The results of this in-field, side stream, experiment on a dynamic system will be presented. A number of key points and factors influencing the performance of the foulant clean up will also be discussed.

  14. Electrophoresis of colloidal dispersions in the low-salt regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Lobaskin; Burkhard Duenweg; Martin Medebach; Thomas Palberg; Christian Holm

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the electrophoretic mobility of spherical charged colloids in a low-salt suspension as a function of the colloidal concentration. Using an effective particle charge and a reduced screening parameter, we map the data for systems with different particle charges and sizes, including numerical simulation data with full electrostatics and hydrodynamics and experimental data for latex dispersions, on a single master curve. We observe two different volume fraction-dependent regimes for the electrophoretic mobility that can be explained in terms of the static properties of the ionic double layer.

  15. Computer simulation of the dispersion of carbon monoxide from roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado, Cesar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and stability 3) The wind speed is constant with height 4) Dispersion is independent of site topography The equations used in the model are, for crosswinds, 12. 5~ & O & 90', 4. 24 1 z+h 2 1 1 z-h 2& exp p ? ( ?) g+ exp ? ( ? ) j L Ro sino 2 CJ 2 0 z (34... to include az for vertical distances as small as 4 meters Same as above Pasquill-Gitford and empirical calibration o an initial az to 1. 5 meters Pasquill-Gifford None short (3 ? 10 mm) releases smooth terrain Same as above Same as above smooth...

  16. Dispersion toughened ceramic composites and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic composites exhibiting increased fracture toughness are produced by the simultaneous codeposition of silicon carbide and titanium disilicide by chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of hydrogen, methyltrichlorosilane and titanium tetrachloride is introduced into a furnace containing a substrate such as graphite or silicon carbide. The thermal decomposition of the methyltrichlorosilane provides a silicon carbide matrix phase and the decomposition of the titanium tetrachloride provides a uniformly dispersed second phase of the intermetallic titanium disilicide within the matrix phase. The fracture toughness of the ceramic composite is in the range of about 6.5 to 7.0 MPa.sqroot.m which represents a significant increase over that of silicon carbide.

  17. RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Walton; P. Goodell; C. Brashears; D. French; A. Kelts

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.

  18. Achromatic phase matching at third orders of dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richman, Bruce

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Achromatic phase-matching (APM) is used for efficiently multiplying the frequency of broad bandwidth light by using a nonlinear optical medium comprising a second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystal and stationary optical elements whose configuration, properties, and arrangement have been optimized to match the angular dispersion characteristics of the SHG crystal to at least the third order. These elements include prisms and diffraction gratings for directing an input light beam onto the SHG crystal such that each ray wavelength is aligned to match the phase-matching angle for the crystal at each wavelength of light to at least the third order and such that every ray wavelength overlap within the crystal.

  19. Electromagnetic energy dispersion in a 5D universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnett, John G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley 6009 WA Australia (Australia)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetism is analyzed in a 5D expanding universe. Compared to the usual 4D description of electrodynamics it can be viewed as adding effective charge and current densities to the universe that are static in time. These lead to effective polarization and magnetization of the vacuum, which is most significant at high redshift. Electromagnetic waves propagate but group and phase velocities are dispersive. This introduces a new energy scale to the cosmos. And as a result electromagnetic waves propagate with superluminal speeds but no energy is transmitted faster than the canonical speed of light c.

  20. Dispersive approach to hadronic light-by-light scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilberto Colangelo; Martin Hoferichter; Massimiliano Procura; Peter Stoffer

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on dispersion theory, we present a formalism for a model-independent evaluation of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In particular, we comment on the definition of the pion pole in this framework and provide a master formula that relates the effect from pi pi intermediate states to the partial waves for the process gamma^* gamma^* --> pi pi. All contributions are expressed in terms of on-shell form factors and scattering amplitudes, and as such amenable to an experimental determination.

  1. Electron acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma with kappa distributed ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devanandhan, S.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron acoustic solitary waves in a two component magnetized plasma consisting of fluid cold electrons and hot superthermal ions are considered. The linear dispersion relation for electron acoustic waves is derived. In the nonlinear regime, the energy integral is obtained by a Sagdeev pseudopotential analysis, which predicts negative solitary potential structures. The effects of superthermality, obliquity, temperature, and Mach number on solitary structures are studied in detail. The results show that the superthermal index {kappa} and electron to ion temperature ratio {sigma} alters the regime where solitary waves can exist. It is found that an increase in magnetic field value results in an enhancement of soliton electric field amplitude and a reduction in soliton width and pulse duration.

  2. Planarization of amorphous carbon films on patterned substrates using gas cluster ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao [Incubation Center, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Nagato, Keisuke; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya [Department of Engineering Synthesis, School of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tani, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Sakane, Yasuo [Western Digital Media Operations, 1710 Automation Parkway, San Jose, CA 95131 (United States)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface planarization and modification of a patterned surface were demonstrated using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). Grooves with 100-400 nm intervals were formed on amorphous carbon films using focused ion beams to study the special frequency dependence of the planarization. Also, line and space patterns were fabricated on Si substrates, and amorphous carbons were deposited as a model structure of discrete track media. Subsequently, surface planarization using Ar-GCIB was carried out. After GCIB irradiations, all of the grooves were completely removed, and a flat surface was realized. And it showed that GCIB irradiation planarized grooves without huge thickness loss. From the power spectrum density of an atomic force microscope, GCIB preferentially removed grooves with small intervals. It was found from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that surface planarization without severe damage in the amorphous carbon and magnetic layers was carried out with GCIB.

  3. The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, A. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

  4. NEGATIVE ION PRODUCTION BY BACK-SCATTERING FROM ALKALI-METAL SURFACES BOMBARDED BY IONS OF HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Peter Juergen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams (and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams (and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams,

  5. 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 203207 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1?×?10{sup 17} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2}. While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

  6. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM); Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  7. Reactive Ion Etch Users Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wager, John F.

    RIE Reactive Ion Etch Users Guide Eric Sundholm 2-22-2007 Standby Condition: be sure that the tool the chamber to remove any potential hazards before the chamber can be opened. 9. Pump Down Chamber Utilities Pump Chamber 10. Check pressure to start turbo pump Display Sensor Display a. Wait for pressure

  8. The Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guzey

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed new facility to collide high-energy electrons with beams of polarized protons/light nuclei and unpolarized nuclei. We overview the goals of the project and key measurements at the EIC. We also briefly comment on recent developments of the project.

  9. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  10. Ion Bernstein waves in a plasma with a kappa velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsengiyumva, F.; Mace, R. L.; Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Vlasov-Poisson model, a numerical investigation of the dispersion relation for ion Bernstein waves in a kappa-distributed plasma has been carried out. The dispersion relation is found to depend significantly on the spectral index of the ions, ?{sub i}, the parameter whose smallness is a measure of the departure from thermal equilibrium of the distribution function. Over all cyclotron harmonics, the typical Bernstein wave curves are shifted to higher wavenumbers (k) if ?{sub i} is reduced. For waves whose frequency lies above the lower hybrid frequency, ?{sub LH}, an increasing excess of superthermal particles (decreasing ?{sub i}) reduces the frequency, ?{sub peak}, of the characteristic peak at which the group velocity vanishes, while the associated k{sub peak} is increased. As the ratio of ion plasma to cyclotron frequency (?{sub pi}/?{sub ci}) is increased, the fall-off of ? at large k is smaller for lower ?{sub i} and curves are shifted towards larger wavenumbers. In the lower hybrid frequency band and harmonic bands above it, the frequency in a low-?{sub i} plasma spans only a part of the intraharmonic space, unlike the Maxwellian case, thus exhibiting considerably less coupling between adjacent bands for low ?{sub i}. It is suggested that the presence of the ensuing stopbands may be a useful diagnostic for the velocity distribution characteristics. The model is applied to the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer in which waves propagating perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field at frequencies between harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency are frequently observed.

  11. Advances in lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, John B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in Lithium-Ion Batteries Edited by Walter A. vantolerance of these batteries this is a curious omission andmysteries of lithium ion batteries. The book begins with an

  12. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  13. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided bymore »a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  14. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  15. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  16. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  17. Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model for the Graphite Anode in Li-Ion Batteries. Journal ofgraphite Chapters 2-3 have developed a method using ferrocene to characterize the SEI in lithium- ion batteries.

  18. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line- of-sight damage from target debris, neutron and gamma radiation. · Target injection: Heavy ions-liquid-protected target chambers with 30 yr lifetimes. · Robust final optics: Focusing magnets for ion beams avoid direct

  19. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  20. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  1. Velocity dispersion and upscaling in a laboratory-simulated VSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, P.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Marion, D. [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)] [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory and numerical study was conducted to investigate the impact of scale-dependent seismic wave propagation in randomly layered media, as applied to sonic logs, surface seismic, and vertical seismic profiles (VSPs). Analysis of the laboratory results (1) confirmed the wavelength dependence of velocities inferred from traveltimes, (2) indicated that scale effects can introduce traveltime errors when upscaling from logs to surface seismic and VSPs, and (3) illustrated that erroneous VSP interval velocities can result when layer thicknesses are smaller than about one-tenth of the wavelength. A simple approximate recipe is presented for estimating these traveltimes by successively filtering the medium using a running Backus average and ray theory. The scale-dependent dispersion was also predicted well using a more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation. The predicted traveltimes, using the approximate recipe, compare well with the times observed in the laboratory stack of steel and plastic layers and in numerical studies of stratified media. The dispersion curves predicted by the approximate method also show the overall behavior computed with the more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation.

  2. Low-pressure debris dispersal from scaled reactor cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.T.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During a severe nuclear reactor accident, degradation of the core may result in debris accumulating in the lower head. Upon failure of the head, the melt may be ejected under pressure through the cavity and into the containment building. Under low system pressure conditions, understanding the mechanisms of debris dispersal is instrumental in assessing the response of the containment to pressurized melt ejection. Current analytical approaches rely on empirical correlations for debris entrainment criteria and very simple gas flow patterns in the cavity. The work reported here is directed toward performing scaled experiments that will develop a data base for refined scaling analyses. Subsequently, extrapolations from the analyses to reactor scale may be performed to provide insight for accident predictions. Mechanistic models for gas flow through the cavity and entrainment of the debris are also being developed from the results presented here. The objective of the test matrix is to vary key parameters to assess the effect on the physical processes of dispersal of the melt from the reactor cavity at low system pressures.

  3. Dispersion modeling and analysis for multilayered open coaxial waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Nordebo; Gokhan Cinar; Stefan Gustafsson; Borje Nilsson

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a detailed modeling and analysis regarding the dispersion characteristics of multilayered open coaxial waveguides. The study is motivated by the need of improved modeling and an increased physical understanding about the wave propagation phenomena on very long power cables which has a potential industrial application with fault localization and monitoring. The electromagnetic model is based on a layer recursive computation of axial-symmetric fields in connection with a magnetic frill generator excitation that can be calibrated to the current measured at the input of the cable. The layer recursive formulation enables a stable and efficient numerical computation of the related dispersion functions as well as a detailed analysis regarding the analytic and asymptotic properties of the associated determinants. Modal contributions as well as the contribution from the associated branch-cut (non-discrete radiating modes) are defined and analyzed. Measurements and modeling of pulse propagation on an 82 km long HVDC power cable are presented as a concrete example. In this example, it is concluded that the contribution from the second TM mode as well as from the branch-cut is negligible for all practical purposes. However, it is also shown that for extremely long power cables the contribution from the branch-cut can in fact dominate over the quasi-TEM mode for some frequency intervals. The main contribution of this paper is to provide the necessary analysis tools for a quantitative study of these phenomena.

  4. Liver antioxidant and plasmatic immune responses in juvenile1 golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) exposed to dispersed crude oil2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) exposed to dispersed crude oil2 3 Thomas Milinkovitch1* , Awa Ndiaye2 , Wilfried Sanchez2 , Stéphane Le ; CD : Chemically Dispersed oil ; D : Dispersant solution ; MD : Mechanically Dispersed oil; WSF application is an oil spill response technique. To evaluate the environmental31 cost of this operation

  5. Enhanced immunological and detoxification responses in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, exposed1 to chemically dispersed oil2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to chemically dispersed oil2 3 Luna-Acosta, A.a,* , Kanan, R.b , Le Floch, S.b , Huet, V.a , Pineau P;Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemically dispersed oil on an20 of the chemical dispersant. After 2 days of exposure to chemically dispersed28 oil, alkylated naphthalenes

  6. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazaki, Akio [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kanagawa 244-0817 (Japan); Kim, Chanju [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chan, Jacky [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Mahjoubfar, Ata [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Goda, Keisuke, E-mail: goda@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Watanabe, Masahiro [Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kanagawa 244-0817 (Japan); Jalali, Bahram [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10??m or smaller defects on a moving target at 20?m/s within a scan width of 25?mm at a scan rate of 90.9?MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  7. Solution dewatering with concomitant ion removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Eric S.; Marshall, Douglas W.; Stone, Mark L.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the biggest needs in the separations and waste handling and reduction area is a method for dewatering ion-containing solutions. Unexpectedly, it has been found that phosphazene polymers can discriminate between water and metal ions, allowing water to pass through the membrane while retaining the ions. This unexpected result, along with the inherent chemical and thermal stability of the phosphazene polymers, yields a powerful tool for separating and dewatering metal-ion-containing solutions.

  8. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , describes R&D needs for heavy-ion accelerator, target and chamber R&D. 44 pages. Defines goals and criteria tasks) - ion accelerator technologies - chamber and maintenance technologies - pulsed power technologiesThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan

  9. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  10. Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

  11. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion Facility Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a position- sensitive ion chamber for online dosimetry, theBeam Exit Window The ion chamber (Fig. 3) monitors the beamthe nitrogen-filled ion chamber leave a trail of ions that

  12. Intense ion beam propagation in a reactor sized chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.L.; Deutsch, C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams in a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber filled with lowIon Fusion, Intense Ion Beams, Reaction Chamber. P.A.C.S.heavy ion beam propagation in the reaction chamber, Fus.

  13. Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry . Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion...

  14. Landau damping of ion acoustic wave in Lorentzian multi-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Plasma Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Shadra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Plasma Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Shadra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landau damping rates of ion acoustic wave are studied by using Vlasov-Poisson model for unmagnetized Lorentzian or kappa distributed plasma containing electrons, positively and negatively charged ions. It is found that the damping rate of ion acoustic wave is increased with the decrease of kappa (i.e., the spectral index of Lorentzian distribution) value. The damping rates of the electrostatic wave in multi-ion component plasmas are discussed in detail which depends on electron to ion temperature ratio and ions masses and density ratios. The numerical results are also shown by choosing some typical experimental parameters of multi-ion plasmas.

  15. The relation between seismic P- and S-wave velocity dispersion in saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Jizba, D. [CSTJF, Pau (France)] [CSTJF, Pau (France)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated rocks appears to be dominated by two mechanisms: the large scale mechanism modeled by Biot, and the local flow or squirt mechanism. The two mechanisms can be distinguished by the ratio of P- to S-wave dispersions, or more conveniently, by the ratio of dynamic bulk to shear compliance dispersions derived from the wave velocities. The authors` formulation suggests that when local flow dominates, the dispersion of the shear compliance will be approximately 4/15 the dispersion of the compressibility. When the Biot mechanism dominates, the constant of proportionality is much smaller. Their examination of ultrasonic velocities from 40 sandstones and granites shows that most, but not all, of the samples were dominated by local flow dispersion, particularly at effective pressures below 40 MPa.

  16. Electric Potential Near The Extraction Region In Negative Ion Sources With Surface Produced Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukano, A. [Monozukuri Department, Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology, 1-10-40 Higashi-Ohi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-0011 (Japan); Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential distribution near the extraction region in negative ion sources for the plasma with the surface produced negative ions is studied analytically. The potential is derived analytically by using a plasma-sheath equation, where negative ions produced on the Plasma Grid (PG) surface are considered in addition to positive ions and electrons. A negative potential peak is formed in the sheath region near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production of negative ions or for low energy negative ions. Negative ions are reflected by the negative potential peak near the PG and returned to the PG surface. This reflection mechanism by the negative potential peak possibly becomes a factor in negative ion extraction. It is also indicated that the potential difference between the plasma region and the wall decreases by the surface produced negative ions. This also has the possibility to contribute to the negative ion extraction.

  17. Study on space charge effect in an electrostatic ion analyzer applied to measure laser produced ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Sha, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundance of different ions produced by laser ion sources is usually analyzed by an electrostatic ion analyzer (EIA). Ion current intensities in the range of several mA/cm{sup 2} at the position of the EIA have been achieved from the laser ion source developed by the Institute of Modern Physics; this indicates that a noticeable influence of space charge effect during the ion transmission will occur. Hence, while the parameters of the EIA or the beams are changed, such as ion species, current intensity, the ions’ transmission efficiency through the EIA is different, which will result in an uncertainty in the estimation of the ions’ yields. Special attention is focused on this issue in this paper. Ion's transmissions through the EIA under different circumstances are studied with simulations and experiments, the results of which are consistent with each other.

  18. Distribution of ion current density on a rotating spherical cap substrate during ion-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marushka, Viktor; Zabeida, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.zabeida@polymtl.ca; Martinu, Ludvik [Engineering Physics Department, Polytechnique Montréal, P.O. Box 6079, Downtown station, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uniformity of ion density is critical for applications relying on the ion assisted deposition technique for the fabrication of the high quality thin films. The authors propose and describe here a method allowing one to calculate the ion density distribution on spherical substrate holders under stationary and rotating conditions for different positions of the ion source. The ion beam shape was approximated by a cos{sup n} function, and the ion current density was represented by a function inversely proportional to the distance from the ion source in accordance with our experimental results. As an example, a calculation of the current density distribution on the spherical cap substrate was performed for a broad beam ion source operated with an anode current of 3?A. The authors propose an approach for process optimization with respect to the ion source position and its inclination, in terms of uniformity and absolute value of the ion current density.

  19. Flow Intermittency, Dispersion, and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Anna, Pietro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Davy, Philippe

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the intermittency of fluid velocities in porous media and its relation to anomalous dispersion. Lagrangian velocities measured at equidistant points along streamlines are shown to form a spatial Markov process. As a consequence of this remarkable property, the dispersion of fluid particles can be described by a continuous time random walk with correlated temporal increments. This new dynamical picture of intermittency provides a direct link between the microscale flow, its intermittent properties, and non-Fickian dispersion.

  20. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierschenk, Thomas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Giulian, Raquel [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Afra, Boshra [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Rodriguez, Matias D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Schauries, D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Mudie, Stephen [Australian Synchrotron] [Australian Synchrotron; Pakarinen, Olli H [ORNL] [ORNL; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Osmani, Orkhan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany] [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Medvedev, Nikita [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Rethfield, Baerbel [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Ridgway, Mark C [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Kluth, Patrick [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  1. animal-mediated seed dispersal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stouffer, School of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Canterbury, Univ. of Extremadura, Av. Virgen del Puerto 2, ES-10600 Plasencia, Spain. Seed dispersal by animals Stouffer, Daniel...

  2. Distribution and Dispersal of the South Pacifc Tree, Fagraea Berteriana (Loganiaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Zachary R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    addressing  the  ridge  top  distribution phenomenon.    ADISTRIBUTION AND DISPERSAL OF THE SOUTH PACIFC TREE, FAGRAEAits  inter? island distribution in the South Pacific.   I 

  3. Dispersal of planets hosted in binaries, transitional members of multiple star systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Marzari; M. Barbieri

    2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explains why planets in binary star systems might have a lower frequency. A transient triple state of the binary causes the dispersal of planets.

  4. A model for P-wave attenuation and dispersion in a porous medium ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lll

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical models of attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow ...... anisotropic layered fluid- and gas-saturated sediments, Geophysics, 62,.

  5. Alfvenic modes in a bi-Maxwellian electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashir, M. F.; Iqbal, Z.; Aslam, I. [Salam Chair, Government College University Lahore, Punjab 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Government College University Lahore, Punjab 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair, Government College University Lahore, Punjab 54000 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing linearized Vlasov-Maxwell system, we derive a generalized dielectric tensor for a magnetized nonrelativistic bi-Maxwellian electron-ion plasma. Assuming low frequency waves in a low {beta} plasma, a new dispersion relation describing oblique propagation of the Alfvenic modes is determined, incorporating the temperature anisotropies of both the electrons and ions and their finite Larmor radii effects. From the resulting dispersion relation for kinetic Alfven waves, analytical expressions are determined for both the kinetic (v{sub t||}){sub i}<<{omega}/k{sub ||}<>v{sub t||e,i} and {beta}<

  6. Modulus dispersion and attenuation in tuff and granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haupt, R.W.; Martin, R.J. III; Tang, X.; Dupree, W.J. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of loading frequency, strain amplitude, and saturation on elastic moduli and attenuation have been measured in samples of the Topopah Spring Member welded tuff. Four different laboratory techniques have been used to determine Young`s modulus and extensional wave attenuation at frequencies ranging from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup 6} Hz. The results are compared with data acquired for Sierra White granite under the same conditions. The modulus and attenuation in room dry samples remain relatively constant over frequency. Frequency dependent attenuation and modulus dispersion are observed in the saturated samples and are attributed to fluid flow and sample size. The properties of tuff were independent of strain amplitude in room dry and saturated conditions.

  7. Chromatic and Dispersive Effects in Nonlinear Integrable Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Stephen D; Valishev, Alexander; Nagaitsev, Sergei N; Danilov, Viatcheslav V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accumulator rings and other circular hadron accelerators are susceptible to intensity-driven parametric instabilities because the zero-current charged particle dynamics are characterized by a single tune. Landau damping can suppress these instabilities, which requires energy spread in the beam or introducing nonlinear magnets such as octupoles. However, this approach reduces dynamic aperture. Nonlinear integrable optics can suppress parametric instabilities independent of energy spread in the distribution, while preserving the dynamic aperture. This novel approach promises to reduce particle losses and enable order-of-magnitude increases in beam intensity. In this paper we present results, obtained using the Lie operator formalism, on how chromaticity and dispersion affect particle orbits in integrable optics. We conclude that chromaticity in general breaks the integrability, unless the vertical and horizontal chromaticities are equal. Because of this, the chromaticity correcting magnets can be weaker ...

  8. The Photon Dispersion as an Indicator for New Physics ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bietenholz

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We first comment on the search for a deviation from the linear photon dispersion relation, in particular based on cosmic photons from Gamma Ray Bursts. Then we consider the non-commutative space as a theoretical concept that could lead to such a deviation, which would be a manifestation of Lorentz Invariance Violation. In particular we review a numerical study of pure U(1) gauge theory in a 4d non-commutative space. Starting from a finite lattice, we explore the phase diagram and the extrapolation to the continuum and infinite volume. These simultaneous limits - taken at fixed non-commutativity - lead to a phase of broken Poincare symmetry, where the photon appears to be IR stable, despite a negative IR divergence to one loop.

  9. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  10. Excitation Theory for Space-Dispersive Active Media Waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barybin, A A

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified electrodynamic approach to the guided-wave excitation theory is generalized to the waveguiding structures containing a hypothetical space-dispersive medium with drifting charge carriers possessing simultaneously elastic, piezoelectric and magnetic properties. Substantial features of our electrodynamic approach are: (i) the allowance for medium losses and (ii) the separation of potential fields peculiar to the slow quasi-static waves. It is shown that the orthogonal complementary fields appearing inside the external source region are just associated with a contribution of the potential fields inherent in exciting sources. Taking account of medium losses converts the usual orthogonality relation into a novel form called the quasi-orthogonality relation. It is found that the separation of potential fields reveals the fine structure of interaction between the exciting sources and mode eigenfields: in addition to the exciting currents interacting with the curl fields, the exciting charges and the double ...

  11. Dispersive Qubit Measurement by Interferometry with Parametric Amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sh. Barzanjeh; D. P. DiVincenzo; B. M. Terhal

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed analysis of how an amplified interferometer can be used to enhance the quality of a dispersive qubit measurement, such as one performed on a superconducting transmon qubit, using homodyne detection on an amplified microwave signal. Our modeling makes a realistic assessment of what is possible in current circuit-QED experiments; in particular, we take into account the frequency-dependence of the qubit-induced phase shift for short microwaves pulses. We compare the possible signal-to-noise ratios obtainable with (single-mode) SU(1,1) interferometers with the current coherent measurement and find a considerable reduction in measurement error probability in an experimentally-accessible range of parameters.

  12. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K. [Vista Metals, Inc., McKeesport, PA (United States); Froes, F.H. [Univ. of Idaho, ID (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  13. Submesoscale dispersion in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poje, Andrew C; Lipphardt,, Bruce; Haus, Brian K; Ryan, Edward H; Haza, Angelique C; Reniers, A J H M; Olascoaga, Josefina; Novelli, Guillaume; Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Chen, Shuyi; Mariano, Arthur J; Jacobs, Gregg; Hogan, Pat; Coelho, Emanuel; Kirwan,, A D; Huntley, Helga; Griffa, Annalisa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable forecasts for the dispersion of oceanic contamination are important for coastal ecosystems, society and the economy as evidenced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011. Accurate prediction of pollutant pathways and concentrations at the ocean surface requires understanding ocean dynamics over a broad range of spatial scales. Fundamental questions concerning the structure of the velocity field at the submesoscales (100 meters to tens of kilometers, hours to days) remain unresolved due to a lack of synoptic measurements at these scales. \\textcolor{black} {Using high-frequency position data provided by the near-simultaneous release of hundreds of accurately tracked surface drifters, we study the structure of submesoscale surface velocity fluctuations in the Northern Gulf Mexico. Observed two-point statistics confirm the validity of classic turbulence scaling laws at 200m$-$50km scales and clearly indicate tha...

  14. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  15. Methods and apparatus for controlling dispersions of nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Golovin, Andrii B

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically reconfigurable metamaterial with spatially varied refractive index is proposed for applications such as optical devices and lenses. The apparatus and method comprises a metamaterial in which the refractive indices are modified in space and time by applying one or more electric fields. The metamaterials are electrically controllable and reconfigurable, and consist of metal (gold, silver, etc.) particles of different shapes, such as rods, with dimension much smaller than the wavelength of light, dispersed in a dielectric medium. The metamaterial is controlled by applying a non-uniform electric field that causes two effects: (1) It aligns the metallic anisometric particles with respect to the direction of the applied electric field and (2) It redistributes particles in space, making their local concentration position dependent.

  16. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  17. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  18. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  19. Avalanche-like fluidization of an attractive dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aika Kurokawa; Valérie Vidal; Kei Kurita; Thibaut Divoux; Sébastien Manneville

    2015-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the transient dynamics of an attractive silica dispersion that displays strong physical aging. Extensive rheology coupled to ultrasonic velocimetry allows us to characterize the global stress response together with the local dynamics of the gel during shear startup experiments. In practice, after being rejuvenated by a preshear, the dispersion is left to age during a time $t_w$ before being submitted to a constant shear rate $\\dot \\gamma$. We investigate in detail the effects of both $t_w$ and $\\dot \\gamma$ on the fluidization dynamics and build a complete phase diagram of the gel behavior. At large enough shear rates, the gel is fully fluidized and flows homogeneously independently of its age. Under lower shear rates, the strong interplay between aging and shear rejuvenation leads, together with wall slip, to a more complex phenomenology. The gel may either display transient shear banding towards complete fluidization, or steady-state shear banding. In the former case, we unravel that the progressive fluidization occurs by successive steps that appear as peaks on the global stress relaxation signal. Flow imaging reveals that the shear band grows up to complete fluidization of the material by sudden avalanche-like events that are correlated to large peaks in the slip velocity at the moving wall. In the case of steady-state shear banding, we recover the classical scenario involving a critical shear rate $ \\dot \\gamma_c$ below which no homogeneous steady flow is possible. We show here that $\\dot \\gamma_c$ displays a nonlinear behavior with $t_w$. Our work paves the way for a thorough description of transient flows of weak attractive gels, and highlights the subtle interplay between shear, wall slip and aging that constitutes a major challenge in terms of modeling that has yet not been met.

  20. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  1. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  2. The ion pairs and superconducting bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Minasyan

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    First, it is shown that the creation of the spinless ion pairs in the lattice, which are hold by the binding with neighbor ion pairs together regarded as covalent. These ion pairs are created by the repulsive potential interaction of two ions which is bound as linear oscillator. The repulsive S-wave scattering between ion pairs and electrons is transformed to the attractive effective interaction between electrons which leads to a creation of electron pairs by a binding energy depending on the condensate fraction of ion pairs $\\frac{N_0}{N}$. In this respect, the absence of ion pairs in the condensate destroys a binding energy of electron pairs and in turn so-called superconductimg phase. As new result presented theory is that the number of the superconducting bosons is not changed in the superconducting phase.

  3. Cooling Techniques for Trapped Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Segal; Christof Wunderlich

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter gives an introduction to, and an overview of, methods for cooling trapped ions. The main addressees are researchers entering the field. It is not intended as a comprehensive survey and historical account of the extensive literature on this topic. We present the physical ideas behind several cooling schemes, outline their mathematical description, and point to relevant literature useful for a more in-depth study of this topic.

  4. Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

  5. Conductivity Histories Measured in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Explosion Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Beside the scientific aspects at least two questions appear to be of practical interest: (1) Does the detonation of an SDF charge create electro-magnetic disturbances strong enough to affect the operation of electrical infrastructure in for example a tunnel system? (2) Does the detonation of an SDF charge in a tunnel system create an electromagnetic signature that relays information of the charge performance to the outside environment?

  6. Measurement of vehicle emissions and the associated dispersion near roadways 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlavinka, M. W

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stud&ca 71 CIIAPTER V DA'I'A PROCI'SSI&NG 73 A. Radian DAKI' 73 B. Balcones Computer, C. Balcones Ravv Data, Reduction 74 77 CIIAP'I'ER. Vl. RESULTS 80 A. Analysis of Data Acc?racy Analog Io Dig&tal Converter Meteorological Inst, rurnents... that 4he model is use&i vvilh&n Lli&& speed arid acceleration ranges sp&inned by Ihc modal data. Mass Balance Techni ue '1'l&e calculation of a polluLant einission feel, nr for non-reactive species mav be calculat&d by the use of concentral, ion pro...

  7. Categorical ExclusIon DeterminatIon Fornl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . CForn1 Project Title:DeterminatIon Fornl

  8. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width {approximately}35 cm for a nominal beam area of {approximately}1,000 cm{sup 2}, and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of {approximately}100 keV. Separately, they`ve developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they`ve developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications.

  9. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S. [Institute of Atomic Energy Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shiragata Shirakane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  10. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  11. Telescopic Time-Scale Bridging for Modeling Dispersion in Rapidly Oscillating Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    Telescopic Time-Scale Bridging for Modeling Dispersion in Rapidly Oscillating Flows Ram K between the oscillation and dispersion time scales. Here, we present a methodology based on an implicit introduced errors. The error was found to decrease with mesh refinement, but a small inherent error

  12. Modeling of the multiscale dispersion of nanoparticles in a hematite coating , F. Willot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Modeling of the multiscale dispersion of nanoparticles in a hematite coating E. Couka1 , F. Willot1 conclude in Sec. (6). 2. Hematite nanocubes coating 2.1. Dispersion of nanoparticles In this work, we-Auguste Desbruères, 91003 Evry, France. Images of a hematite-based epoxy coating are obtained by scanning electron

  13. Dispersion and Characterization of Nickel Nanostrands in Thermoset and Thermoplastic Polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalen, Casey Allen

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    research done on dispersing powdered NiNS in various polymer matrices. This thesis covers the research in dispersing NiNS in three separate polymer systems, and related composite processing and characterization. An aromatic polyimide (CP2) is first used...

  14. Price Dispersion in the Housing Market: The Role of Bargaining and Search Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Price Dispersion in the Housing Market: The Role of Bargaining and Search Costs Gaetano Lisi bargaining powers and search costs the selling price will be different. Recently, from a theoretical point a basic fact of housing markets: price dispersion. The variance in house prices is basically due to both

  15. Participatory Sensing in Commerce: Using Mobile Camera Phones to Track Market Price Dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Nirupama

    their choices. Nevertheless, a major cause is the consumer search cost incurred in collecting pricingParticipatory Sensing in Commerce: Using Mobile Camera Phones to Track Market Price Dispersion In economics, price dispersion refers to the price difference of a homogeneous good across different vendors

  16. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. Adaptive all-order dispersion compensation of ultrafast laser pulses using dynamic spectral holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, David D.

    Adaptive all-order dispersion compensation of ultrafast laser pulses using dynamic spectral-1396 Received 14 July 1999; accepted for publication 24 September 1999 The time-varying dispersion of ultrafast laser pulses can be self-adaptively stabilized using real-time dynamic spectral holography

  18. Cyclogenesis Simulation of Typhoon Prapiroon (2000) Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyclogenesis Simulation of Typhoon Prapiroon (2000) Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion (2000), in the western North Pacific, is simulated to understand the role of Rossby wave energy process is through the conventional barotropic Rossby wave energy dispersion, which enhances the low

  19. Coupling traffic models on networks and urban dispersion models for simulating sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    models for modeling and testing different traffic scenarios, in order to define the impact on air quality it with the urban dispersion model Sirane. Keywords: urban air quality, macroscopic traffic models, road networks, pollutant dispersion models, traffic emissions control. AMS subject classification: 35L65, 35L67, 60K30, 90B

  20. Gain dispersion in Visible Light Photon Counters as a function of counting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.; Estrada, J.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of light signals using Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC), that indicate an increase in gain dispersion as the counting rate increases. We show that this dispersion can be understood on the basis of a recent observation of localized field reduction in VLPCs at high input rates.

  1. Seed dispersal by wind: towards a conceptual framework of seed abscission and its contribution to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    above some threshold wind speed and (ii) depends on the drag force generated by the wind. 2. We revisitSeed dispersal by wind: towards a conceptual framework of seed abscission and its contribution determines many aspects of seed dispersal by wind. While there is yet no complete mechanistic framework

  2. Population Ecology at the Range Edge Survival and Dispersal of a High-Density Lepidopteran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Ecology at the Range Edge Survival and Dispersal of a High-Density Lepidopteran Population Cecilia Ronnås Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Ecology Service/Repro, Uppsala 2011 #12;Population Ecology at the Range Edge. Survival and Dispersal of a High

  3. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMOCHROMIC PROPERTIES OF POLYTHIOPHENES DISPERSED IN HOST POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euler, William B.

    INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMOCHROMIC PROPERTIES OF POLYTHIOPHENES DISPERSED IN HOST POLYMERS Brett L films or in solution. However, the utilization of conjugated polymers in many electronic applications requires them to be dispersed in a host polymer matrix.2 There have been few investigations

  4. Different generation regimes of mode-locked all-positive-dispersion all-fiber Yb laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    to achieve stable mode-locking and ultra-short pulse generation in an all-positive dispersion cavityDifferent generation regimes of mode-locked all-positive-dispersion all-fiber Yb laser Sergey Kobtseva , Sergey Kukarina , Sergey Smirnova , Sergey Turitsynb , Anton Latkina a Laser system laboratory

  5. POPULATION ECOLOGY Seasonal and Spatial Dynamics of Alate Aphid Dispersal in Snap Bean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nault, Brian

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Seasonal and Spatial Dynamics of Alate Aphid Dispersal in Snap Bean Fields for viruses that may be acquired by aphids and transmitted to snap bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. Snap bean Þelds and temporal and spatial dispersal patterns of commonly encountered aphids in commercial snap bean Þelds

  6. Harmonic phase-dispersion microscope with a MachZehnder interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Harmonic phase-dispersion microscope with a Mach­Zehnder interferometer Andrew Ahn, Changhuei Yang S. Feld Harmonic phase-dispersion microscopy (PDM) is a new imaging technique in which contrast is provided by differences in refractive index at two harmonically related wavelengths. We report a new

  7. Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 20292043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 2029­2043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment and Beardsley, 1995; Geyer et al., 1996), while its sediment is dispersed primarily by bottom bound- ary layer dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California Jonathan A. Warricka,Ã, Leal A.K. Mertesb , Libe

  8. Fractional advection-dispersion equations for1 modeling transport at the Earth surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    Fractional advection-dispersion equations for1 modeling transport at the Earth surface2 Rina partial differential equations such as the advection-dispersion equation12 (ADE) begin with assumptions biomechanical transport and mixing29 by bioturbation, and the transport of sediment particles and sediment

  9. Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012 May 9,Investor Flowsheating

  10. Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012 May 9,Investor

  11. Dispersion of swimming algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows: theory and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croze, O A; Ahmed, M; Bees, M A; Brandt, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algal swimming is often biased by environmental cues, e.g. gravitational and viscous torques drive cells towards downwelling fluid (gyrotaxis). In view of biotechnological applications, it is important to understand how such biased swimming affects cell dispersion in a flow. Here, we study the dispersion of gyrotactic swimming algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows. By direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cell motion within upwelling and downwelling channel flows, we evaluate time-dependent measures of dispersion for increasing values of the flow Peclet (Reynolds) numbers, Pe (Re). Furthermore, we derive an analytical `swimming Taylor-Aris dispersion' theory, using flow-dependent transport parameters given by existing microscopic models. In the laminar regime, DNS results and analytical predictions compare very well, providing the first confirmation that cells' response to flow is best described by the generalized-Taylor-dispersion microscopic model. We predict that cells drift along a channel faster th...

  12. Negative ion source with low temperature transverse divergence optical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, J.H.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion source is provided which has extremely low transverse divergence as a result of a unique ion focusing system in which the focal line of an ion beam emanating from an elongated, concave converter surface is outside of the ion exit slit of the source and the path of the exiting ions. The beam source operates with a minimum ion temperature which makes possible a sharply focused (extremely low transverse divergence) ribbon like negative ion beam.

  13. Negative ion source with low temperature transverse divergence optical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion source is provided which has extremely low transverse divergence as a result of a unique ion focusing system in which the focal line of an ion beam emanating from an elongated, concave converter surface is outside of the ion exit slit of the source and the path of the exiting ions. The beam source operates with a minimum ion temperature which makes possible a sharply focused (extremely low transverse divergence) ribbon like negative ion beam.

  14. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musket, R.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nmion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  15. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musket, R G

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nm < SEM hole diameter < {approx}100 nm), the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  16. LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy » CPO: LosUniqueIon

  17. ION Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP Wind Farm Jump to:ILab Incubator PtyION Engineering

  18. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY ION

  19. Metal-Ion-Mediated Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod EggertMercuryAdvancedMetal-Ion-Mediated

  20. A single ion inside a miniature cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Matthias

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and the characterisation of the trap in terms of trap frequencies, external electric fields, micromotion compensation, ion lifetime and motional heating is discussed. Furthermore we introduce a set of experimental tech- niques to manipulate the ion on the infrared... .3.4. Calibration of the Electrostatic Compensation Fields . . . . . . . 52 1.3.5. Micromotion Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 1.3.6. Ion Lifetime and Heating Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 1.4. Manipulation on the 935 nm...