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1

1 Austin Hall rms 189 & 405 2 Bexell rm 117  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Restroom Annex 15 Ocean Admin · rm 101a 16 Peavy Hall · rm A030C 17 Radiation Center · rm B126a 18 Reed

Escher, Christine

2

College of Medicine RM Radiation Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry. Prereq: PHY 213 or 232; MA, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RAS 546.) RM 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

3

Advanced Calculus 2 1. The derivative: Let Rm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . . . , m). (9) We assume the transformation (9) to be invertible, that is, we can for the xj as functionsAdvanced Calculus 2 1. The derivative: Let Rm have components j and x: Rm Rn by x() = x1 matrix. You can think of A as a linear function taking Rm to Rm . We denote by AB the image of B under A

Logan, David

4

The $E_{\\rm p}$ - $E_{\\rm iso}$ relation and the internal shock model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The validity of the $E_{\\rm p}$ - $E_{\\rm iso}$ correlation in gamma-ray bursts and the possibility of explaining the prompt emission with internal shocks are highly debated questions. We study whether the $E_{\\rm p}$ - $E_{\\rm iso}$ correlation can be reproduced if internal shocks are indeed responsible for the prompt emission, or conversely, if the correlation can be used to constrain the internal shock scenario. We developed a toy model where internal shocks are limited to the collision of only two shells. Synthetic burst populations were constructed for various distributions of the model parameters, such as the injected power in the relativistic outflow, the average Lorentz factor, and its typical contrast between the shells. These parameters can be independent or linked by various relations. Synthetic $E_{\\rm p}$ - $E_{\\rm iso}$ diagrams are obtained in the different cases and compared with the observed correlation. The reference observed correlation is the one defined by the BAT6 sample, a sample of Swi...

Mochkovitch, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Construction Readiness RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91Power Plant |Readiness RM

6

Eikonal profile functions and amplitudes for $\\rm pp$ and $\\bar{\\rm p}{\\rm p}$ scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The eikonal profile function $J(b)$ obtained from the Model of the Stochastic Vacuum is parametrized in a form suitable for comparison with experiment. The amplitude and the extended profile function (including imaginary and real parts) are determined directly from the complete pp and $\\bar{\\rm p}$p elastic scattering data at high energies. Full and accurate representation of the data is presented, with smooth energy dependence of all parameters. The changes needed in the original profile function required for description of scattering beyond the forward direction are described.

Flavio Pereira; Erasmo Ferreira

1998-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Preliminary Safety Design RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D) PowerSafety Design RM Preliminary

8

Commercial Grade Dedication RM | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 InjectionDepartment of Energy CommercialRM Commercial

9

Power Marketing and Contracts in RM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design PassivePostdoctoral Opportunities Are youMeetingRM's

10

RM-10A robotic manipulator system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The REMOTE RM-10A is a man-replacement manipulator system that has been developed specifically for use in radioactive and other hazardous environments. It can be teleoperated, with man-in-the-loop, for unstructured tasks or programmed to perform routine tasks automatically much like robots in the automated manufacturing industry. The RM-10A is a servomanipulator utilizing a closed-loop, microprocessor-based control system. The system consists of a slave assembly, master control station, and interconnecting cabling. The slave assembly is the part of the system that enters the hostile environment. It is man-like is size and configuration with two identical arms attached to a torso structure. Each arm attaches to the torso using two captive screws and two guide pins. The guide pins position and stabilize an arm during removal and reinstallation and also align the two electrical connectors located in the arm support plate and torso. These features allow easy remote replacement of an arm, and commonality of the arms allow interchangeability. The water-resistant slave assembly is equipped with gaskets and O-ring seals in the torso and arm and camera assemblies. In addition, each slave arm's elbow, wrist, and tong are protected by replaceable polyurethane boots. An upper camera assembly, consisting of a color television (TV) camera, 6:1 zoom lens, and a pan/tilt unit, mount to the torso to provide remote viewing capability.

White, J.R.; Coughlan, J.B.; Harvey, H.W.; Upton, R.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measurement of $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ decay rate and $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ parameters at KEDR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the $J/\\psi$ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ as well as $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained: $\\Gamma^0_{\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}}=2.98\\pm0.18 \\phantom{|}^{+0.15}_{-0.33}$ keV, $M_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 2983.5 \\pm 1.4 \\phantom{|}^{+1.6}_{-3.6}$ MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 27.2 \\pm 3.1 \\phantom{|}^{+5.4}_{-2.6}$ MeV.

Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For extreme sea states, we assumed the RM5 design was not operating, that the flap was locked at 45 degrees, and that the structure was subject to 20% inflated 100-year extreme...

13

Selection biases in the gamma ray burst E$_{\\rm iso}$ -- L$_{\\rm opt,X}$ correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma ray burst (GRB) optical and X-ray afterglow luminosity is expected to correlate with the GRB isotropic equivalent kinetic energy of the outflow in the standard synchrotron model for GRB afterglows. Previous studies, using prompt GRB isotropic equivalent energy ($E_{\\rm iso}$) as a proxy for isotropic equivalent kinetic energy, have generally confirmed a correlation between X-ray and optical afterglow luminosities. Assuming that GRB afterglow luminosity does not evolve strongly with redshift, we identify a strong Malmquist bias in GRB optical and X-ray afterglow luminosity data. We show that selection effects dominate the observed E$_{\\rm iso}$ -- L$_{\\rm opt,X}$ correlations, and have likely been underestimated in other studies. The bias is strongest for a subset of optically faint bursts $m>24$ at 24 hr with $z>2$. After removing this optical selection bias, the E$_{\\rm iso}$ -- L$_{\\rm opt,X}$ correlation for long GRBs is not statistically significant, but combining both long and short GRB luminosity ...

Coward, David; Wan, Linfeng; Macpherson, Damien

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bremsstrahlung emission during $?$-decay of $^{226}{\\rm Ra}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtained the spectrum of probability of the bremsstrahlung emission accompanying the $\\alpha$-decay of $^{226}{\\rm Ra}$ (E$_{\\alpha}$=4.8 MeV) by measuring the $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ coincidences and using the model presented in our previous study on the $\\alpha-$decay of $^{214}{\\rm Po}$ (E$_{\\alpha}$=7.7 MeV). We compare the experimental data with the quantum mechanical calculation and find a good agreement between theory and experiment. We discuss the differences between the photon spectra connected with the $\\alpha$-decay of the $^{226}{\\rm Ra}$ and $^{214}{\\rm Po}$ nuclei. For the two mentioned nuclei we analyze the bremsstrahlung emission contributions from the tunneling and external regions of the nucleus barrier into the total spectrum, and we find the destructive interference between these contributions. We also find that the emission of photons during tunneling of the $\\alpha$-particle gives an important contribution to the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the whole E$_{\\gamma}$ energy range of the studied $^{226}$Ra nucleus.

Giorgio Giardina; Giovanni Fazio; Giuseppe Mandaglio; Marina Manganaro; Serghei P. Maydanyuk; Vladislav S. Olkhovsky; Nikolay V. Eremin; Anton A. Paskhalov; Dmitry A. Smirnov; Carmelo Sacca

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hoyle band and $?$ condensation in ${^{12}{\\rm C}}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The excited states in ${^{12}{\\rm C}}$ are investigated by using an extended version of the so-called Tohsaki-Horiuchi- Schuck-R\\"opke (THSR) wave function, where both the $3\\alpha$ condensate and ${^{8}{\\rm Be}} + \\alpha$ cluster asymptotic configurations are included. A new method is also used to resolve spurious continuum coupling with physical states. We focus on the structures of the "Hoyle band" states, $2_2^+$, and $4_2^+$ states, which are recently observed above the Hoyle state and of the $0_3^+$ and $0_4^+$ states, which are also quite recently identified in experiment. Their resonance parameters and decay properties are reasonably reproduced. All these states have gaslike configurations of the $3\\alpha$ clusters with larger root mean square radii than that of the Hoyle state. The Hoyle band is not simply considered to be the ${^{8}{\\rm Be}}(0^+) +\\alpha$ rotation as suggested by previous cluster model calculations, nor to be a rotation of a rigid-body triangle-shaped object composed of the $3\\alpha$ particles. This is mainly due to the specificity of the Hoyle state, which has the $3\\alpha$ condensate structure and gives a rise to the $0_3^+$ state with a prominent ${^{8}{\\rm Be}}(0^+)+\\alpha$ structure as a result of very strong monopole excitation from the Hoyle state.

Y. Funaki

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

16

Experimental study to explore the $\\rm ^8Be$ induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan Horse Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To explore a possible indirect method for $\\rm ^8Be$ induced astrophysical reactions, the $\\rm ^9Be=({}^8Be+\\it n)$ cluster structure was studied via the Trojan Horse Method. It is the first time to study a super short life nucleus $\\rm ^8Be$ via the Trojan Horse Method, and it is the first time to make a valid test for $l=1$ Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^9Be$ nucleus is assumed to have a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure and used as the Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^8Be$ nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual $\\rm ^8Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li$ reaction via a suitable 3-body reaction $\\rm ^9Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li +\\it n$. The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside $\\rm ^9Be$ was reconstructed. The agreement between experimental and theoretical momentum distribution indicates that there should be a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure inside $\\rm ^9Be$. Therefor the experimental study of $\\rm ^8Be$ induced reactions, for example the experimental measurement of the $\\rm ^8Be +\\alpha \\rightarrow {}^{12}C$ reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

Wen Qun-Gang; Li Cheng-Bo; Zhou Shu-Hua; Bakhadir Irgaziev; Fu Yuan-Yong; Claudio Spitaleri; Marco La Cognata; Zhou Jing; Meng Qiu-Ying; Livio Lamia; Marcello Lattuada

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

TraceyStancik Bldg.201,Rm.2S-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.dis.anl.gov/training/asme/info.html Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLCTraceyStancik Bldg.201,Rm.2S-06 ArgonneNationalLaboratory 9700SouthCassAve. Argonne,IL60439 Hotel will be attending the DOE/Argonne ASME Training Course. The hotel reservation deadline is May 23, 2014. Class

Kemner, Ken

18

TraceyStancik Bldg.201,Rm.2S-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.dis.anl.gov/conferences/qa/info.html U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managedTraceyStancik Bldg.201,Rm.2S-06 ArgonneNationalLaboratory 9700SouthCassAve. ArgonneIL60439 Hotel reserved for Training Course participants at: Aloft Bolingbrook 500 Janes Avenue Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (877

Kemner, Ken

19

Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time-series and stage vs. cross-section area rating relationship.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

On p-adic L-functions for ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ over totally real fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We refine and extend previous constructions of p-adic L-functions for Rankin-Selberg convolutions on ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ for regular algebraic representations over totally real fields. We also proof a functional equation for this p-adic L-function, which will be of interest in further study of its arithmetic properties.

Januszewski, Fabian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- J. Chris Cantwell  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commenter: J. Chris Cantwell 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

22

10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- Susan Leckband  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commenter: Susan Leckband 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

23

APRIL 3 10:3011:30am Rm 102 Status and Future of Recreational Fisheries in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anderson, Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) APRIL 8 5:00­6:00pm Rm 107 Evolution of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in Washington State Tony Floor, Director, Fishing Affairs, NW Marine Trade APRIL 17 10:30am­12:20pm Rm 102 A) Involving Youth in Recreational Fishing B) Management and Status

Anderson, Richard

24

Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour (%24/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Permanent Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Machine (PMa-SynRM) Design and Performance Analysis for Fan and Pump Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................... 14 IIB. Reference Induction Machine .......................................................................... 14 IIC. MMF Study of the NEMA Stator .................................................................... 17 IID. Simulation Results...RM. ................................................................................................................. 6 Fig 1-6: Power factor of a synchronous machine (SynRM). .............................................. 8 Fig 1-7: SynRM different rotors: (a) Conventional Salient Pole (b) Isolated Segmental, (c) Transversally Laminated, (d) Double Barrier, (e...

Vartanian, Robert

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

26

Energy Dependence of $K/?$, $p/?$, and $K/p$ Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions from $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy-ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$, and $K/p$ fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0-5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable $\\rm \

STAR Collaboration; N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; R. Esha; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Charge correlations using the balance function in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$ TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In high-energy heavy-ion collisions, the correlations between the emitted particles can be used as a probe to gain insight into the charge creation mechanisms. In this Letter, we report the first results of such studies using the electric charge balance function in the relative pseudorapidity ($\\Delta\\eta$) and azimuthal angle ($\\Delta\\varphi$) in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The width of the balance function decreases with growing centrality (i.e. for more central collisions) in both projections. This centrality dependence is not reproduced by HIJING, while AMPT, a model which incorporates strings and parton rescattering, exhibits qualitative agreement with the measured correlations in $\\Delta\\varphi$ but fails to describe the correlations in $\\Delta\\eta$. A thermal blast-wave model incorporating local charge conservation and tuned to describe the $p_{\\rm T}$ spectra and v$_2$ measurements reported by ALICE, is used to fit the centrality dependence of the width of the balance function and to extract the average separation of balancing charges at freeze-out. The comparison of our results with measurements at lower energies reveals an ordering with $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$: the balance functions become narrower with increasing energy for all centralities. This is consistent with the effect of larger radial flow at the LHC energies but also with the late stage creation scenario of balancing charges. However, the relative decrease of the balance function widths in $\\Delta\\eta$ and $\\Delta\\varphi$ with centrality from the highest SPS to the LHC energy exhibits only small differences. This observation cannot be interpreted solely within the framework where the majority of the charge is produced at a later stage in the evolution of the heavy--ion collision.

ALICE Collaboration

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Zeros, Dips and Signs in pp and p$\\rm\\bf\\bar p$ Elastic Amplitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dips observed in the differential cross sections of elastic pp and p$\\bar{\\rm p}$ scattering are studied in terms of the locations of the zeros of the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude and of the sign of real part at large $|t|$. It is confirmed that the differences in shapes of the dips in the pp and p$\\bar{\\rm p}$ systems are determined by a change of sign of the real tail, which seems to be determined by perturbative QCD contributions.

Flavio Pereira; Erasmo Ferreira

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Nuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the integration of all information, including nuclear forensic data, law enforcement and intelligence dataNuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism Kenneth G relationships Nuclear Forensics require high-level expertise, undisputed signatures & extremely high fidelity

Perkins, Richard A.

30

Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

31

Western University Spencer Engineering Building, Rm. 3002 London, ON, Canada N6A 5B9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Energy Materials The Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Faculty of Engineering about the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering can be found at http://www.eng.uwo.ca/mechanicalWestern University Spencer Engineering Building, Rm. 3002 London, ON, Canada N6A 5B9 t. 519

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

32

BREA Minutes Meeting Date and Place: Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014; Building 400, Rm RSB 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BREA Minutes Meeting Date and Place: Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014; Building 400, Rm RSB 2 Attendees live in New York State (NYS), you can change your medical plan after the first year i.e., if you in NYS. Our current insurance with CIGNA is through the Lab, which is selfinsured. How long

Johnson, Peter D.

33

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buffalo Head Substation Project Adoption of Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment (Document No. WY-050-EA11-108) DOEEA - 1938 Environmental Assessment July 2012...

34

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hermosa West Wind Energy Project Albany County, Wyoming Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOEEIS - 0438 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Volume I Draft Environmental Impact...

35

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wray Wind Energy Project Environmental Assessment DOEEA - 1884 Environmental Assessment December 2012 Finding of No Significant Impact 2012 Comments may be sent to: Mr. Rod...

36

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2 MSA2

37

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2 MSA2Buffalo

38

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2

39

RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2Wray Wind Energy

40

Micro-Segmentao de Clientes com Base em Dados de Consumo: Modelo RM-Similis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Micro-Segmentação de Clientes com Base em Dados de Consumo: Modelo RM-Similis Luís Cavique ESCS apresentadas as conclusões. 2 Base de Dados de Clientes Na caracterização de clientes são geralmente utilizados dados resultantes de inquéritos. Com o apoio das Base de Dados ou Aplicações para Clientes, pretende

Cavique, Luís

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

jou.rm.alnf ELSEVIER Journal of Nuclear Materials 241-243 (1997) 255-259  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

jou.rm.alnf HUMOr ELSEVIER Journal of Nuclear Materials 241-243 (1997) 255-259 Erosion lifetime at the side walls. 0022-3115/97/$17.00 Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII S0022-3!15(96)00510-7 #12;256 H.D. Pacher et al. / Journal of Nuclear Materials 241 243 (1997) 255 259 10~' ~10 4 1000 ~ _ 1

Raffray, A. René

42

Business Plan - RM MedComm's Opportunity for Business in Healthcare Design Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhibit 1 ? Sales Forecast 11 Exhibit 2 ? NAICS Hierarchy for Engineering Services 19 Exhibit 3 ? Health Care Market Size 20 Exhibit 4 ? Customer Demand 27 Exhibit 5 ? Sales Forecast 31 Exhibit 6 ? Relationship Sales...?s demands, RM MedComm will increase the staff size as required. Forecast and Objectives The following forecast is based upon the prior listed assumptions in this section. At $165.7K per project and a $700M market, the number of health care projects...

Mason, Raymond

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

$N_{\\rm eff}$ in low-scale seesaw models versus the lightest neutrino mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the contribution to $N_{\\rm eff}$ of the extra sterile states in low-scale Type I seesaw models (with three extra sterile states). We explore the full parameter space and find that at least two of the heavy states always reach thermalisation in the Early Universe, while the third one might not thermalise provided the lightest neutrino mass is below ${\\mathcal O}(10^{-3}$eV). Constraints from cosmology therefore severely restrict the spectra of heavy states in the range 1eV- 100 MeV. The implications for neutrinoless double beta decay are also discussed.

Hernandez, P; Lopez-Pavon, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sensorless Speed Control of Permanent Magnet-Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor (PMa-SynRM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 5-17 (From top to bottom) Phase A current (DSP)-[1V/div], q-axis and d-axis currents-[1V/div] when motor speed is changed from 130RPM to 10RPM and back to 130RPM... torque at standstill (i.e., zero speed) and low speeds as well as constant output power over wide speed range. In order to meet these requirements, the PMa-SynRM machines are designed to operate not only in the constant torque region where the motor...

Chakali, Anil K.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

$^4{\\rm He}$+$n$+$n$ continuum within an ab initio framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The low-lying continuum spectrum of the $^6{\\rm He}$ nucleus is investigated for the first time within an ab initio framework that encompasses the $^4{\\rm He}$+$n$+$n$ three-cluster dynamics characterizing its lowest decay channel. This is achieved through an extension of the no-core-shell model combined with the resonating-group method, in which energy-independent non-local interactions among three nuclear fragments can be calculated microscopically starting from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schr\\"odinger equation is solved with three-body scattering boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we find the known $J^\\pi = 2^+$ resonance as well as a result consistent with a new low-lying second $2^+$ resonance recently observed at GANIL at $2.6$ MeV above the $^6$He ground state. We also find resonances in the $2^-$, $1^+$ and $0^-$ channels, while no low-lying resonances are present in the $0^+$ and $1^-$ channels.

Carolina Romero-Redondo; Sofia Quaglioni; Petr Navrtil; Guillaume Hupin

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Spin Structure Function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ of the Proton and a Test of the Bjorken Sum Rule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New results for the double spin asymmetry $A_1^{\\rm p}$ and the proton longitudinal spin structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ are presented. They were obtained by the COMPASS collaboration using polarised 200 GeV muons scattered off a longitudinally polarised NH$_3$ target. The data were collected in 2011 and complement those recorded in 2007 at 160\\,GeV, in particular at lower values of $x$. They improve the statistical precision of $g_1^{\\rm p}(x)$ by about a factor of two in the region $x\\lesssim 0.02$. A next-to-leading order QCD fit to the $g_1$ world data is performed. It leads to a new determination of the quark spin contribution to the nucleon spin, $\\Delta \\Sigma$ ranging from 0.26 to 0.36, and to a re-evaluation of the first moment of $g_1^{\\rm p}$. The uncertainty of $\\Delta \\Sigma$ is mostly due to the large uncertainty in the present determinations of the gluon helicity distribution. A new evaluation of the Bjorken sum rule based on the COMPASS results for the non-singlet structure function $g_1^{\\rm...

Adolph, C; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Beck, G R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Buechele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chang, W -C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Torre, S Dalla; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; von Hohenesche, N du Fresne; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Fuchey, E; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Giordano, F; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grabmller, S; Grasso, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hahne, D; von Harrach, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Hsieh, C -Yu; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jrg, P; Joosten, R; Kabu, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Koenigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kraemer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Longo, R; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W -D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J -C; Pereira, F; Pesek, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rocco, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schoenning, K; Schopferer, S; Selyunin, A; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Tosello, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Veloso, J; Virius, M; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Double Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadron Electroproductions from a Transversely Polarized $^3\\rm{He}$ Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the measurement of beam-target double-spin asymmetries ($A_\\text{LT}$) in the inclusive production of identified hadrons, $\\vec{e}~$+$~^3\\text{He}^{\\uparrow}\\rightarrow h+X$, using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a transversely polarized $^3\\rm{He}$ target. Hadrons ($\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$ and proton) were detected at 16$^{\\circ}$ with an average momentum $$=2.35 GeV/c and a transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) coverage from 0.60 to 0.68 GeV/c. Asymmetries from the $^3\\text{He}$ target were observed to be non-zero for $\\pi^{\\pm}$ production when the target was polarized transversely in the horizontal plane. The $\\pi^{+}$ and $\\pi^{-}$ asymmetries have opposite signs, analogous to the behavior of $A_\\text{LT}$ in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration; Y. X. Zhao; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. -C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. irca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; W. A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; Y. Wang; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Blast Wave Fits to Elliptic Flow Data at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =$ 7.7--2760 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present blast wave fits to elliptic flow ($v_{2}(p_{\\rm T})$) data in minimum bias collisions from the $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} =$ 7.7--200 GeV at RHIC, and 2.76 TeV at LHC. The fits are performed separately for particles and corresponding anti-particles. The mean transverse velocity parameter $\\beta$ shows an energy dependent difference between particles and corresponding anti-particles, which increases as the beam energy decreases. Possible effects of feed down, baryon stopping, anti-particle absorption, and early production times for anti-particles are discussed.

X. Sun; H. Masui; A. M. Poskanzer; A. Schmah

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Leptonic decay of the phi(1020) meson in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV measured with the STAR experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the measurement of the phi(1020) meson production via the leptonic decay channel in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV from the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) experiment. The transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) spectrum is measured for 0.1 $\\le p_{\\rm T} \\le 2.5$ GeV/$c$ at mid-rapidity ($|y|\\le1$) with a similar detector setup of corresponding measurements via the hadronic decay channel. We obtain the $p_{\\rm T}$-integrated phi(1020) mass $M_{\\phi}=1017.7\\pm0.8 (\\rm {stat.}) \\pm0.9 (\\rm {sys.})$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and width $\\Gamma_{\\phi} = 8.0\\pm 2.5(\\rm {stat.}) \\pm 2.3(\\rm {sys.}) \\textrm{MeV/}c^{2}$, which are within 1.5 $\\sigma$ and 1.1 $\\sigma$ of the vacuum values, respectively. No significant difference is observed in the reconstructed phi(1020) $p_{\\rm T}$ spectrum, $dN/dy$, or $\\left$ between the leptonic and hadronic decay channels. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model including the medium-modified phi(1020).

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; X. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; X. Li; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; Y. G. Ma; R. Ma; G. L. Ma; L. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; S. Raniwala; R. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; M. K. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; D. Solanki; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. J. Summa; Y. Sun; X. M. Sun; X. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; J. S. Wang; G. Wang; F. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; H. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. F. Xu; N. Xu; H. Xu; Y. Yang; S. Yang; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; X. P. Zhang; J. B. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; J. Zhao; F. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

Disc evolution and the relationship between $L_{\\rm acc}$ and $L_\\ast$ in T Tauri stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the evolution of accretion luminosity $L_{\\rm acc}$ and stellar luminosity ${L_\\ast}$ in pre-mainsequence stars. We make the assumption that when the star appears as a Class II object, the major phase of accretion is long past, and the accretion disc has entered its asymptotic phase. We use an approximate stellar evolution scheme for accreting pre-mainsequence stars based on Hartmann, Cassen & Kenyon, 1997. We show that the observed range of values $k = L_{\\rm acc}/L_\\ast$ between 0.01 and 1 can be reproduced if the values of the disc mass fraction $M_{\\rm disc}/M_*$ at the start of the T Tauri phase lie in the range 0.01 -- 0.2, independent of stellar mass. We also show that the observed upper bound of $L_{\\rm acc} \\sim L_\\ast$ is a generic feature of such disc accretion. We conclude that as long as the data uniformly fills the region between this upper bound and observational detection thresholds, then the degeneracies between age, mass and accretion history severely limit the use of this data for constraining possible scalings between disc properties and stellar mass.

I. Tilling; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle; C. A. Tout

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydrogeology (01:460:428) Time & Place: Wednesdays, 3:20 6:20pm, Rm. 339, Wright Labs, Busch Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogeology (01:460:428) Fall 2011 Time & Place: Wednesdays, 3:20 ­ 6:20pm, Rm. 339, Wright Labs:00pm, Rm. 336, Wright Labs, Busch By Appointment Textbook: Groundwater, by R.A. Freeze and J.A. Cherry

53

Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, I. [TLK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G. [Univ. Politehnica of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in $B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first measurement of decay-time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decay $B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and an updated measurement of the ratio of branching fractions $\\mathcal{B}(B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0)/\\mathcal{B}(B_d^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0)$ are presented. The results are obtained using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions recorded with the LHCb detector at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The results on the CP asymmetries are $A_{\\Delta\\Gamma}(B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0) = 0.49_{-0.65}^{+0.77}(stat) \\pm 0.06(syst)$, $C_{\\rm dir}(B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0) = -0.28 \\pm 0.41(stat) \\pm 0.08(syst)$ and $S_{\\rm mix}(B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0) = -0.08 \\pm 0.40(stat) \\pm 0.08(syst)$. The ratio $\\mathcal{B}(B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0)/\\mathcal{B}(B_d^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0)$ is measured to be $0.0431 \\pm 0.0017(stat) \\pm 0.0012(syst) \\pm 0.0025(f_s/f_d)$, where the last uncerta...

Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frdric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dlage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Surez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Frber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garca Pardias, Julin; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gian, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Gbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gndara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugs, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An rf-carpet electrospray ion source to provide isobaric mass calibrants for trans-uranium elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For trans-uranium elements, stable atomic isobars do not exist. In order to provide isobaric reference ions for the mass measurement of trans-uranium elements, an electrospray ion source (ESI) was combined with an rf-carpet to collect molecular ions efficiently. The rf-carpet allows for simplification of the pumping system to transport ions from the ESI to a precision mass analyzer. Molecular ions appropriate for isobaric references of trans-uranium elements were extracted from the rf-carpet and analyzed by a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph (MRTOF-MS) with a resolving power of $\\rm{R_m} \\gtrsim100,000$.

S. Naimi; S. Nakamura; Y. Ito; H. Mita; K. Okada; A. Ozawa; P. Schury; T. Sonoda; A. Takamine; M. Wada; H. Wollnik

2012-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ion Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Fischer, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EMSL - ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ions en Reorientation of the free OH group in the top-most layer of airwater interface of sodium fluoride aqueous http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

58

Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 62 and 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations on relative pseudorapidity $\\eta$ and azimuth $\\phi$ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV with transverse momentum $p_t \\geq 0.15$ GeV/$c$, $|\\eta| \\leq 1$ and $2\\pi$ azimuth. Observed correlations include a {same-side} (relative azimuth $< \\pi/2$) 2D peak, a closely-related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until mid-centrality where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within a small centrality interval. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly {relative to} binary-collision scaling, the $\\eta$ width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly ($\\eta$ elongation) and the $\\phi$ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are more remarkable when contrasted with expectations of jet quenching in a dense medium. Observed centrality trends are compared to {\\sc hijing} predictions and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy ion collision scenarios which invoke rapid parton thermalization. On the other hand, if the collision system is effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the observations reported here would be inconsistent with a minijet picture.

STAR Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. de Souza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

The role of the quantum properties of gravitational radiation in the dete ction of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role that the quantum properties of a gravitational wave could play in the detection of gravitational radiation is analyzed. It is not only corroborated that in the current laser-interferometric detectors the resolution of the experimental apparatus could lie very far from the corresponding quantum threshold (thus the backreaction effect of the measuring device upon the gravitational wave is negligible), but it is also suggested that the consideration of the quantum properties of the wave could entail the definition of dispersion of the measurement outputs. This dispersion would be a function not only of the sensitivity of the measuring device, but also of the interaction time (between measuring device and gravitational radiation) and of the arm length of the corresponding laser- interferometer. It would have a minimum limit, and the introduction of the current experimental parameters insinuates that the dispersion of the existing proposals could lie very far from this minimum, which means that they would show a very large dispersion.

A. Camacho

1998-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

The energy production rate density of cosmic rays in the local universe is $\\sim10^{44-45}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ at all particle energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy output (per logarithmic interval of particle energies) of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with energies $10{\\rm GeV}\\lesssim\\varepsilon_p\\lesssim100{\\rm GeV}$ is $\\sim 10^{47}\\rm erg$ per solar mass of star$-$formation, based on the CR production rate in the Milky Way and in starburst galaxies, implying a generation rate of $\\varepsilon_p^2Q\\sim 10^{45}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ in the local universe. It is only $\\sim 10$ times larger than the output, $\\varepsilon_p^2 Q=0.5\\pm0.2\\times 10^{44}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$, of Ultra High Energy CRs (UHECRs) at energies $10^{10.5}{\\rm GeV}<\\varepsilon_p<10^{12}\\rm GeV$ (obtained assuming they are mostly protons), which in turn is comparable to the lower limit of $\\varepsilon_p^2 Q\\ge 0.5\\times 10^{44}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ of high energy CRs with $10^6{\\rm GeV}\\lesssim\\varepsilon_p\\lesssim 10^{8}\\rm GeV$ implied by the saturation of the Waxman-Bahcall bound by the neutrino excess recently discovered by IceCube. These similarities are consistent with a flat pro...

Katz, Boaz; Thompson, Todd; Loeb, Abraham

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Dust-to-gas ratio, $X_{\\rm CO}$ factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the correlation between extinction and H~{\\sc i} and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes ($|b|>10\\degr$) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I (Chen et al. 2014), we present a three-dimensional dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6,000\\,deg$^2$ at a spatial angular resolution of 6\\,arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H~{\\sc i} data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H~{\\sc i} survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio $DGR=A_V/N({\\rm H})$ and CO-to-$\\rm H_2$ conversion factor $X_{\\rm CO}=N({\\rm H_2})/W_{\\rm CO}$ for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemis...

Chen, B -Q; Yuan, H -B; Huang, Y; Xiang, M -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Centrality dependence of particle production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN} }$= 5.02 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report measurements of the primary charged particle pseudorapidity density and transverse momentum distributions in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV, and investigate their correlation with experimental observables sensitive to the centrality of the collision. Centrality classes are defined using different event activity estimators, i.e. charged particle multiplicities measured in three disjunct pseudorapidity regions as well as the energy measured at beam rapidity (zero-degree). The procedures to determine the centrality, quantified by the number of participants ($N_{\\rm part}$), or the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions ($N_{\\rm coll}$), are described. We show that, in contrast to Pb-Pb collisions, in p-Pb collisions large multiplicity fluctuations together with the small range of participants available, generate a dynamical bias in centrality classes based on particle multiplicity. We propose to use the zero-degree energy, which we expect not to introduce a dynamical bias, as an alternative event-centrality estimator. Based on zero-degree energy centrality classes, the $N_{\\rm part}$ dependence of particle production is studied. Under the assumption that the multiplicity measured in the Pb-going rapidity region scales with the number of Pb-participants, an approximate independence of the multiplicity per participating nucleon measured at mid-rapitity of the number of participating nucleons is observed. Furthermore, at high-$p_{\\rm T}$ the p-Pb spectra are found to be consistent with the pp spectra scaled by $N_{\\rm coll}$ for all centrality classes. Our results represent valuable input for the study of the event activity dependence of hard probes in p-Pb collision and, hence, help to establish baselines for the interpretation of the Pb-Pb data.

ALICE Collaboration

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations. Abstract: Structures for Lossless Ion...

64

secondary ion detection | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion detection secondary ion detection Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

65

Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

66

Evaluation of Cu as an interlayer in Be/F82H diffusion bonds for ITER TBM R.M. Hunt a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion in the region. Prior diffusion bonding research has shown that titanium is a good bonding aidEvaluation of Cu as an interlayer in Be/F82H diffusion bonds for ITER TBM R.M. Hunt a, , S.H. Goods has been investigated as a potential interlayer material for diffusion bonds between beryllium

Abdou, Mohamed

67

Hierarchical A*: Searching Abstraction Hierarchies Efficiently R.C. Holte, M.B. Perez, R.M. Zimmer, A.J. MacDonald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A.J. MacDonald Abstract Abstraction, in search, problem solving, and planning, works by replacing.C. Holte1 , M.B. Perez1 , R.M. Zimmer2 , A.J. MacDonald3 1. Introduction Several researchers have

Valtorta, Marco

68

NO LATER than June 14, 2013 We highly encourage you to attend The Columbia Young Artists Film Lab event held in Rm. 511  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Film Lab event held in Rm. 511 Dodge Hall on the Columbia University Campus, May 19th, at 4pm. Bring of this program? What are your goals? 3) Film scenario: Read the following openings, choose one and imagine window. Trying to keep quiet, they just can't stop their giggling. One after the other they pull

Grishok, Alla

69

Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook NY 11794-3717  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook twice won the NYS Advisor of the Year Award. The seminar will cover the following topics: Statement and rationales Lunch will be served at 12:30 PM The NYS SBDC is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business

Luryi, Serge

70

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In INFORMATION SYSTEMS? This handout will provide education. You'll gain a solid foundation in the various business disciplines and gain an understanding

71

Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20rm T}<0.36$ GeV/c are better described by the model with granular emission than that of one Gaussian. The model with granular source has more parameters than the simple Gaussian, hence can describe more complicated shapes.

Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dielectron Mass Spectra from Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the STAR measurements of dielectron ($e^+e^-$) production at midrapidity ($|y_{ee}|<$1) in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200\\,GeV. The measurements are evaluated in different invariant mass regions with a focus on 0.30-0.76 ($\\rho$-like), 0.76-0.80 ($\\omega$-like), and 0.98-1.05 ($\\phi$-like) GeV/$c^{2}$. The spectrum in the $\\omega$-like and $\\phi$-like regions can be well described by the hadronic cocktail simulation. In the $\\rho$-like region, however, the vacuum $\\rho$ spectral function cannot describe the shape of the dielectron excess. In this range, an enhancement of 1.77$\\pm$0.11(stat.)$\\pm$0.24(sys.)$\\pm$0.33(cocktail) is determined with respect to the hadronic cocktail simulation that excludes the $\\rho$ meson. The excess yield in the $\\rho$-like region increases with the number of collision participants faster than the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ yields. Theoretical models with broadened $\\rho$ contributions through interactions with constituents in the hot QCD medium provide a consistent description of the dilepton mass spectra for the measurement presented here and the earlier data at the Super Proton Synchrotron energies.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderndze la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

74

RM Environmental Review (NEPA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Environmental Review-NEPA

75

Preliminary Safety Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department of Energy University of California

76

Prelminary Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department of Energy UniversityPreliminary Design

77

Project Execution Plan RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department ofThatGrid3 Program Update:Development

78

Final Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 TotalFinal Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0

79

Readiness Review RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoansDepartment ofScoreEO-05-01:Department

80

Risk Management RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department ofRequirementsEnergyJDickson AboutApplications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Commissioning Plan RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI: AddressingEnergy CommercialCheckout,

82

Conceptual Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:Fresno U.S.Energy Order

83

Conceptual Safety Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:Fresno U.S.Energy OrderOil, and Gas

84

Construction Readiness RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:FresnoM-WG Idaho,Construction Project Safety

85

Acquisition Strategy RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout Us » FAQsUCNI Access(MarchAcquisition

86

RM Capital Investment Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2 MSA2 MSACapital

87

RM Power Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote: This is a2 MSA2Wray Wind

88

Integrated Project Team RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartmentJune 20, 2012 The12,1,TrakLok

89

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE Zero EnergyData Center Optimization Plan3Energy 4, 2007:

90

Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using hydrodynamically shaped gas target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a $\\lambda = 10$ $\\mu$m CO$_2$ laser on optically shaped H$_2$ and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse ($I\\lesssim10^{14}\\, {\\rm Wcm^{-2}}$) was used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This was followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse ($I>10^{16}\\, {\\rm Wcm^{-2}}$) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions were accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies ($> 110$ mJ & $energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findin...

Tresca, O; Cook, N; Maharjan, C; Polyanskiy, M N; Najmudin, Z; Shkolnikov, P; Pogorelsky, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ion Monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evidence on the absence of critical transition in AMPT for Pb-Pb collisions at $sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Event-by-event fluctuations in the spatial patterns in charged particles generated in Pb--Pb collisions at the center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{S_{\\rm{NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV are studied within A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT) model. The spatial patterns of the particles generated in the ($\\eta, \\phi$) space for $|\\eta| \\le 0.8$ are studied using the methodology of intermittency and erraticity analysis. We find negative intermittency for charged particles generated in a range of $p_{\\rm{T}}$ windows. This result contrasts sharply from what is expected for a quark-gluon plasma undergoing hadronization by a second-order phase transition. Appropriate scaling behavior is examined, resulting in definitive scaling exponent $\

Ramni Gupta; Rohni Sharma

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Event-plane dependent dihadron correlations with harmonic $v_n$ subtraction in Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}=200$ GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAR measurements of dihadron azimuthal correlations ($\\Delta\\phi$) are reported in mid-central (20-60\\%) Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}=200$ GeV as a function of the trigger particle's azimuthal angle relative to the event plane, $\\phi_{s}=|\\phi_{t}-\\psi_{\\rm EP}|$. The elliptic ($v_2$), triangular ($v_3$), and quadratic ($v_4$) flow harmonic backgrounds are subtracted using the Zero Yield At Minimum (ZYAM) method. The results are compared to minimum-bias d+Au collisions. It is found that a finite near-side ($|\\Delta\\phi|\\pi/2$) correlation shows a modification from d+Au data, varying with $\\phi_{s}$. The modification may be a consequence of pathlength-dependent jet-quenching and may lead to a better understanding of high-density QCD.

STAR Collaboration

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

TITAN's Digital RFQ Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher, Operation and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a description of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap built as part of the TITAN facility. It consists of a gas-filled, segmented, linear Paul trap and is the first stage of the TITAN setup with the purpose of cooling and bunching radioactive ion beams delivered from ISAC-TRIUMF. This is the first such device to be driven digitally, i.e., using a high voltage ($V_{pp} = \\rm{400 \\, V}$), wide bandwidth ($0.2 < f < 1.2 \\, \\rm{MHz}$) square-wave as compared to the typical sinusoidal wave form. Results from the commissioning of the device as well as systematic studies with stable and radioactive ions are presented including efficiency measurements with stable $^{133}$Cs and radioactive $^{124, 126}$Cs. A novel and unique mode of operation of this device is also demonstrated where the cooled ion bunches are extracted in reverse mode, i.e., in the same direction as previously injected.

T. Brunner; M. J. Smith; M. Brodeur; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri A. Lapierre; E. Man; R. Ringle; M. C. Simon; J. A. Vaz; P. Delheij; M. Good; M. R. Pearson; J. Dilling

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Roadmap to Control Penguin Effects in $B^0_d\\to J/?K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/??$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decays play key roles in testing the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model. The theoretical interpretation of the corresponding observables is limited by uncertainties from doubly Cabibbo-suppressed penguin topologies. With continuously increasing experimental precision, it is mandatory to get a handle on these contributions, which cannot be calculated reliably in QCD. In the case of the measurement of $\\sin2\\beta$ from $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$, the $U$-spin-related decay $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ offers a tool to control the penguin effects. As the required measurements are not yet available, we use data for decays with similar dynamics and the $SU(3)$ flavour symmetry to constrain the size of the expected penguin corrections. We predict the CP asymmetries of $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and present a scenario to fully exploit the physics potential of this decay, emphasising also the determination of hadronic parameters and their comparison with theory. In the case of the benchmark mode $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ used to determine the $B^0_s$-$\\bar B^0_s$ mixing phase $\\phi_s$ the penguin effects can be controlled through $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi \\rho^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\overline{K}^{*0}$ decays. The LHCb collaboration has recently presented pioneering results on this topic. We analyse their implications and present a roadmap for controlling the penguin effects.

Kristof De Bruyn; Robert Fleischer

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effect of event selection on jetlike correlation measurement in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=200$ GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dihadron correlations are analyzed in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = 200$ GeV $d$+Au collisions classified by forward charged particle multiplicity and zero-degree neutral energy in the Au-beam direction. It is found that the jetlike correlated yield increases with the event multiplicity. After taking into account this dependence, the non-jet contribution on the away side is minimal, leaving little room for a back-to-back ridge in these collisions.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; B. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; C. Li; X. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; L. Ma; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; R. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; M. K. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. J. Summa; Z. Sun; Y. Sun; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; Z. Tang; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; J. S. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; Y. Yang; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; S. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; S. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ion funnel ion trap and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Heavy Ion Event Displays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

99

ion microprobe | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microprobe ion microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

100

EMSL - secondary ion detection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

secondary-ion-detection en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-struc...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microfabricated ion frequency standard  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

Sakai, Shigeki, E-mail: sakai-shigeki@nissin.co.jp; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)] [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Measurements of Dielectron Production in Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV from the STAR Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on measurements of dielectron ($e^+e^-$) production in Au$+$Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region ($M_{ee}<$ 1 GeV/$c^2$). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the $\\rho$-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 $-$ 0.76 GeV/$c^2$, integrated over the full $p_{\\rm T}$ acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76 $\\pm$ 0.06 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.26 (sys.) $\\pm$ 0.29 (cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weak centrality and $p_{\\rm T}$ dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44 $\\pm$ 0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the $\\rho$ meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. Additionally, we report on measurements of $\\omega$ and $\\phi$-meson production through their $e^+e^-$ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis Blast-Wave model predictions as well as, in the case of the $\\phi$-meson, results through its $K^+K^-$ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1$

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Z. Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; X. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; L. Kochenda; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; C. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; X. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; Y. G. Ma; G. L. Ma; L. Ma; R. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; R. Pak; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; M. Stepanov; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. Summa; X. Sun; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; B. Surrow; N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; G. Wang; Y. Wang; F. Wang; Y. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. G. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; H. Xu; N. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; S. Yang; Y. Yang; C. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; X. P. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

104

Simultaneous determination of $?_{\\rm M0}$ and $H_0$ from joint Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray observations with median statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clusters of galaxies contain a fair sample of the universal baryonic mass fraction. A combined analysis of the intracluster medium (ICM) within their hydrostatic regions, as derived from both Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) measurements and X-ray images, makes it possible to constrain the cosmological parameters. We consider both gas fraction estimates and angular diameter distance measurements. Adopting median statistics, we find, at the 2-$\\sigma$ level, the pressureless matter density, $\\Omega_{\\rm M0}$, to be between 0.30 and 0.40 and the Hubble constant, $H_0$, between 44 and 66 Km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$.

M. Sereno

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Accurate...

107

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Comparative Analysis of the Supernova Legacy Survey Sample with {\\Lambda}CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of Type~Ia SNe has thus far produced the most reliable measurement of the expansion history of the Universe, suggesting that $\\Lambda$CDM offers the best explanation for the redshift--luminosity distribution observed in these events. But the analysis of other kinds of source, such as cosmic chronometers, gamma ray bursts, and high-$z$ quasars, conflicts with this conclusion, indicating instead that the constant expansion rate implied by the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is a better fit to the data. The central difficulty with the use of Type~Ia SNe as standard candles is that one must optimize three or four nuisance parameters characterizing supernova luminosities simultaneously with the parameters of an expansion model. Hence in comparing competing models, one must reduce the data independently for each. We carry~out such a comparison of $\\Lambda$CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe, using the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample of 252 SN~events, and show that each model fits its individually reduced data...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Maier, Robert S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

110

Single Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

Thomas Schenkel

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Single Ion Implantation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

Thomas Schenkel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Lithium Ion Production NDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

113

Lithium ion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

Roy, Prabir K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Microfabricated ion trap array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

116

Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first wide-range measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density distribution, for different centralities (the 0-5%, 5-10%, 10-20%, and 20-30% most central events) in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$ TeV at the LHC. The measurement is performed using the full coverage of the ALICE detectors, $-5.0 assumptions. The rapidity density distribution is found to be significantly wider than the predictions of the Landau model. We assess the validity of longitudinal scaling by comparing to lower energy results from RHIC. Finally the mechanisms of the underlying particle production are discussed based on a comparison with various theoretical models.

ALICE Collaboration

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Single Spin Asymmetries in Charged Kaon Production from Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1$<$$x_{bj}$$<$0.4 for $K^{+}$ and $K^{-}$ production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for $K^{+}$ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for $K^{-}$ favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the $K^{+}$ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the $K^{-}$ results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

Y. X. Zhao; Y. Wang; K. Allada; K. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; T. Averett; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; P. C. Bradshaw; P. Bosted; A. Camsonne; M. Canan; G. D. Cates; C. Chen; J. -P. Chen; W. Chen; K. Chirapatpimol; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; J. C. Cornejo; F. Cusanno; M. M. Dalton; W. Deconinck; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; X. Deng; A. Deur; H. Ding; P. A. M. Dolph; C. Dutta; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; S. Frullani; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; S. Golge; L. Guo; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; J. Huang; M. Huang; H. F Ibrahim; M. Iodice; X. Jiang; G. Jin; M. K. Jones; J. Katich; A. Kelleher; W. Kim; A. Kolarkar; W. Korsch; J. J. LeRose; X. Li; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; E. Long; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; D. McNulty; Z. -E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; C. Muoz Camacho; S. Nanda; A. Narayan; V. Nelyubin; B. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Osipenko; D. Parno; J. -C. Peng; S. K. Phillips; M. Posik; A. J. R. Puckett; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; A. Rakhman; R. Ransome; S. Riordan; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; A. Shahinyan; M. H. Shabestari; S. irca; S. Stepanyan; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; L. -G. Tang; A. Tobias; G. M. Urciuoli; I. Vilardi; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; Y. Ye; Z. Ye; L. Yuan; X. Zhan; Y. Zhang; Y. -W. Zhang; B. Zhao; X. Zheng; L. Zhu; X. Zhu; X. Zong

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Systematic Study of Chloride Ion Solvation in Water using van der Waals Inclusive Hybrid Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the solvation and electronic structure of the aqueous chloride ion solution was investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based \\textit{ab initio} molecular dynamics (AIMD). From an analysis of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and solvation structures, we found that exact exchange ($E_{\\rm xx}$) and non-local van der Waals (vdW) interactions effectively \\textit{weaken} the interactions between the Cl$^-$ ion and the first solvation shell. With a Cl-O coordination number in excellent agreement with experiment, we found that most configurations generated with vdW-inclusive hybrid DFT exhibit 6-fold coordinated distorted trigonal prism structures, which is indicative of a significantly disordered first solvation shell. By performing a series of band structure calculations on configurations generated from AIMD simulations with varying DFT potentials, we found that the solvated ion orbital energy levels (unlike the band structure of liquid water) strongly depend on the un...

Bankura, Arindam; DiStasio, Robert A; Swartz, Charles W; Klein, Michael L; Wu, Xifan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ion photon emission microscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

120

Collection of ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide an improved technique for detecting ions as the area from which ions are attracted to a detector is increased, consequently increasing the number of ions detected. This is achieved by providing the outer electrodes of the detector connected to the electrical potential, together with alternate intermediate electrodes. The other intermediate electrodes and preferably the housing are grounded. The technique renders such detection techniques more sensitive and gives them a lower threshold at which they can function.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Systematic Study of Chloride Ion Solvation in Water using van der Waals Inclusive Hybrid Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the solvation and electronic structure of the aqueous chloride ion solution was investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based \\textit{ab initio} molecular dynamics (AIMD). From an analysis of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and solvation structures, we found that exact exchange ($E_{\\rm xx}$) and non-local van der Waals (vdW) interactions effectively \\textit{weaken} the interactions between the Cl$^-$ ion and the first solvation shell. With a Cl-O coordination number in excellent agreement with experiment, we found that most configurations generated with vdW-inclusive hybrid DFT exhibit 6-fold coordinated distorted trigonal prism structures, which is indicative of a significantly disordered first solvation shell. By performing a series of band structure calculations on configurations generated from AIMD simulations with varying DFT potentials, we found that the solvated ion orbital energy levels (unlike the band structure of liquid water) strongly depend on the underlying molecular structures. In addition, these orbital energy levels were also significantly affected by the DFT functional employed for the electronic structure; as the fraction of $E_{\\rm xx}$ was increased, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital of Cl$^-$ and the valence band maximum of liquid water steadily increased towards the experimental value.

Arindam Bankura; Biswajit Santra; Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Charles W. Swartz; Michael L. Klein; Xifan Wu

2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

EMSL - ion microprobe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microprobe en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defects...

123

Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

Leung, K.N.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ion-beam technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

Blain, Matthew G.

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ion mobility sensor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 76 FERC 61,347, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services by Public Utilities, Docket No. RM95-8-000, Recovery of Stranded Costs by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMM-OPINION-ORDER, 76 FERC ¶61,347, Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non Incorporated Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non-discriminatory Transmission Services Utilities, Docket No. RM94-7-001 [62,646] [¶61,347] Promoting Wholesale Competition Through Open-Access Non

Laughlin, Robert B.

130

Geosynthetics and Geosynthetic-Engineered Soil Structures, Symposium sponsored by the ASCE Engineering Mechanics Division, honoring Prof. R.M. Koerner, McMat 2005, Baton Rouge, Louisiana June 2, 2005.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geosynthetics and Geosynthetic-Engineered Soil Structures, Symposium sponsored by the ASCE Engineering Mechanics Division, honoring Prof. R.M. Koerner, McMat 2005, Baton Rouge, Louisiana June 2, 2005. Limit analysis of reinforced soils and limit loads on reinforced soil slabs Radoslaw L. Michalowski1

Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

131

Relating to ion detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV in a multiphase transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jets [$v_{n}^{jet} (n=2, 3)$] have been investigated in Pb+Pb collisions at the center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV within a framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The $v_{2}^{jet}$ is in good agreement with the recent ATLAS data. However, the $v_{3}^{jet}$ shows a smaller magnitude than $v_{2}^{jet}$, and approaches zero at a larger transverse momentum. It is attributed to the path-length dependence in which the jet energy loss fraction depends on the azimuthal angles with respect to different orders of event planes. The ratio $v_{n}^{jet}/\\varepsilon_{n}$ increases from peripheral to noncentral collisions, and $v_{n}^{jet}$ increases with the initial spatial asymmetry ($\\varepsilon_{n}$) for a given centrality bin. These behaviors indicate that the $v_{n}^{jet}$ is produced by the strong interactions between jet and the partonic medium with different initial geometry shapes. Therefore, azimuthal anisotropies of reconstructed jet are proposed as a good probe to study the initial spatial fluctuations, which are expected to provide constraints on the path-length dependence of jet quenching models.

Mao-Wu Nie; Guo-Liang Ma

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Long-range pseudorapidity dihadron correlations in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=200$ GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dihadron angular correlations in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=200$ GeV are reported as a function of the measured zero-degree calorimeter neutral energy and the forward charged hadron multiplicity in the Au-beam direction. A finite correlated yield is observed at large relative pseudorapidity ($\\Delta\\eta$) on the near side (i.e. relative azimuth $\\Delta\\phi\\sim0$). This correlated yield as a function of $\\Delta\\eta$ appears to scale with the dominant, primarily jet-related, away-side ($\\Delta\\phi\\sim\\pi$) yield. The Fourier coefficients of the $\\Delta\\phi$ correlation, $V_{n}=\\langle\\cos n\\Delta\\phi\\rangle$, have a strong $\\Delta\\eta$ dependence. In addition, it is found that $V_{1}$ is approximately inversely proportional to the mid-rapidity event multiplicity, while $V_{2}$ is independent of it with similar magnitude in the forward ($d$-going) and backward (Au-going) directions.

L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez; J. M. campbell; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; I. Chakaberia; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; J. H. Chen; X. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; W. Christie; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; H. J. Crawford; S. Das; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; R. Esha; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; P. Federic; J. Fedorisin; Feng; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; L. Fulek; C. A. Gagliardi; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; S. Gupta; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; L. He; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; B. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; K. Jiang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; X. Li; X. Li; W. Li; Z. M. Li; Y. Li; C. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; L. Ma; R. Ma; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; N. Magdy; R. Majka; A. Manion; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; K. Meehan; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; V. Okorokov; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; M. Posik; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; M. K. Sharma; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. Sikora; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Smirnov; D. Solanki; L. Song; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; B. J. Summa; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; X. M. Sun; X. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; A. N. Tawfik; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; S. K. Tripathy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Upsal; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; R. Varma; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; Y. Wang; F. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; G. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; Z. Xu; Q. H. Xu; N. Xu; H. Xu; Y. F. Xu; Y. Yang; C. Yang; S. Yang; Q. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I. -K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; S. Zhang; J. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ion exchange phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Ion sensing method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ion manipulation device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

Ward, James W. (Canoga Park, CA); Schlanger, Herbert (Simi Valley, CA); McNulty, Jr., Hugh (Santa Monica, CA); Parker, Norman W. (Camarillo, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ion electric propulsion unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results of numerical simulations on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. For the beam speed exceeding the thermal speed of background ions and the beam temperature much lower than the background ion temperature, it is found that the instability results in strong perpendicular heating and slowing down of parallel drift of the beam ions, leading to the saturation of the instability. Applications to plasma heating and space plasma physics are discussed.

Miura, A.; Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

MJJ RM Handbook-new  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO Comments forMISUSE

142

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 Total System12 EERE CongressionalDepartment

143

Sandia National Laboratories: RM3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolar Regional Test CenterCMCNational LaboratoriesRF

144

Earned Value Management System RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThreeEnergyDepartment0:Energy3 - In the MatterEarly Days

145

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 Printing andNancy Anne BaugherRFI |Group ReportNational

146

Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

Cowgill, Donald F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

Bower, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Weeks, Donald R. (Saratoga, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Asymmetric ion trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

Asymmetric ion trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Alexander, Michael L. (Richland, WA); Follansbee, James C. (Pasco, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advances in lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in Lithium-Ion Batteries Edited by Walter A. vanpuzzling mysteries of lithium ion batteries. The book beginssuch importance to lithium ion batteries one is amazed that

Kerr, John B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

Greenly, J.B.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Liu, Changle (Midland, MI); Xu, Kang (Montgomery Village, MD); Skotheim, Terje A. (Tucson, AZ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Electron density diagnostic for hot plasmas in coronal regime by using B-like ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Line ratio of $3d-2p$ transition lines in boron-like spectra of Si X, S XII, Ar XIV and Fe XXII has been investigated. Collisional-radiative model calculations reveal that the line ratio is sensitive to the electron density in ranges of $n_{\\rm e}=4.0\\times10^7-3.0\\times10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$, $4.0\\times10^8-3.0\\times10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$, $3.0\\times10^9-4.0\\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $2.0\\times10^{12}-3.0\\times10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$, respectively. This complements the K-shell diagnostics of helium-like ions. By comparison between the prediction and the measured values, effective electron densities in the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) plasmas performed by Lepson and collaborators at Lawrence Livermore EBIT, are estimated to be $n_{\\rm e}=3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.6}\\times10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $5.6^{+1.0}_{-1.1}\\times10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ for sulphur and argon plasmas. In case of argon, a good agreement is shown with the actual electron density derived from N VI K-shell spectrum. We further explore the $3d-2p$ transition lines of Si X and S XII in the stellar coronal spectra measured with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer combined with High Resolution Camera on board the {\\it Chandra X-ray Observatory}. The constrained electron densities show a good agreement with the those determined from C V and O VII K-shell spectra.

Guiyun Liang; Gang Zhao

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Photoabsorption by Ions and Atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of photoabsorption by atoms and ions is presented. Specifically, examples of near-chaotic behavior in photoionization of positive ions, low-energy manifestations of nondipole effects, high-energy breakdown of the single particle picture and new phenomenology uncovered in the inner-shell photoabsorption by negative ions are discussed.

Manson, Steven T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ion Chromatograph | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderndela Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

A novel planar ion funnel design for miniature ion optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The novel planar ion funnel (PIF) design presented in this article emphasizes simple fabrication, assembly, and operation, making it amenable to extreme miniaturization. Simulations performed in SIMION 8.0 indicate that ion focusing can be achieved by using a gradient of electrostatic potentials on concentric metal rings in a plane. A prototype was fabricated on a 35 35 mm custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) with a center hole for ions to pass through and a series of concentric circular metal rings of increasing diameter on the front side of the PCB. Metal vias on the PCB electrically connected each metal ring to a resistive potential divider that was soldered on the back of the PCB. The PIF was tested at 5.5 10{sup ?6} Torr in a vacuum test setup that was equipped with a broad-beam ion source on the front and a micro channel plate (MCP) ion detector on the back of the PIF. The ion current recorded on the MCP anode during testing indicated a 23 increase in the ion transmission through the PIF when electric potentials were applied to the rings. These preliminary results demonstrate the functionality of a 2D ion funnel design with a much smaller footprint and simpler driving electronics than conventional 3D ion funnels. Future directions to improve the design and a possible micromachining approach to fabrication are discussed in the conclusions.

Chaudhary, A.; Amerom, Friso H. W. van; Short, R. T. [Space and Marine Technology Laboratory, SRI International, 450 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compact ion accelerator source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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166

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

DIVALENT ION EXCHANGE WITH ALKALI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injection for Enhanced Oil Recovery - A Status Report," SPEDOE Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, Apri120-ions is important enhanced oil recovery with chemical addi-

Bunge, A.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationships in the Li-Ion Battery Electrode Material LiNiAl foil may be used for Li ion battery cathode materials andElectrode materials, Li ion battery, Na ion battery, X-ray

Doeff, Marca M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Apparatus and method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of dissociating ions in a multipole ion guide is disclosed. A stream of charged ions is supplied to the ion guide. A main RF field is applied to the ion guide to confine the ions through the ion guide. An excitation RF field is applied to one pair of rods of the ion guide. The ions undergo dissociation when the applied excitation RF field is resonant with a secular frequency of the ions. The multipole ion guide is, but not limited to, a quadrupole, a hexapole, and an octopole.

Webb, Ian K.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

asymmetric ion mobility: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both...

172

Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

173

Solid lithium-ion electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Solid lithium-ion electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thin film ion conducting coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laser acceleration of ion beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Metal vapor arc ion plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Review of ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

Alonso, J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nonlinear integrable ion traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microscopic dynamics simulations of heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei are investigated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. With a subtle consideration of the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and the symmetry potential, the stability of nuclei and the fusion excitation functions of heavy-ion fusion reactions $^{16}$O+$^{76}$Ge, $^{16}$O+$^{154}$Sm, $^{40}$Ca+$^{96}$Zr and $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca are systematically studied. The fusion cross sections of these reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier can be well reproduced by using the ImQMD model. The corresponding slope parameter of the symmetry energy adopted in the calculations is $L \\approx 78$ MeV and the surface energy coefficient is $g_{\\rm sur}=18\\pm 1.5$ MeVfm$^2$. In addition, it is found that the surface-symmetry term significantly influences the fusion cross sections of neutron-rich fusion systems. For sub-barrier fusion, the dynamical fluctuations in the densities of the reaction partners and the enhanced surface diffuseness at neck side result in the lowering of the fusion barrier.

Ning Wang; Li Ou; Yingxun Zhang; Zhuxia Li

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solenoid and monocusp ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ion chamber based neutron detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Challenges for Na-ion Negative Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Na-ion batteries have been proposed as candidates for replacing Li-ion batteries. In this paper we examine the viability of Na-ion negative electrode materials based on Na alloys or hard carbons in terms of volumetric ...

Chevrier, V. L.

186

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources Claude M Lyneis, D. Leitner,to developing a 4 th generation ECR ion source with an RFover current 3 rd generation ECR ion sources, which operate

Lyneis, Claude M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

Greenly, John, B.

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

Kwan, Joe W.

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ion/Surface Reactions and Ion Soft-Landing. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/Surface Reactions and Ion Soft-Landing. Ion/Surface

190

Ion transport through cell membrane channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

Hershcovitch, Ady

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

Ji, Lili

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ion beam extractor with counterbore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractor system for a plasma ion source has a single (first) electrode with one or more apertures, or a pair of spaced electrodes, a first or plasma forming electrode and a second or extraction electrode, with one or more aligned apertures. The aperture(s) in the first electrode (or the second electrode or both) have a counterbore on the downstream side (i.e. away from the plasma ion source or facing the second electrode). The counterbored extraction system reduces aberrations and improves focusing. The invention also includes an ion source with the counterbored extraction system, and a method of improving focusing in an extraction system by providing a counterbore.

Ji, Qing; Standiford, Keith; King, Tsu-Jae; Leung, Ka-Ngo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Three chamber negative ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Semiconductor Ion Implanters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

MacKinnon, Barry A. [Isys, 2727 Walsh Ave., Suite 103, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States); Ruffell, John P. [Group 3, LLC, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Surface trap for ytterbium ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conducted an experiment to load a shallow planar ion trap from a cold atom source of Ytterbium using photoionization. The surface trap consisted of a three-rod radio frequency Paul trap fabricated using standard printed ...

Campbell, Jonathan A. (Jonathan Alan)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Vitrification of ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Turbulent transport of energetic ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaching ITER operation, the issue of anomalous transport of fast particles becomes more and more important. This is partly because the ITER heating and current drive system relies heavily on neutral beam injection. Moreover burning plasmas are heated by fast fusion {alpha} particles.Fusion {alpha} particles are characterised by a fixed energy and an isotropic velocity distribution. Therefore they have gyroradii one magnitude larger than the thermal ions. The dependency of the particle diffusion of {alpha} test particles on the Kubo number K = VExB{tau}c/{lambda}c (VExB mean E x B velocity, {tau}c, {lambda}c correlation time and length of the turbulent potential) is presented. For different turbulent regimes, different dependency of the diffusion on the gyroradius is found. For large Kubo numbers, the transport is found to remain constant for gyroradii up to the correlation length of the potential, whereas it is drastically reduced in the small Kubo number regime.In the second part, a model for beam ions injected along the equilibrium magnetic field is described. The beam ions are treated gyrokinetically in a self-consistent way with the equilibrium distribution function taken as a shifted Maxwellian. The implications of such a model for the Vlasov equation, the field equations, and the calculation of moments and fluxes are discussed. Linear and nonlinear results, obtained with the gyrokinetic flux tube code GENE show the existence of a new instability driven by fast beam ions. The instability has a maximum growth rate at perpendicular wave numbers of ky{rho}s {approx} 0.15 and depends mainly on the beam velocity and the density gradient of the beam ions. This instability leads to a replacement of bulk ion particle transport by fast ion particle transport, connected to a strongly enhanced heat flux. In the presence of this instability, the turbulent particle and heat transport is dominated by fast ions.

Dannert, Tilman; Hauff, Thilo; Jenko, Frank; Guenter, Sibylle [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Perspective Ion Channels: From Conductance to Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane is an essen- tially insurmountable barrier for the flow of ions; therefore, ion transport is carried out by membrane-embedded specialized proteins in the form of transporters and ion channels a purely electrical concept to a structural dynamics view of ions in- teracting with a membrane protein

Bezanilla, Francisco

200

Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ?3 solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9?keV created by molybdenum He-? emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4{sup ?1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

Ma, T., E-mail: ma8@llnl.gov; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Dppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)] [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chapman, D. A. [Plasma Physics Group, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom) [Plasma Physics Group, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Falcone, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fortmann, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States) [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; White, T. G. [University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Extreme Matter Institute, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Vorberger, J. [Max Planck Institut fr Physik komplexer Systeme, Ntthnizer Strae 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Max Planck Institut fr Physik komplexer Systeme, Ntthnizer Strae 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A {approximately} 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies {radical}s {approximately} 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

Gavin, S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A [approximately] 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies [radical]s [approximately] 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

Gavin, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Chemistry of heavy ion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

Hoffman, D.C.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Voltage, Stability and Diffusion Barrier Differences between Sodium-ion and Lithium-ion Intercalation Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To evaluate the potential of Na-ion batteries, we contrast in this work the difference between Na-ion and Li-ion based intercalation chemistries in terms of three key battery propertiesvoltage, phase stability and diffusion ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

209

Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternatives to Current Lithium-Ion Batteries. Adv. EnergyMaterials for Lithium Ion Batteries. Materials Matters. 7 4.to the Study of Lithium Ion Batteries. J. Solid State

Doeff, Marca M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Increased Ion Transmission: Exploring the Analytical Utility of Periodic-Focusing DC Ion Guide Drift Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful, post-ionization separation that yields structural information of ions through an ion-neutral collision cross section. The ion-neutral collision cross section is governed by the collision...

Blase, Ryan Christopher

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

Trapped-ion Lissajous trajectories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we present a protocol for generating Lissajous curves with a trapped ion by engineering Rashba- and the Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit interactions in a Paul trap. The unique anisotropic Rashba $\\alpha_{x}$, $\\alpha_{y}$ and Dresselhaus $\\beta_{x}$, $\\beta_{y}$ couplings afforded by our setup also enables us to obtain an "unusual" Zitterbewegung, i.e., the semiconductor analog of the relativistic trembling motion of electrons, with cycloidal trajectories in the absence of magnetic fields. We have also introduced bounded SO interactions, confined to an upper-bound vibrational subspace of the Fock states, as an additional mechanism to manipulate the Lissajous motion of the trapped ion. Finally, we accounted for dissipative effects on the vibrational degrees of freedom of the ion and find that the Lissajous trajectories are still robust and well defined for realistic parameters.

R. F. Rossetti; G. D. de Moraes Neto; J. Carlos Egues; M. H. Y. Moussa

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Tachyon Physics with Trapped Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been predicted that particles with imaginary mass, called tachyons, would be able to travel faster than the speed of light. So far, there has not been any experimental evidence for tachyons in either natural or engineered systems. Here, we propose how to experimentally simulate Dirac tachyons with trapped ions. Quantum measurement on a Dirac particle simulated by a trapped ion causes it to have an imaginary mass so that it may travel faster than the effective speed of light. We show that a Dirac tachyon must have spinor-motion entanglement in order to be superluminal. We also show that it exhibits significantly more Klein tunneling than a normal Dirac particle. We provide numerical simulations with realistic ion systems and show that our scheme is feasible with current technology.

Lee, Tony E; Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

215

Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

218

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Central collisions of heavy ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

Fung, Sun-yiu.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ion exchange purification of scandium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relating to monitoring ion sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulfCenterHeavy Ions Heavy ions

223

Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Abstract: Differential ion...

225

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

226

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Abstract: Sodium ion (Na+) batteries...

227

ambient ion sources: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

228

The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

Shaw, A. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

6 Ion Transport, Osmoregulation, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

177 6 Ion Transport, Osmoregulation, and Acid­Base Balance W.S. Marshall and M. Grosell CONTENTS I)............................................................................182 5. Skin and Opercular Membrane..................................................................................................183 2. Sea-Water Transport Mode -- Na+,K+-ATPase and Na+,K+, 2Cl­ Co-transport

Grosell, Martin

230

Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM); Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

An improved measurement of electron-ion recombination in high-pressure xenon gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on results obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype of the NEXT-100 high-pressure xenon gas time projection chamber (TPC), exposed to an alpha decay calibration source. Compared to our previous measurements with alpha particles, an upgraded detector and improved analysis techniques have been used. We measure event-by-event correlated fluctuations between ionization and scintillation due to electron-ion recombination in the gas, with correlation coeffcients between -0.80 and -0.56 depending on the drift field conditions. By combining the two signals, we obtain a 2.8 % FWHM energy resolution for 5.49 MeV alpha particles and a measurement of the optical gain of the electroluminescent TPC. The improved energy resolution also allows us to measure the specific activity of the radon in the gas due to natural impurities. Finally, we measure the average ratio of excited to ionized atoms produced in the xenon gas by alpha particles to be $0.561\\pm 0.045$, translating into an average energy to produce a primary scintillation photon of $W_{\\rm ex}=(39.2\\pm 3.2)$ eV.

NEXT Collaboration; L. Serra; M. Sorel; V. lvarez; F. I. G. Borges; M. Camargo; S. Crcel; S. Cebrin; A. Cervera; C. A. N. Conde; T. Dafni; J. Daz; R. Esteve; L. M. P. Fernandes; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. D. C. Freitas; V. M. Gehman; A. Goldschmidt; J. J. Gmez-Cadenas; D. Gonzlez-Daz; R. M. Gutirrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; I. G. Irastorza; L. Labarga; A. Laing; I. Liubarsky; N. Lopez-March; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzn; A. Mar; J. Martn-Albo; G. Martnez-Lema; A. Martnez; T. Miller; F. Monrabal; M. Monserrate; C. M. B. Monteiro; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Muoz Vidal; M. Nebot-Guinot; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; J. Prez; J. L. Prez Aparicio; M. Querol; J. Renner; L. Ripoll; A. Rodrguez; J. Rodrguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; D. Shuman; A. Simn; C. Sofka; J. F. Toledo; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; J. F. C. A. Veloso; J. A. Villar; R. Webb; J. T. White; N. Yahlali

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nonlinear ion concentration polarization : fundamentals and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion exchange membrane (IEM) is a functional material that has a permselectivity of ions. Two types of IEMs - anion exchange membrane (AEM) and cation exchange membrane (CEM) - are used in a variety of electrochemical ...

Kwak, Rhokyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Laser ion source with solenoid field  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

Roy J. Glauber

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Adsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale particles showed much improved Cu ion adsorption efficiency, compared with the micro hydro- gels. The amountAdsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) Micro

238

Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

Remsberg, L.P.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Strangeness signals in heavy ion collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental data on strange meson and strange baryon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed.

Remsberg, L.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Solution dewatering with concomitant ion removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One of the biggest needs in the separations and waste handling and reduction area is a method for dewatering ion-containing solutions. Unexpectedly, it has been found that phosphazene polymers can discriminate between water and metal ions, allowing water to pass through the membrane while retaining the ions. This unexpected result, along with the inherent chemical and thermal stability of the phosphazene polymers, yields a powerful tool for separating and dewatering metal-ion-containing solutions.

Peterson, Eric S.; Marshall, Douglas W.; Stone, Mark L.

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-see http://videos.komando.com/2008/08/19/water-painting/]. #12;12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 1 Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion* Presented by B. Grant Logan on behalf of the U.S. Heavy Ion

242

Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry . Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion...

243

Improved Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the assembled Li-ion battery, such as the operating1-4: Schematic of a Li-ion battery. Li + ions are shuttledprocessing of active Li-ion battery materials. Various

Conry, Thomas Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Study on space charge effect in an electrostatic ion analyzer applied to measure laser produced ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of different ions produced by laser ion sources is usually analyzed by an electrostatic ion analyzer (EIA). Ion current intensities in the range of several mA/cm{sup 2} at the position of the EIA have been achieved from the laser ion source developed by the Institute of Modern Physics; this indicates that a noticeable influence of space charge effect during the ion transmission will occur. Hence, while the parameters of the EIA or the beams are changed, such as ion species, current intensity, the ions transmission efficiency through the EIA is different, which will result in an uncertainty in the estimation of the ions yields. Special attention is focused on this issue in this paper. Ion's transmissions through the EIA under different circumstances are studied with simulations and experiments, the results of which are consistent with each other.

Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Sha, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Distribution of ion current density on a rotating spherical cap substrate during ion-assisted deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uniformity of ion density is critical for applications relying on the ion assisted deposition technique for the fabrication of the high quality thin films. The authors propose and describe here a method allowing one to calculate the ion density distribution on spherical substrate holders under stationary and rotating conditions for different positions of the ion source. The ion beam shape was approximated by a cos{sup n} function, and the ion current density was represented by a function inversely proportional to the distance from the ion source in accordance with our experimental results. As an example, a calculation of the current density distribution on the spherical cap substrate was performed for a broad beam ion source operated with an anode current of 3?A. The authors propose an approach for process optimization with respect to the ion source position and its inclination, in terms of uniformity and absolute value of the ion current density.

Marushka, Viktor; Zabeida, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.zabeida@polymtl.ca; Martinu, Ludvik [Engineering Physics Department, Polytechnique Montral, P.O. Box 6079, Downtown station, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past year, the main emphasis in this research program has been on multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of aromatic clusters. This is being pursued in addition to continuing work in areas of ion dip spectroscopy and ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The program has the overall objective of developing improved ultrasensitive molecular detection methods based on multiphoton laser spectroscopy. Photoionization techniques are employed due to their extreme sensitivity combined with mass selectivity. The combination of these two features has led to the current capability to study molecular clusters of specific sizes with high spectral resolution. Clusters are formed in abundance in a supersonic expansion, where they are excited and ionized by an ultraviolet laser beam. The studies reported here are principally based on simple resonant excitation of clusters, followed by one-photon ionization. For the naphthalene clusters, a single laser wavelength suffices for both excitation steps. Additional investigations have been carried out to measure excited state cluster ionization spectra and cluster ion fragmentation spectra. Results from these measurements are not yet sufficiently advanced to report in detail, however the preliminary data support the importance of recently proposed new fundamental ionization mechanisms in clusters. This brief report summarizes results described in more detail in the preprint titled: Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of naphthalene clusters and the preprint titled: Resonance interactions in naphthalene clusters. It also briefly describes preliminary undisclosed results of current investigations.

Wessel, J.E.

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Power Marketing and Contracts in RM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements for FERC Order 890 as outlined in Western's Open Access Transmission Tariff. Final Agenda - Meeting Transmission Challenges in the Rocky Mountain Region...

248

Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Western's RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by adding 11 wind turbine generators (WTGs) on approximately 1,200 acres of State and private land adjoining the eastern border of the existing Project. The electricity...

249

Conceptual Design RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized9 *Concentrating SolarDesign

250

Conceptual Safety Design RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized9 *Concentrating

251

Decommissioning Plan RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone Modeling | Department

252

Final Design RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department-5FederalFeds feedFerrinFinal Design

253

Integrated Project Team RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives Initiatives Through a variety ofthe Supportingand2011Integrated

254

High Performance Sustainable Building Design RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTSSeparationHelping to Finance3High

255

Acquisition Strategy RM | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3-- ------------------------------Chapter 39.2 (June 2005) 1

256

Readiness Review RM | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergy 0611__Joint_DOE_GoJ_AMS_Data_v3.pptx More DocumentsCommunicationsProvides an

257

Risk Management RM | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan Funds Revolving LoanA l i c e L i p

258

Safety Design Strategy RM | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENT OF Peter Malati,

259

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of-Director'sPolicy

260

Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1  470.4-7 | Department

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Preliminary Design RM | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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262

Construction Project Safety and Health Plan RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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263

Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Western's RM Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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264

Power Marketing and Contracts in RM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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265

Microsoft Word - RM Procedures.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05 Oak RidgeBob Charrow Date: OctoberRecords

266

Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

Bierschenk, Thomas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Giulian, Raquel [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Afra, Boshra [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Rodriguez, Matias D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Schauries, D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Mudie, Stephen [Australian Synchrotron] [Australian Synchrotron; Pakarinen, Olli H [ORNL] [ORNL; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Osmani, Orkhan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany] [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Medvedev, Nikita [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Rethfield, Baerbel [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Ridgway, Mark C [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Kluth, Patrick [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Composite oxygen ion transport element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oxygen ion-beam microlithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electrolytes for lithium ion batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of electrolytes for use in a lithium ion battery. The genus of electrolytes includes ketone-based solvents, such as, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone; 3,3-dimethyl 2-butanone(pinacolone) and 2-butanone. These solvents can be used in combination with non-Lewis Acid salts, such as Li.sub.2[B.sub.12F.sub.12] and LiBOB.

Vaughey, John; Jansen, Andrew N.; Dees, Dennis W.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Central collisions of heavy ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

Fung, Sun-yiu.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The ion pairs and superconducting bosons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First, it is shown that the creation of the spinless ion pairs in the lattice, which are hold by the binding with neighbor ion pairs together regarded as covalent. These ion pairs are created by the repulsive potential interaction of two ions which is bound as linear oscillator. The repulsive S-wave scattering between ion pairs and electrons is transformed to the attractive effective interaction between electrons which leads to a creation of electron pairs by a binding energy depending on the condensate fraction of ion pairs $\\frac{N_0}{N}$. In this respect, the absence of ion pairs in the condensate destroys a binding energy of electron pairs and in turn so-called superconductimg phase. As new result presented theory is that the number of the superconducting bosons is not changed in the superconducting phase.

V. N. Minasyan

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This enterprise uses photoelectron spectroscopy to study the properties of negative ions and radicals. The essence of our experiment is to cross a 0.6 keV mass-selected ion beam (M{sup {minus}}) with the output of a CW laser, {Dirac h}{omega}{sub o}. The resultant detached photoelectrons with kinetic energy, KE, are energy analyzed by means of a set of electrostatic hemispherical analyzers. Analysis of the photoelectron spectra enables us to extract molecular electron affinities, vibrational frequencies and electronic splittings of the final radical, M, as well as the relative molecular geometries of ions (M{sup {minus}}) and radicals (M). We have scrutinized the two simplest nitrenes: methylnitrene (CH{sub 3}N) and phenylnitrene (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N). By preparing the corresponding anions, CH{sub 3}N{sup {minus}} and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N{sup {minus}}, we have studied these nitrene biradicals. Singlet methylnitrene is especially interesting since it is formally a transition state.''

Ellison, G.B.

1992-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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274

Ion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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275

Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

active material for Li-ion battery, Fe2OF4. ElectrochemistryIron Fluoride, in a Li Ion Battery: A Solid-State NMR, X-raymaterials for Li-ion battery133 8.2. P2 type

Lee, Dae Hoe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Deep Reactive Ion Etching | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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278

ION Engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive LtdINDEX Jump to: navigation,ION

279

Sample inlet tube for ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved inlet tube is positioned within an aperture through the device to allow the passage of ions from the ion source, through the improved inlet tube, and into the interior of the device. The inlet tube is designed with a larger end and a smaller end wherein the larger end has a larger interior diameter than the interior diameter of the smaller end. The inlet tube is positioned within the aperture such that the larger end is pointed towards the ion source, to receive ions therefrom, and the smaller end is directed towards the interior of the device, to deliver the ions thereto. Preferably, the ion source utilized in the operation of the present invention is a standard electrospray ionization source. Similarly, the present invention finds particular utility in conjunction with analytical devices such as mass spectrometers.

Prior, David [Hermiston, OR; Price, John [Richland, WA; Bruce, Jim [Oceanside, CA

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Anisotropic reactive ion etching of vanadium dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Weichold Vanadium dioxide (V02) was anisotropically reactive ion etched using carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) . CF4, as an etch gas, provided the chemistry along with the control needed to achieve an anisotropic etch. This chemistry was practically inert... with vanadium quite easily. This leads to interest in using a fluorine- based chemistry. The goal of this research is to produce a selective anisotropic reactive ion etch for VO2 /photoresist using only carbon tetrafluoride (CFq) . Reactive ion etching...

Radle, Byron K

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

Lucht, Brett L

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

Foster, Nancy S. (Boulder, CO); Koval, Carl A. (Golden, CO); Noble, Richard D. (Boulder, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Romanian ECR ion source project RECRIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 14.5 GHz ECR ion source is in an advanced stage of construction at the Institute of Atomic Physics of Bucharest, Romania. This ECR multicharge heavy ion source (RECRIS) is designed to be independently used in atomic physics research as well as an injector into the existing rf heavy ion postaccelerator of the Bucharest FN tandem accelerator. The general design and main characteristics of RECRIS are presented as well as the present status and the schedule of this project. A research program and facility was started in order to study physical ways to improve the ECR ion source performances. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Dobrescu, S.; Schaechter, L.; Badescu-Singureanu, A.I.; Zoran, V. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P. O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)] [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P. O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Perpendicular ion acceleration in whistler turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whistler turbulence is an important contributor to solar wind turbulence dissipation. This turbulence contains obliquely propagating whistler waves at electron scales, and these waves have electrostatic components perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. In this paper, a full kinetic, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that whistler turbulence can accelerate ions in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. When the ions pass through wave-particle resonances region in the phase space during their cyclotron motion, the ions are effectively accelerated in the perpendicular direction. The simulation results suggest that whistler turbulence contributes to the perpendicular heating of ions observed in the solar wind.

Saito, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)] [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Low Energy Ion Implantationin Semiconductor Manufacturing | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Low Energy Ion Implantation in Semiconductor Manufacturing Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

287

Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltn

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

Clark, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Characterization of ionic liquid ion sources for focused ion beam applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique, a beam of ions is reduced to nanometer dimensions using dedicated optics and directed to a substrate for patterning. This technique is widely used in micro- and nanofabrication for ...

Perez Martinez, Carla S. (Carla Sofia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Excited level anisotropy produced by ion-solid and ion-liquid surface interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXCITED LEPEL ANISOTPOPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE INTERACTIONS A Thesis CHIN SHUANG LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Physics EXCITED LEVEL ANISOTROPY PRODUCED BY ION-SOLID AND ION-LIQUID SURFACE 'INTERACTIONS A Thesis by CHIN SHUANG LEE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Departmert Member...

Lee, Chin Shuang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ion acoustic solitons/double layers in two-ion plasma revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion acoustic solitons and double layers are studied in a collisionless plasma consisting of cold heavier ion species, a warm lighter ion species, and hot electrons having Boltzmann distributions by Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. In contrast to the previous results, no double layers and super-solitons are found when both the heavy and lighter ion species are treated as cold. Only the positive potential solitons are found in this case. When the thermal effects of the lighter ion species are included, in addition to the usual ion-acoustic solitons occurring at M?>?1 (where the Mach number, M, is defined as the ratio of the speed of the solitary wave and the ion-acoustic speed considering temperature of hot electrons and mass of the heavier ion species), slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers are found to occur at low Mach number (M?ion-acoustic mode is actually a new ion-ion hybrid acoustic mode which disappears when the normalized number density of lighter ion species tends to 1 (i.e., no heavier species). An interesting property of the new slow ion-acoustic mode is that at low number density of the lighter ion species, only negative potential solitons/double layers are found whereas for increasing densities there is a transition first to positive solitons/double layers, and then only positive solitons. The model can be easily applicable to the dusty plasmas having positively charged dust grains by replacing the heavier ion species by the dust mass and doing a simple normalization to take account of the dust charge.

Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: gslakhina@gmail.com; Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Kakad, A. P., E-mail: amar@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

Wessel, J.

1987-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Analysis by Highly Charged Ion Based Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry T. Schenkel,1 A high vacuum (10^8 torr). In posi- tive polarity, HCI can be decelerated to an impact energy of $1 ke in the interaction of slow (u highly charged ions (e.g., Au69+ ) with solid surfaces increases secondary

294

The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-consistent power plant design for a multi- beam induction linac, final focus and chamber propagationThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan Director Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Presented to FESAC Workshop on Development Paths

295

The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

Knapp, D.

1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

atom-probe field ion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2...

297

Beam current controller for laser ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

Okamura, Masahiro

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SMALL FREE NEGATIVE IONS R. STEPHEN BERRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are those pertinent to gaseous discharge physics, to radiation damage problems, and to the study of ion. Electron Affinities A. The Hydride Ion B. Optical Methods C. Thresholds and Excited States D. Other, and optical properties, and the experi- mental and theoretical methods for studying these properties. We

Berry, R. Stephen

300

Laser cooling of trapped ions Jurgen Eschner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the art is reported, and several new cooling techniques are outlined. The principles of ion trapping by elucidating several milestone experiments. In addition, a number of special cooling techniques pertainingLaser cooling of trapped ions Jurgen Eschner Institut fu r Experimentalphysik, Universita

Blatt, Rainer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions. PACS numbers: 31.15.AR,31

302

Heavy ion fusion physics issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple systems model has been used to determine the sensitivity of the cost of electricity and the total cost of a power plant to the various uncertainties expressed in the following six issues. (1) can, at reasonable cost, an accelerator be built that puts more than 1 MJ of energy into a small 6-D phase space volume. (2) Can the beam be focused over a distance of several meters onto a small target in a reaction chamber. (3) Do present calculations adequately describe ion energy deposition. (4) Do current numerical simulations adequately describe the hydrodynamic and thermonuclear behavior of targets. (5) Can targets be cheaply mass produced. (6) Can an economical, tritium-breeding reactor be built.

Bangerter, R.O.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Rechargeable lithium-ion cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

Bechtold, Dieter (Bad Vilbel, DE); Bartke, Dietrich (Kelkheim, DE); Kramer, Peter (Konigstein, DE); Kretzschmar, Reiner (Kelkheim, DE); Vollbert, Jurgen (Hattersheim, DE)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NA61/SHINE ion program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN covers one of the most interesting regions of the phase diagram (T - \\mu_{B}) of strongly interacting matter. The study of central Pb+Pb collisions by NA49 indicate that the threshold for deconfinement is reached already at the low SPS energies. Theoretical considerations predict a critical point of strongly interacting matter at energies accessible at the SPS. The NA61/SHINE experiment, a successor of the NA49 project, will study hadron production in p+p, p+A, h+A, and A+A reactions at various energies. The broad physics program includes the investigation of the properties of strongly interacting matter, as well as precision measurements of hadron spectra for the T2K neutrino experiment and for the Pierre Auger Observatory and KASCADE cosmic-ray projects. The main physics goals of the NA61/SHINE ion program are to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement at low SPS energies and to find signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. To achieve these goals a broad range in the (T - \\mu_{B}) phase diagram will be covered by performing an energy (10A-158A GeV/c) and system size (p+p, B+C, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) scan. The first data for this 2-D scan were taken in 2009, i.e. p+p interactions at 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 GeV/c beam energy. This contribution will summarize physics arguments for the NA61/SHINE ion program, show the detector performance and present the current status of the experiment and plans for the next years.

Maja Mackowiak for the NA61 Collaboration

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Magnetic island evolution in hot ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of finite ion temperature on magnetic island evolution are studied by means of numerical simulations of a reduced set of two-fluid equations which include ion as well as electron diamagnetism in slab geometry. The polarization current is found to be almost an order of magnitude larger in hot than in cold ion plasmas, due to the strong shear of ion velocity around the separatrix of the magnetic islands. As a function of the island width, the propagation speed decreases from the electron drift velocity (for islands thinner than the Larmor radius) to values close to the guiding-center velocity (for islands of order 10 times the Larmor radius). In the latter regime, the polarization current is destabilizing (i.e., it drives magnetic island growth). This is in contrast to cold ion plasmas, where the polarization current is generally found to have a healing effect on freely propagating magnetic island.

Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ion acceleration processes at reforming collisionless shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The identification of pre-acceleration mechanisms for cosmic ray ions in supernova remnant shocks is an important problem in astrophysics. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) shock simulations have shown that inclusion of the full electron kinetics yields non-time-stationary solutions, in contrast to previous hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations. Here, by running a PIC code at high phase space resolution, ion acceleration mechanisms associated with the time dependence of a supercritical collisionless perpendicular shock are examined. In particular the components of $\\int \\mathbf{F} \\cdot \\mathbf{v} dt$ are analysed along trajectories for ions that reach both high and low energies. Selection mechanisms for the ions that reach high energies are also examined. In contrast to quasi-stationary shock solutions, the suprathermal protons are selected from the background population on the basis of the time at which they arrive at the shock, and thus are generated in bursts.

R. E. Lee; S. C. Chapman; R. O. Dendy

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

ECR ion source with electron gun  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Production of multiply charged ion beams from solid substances with the mVINIS ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mVINIS ion source has enabled us to obtain multiply charged ion beams from gases as well as from solid materials. The solid substance ion beams were produced by using two techniques: (a) the evaporation of metals by using the inlet system based on a minioven and (b) the metal-ions-from-volatile-compounds method (MIVOC) by using the modified gas inlet system. Great efforts were made in the production of high current stable ion beams of solids with relatively high melting points (over 1000 deg. C). The B{sup 3+} ion-beam current of over 300 {mu}A was one of the most intensive beams extracted until now. The obtained multiply charged ion-beam spectra of solid substances (B, Fe, and Zn) are presented as well as some of the corresponding experimental results achieved during the modification of polymers, carbon materials, and fullerenes.

Draganic, I.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Nedeljkovic, T.; Siljegovic, M. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box. 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Response of Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation. Response of Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation. Abstract: Response of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) to ion and...

313

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Friday, 23 March 2012 13:53 Lithium-ion batteries are in smart...

314

Model Reformulation and Design of Lithium-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

987 94 Model Reformulation and Design of Lithium-ion Batteries V.R. Subramanian1,*, V. Boovaragavan Prediction......................................997 Optimal Design of Lithium-ion Batteries Lithium-ion batteries, product design, Bayesian estimation, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation

Subramanian, Venkat

315

Ground-state alignment of atoms and ions: New Diagnostics of Astrophysical Magnetic field in diffuse medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a new technique of studying magnetic fields in diffuse astrophysical media, e.g. interstellar and intergalactic gas/plasma. This technique is based on the angular momentum alignment of atoms and ions in their ground or metastable states. As the life-time of atoms in such states is long, the alignment induced by anisotropic radiation is susceptible to weak magnetic fields ($1{\\rm G}\\gtrsim B\\gtrsim0.1\\mu$G). The alignment reveals itself in terms of the polarization of the absorbed and emitted light. A variety of atoms with fine or hyperfine splitting of the ground or metastable states exhibit the alignment and the resulting polarization degree in some cases exceeds 20%. We show that in the case of absorption the polarization direction is either parallel or perpendicular to magnetic field, while more complex dependencies emerge for the case of emission of aligned atoms. We show that the corresponding studies of magnetic fields can be performed with optical and UV polarimetry. A unique feature of these studies is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In addition, we point out that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide yet another promising diagnostics of magnetic fields, including the magnetic fields in the Early Universe. We mention several cases of interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields for which the studies of magnetic fields using ground state atomic alignment effect are promising.

Huirong Yan; A. Lazarian

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ion Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnels and Elevated Drift Gas Pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to characterize biological mixtures has been illustrated over the past eight years. However, the challenges posed by the extreme complexity of many biological samples have demonstrated the need for higher resolution IMS-MS measurements. We have developed a higher resolution ESI-IMS-TOF MS by utilizing high pressure electrodynamic ion funnels at both ends of the IMS drift cell and operating the drift cell at an elevated pressure compared to a previous design. The ESI-IMS-TOF MS instrument consists of an ESI source, an hourglass ion funnel used for ion accumulation/injection into an 88 cm drift cell followed by a 10 cm ion funnel and a commercial orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer providing high mass measurement accuracy. It was found that the rear (exit) ion funnel could be effectively operated as an extension of the drift cell when the DC fields were matched, allowing the instrument to have an effective drift region of 98 cm. Two differentially pumped quadrupole regions were used to couple the IMS and TOF MS to focus and minimize the ion transient time between the stages. The resolution of the instrument was evaluated at pressures ranging from 4 to12 Torr and ion mobility drift voltages of 16 V/cm (4 Torr) to 43 V/cm (12 Torr). An increase in resolution from 55 to 80 was observed from 4 to 12 Torr nitrogen drift gas with no loss in sensitivity. Given the increased usage of ion funnels prior to ion mobility separations, additional attention was directed towards the influence of drift gas on the observed ion populations trapped and transmitted using an electrodynamic ion funnel. The choice of drift gas was shown to influence the degree of ion heating and relative trapping efficiency within the ion funnel.

Baker, Erin Shammel; Clowers, Brian H.; Li, Fumin; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Prior, David C.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Solid lithium ion conducting electrolytes and methods of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition comprised of nanoparticles of lithium ion conducting solid oxide material, wherein the solid oxide material is comprised of lithium ions, and at least one type of metal ion selected from pentavalent metal ions and trivalent lanthanide metal ions. Solution methods useful for synthesizing these solid oxide materials, as well as precursor solutions and components thereof, are also described. The solid oxide materials are incorporated as electrolytes into lithium ion batteries.

Narula, Chaitanya K; Daniel, Claus

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

319

Secretary Chu Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production in North Carolina Secretary Chu Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production in North Carolina July 26, 2011 -...

320

EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Next Generation Lithium Ion...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Next Generation Lithium Ion Batteries Breakout Session Report EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Next Generation Lithium Ion Batteries Breakout Session Report Breakout session...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Abstract: Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have...

322

Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

323

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

324

Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

325

EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Beyond Lithium Ion Breakout...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Beyond Lithium Ion Breakout Session Report EV Everywhere Batteries Workshop - Beyond Lithium Ion Breakout Session Report Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand...

326

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

327

Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

15eswise2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte...

328

Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Free Energy Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using...

329

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

330

Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable magnesium...

331

Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success...

332

Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

Efthimion, P.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques 2011 DOE...

334

Accelerated High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Hydrogen. Accelerated High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Hydrogen. Abstract: The resolving...

335

Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage...

336

anionic ion exchangers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ions and water flow under the influence of gradients in hydrostatic pressure, ion chemical potential, and electrical potential (voltage), leading to solvent flow, ionic fluxes...

337

alkane molecular ions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1977-01-01 25 Blackbody thermometry with cold molecular ions and application to ion-based frequency standards Physics Websites Summary: Blackbody thermometry with cold...

338

Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

339

Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell ironiron-oxide nanomaterials. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide...

340

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP`s and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 {mu}s, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity.

Gauvreau, J.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ion chromatographic analysis of oil shale leachates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work an investigation of the use of ion chromatography to determine environmentally significant anions present in oil shale leachates was undertaken. Nadkarni et al. have used ion chromatography to separate and quantify halogen, sulfur and nitrogen species in oil shales after combustion in a Parr bomb. Potts and Potas used ion chromatography to monitor inorganic ions in cooling tower wastewater from coal gasification. Wallace and coworkers have used ion chromatography to determine anions encountered in retort wastewaters. The ions of interest in this work were the ions of sulfur oxides including sulfite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionite (S{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionate (S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), peroxyodisulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}), and tetrathionate (S{sub 4}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), sulfide (S{sup 2{minus}}) hydrosulfide (HS{sup {minus}}), cyanide (CN{sup {minus}}), thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), and cyanate (OCN{sup {minus}}). A literature search was completed and a leaching procedure developed. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Butler, N.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Improved production of N{sup +} ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N{sup +} ion beam using a multicusp ion source having a chamber formed by a cylindrical chamber wall surrounded by a plurality of magnets, a filament centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode having an extraction orifice at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets spaced from said plasma electrode and dividing the chamber into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber, maintaining the chamber wall at a positive voltage relative to the filament and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beam, disposing a hot liner within the chamber and near the chamber wall to limit recombination of N{sup +} ions into the N{sub 2}{sup +} ions, spacing the magnets of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3--8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} torr) for an optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beam.

Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kunkel, W.B.; Walther, S.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Damage profile and ion distribution of slow heavy ions in compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a significant concentration of defects and lattice disorder in solids during their slowing-down process via ion-solid interactions. For irradiation effects research and many industrial applications, atomic defect production, ion range, and doping concentration are commonly estimated by the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code. In this study, ion-induced damage and projectile ranges of low energy Au ions in SiC are determined using complementary ion beam and microscopy techniques. Considerable errors in both disorder profile and ion range predicted by the SRIM code indicate an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, by a factor of 2 in most cases, in the energy region up to 25 keV/nucleon. Such large discrepancies are also observed for slow heavy ions, including Pt, Au, and Pb ions, in other compound materials, such as GaN, AlN, and SrTiO{sub 3}. Due to the importance of these materials for advanced device and nuclear applications, better electronic stopping cross section predictions, based on a reciprocity principle developed by Sigmund, is suggested with fitting parameters for possible improvement.

Zhang Yanwen; Wang Chongmin; Zhu Zihua; Jiang Weilin; Weber, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Bae, I.-T. [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Sun Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ishimaru, Manabu [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Focused ion beam source method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Physics with fast molecular-ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

Kanter, E.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Spontaneous ion beam formation in the laboratory, space, and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence for the spontaneous formation of multiple double layers within a single divergent magnetic field structure. Downstream of the divergent magnetic field, multiple accelerated ion populations are observed. The similarity of the accelerated ion populations observed in these laboratory experiments to ion populations observed in the magnetosphere and in numerical simulations suggests that the observation of a complex ion velocity distribution alone is insufficient to distinguish between simple plasma expansion and magnetic reconnection. Further, the effective temperature of the aggregate ion population is significantly larger than the temperatures of the individual ion population components, suggesting that insufficiently resolved measurements could misidentify multiple beam creation as ion heating. Ions accelerated in randomly oriented electric fields that mimic heating would have an ion heating rate dependent on the ion charge and mass that is qualitatively consistent with recent experimental observations of ion heating during magnetic reconnection.

Carr, J. Jr.; Cassak, P. A.; Galante, M.; Keesee, A. M.; Lusk, G.; Magee, R. M.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; Vandervort, R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [University of Troms, Troms (Norway)] [University of Troms, Troms (Norway); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [Department of Physics, University of ColoradoBoulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of ColoradoBoulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Eastwood, J. P. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

A quantum information processor with trapped ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum computers hold the promise to solve certain problems exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. Trapped atomic ions are among the physical systems in which building such a computing device seems viable. ...

Schindler, Philipp

351

Intercalation dynamics in lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new continuum model has been proposed by Singh, Ceder, and Bazant for the ion intercalation dynamics in a single crystal of rechargeable-battery electrode materials. It is based on the Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled to ...

Burch, Damian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Towards the development of calcium ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel system for the study of calcium-ion electroactive materials has been developed, characterized, and utilized to screen a number of candidate calcium intercalation compounds. The system is comprised of a dried, ...

Rogosic, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ion processing element with composite media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Confirms the Prediction that (CO)5 and (CO)6 Each Has a Singlet Ground State. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction that (CO)5 and (CO)6 Each Has a...

357

Flow-through ion beam source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and an apparatus for forming a charge neutral ion beam which is useful in producing thin films of material on electrically conductive or non-conductive substrates are provided. 4 figs.

Springer, R.W.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Theory and application of planar ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we investigate a new geometry of Paul trap with electrodes in a plane. These planar ion traps are compatible with modern silicon microfabrication, and can be scaled up to large arrays with multiple trapping ...

Pearson, Christopher Elliott

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Alonso, J.R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: research with multiple- beam experiment MBE-4; induction linac systems experiments; and long- range research and development of heavy-ion fusion accelerators.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Ion current detector for high pressure ion sources for monitoring separations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to any application involving the monitoring of signal arising from ions produced by electrospray or other high pressure (>100 torr) ion sources. The present invention relates specifically to an apparatus and method for the detection of ions emitted from a capillary electrophoresis (CE) system, liquid chromatography, or other small-scale separation methods. And further, the invention provides a very simple diagnostic as to the quality of the separation and the operation of an electrospray source. 7 figs.

Smith, R.D.; Wahl, J.H.; Hofstadler, S.A.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Negative Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphitized carbons have played a key role in the successful commercialization of Li-ion batteries. The physicochemical properties of carbon cover a wide range; therefore identifying the optimum active electrode material can be time consuming. The significant physical properties of negative electrodes for Li-ion batteries are summarized, and the relationship of these properties to their electrochemical performance in nonaqueous electrolytes, are discussed in this paper.

Kinoshita, Kim; Zaghib, Karim

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

Lynch, W G; Zhang, Y; Danielewicz, P; Famiano, M; Li, Z; Steiner, A W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

Leung, K.N.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

Spdtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ion thermal double layers in a pair-ion warm magnetized plasma containing charged dust impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the formation and the dynamics of ion thermal double layers (ITDLs) in a magnetized plasma, composed of positive and negative ions as well as a fraction of stationary charged (positive or negative) dust impurities have been studied. Using plasma hydrodynamics and Poisson equations for the two ion species, a modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation has been derived. The effects of the external magnetic field, the concentration of charged dust impurities, and the negative to positive ion temperature ratio on the ITDLs structure are investigated.

El-Labany, S. K.; El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); El-Bedwehy, N. A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

Takahashi, Kazunori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Fujiwara, Tamiya [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

Dietz, Mark L. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bartsch, Richard A. (Lubbock, TX); Barrans, Jr., Richard E. (Downers Grove, IL); Rausch, David (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of ion acoustic solitary waves is studied in a magnetized dense electron-positron-ion plasma. The ions are described by the hydrodynamic equations, and the electron and positron are assumed to follow the Thomas-Fermi density distribution. The pseudopotential is derived directly from the basic equations including Poisson's equation without assuming the quasineutrality condition. The effect of ion temperature on the solitary waves is studied, and the ranges of parameters for which solitary waves and double layers exist are also studied in detail using Sagdeev's technique.

Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Saha, Taraknath [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Department of Physics, Plasma Research Laboratory, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Uptake of metal ions on humic acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics, the sorption capacities, pH and temperature dependence of sorption of humic acids (HAs) of Turkish brown coals with respect to Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) ions were investigated, and the roles of the carboxylic and phenolic groups in the adsorption of metals ion on HAs were searched in this work. These metal ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of HAs. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in between 50 and 60 min for all studied cations. HAs extracted from different brown coals have been characterized by chemical and physical methods. The chemical properties of HAs showed differences depending on the source from which they were obtained. The sorption of metals on the surface of HAs depends strongly on the pH, and sorption decreases with decreasing pH. Maximum removal of metal ions was demonstrated at pH values of 4.1-5.0. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to describe observed sorption phenomena. The {Delta}G{sup 0} became negative as the temperature increased, and so the equilibrium constant decreased slightly. The investigation proved that the HAs are suitable materials for the studied heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution and could be considered as potential material for purification of effluent polluted with toxic metal ions.

Pehlivan, E.; Arslan, G. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ion irradiation induced effects in polyamidoimide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between ion beam and polyamidoimide (PAI) is studied by means of low-temperature infrared spectroscopy. 200 keV Ar{sup +} and 250 keV He{sup +} beams with fluences ranging from 10{sup 13} ions cm{sup {minus}2} to 5{times}10{sup 16} ions cm{sup {minus}2} are found to induce atomic bond breaks leading to absorption bands at 2344, 2261, and 2125 cm{sup {minus}1} corresponding respectively to CO{sub 2}, C=N=N and C=N--R vibrations. Shrinkage of the polymer along with a drastic decrease of the resistivity during Ar{sup +} and He{sup +} irradiation are observed. Speculations on the respective role of electronic processes and atomic collisions in the evolution of the polymer are made. No evidence of PAI modification through knock-on mechanism for fluences lower than 5{times}10{sup 15} ions cm{sup {minus}2} is noticed. In fact, our results would suggest a predominant role of the electronic processes for the low fluences (up to 5{times}10{sup 15} ions cm{sup {minus}2} ), whereas a degradation mechanism based on atomic collisions is more likely to take place for higher fluences. A theoretical mechanism of reactions based upon our Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and secondary ion mass spectroscopies (SIMS) results, describing the chemical changes occurring in the PAI, is presented and briefly discussed.

Merhari, L.; Belorgeot, C.; Moliton, J.P. (Laboratoire d'Electronique des Polymeres sous Faisceaux Ioniques 123, avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Solar-wind minor ions: recent observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the years following the Solar Wind Four Conference at Burghausen our knowledge of the solar wind ion composition and dynamics has grown. There have been some surprises, and our understanding of the evolution of the solar wind has been improved. Systematic studies have shown that the minor ions generally travel with a common bulk speed and have temperatures roughly proportional to their masses. It has been determined that the /sup 3/He/sup + +/ content varies greatly; /sup 3/He/sup + +///sup 4/He/sup + +/ ranges from as high as 10/sup 2/ values to below 2 x 10/sup -4/. In some solar wind flows which can be related to energetic coronal events, the minor ions are found in unusual ionization states containing Fe/sup 16 +/ as a prominent ion, showing that the states were formed at unusually high temperatures. Unexpectedly, in a few flows substantial quantities of /sup 4/He/sup +/ have been detected, sometimes with ions identifiable as O/sup 2 +/ and O/sup 3 +/. Surprisingly, in some of these examples the ionization state is mixed showing that part of the plasma escaped the corona without attaining the usual million-degree temperatures while other parts were heated more nearly in the normal manner. Additionally, detailed studies of the minor ions have increased our understanding of the coronal expansion. For example, such studies have contributed to identifying near equatorial coronal streamers as the source of solar wind flows between high speed streams.

Bame, S.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation and Battery Management System Tutor degradation mechanisms of a Li-ion cell based on LiCoO2", Journal of Power Sources #12;Lithium ions and e and Y. Fuentes. Computer simulations of a lithium-ion polymer battery and implications for higher

Schenato, Luca

379

Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions W. M. Itano, J. C. Bergquist, A-16 . Keywords: aluminum, atomic clocks, frequency standards, ion traps, mercury 1. INTRODUCTION Optical frequency standards based on the mercury ion and, more recently, the aluminum ion are under devel- opment

380

High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The ability to detect trace amounts of metal ions is important because of the toxicity of heavy metal ionsDetection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts Vasanth Rajagopalan, Salah Boussaad on many living organisms and the consequence of heavy metal ions not being biodegradable. To date, heavy

Zhang, Yanchao

382

Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion implantation is usually a highly statistical process, where high fluences of energetic ions, ranging from {approx}10{sup 9} to >10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted. For single atom device development, control over the absolute number of ions is needed and ions have to be placed with high spatial resolution. In the following sections we will discuss a series of approaches to single ion implantation with regard to single ion impact sensing and control of single ion positioning.

Schenkel, Thomas

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ion distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: rst measurements with the 2D ion energy spectrometer CORALL on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of supra- thermal ion populations upstream and downstream from the bow shock do not depend on the solarIon distribution dynamics near the Earth's bow shock: ®rst measurements with the 2D ion energy the Earth's bow shock is studied on the basis of quasi-3D measurements of ion energy spectra in the range

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

PERPENDICULAR ION HEATING BY REDUCED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies argue that the rate of stochastic ion heating in low-frequency Alfvn-wave turbulence is given by Q = c{sub 1}((?u){sup 3}/?)exp ( c{sub 2}/?), where ?u is the rms turbulent velocity at the scale of the ion gyroradius ?, ? = ?u/v{sub i}, v{sub i} is the perpendicular ion thermal speed, and c{sub 1} and c{sub 2} are dimensionless constants. We test this theoretical result by numerically simulating test particles interacting with strong reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence. The heating rates in our simulations are well fit by this formula. The best-fit values of c{sub 1} are ?1. The best-fit values of c{sub 2} decrease (i.e., stochastic heating becomes more effective) as the Reynolds number and the number of grid points in the RMHD simulations increase. As an example, in a 1024{sup 2} 256 RMHD simulation with a dissipation wavenumber of the order of the inverse ion gyroradius, we find c{sub 2} = 0.21. We show that stochastic heating is significantly stronger in strong RMHD turbulence than in a field of randomly phased Alfvn waves with the same power spectrum, because coherent structures in strong RMHD turbulence increase orbit stochasticity in the regions where ions are heated most strongly. We find that c{sub 1} increases by a factor of ?3 while c{sub 2} changes very little as the ion thermal speed increases from values <ion heating in the solar wind.

Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean C.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: qdy2@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: jeanc.perez@unh.edu, E-mail: eliot@astro.berkeley.edu [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ion Crystals Produced by Laser and Sympathetic Cooling in a Linear RF Ion Trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed investigation of ion crystals produced by laser and sympathetic cooling in a linear RF trap has been conducted. The laser cooling methods were examined and applied to the trapped ^24Mg^(positive) ions. The crystals produced by the laser...

Zhu, Feng

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

KooPeratIonsProGraMMe CooPeratIon ProGraMs03  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

und Innovation haben die Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und die Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft ihre Kooperationen for Research and Innovation, the Max Planck Society and Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft intend to continue50 KooPeratIonsProGraMMe CooPeratIon ProGraMs03 Kooperationen mit der Fraunhofer

388

Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 ?s pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Li Ion Battery: A Solid-State NMR, X-ray Diffraction,in a Li Ion Battery: A Solid-State NMR, X-ray Diffraction,

Lee, Dae Hoe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Improvement of four anode rods ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, an improved form of a saddle field ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of four anode rods made from copper and two copper cathode discs. The two cathode discs are placed symmetrically on both sides of the four anode rods. The electrical discharge and output ion beam characteristics were measured at different pressures using argon gas. The optimum distance between each two anode rods was determined. Also the optimum distance between the four anode rods and any cathode disc was obtained. It was found that the optimum distance between each two anode rods equal to 6 mm, while the optimum distance between the four anode rods and any cathode disc equal to 16 mm, where a stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current can be obtained. The effect of negative extraction voltage applied to both the extractor electrode and Faraday cup on the output ion beam current was studied. The sputter yield of copper and aluminum targets using argon ions of different energies was determined.

Abdel Salam, F. W.; El-Khabeary, H.; Abdel Reheem, A. M. [Accelerators and Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P. No. 13759 (Egypt); Ahmed, M. M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

Williams, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miner, J.R. [United Technologies, Pratt and Whitney, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development and Application of an Electrospray Ionization Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometer Using an RF Ion Funnel and Periodic-focusing Ion Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

home-built electrospray ionization (ESI) source and rf ion funnel(IF) as an ion transfer interface, modular periodic-focusing ion guide (PFIG) as a drift tube (DT) for arrival time measurement, and orthogonally accelerated linear time-of-flight mass...

Jeon, Junho

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Method for improving the durability of ion insertion materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method of protecting an ion insertion material from the degradative effects of a liquid or gel-type electrolyte material by disposing a protective, solid ion conducting, electrically insulating, layer between the ion insertion layer and the liquid or gel-type electrolyte material. The invention further provides liquid or gel-type electrochemical cells having improved durability having a pair of electrodes, a pair of ion insertion layers sandwiched between the pair of electrodes, a pair of solid ion conducting layers sandwiched between the ion insertion layers, and a liquid or gel-type electrolyte material disposed between the solid ion conducting layers, where the solid ion conducting layer minimizes or prevents degradation of the faces of the ion insertion materials facing the liquid or gel-type electrolyte material. Electrochemical cells of this invention having increased durability include secondary lithium batteries and electrochromic devices.

Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Cheong, Hyeonsik M. (Seoul, KR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

Vadim Volkov

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Liners for ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvn fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitt Mnchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitt Mnchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Mller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut fr Grenzflchenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universitt Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut fr Grenzflchenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universitt Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitt Mnchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Deionization and desalination using electrostatic ion pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a new method and apparatus/system for purifying ionic solutions, such as, for example, desalinating water, using engineered charged surfaces to sorb ions from such solutions. Surface charge is applied externally, and is synchronized with oscillatory fluid movements between substantially parallel charged plates. Ions are held in place during fluid movement in one direction (because they are held in the electrical double layer), and released for transport during fluid movement in the opposite direction by removing the applied electric field. In this way the ions, such as salt, are "ratcheted" across the charged surface from the feed side to the concentrate side. The process itself is very simple and involves only pumps, charged surfaces, and manifolds for fluid collection.

Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Haslam, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA); Schaldach, Charlene M. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Kevin C. (San Ramon, CA); Cussler, Edward (Edina, MN)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Deionization and desalination using electrostatic ion pumping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a new method and apparatus/system for purifying ionic solutions, such as, for example, desalinating water, using engineered charged surfaces to sorb ions from such solutions. Surface charge is applied externally, and is synchronized with oscillatory fluid movements between substantially parallel charged plates. Ions are held in place during fluid movement in one direction (because they are held in the electrical double layer), and released for transport during fluid movement in the opposite direction by removing the applied electric field. In this way the ions, such as salt, are "ratcheted" across the charged surface from the feed side to the concentrate side. The process itself is very simple and involves only pumps, charged surfaces, and manifolds for fluid collection.

Bourcier, William L.; Aines, Roger D.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Schaldach, Charlene M.; O'Brien, Kevin C.; Cussler, Edward

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

The dressed mobile atoms and ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider free atoms and ions in $\\R^3$ interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Because of the translation invariance we consider the reduced hamiltonian associated with the total momentum. After introducing an ultraviolet cutoff we prove that the reduced hamiltonian for atoms has a ground state if the coupling constant and the total momentum are sufficiently small. In the case of ions an extra infrared regularization is needed. We also consider the case of the hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field. Finally we determine the absolutely continuous spectrum of the reduced hamiltonian.

Laurent Amour; Benoit Grebert; Jean-Claude Guillot

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

A single ion inside a miniature cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of nature. For instance, Joseph von Fraunhofers observation of absorption-lines in the optical spectrum of the Sun was crucial for the development of Rydbergs formula and Bohrs atomic model. However, under normal conditions the light... the prescribed word limit of 60000 words. Abstract A Single Ion Inside a Miniature Cavity This thesis describes the first experimentally achieved coupling of a single atomic ion to an optical fibre-cavity as well as the first photonic interaction between a...

Steiner, Matthias

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

406

Stored-Ion Collisional Relaxation to Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using a chart recorder, an oscilloscope, or a multichannel analyzer, as appropriate. About n =1.5 X 10' hot ions initially produced in the trap were observed to cool from 1.2X 10 K to 4.3 X 10'K:?T? in=50 s via dissipation of random motional en... as for regular articles is followed, and page proofs are sent to authors. Stored-ion collisional relaxation to equihbrium D. A. Church Physics Department, Texas AkM Uniuersity, College Station, Texas 77843A242 (Received 10 August 1987) The rate of energy...

Church, David A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrostatic ion-acoustic periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons are investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived with appropriate boundary conditions for periodic waves. The corresponding analytical and various numerical solutions are presented with Sagdeev potential approach. Differences between the results caused by the kappa and Maxwell distributions are emphasized. It is revealed that only hump (compressive) structures of the cnoidal waves and solitons are formed. It is shown that amplitudes of the cnoidal waves and solitons are reduced in an EPI plasma case in comparison with the ordinary electron-ion plasmas. The effects caused by the temperature variations of the warm ions are also discussed. It is obtained that the amplitude of the cnoidal waves and solitons decreases for a kappa distributed (nonthermal) electrons and positrons plasma case in comparison with the Maxwellian distributed (thermal) electrons and positrons EPI plasmas. The existence of kappa distributed particles leads to decreasing of ion-acoustic frequency up to thermal ions frequency.

Kaladze, T. [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan) [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I.Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Georgia (United States); Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com [Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Numerical investigation of the ion temperature effect in magnetized plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ion temperature, magnitude of magnetic field and its orientation on a magnetized plasma sheath consisting of electrons and two species of positive ions are investigated. Using three-fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the dimensionless equations are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that with the increase of the ion temperature and magnetic field strength there is a significant change in ion densities and energies in the sheath. It is also noticed that increase of magnetic field angle enhances the ion density near the sheath edge for a constant ion temperature. With increase in ion temperature and magnetic field angle, the lighter ion density near the sheath edge enhances and reverses for the heavier ion species.

Shaw, A. K.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. J. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Kamrup (M) (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization in a Fourier Transform Ion Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser...

412

Six-Membered-Ring Malonatoborate-Based Lithium Salts as Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

References 1. Lithium Ion Batteries: Fundamentals andProgram for Lithium Ion Batteries, U.S. Department ofas Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries Li Yang a , Hanjun

Yang, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - aligned ion implementation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

deflection and focus... it with the single ion detector. The alignment of the ion optics was typically verified at the beginning of each ion... Feedback-controlled ... Source:...

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - akselerator ion energi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

48,novembre 1987 ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF ION... of magnitude below the peak ion current intensity. The higher energy ion tail can be explained by charge... transfer collision...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ion hall Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 13 Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition of GMR Multilayers Summary: guns, it uses low energy ion sources that combine end-Hall ion 29 and hollow cathode...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-sensing ion channel-1b Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion trap -Laser cooling technique has the ad- Summary: Future works The Ion trap - Laser cooling technique has the ad- vantages to easily manipulate... atomic and molecular ions...

417

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold Lithium or Rubidium atom and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Mireille Aymar; Romain Gurout; Olivier Dulieu

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, UPR3321, Ba circumflex t. 505, Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guerout, R. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, CNRS, ENS, Univ Pierre et Marie Curie case 74, Campus Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Structure of the Alkali-metal-atom-Strontium molecular ions: towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a Strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold Lithium or Rubidium atom and a Strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Research in heavy-ion nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Fusion-fission in light nuclear systems; High-resolution Q-value measurement for the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction; Heavy-ion reactions and limits to fusion; and Hybrid MWPC-Bragg curve detector development.

Sanders, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Depth enhancement of ion sensitized data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of fabricating a durable data storage medium is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. Additionally, a durable data storage medium including a substrate having etched characters therein is disclosed, the substrate characterized as containing detectable residual amounts of ions used in the preparation process.

Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

STAR Highlights on Heavy Ion Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RHIC-STAR is a mid-rapidity collider experiment for studying high energy nuclear collisions. The main physics goals of STAR experiment are 1) studying the properties of the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, 2) explore the QCD phase diagram structure. In these proceedings, we will review the recent results of heavy ion physics at STAR.

Shusu Shi

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Sources of polarized ions and atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation we discuss methods of producing large quantities of polarized atoms and ions (Stern-Gerlach separation, optical pumping, and spin-exchange) as well as experimental methods of measuring the degree of polarization of atomic systems. The usefulness of polarized atoms in probing the microscopic magnetic surface properties of materials will also be discussed. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Cornelius, W.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Quantum Stochastic Heating of a Trapped Ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The resonant heating of a harmonically trapped ion by a standing-wave light field is described as a quantum stochastic process combining a coherent Schroedinger evolution with Bohr-Einstein quantum jumps. Quantum and semi-quantum treatments are compared.

L. Horvath; R. Fisher; M. J. Collett; H. J. Carmichael

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

Laurinat, J.E.

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to today's large NP accelerators like GSI-FAIR, RHIC economical for 1-2 GWe baseload power plants. Heavy chambers. · Competitive economics: projected in several power plant studies and with no high levelSlide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Briefing for the National Academy

429

Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

Chaudhuri, A K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Secondary electron ion source neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Secondary electron ion source neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ORIGINAL PAPER Using nanoelectrospray ion mobility spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Using nanoelectrospray ion mobility spectrometry (GEMMA) to determine the size-phase electrophoretic mobil- ity molecular analyzer (GEMMA) has received increased attention for such measurements, isolated and purified using standard biochemical protocols, were also analyzed using multi-angle laser

Economou, Tassos

437

Feedback cooling of a single trapped ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on a real-time measurement of the motion of a single ion in a Paul trap, we demonstrate its electro-mechanical cooling below the Doppler limit by homodyne feedback control (cold damping). The feedback cooling results are well described by a model based on a quantum mechanical Master Equation.

Pavel Bushev; Daniel Rotter; Alex Wilson; Francois Dubin; Christoph Becher; Juergen Eschner; Rainer Blatt; Viktor Steixner; Peter Rabl; Peter Zoller

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ion manipulation device with electrical breakdown protection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. The surfaces are housed in a chamber, and at least one electrically insulative shield is coupled to an inner surface of the chamber for increasing a mean-free-path between two adjacent electrodes in the chamber.

Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Executive Summary Understanding the glue that binds us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Physics Possibilities at the Intensity Frontier . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1 charge. This causes the gluons to interact with each other, generating nearly all the mass of the nucleon

Homes, Christopher C.

440

BARC TIFR Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enterprise using accelerated heavy ion beams is to unravel the complexities of the nuclear world in all by the accelerator. The projectile impinges on a target nucleus with enough energy to overcome the electrostatic repulsion so that the collision process is governed by the nuclear interactions. Using a variety

Shyamasundar, R.K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

MIT Lincoln Laboratory Plasma and Ions-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

them anions · Fire, lightning, fluorescent lamps, and the Sun and stars all contain plasma ­ In fact include fluorescent lamps, neon signs, plasma globes, plasma TVs ­ They easily form at room temperature lightning carbon arc nuclear blast #12;MIT Lincoln LaboratoryPlasma and Ions-4 A. Siegel 5/12/07 How Does

Wurtman, Richard

442

Towards a lithium-ion fiber battery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the key objectives in the realm of flexible electronics and flexible power sources is to achieve large-area, low-cost, scalable production of flexible systems. In this thesis we propose a new Li-ion battery architecture ...

Grena, Benjamin (Benjamin Jean-Baptiste)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

444

Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

445

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

446

Superlattice Structure and Precipitates in O+ and Zr+ Ion Coimplanted...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Zr+ Ion Coimplanted SrTiO3: a Model Waste Form for 90Sr. Abstract: We investigate strontium titanate as a model waste form for 90Sr. Implantation with O+ and Zr+ ions, followed...

447

Lithium-ion batteries having conformal solid electrolyte layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hybrid solid-liquid electrolyte lithium-ion battery devices are disclosed. Certain devices comprise anodes and cathodes conformally coated with an electron insulating and lithium ion conductive solid electrolyte layer.

Kim, Gi-Heon; Jung, Yoon Seok

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

Tuszewski, M.G.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hybrid approaches to quantum information using ions, atoms and photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents two hybrid systems for quantum information processing - one joining cold ions and cold atoms and another coupling linear chains of atomic ions with photons via an optical resonator. The first experimental ...

Cetina, Marko, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D...

451

Electrochemical shock : mechanical degradation of ion-intercalation materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ion-intercalation materials used in high-energy batteries such as lithium-ion undergo large composition changes-which correlate to high storage capacity-but which also induce structural changes and stresses that can ...

Woodford, William Henry, IV

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Stress enhanced diffusion of krypton ions in polycrystalline titanium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation on the mutual influence of pre-existing residual stress and point defect following ion implantation is presented. The study has been carried out using polycrystalline titanium samples energetically implanted with krypton ions at different fluences. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the concentration profile of the injected krypton ions, while synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used for stress determination. Ion beam analysis and synchrotron X-ray diffraction stress profile measurements of the implanted titanium samples show a clear evidence of stress-enhanced diffusion of krypton ions in titanium. It is further observed that for the titanium samples implanted at low fluence, ion implantation modifies the pre-existing residual stress through the introduction of point and open volume defects. The stress fields resulting from the ion implantation act to drift the krypton inclusions towards the surface of titanium.

Nsengiyumva, S., E-mail: s.nsengiyumva@ru.ac.za [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Raji, A. T. [School of Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Mucklenuek Campus, P O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa); Rivire, J. P. [Laboratoire de Mtallurgie Physique, UMR 6630 CNRS- Universit de Poitiers, Bd M. et P. Curie, BP30179, 86962 Chasseneuil Futuroscope, Cedex (France); Britton, D. T.; Hrting, M. [NanoSciences Innovation Center, Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Dispelling a Misconception About Mg-Ion Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

One promising alternative would be a battery based on a multivalent ion, such as magnesium (Mg). Whereas a Li-ion with a charge of +1 provides only a single electron for an...

454

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electroluminescence in ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports the light emission in ion gel gated, thin film organic semiconductor transistors and investigates the light emission mechanism behind these devices. We report that ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors emit...

Bhat, Shrivalli

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Towards a cryogenic planar ion trap for Sr-88  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes experiments with ion traps constructed with electrodes in a single two-dimensional plane, and ion traps operated in a cryogenic environment at 77K and 4K temperatures. These two technologies address ...

Bakr, Waseem (Waseem S.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

ccsd00004463, Transverse Kinematics of Ions Stored in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, multiple scattering, cooling 1 Introduction The use and development of ion trapping techniques, which cooling has also been observed [10]. Interesting dynamics of the ion motion have been discovered

458

Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New cathode and anode electrodes are required to improve the energy density of Li-ion cells for transportation technologies. The cost of Li-ion systems for transportation...

459

arc ion sources: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and performance of vacuum arc ion sources. Brown, I 2013-01-01 2 Development of High Efficiency Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source (VADIS) at CERN Isolde CERN Preprints Summary: We...

460

arc ion source: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and performance of vacuum arc ion sources. Brown, I 2013-01-01 2 Development of High Efficiency Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source (VADIS) at CERN Isolde CERN Preprints Summary: We...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion dete rm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A 2.45 GHz ECR ion source for production of medium charge states ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory we are constructing an ECR ion source test facility for nuclear science as well as industrial applications experiments. For these purposes, a single-stage 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been designed and constructed. It features an axial magnetic field with a mirror ratio of up to six and a hexapole field produced by a simple Nd{endash}Fe{endash}B permanent magnet assembly. In order to enhance the ion confinement time, the source plasma volume has been enlarged as much as possible while still maintaining a high mirror ratio. This paper describes the design of the ion source, the extraction system and the test stand. First, operational experience and experimental results with an argon discharge are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Wutte, D.C.; Leitner, M.A.; Williams, M.D.; Leung, K.N.; Gough, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Saadatmand, K.; Benveniste, V. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

Humberto Da Silva Jr; Maurice Raoult; Mireille Aymar; Olivier Dulieu

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

Silva, Humberto Da; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for derivatizing the radiofullerenes for water-solubility and a method for removing exohedral radionuclides are reported. The methods and chemistry developed during this CRADA are the crucial first steps for the development of fullerenes as a method superior to existing technologies for in vivo transport of radionuclides.

Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln{sup 11}]-amyloid {beta}-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will become routine tomorrow.

Nicholas B. Lentz

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Rare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pr,10,11 Eu,12 Dy,13 Er,13­15 and Tm16 doped GaN. Rare earth elements were added during growthRare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources L. C. Chao, B write implantation. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 99 08306-7 I. INTRODUCTION Rare earth

Steckl, Andrew J.

467

Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

Arora, Michelle B. (Woodridge, IL); Hestekin, Jamie A. (Morton Grove, IL); Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); St. Martin, Edward J. (Libertyville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

470

Flow and equation of state in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

Danielewicz, P

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Flow and equation of state in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

P. Danielewicz

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

Flow and equation of state in heavy ion collisions (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status of flow in heavy-ion collisions and of inference of hadronic-matter properties is reviewed.

Danielewicz, P

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O) and deuterated water (D{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H{sup +}) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D{sup +}). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +}, into the desired ion species, H{sup +} and D{sup +}, respectively. 4 figs.

Spence, D.; Lykke, K.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique to enhance the yield of atomic ion species (H.sup.+, D.sup.+, O.sup.+, N.sup.+, etc.) from plasma ion sources. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H.sub.2 O, D.sub.2 O, O.sub.2, and SF.sub.6, among others, with the most effective being water (H.sub.2 O) and deuterated water (D.sub.2 O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave generated plasmas have produced ion beams comprised of close to 100% purity protons (H.sup.+) and close to 100% purity deuterons (D.sup.+). The technique also increases the total yield of protons and deuterons by converting unwanted ion species, namely, H.sub.2.sup.+,H.sub.3.sup.+ and D.sub.2.sup.+, D.sub.3.sup.+, into the desired ion species, H.sup.+ and D.sup.+, respectively.

Spence, David (Hinsdale, IL); Lykke, Keith (Woodridge, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Multiple ion species plasmas with thermal ions in an oblique magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a three-fluid model, the combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and finite temperature of positive ion species on the characteristics of the sheath region of multi-component plasmas are investigated numerically. It is assumed that the ion species are singly charged and have different masses. In the presence of an external magnetic field, it is shown that the density distribution of positive ion species (especially the lighter ion species) begins to fluctuate and does not decrease monotonically towards the wall. Also, it is shown that by increasing the magnetic field, the amplitude of fluctuation increases and its position moves towards the sheath edge. Moreover, it is illustrated that the presence of the magnetic field affects the sheath width and by increasing the magnetic field, the sheath width decreases. In addition, the results show that in the presence of the magnetic field, the increase of temperature of positive ion species has an infinitesimal effect on the sheath width and density distribution of positive ion species.

Hatami, M. M. [Physics Department of K N Toosi University of Technology, 15418-49611 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department of K N Toosi University of Technology, 15418-49611 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Microchip and wedge ion funnels and planar ion beam analyzers using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrodynamic ion funnels confine, guide, or focus ions in gases using the Dehmelt potential of oscillatory electric field. New funnel designs operating at or close to atmospheric gas pressure are described. Effective ion focusing at such pressures is enabled by fields of extreme amplitude and frequency, allowed in microscopic gaps that have much higher electrical breakdown thresholds in any gas than the macroscopic gaps of present funnels. The new microscopic-gap funnels are useful for interfacing atmospheric-pressure ionization sources to mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility separation (IMS) stages including differential IMS or FAIMS, as well as IMS and MS stages in various configurations. In particular, "wedge" funnels comprising two planar surfaces positioned at an angle and wedge funnel traps derived therefrom can compress ion beams in one dimension, producing narrow belt-shaped beams and laterally elongated cuboid packets. This beam profile reduces the ion density and thus space-charge effects, mitigating the adverse impact thereof on the resolving power, measurement accuracy, and dynamic range of MS and IMS analyzers, while a greater overlap with coplanar light or particle beams can benefit spectroscopic methods.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultraviolet emissions from Gd3 + ions excited by energy transfer from Ho3 + ions Ying Yu October 2010 Accepted 28 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Ultraviolet emission Upconversion Energy transfer a b s t r a c t Ultraviolet (UV) upconversion (UC) emissions of Gd3+ ion were

Cao, Wenwu

479

Equivalence of trans paths in ion channels Juan Alvarez*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explore stochastic models for the study of ion transport in biological cells. Analysis of these models explains and explores an interesting feature of ion transport observed by biophysicists. Namely the interior and exterior of the cell. The membrane is a lipid bilayer that is essentially impermeable to ions

Hajek, Bruce

480

Ion Transport Through Cell Membrane Channels Jan Gomulkiewicz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ion Transport Through Cell Membrane Channels Jan Gomulkiewicz1 , Jacek Mikisz2 , and Stanislaw various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes for the life of a cell. In particular, a fundamental phenomenon is a transport of ions through cell membranes

Miekisz, Jacek

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481

Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

John Wright; Carolyn Auchter; Chen-Kuan Chou; Richard D. Graham; Thomas W. Noel; Tomasz Sakrejda; Zichao Zhou; Boris B. Blinov

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

Wright, John; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Graham, Richard D; Noel, Thomas W; Sakrejda, Tomasz; Zhou, Zichao; Blinov, Boris B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Mechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials Patrick Sinko B.S. Materials Science and Engineering 2013, Virginia Tech John Cannarella PhD. Candidate Mechanical and Aerospace and motivation ­ Why study lithium-ion batteries? ­ Lithium-ion battery fundamentals ­ Why study the mechanical

Petta, Jason

485

Thin, Flexible Secondary Li-Ion Paper Liangbing Hu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin, Flexible Secondary Li-Ion Paper Batteries Liangbing Hu, Hui Wu, Fabio La Mantia, Yuan Yang, secondary Li-ion batteries are key components in por- table electronics due to their high power and energy integrated all of the components of a Li-ion battery into a single sheet of paper with a simple lamination

Cui, Yi

486

Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, may serve as a means for purifying industrial wastewaters that contain toxic heavy metal ions heavy metals often through ion exchange. This biosorption can be used for purification of metalModeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption S I L K E S C H I E W E R A N D B O H U M I L V O

Volesky, Bohumil

487

Secondary ion emission from single massive gold cluster impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are an inefficient method to desorb and generate secondary ions. The use of poly-atomic projectiles, such as (CsI)nCs, Au3, SF5 and C60, has been demonstrated to be an effective means to enhance secondary ion yields. Still larger secondary ion yields can be obtained...

Hager, George Joseph

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

488

Structural Integration of Silicon Solar Cells and Lithium-ion Batteries Using Printed Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery were adhesively joinedfilm solid state Li-ion battery was not able to withstand5.8 The performance of the Li-ion battery under tensile

Kang, Jin Sung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The determination of some anions using ion chromatography and ion chromatography-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN...

Hillman, Daniel C

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Method and apparatus for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams. A method of purifying an ion beam includes: inputting the ion beam into a gas-filled multipole ion guide, the ion beam including a plurality of ions; increasing a laser-ion interaction time by collisional cooling the plurality of ions using the gas-filled multipole ion guide, the plurality of ions including at least one contaminant; and suppressing the at least one contaminant by selectively removing the at least one contaminant from the ion beam by electron photodetaching at least a portion of the at least one contaminant using a laser beam.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Yuan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Havener, Charles C. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

491

Heating of beam ions by ion acoustic waves A. Vaivads, K. Ro nnmark, T. Oscarsson, and M. Andre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectral density at frequencies much below the ion gyrofrequency. The wave power decreases with increasingHeating of beam ions by ion acoustic waves A. Vaivads, K. Ro? nnmark, T. Oscarsson, and M. Andre? Swedish Institute of Space Physics, University of Umea? , S-901 87 UMEA? , Sweden Received: 30 April 1997

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

492

33The Dawn Mission: Ion Rockets and Spiral Orbits Ion rocket motors provide a small but steady  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

33The Dawn Mission: Ion Rockets and Spiral Orbits Ion rocket motors provide a small but steady by the polar function r(). Because the integrand is generally a messy one for most realistic cases or the action of ion engine itself. Let's improve this kinematic model by approximating the radial motion

493

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS Principal Components . . . . .Ion Sources Pre-accelerators Low-beta Accelerators Sain Accelerators Rf Linacs . . .

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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