Sample records for ion collider rhic

  1. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  2. RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a ripple, the product of those pre-smash particles flying at relativistic speeds. By examining accelerated ions directly, scientists might clearly identify physics phenomena...

  3. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  4. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.; et al

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity eRHIC. In it, electrons from the polarized pre-injector will be accelerated to their top energy by passing six times through two SRF linacs. After colliding with the hadron beam in up to three detectors, the e-beam will be decelerated by the same linacs and dumped. The six-pass magnetic system with small-gap magnets will be installed from the start. We will stage the electron energy from 5 GeV to 30 GeV stepwise by increasing the lengths of the SRF linacs. We discuss details of eRHIC's layout in Section 3. We considered several IR designs for eRHIC. The latest one, with a 10 mrad crossing angle and {beta}* = 5 cm, takes advantage of newly commissioned Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles. Section 4 details the eRHIC lattice and the IR layout. The current eRHIC design focuses on electron-hadron collisions. If justified by the EIC physics, we will add a 30 GeV polarized positron ring with full energy injection from eRHIC ERL. This addition to the eRHIC facility provide for positron-hadron collisions, but at a significantly lower luminosity than those attainable in the electron-hadron mode. As a novel high-luminosity EIC, eRHIC faces many technical challenges, such as generating 50 mA of polarized electron current. eRHIC also will employ coherent electron cooling (CeC) for the hadron beams. Staff at BNL, JLab, and MIT is pursuing vigorously an R&D program for resolving addressing these obstacles. In collaboration with Jlab, BNL plans experimentally to demonstrate CeC at the RHIC. We discuss the structure and the status of the eRHIC R&D in Section 5.

  5. Future BNL plans for a polarized electron-ion collider (eRHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.

    2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide polarized electron-proton collisions of {radical}s = 100 GeV; addition of a 10 GeV electron accelerator to the existing RHIC facility is currently under study. Two design lines are under consideration: a self-polarizing electron ring, and an energy recovery linac. While the latter provides significantly higher luminosities, it is technologically very challenging. We present both design approaches and discuss their advantages and limitations.

  6. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Review of the modifications and upgrades since 2002 and planned improvements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Arenius, Dana

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system, which also resulted in an improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases, balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid-helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid-helium storage tank, compressor-bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thomson ex

  7. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  8. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) CRYOGENIC SYSTEM AT BNL: REVIEW OF THE MODIFICATIONS AND UPGRADES SINCE 2002 AND PLANNED IMPROVEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THAN,Y.R.; TUOZZOLO, J.; SIDI-YAKHLEF, A.; GANNI, V.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system which also resulted in improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases by balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid helium storage tank, compressor bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thompson expander) with associated heat exchangers at the cold end of the plant. Also, liquid helium pumps used for forced circulation of the sub-cooled helium through the magnet loops were eliminated by an accelerator supply flow reconfiguration. Planned future upgrades include the resizing of expanders 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies.

  9. Inside RHIC | Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL People Inside RHICRelativistic Heavy Ion Collider Home Archives Submission Guidelines Contact RHIC Latest Stories gnes Mcsy RHIC Physics Feeds Future High-Tech Workforce:...

  10. Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: Overview Ilan Ben-Zvi Collider-Accelerator Department's Machine Advisory Committee January 2006 #12;Motivation · The motivation for electron coolingRHIC are on the DOE's 20 years facilities plan. RHIC luminosity decay (3.5 hours) #12;What is special about cooling

  11. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  12. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  13. Toward an understanding of the single electron data measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J. [SUBATECH, Universite de Nantes, EMN, IN2P3/CNRS, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, F-44307 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High transverse momentum (p{sub T}) single nonphotonic electrons which have been measured in the RHIC experiments come dominantly from heavy meson decay. The ratio of their p{sub T} spectra in pp and AA collisions [R{sub AA}(p{sub T})] reveals the energy loss of heavy quarks in the environment created by AA collisions. Using a fixed coupling constant and the Debye mass (m{sub D}{approx_equal}gT) as the infrared regulator, perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations are not able to reproduce the data, neither the energy loss nor the azimuthal (v{sub 2}) distribution. Employing a running coupling constant and replacing the Debye mass by a more realistic hard thermal loop (HTL) calculation, we find a substantial increase in the collisional energy loss, which brings the v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) distribution as well as R{sub AA}(p{sub T}) to values close to the experimental ones without excluding a contribution from radiative energy loss.

  14. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  15. RHIC | Booster Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Ion Source (EBIS), for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) science programs. The workhorse injectors for nuclear physics...

  16. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN logo U.S.-CERN Agreement Paves Way for New Era of Scientific Discovery A new agreement between the United States and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)...

  17. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

  18. The Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guzey

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed new facility to collide high-energy electrons with beams of polarized protons/light nuclei and unpolarized nuclei. We overview the goals of the project and key measurements at the EIC. We also briefly comment on recent developments of the project.

  19. INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR THE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG, C.; PARKER, B.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at luminosities in the 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range (e-p case), adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accommodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region will be presented.

  20. Jet Quenching in Heavy-Ion Collisions - The Transition Era from RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A status report on the jet quenching physics in heavy-ion collisions is given as it appears after more than 10 years of collecting and analysing data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and ~1.5 years of physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The (theoretical) predictions and expectations before the start of the LHC program are contrasted with the most recent experimental results, focussing on the nuclear modification factor R_{AA}, the elliptic flow v_2 of high-p_T particles, and on the problem of initial conditions.

  1. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  3. Colliding Nuclei at High Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  4. RHIC R&D -eCooling Annual DOE/Nuclear Physics Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &D effort by Ilan Ben-Zvi, Collider-Accelerator Department Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;The RHIC II Booster AGS RHIC II Electron cooling IP2 Location of cooler: IP2 Objective: Cool RHIC stored ion beamsRHIC R&D - eCooling Annual DOE/Nuclear Physics Review of RHIC Science and Technology July 24

  5. Electron Cooling for RHIC* Ilan Ben-Zvi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cooling for RHIC* Ilan Ben-Zvi Collider Accelerator Department and National Synchrotron the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues

  6. VACUUM PRESSURE RISE WITH INTENSE ION BEAMS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; BAI,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; HUANG,H.; MACKAY,W.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; SMART,L.A.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When RHIC is filled with bunches of intense ion beams a pressure rise is observed. The pressure rise exceeds the acceptable limit for operation with the design intensities. Observations of events leading to a pressure rise are summarized. Relevant parameters include ion species, charge per bunch, bunch spacing, and the location in the ring. Effects that contribute to a pressure rise are discussed, including beam gas ionization and ion desorption, loss-induced gas desorption, and electron desorption from electron clouds.

  7. Multiphase transport model for heavy ion collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-wei Lin; Subrata Pal; C. M. Ko; Bao-An Li; Bin Zhang

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT) with both partonic and hadronic interactions, we study the multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions of charged particles such as pions, kaons and protons in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies. Effects due to nuclear shadowing and jet quenching on these observables are also studied. We further show preliminary results on the production of multistrange baryons from the strangeness-exchange reactions during the hadronic stage of heavy ion collisions.

  8. RHIC - Exploring the Universe Within

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. What physicists learn from these collisions may help us understand more about why the physical world works the way it does, from the smallest subatomic particles, to the largest stars.

  9. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  10. QGP viscosity at RHIC and the LHC - a 2012 status report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huichao Song

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we briefly review the recent progress related to extracting the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) specific shear viscosity from the flow data measured at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  11. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  12. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, consisting of two 3.8 km long superconducting rings, was commissioned in 1999. Since then the machine collided fully stripped gold ions at five different energies, up to 100 GeV/u, deuterons with gold ions at 100 GeV/u, and protons at 100 GeV with a beam polarizations of up 45%. Over four operating periods the heavy ion luminosity has increased by two orders of magnitude, and now exceeds the design value by a factor of 2. Another factor of 2 is targeted for the next 4 years, as well as a more than 10-fold increase in the proton luminosity and a 2-fold increase in the polarization. Possible further upgrades include an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), stochastic and electron cooling, and an electron ring to form an electron-ion collider (eRHIC).

  13. AGS to RHIC transfer line: Design and commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKay, W.W; Ahrens, L.; Bennan, M.; Brown, K. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fall of 1995, we successfully completed a major milestone in the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) project: the first beam test of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) to RHIC (ATR) transfer line. The ATR serves as a test bed for the new RHIC control system. This transfer line is highly instrumented, with several types of instrumentation for characterizing the extracted beam from AGS and for matching the beam into RHIC. We describe the design and performance of ATR with gold ions with an eye to reaching the design criteria for RHIC operation, both in beam quality and controls.

  14. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au + Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p + p, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au + Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  15. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  16. Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

  17. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system of deconfined partonic matter, the quark gluon plasma (QGP) [1]. Matter under such extreme conditions can be studied in the laboratory by colliding nuclei at very high energies. The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National... C. Zhong,39 J. Zhou,36 R. Zoulkarneev,13 Y. Zoulkarneeva,13 and J. X. Zuo39 (STAR Collaboration) 1Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory...

  18. RHIC | Physics of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics (the study of the atom's constituents), astrophysics (the study of stars and planets), condensed matter physics (the science of solid matter) and cosmology (the study of...

  19. Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benchmarking experiments Also: Cost and schedule. Work in progress. #12;Electron cooling group. Reporting to Thomas Roser systems Yuri Eidelman, electron cooling simulations. Harald Hahn, Superconducting RF and HOMs. AdyElectron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: Overview Ilan Ben-Zvi Collider

  20. Production of e(+)e(-) pairs accompanied by nuclear dissociation in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, KJ; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, DA; Morozov, V.; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Buren, GV; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, VP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, B.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracker at the RHIC (STAR) detector at the Relativ- istic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Tracks were reconstructed in a large cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) [24] embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The track position and specific energy...

  1. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY AND HIGHER POLARIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SATOGATA,T.

    2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent rings, has completed its fourth year of operation since commissioning in 1999. RHIC is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and asymmetric beam collisions. RHIC has produced physics data at four experiments in runs that include gold-on-gold collisions at various beam energies (9.8, 31, 65, and 100 GeV/u), high-energy polarized proton-proton collisions (100 GeV), and deuteron-gold collisions (100 GeV/u). We review recent machine performance for high-luminosity gold-gold operations and polarized proton operations, including causes and solutions for known operational limits. Plans and progress for luminosity and polarization improvements, electron cooling, and the electron-ion collider eRHIC are discussed.

  2. FY2014 Parameters for Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The nominal parameters for gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are worked out using various formulas to derive mass, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters etc.. The ''standard setup'', ''medium-energy'', and ''low-energy'' parameters are summarized in separate sections.

  3. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron. It is the nucleus of a helium-3 atom.) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters etc..

  4. Rapidity losses in heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. C. Zhou; Z. B. Yin; D. C. Zhou

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the rapidity losses in central heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies with the mean rapidity determined from the projectile net-baryon distribution after collisions. The projectile net-baryon distribution in the full rapidity range was obtained by removing the target contribution phenomenologically at forward rapidity region from the experimental net-baryon measurements and taking into account the projectile contribution at backward rapidity region. Based on the full projectile net-baryon distributions, calculation results show that the rapidity loss stops increasing from the SPS top energy to RHIC energies, indicating that baryon transport does not depend strongly on energy at high energies.

  5. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  6. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  7. Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Accardi; J. L. Albacete; M. Anselmino; N. Armesto; E. C. Aschenauer; A. Bacchetta; D. Boer; W. K. Brooks; T. Burton; N. -B. Chang; W. -T. Deng; A. Deshpande; M. Diehl; A. Dumitru; R. Dupré; R. Ent; S. Fazio; H. Gao; V. Guzey; H. Hakobyan; Y. Hao; D. Hasch; R. Holt; T. Horn; M. Huang; A. Hutton; C. Hyde; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Klein; B. Kopeliovich; Y. Kovchegov; K. Kumar; K. Kumeri?ki; M. A. C. Lamont; T. Lappi; J. -H. Lee; Y. Lee; E. M. Levin; F. -L. Lin; V. Litvinenko; T. W. Ludlam; C. Marquet; Z. -E. Meziani; R. McKeown; A. Metz; R. Milner; V. S. Morozov; A. H. Mueller; B. Müller; D. Müller; P. Nadel-Turonski; H. Paukkunen; A. Prokudin; V. Ptitsyn; X. Qian; J. -W. Qiu; M. Ramsey-Musolf; T. Roser; F. Sabatié; R. Sassot; G. Schnell; P. Schweitzer; E. Sichtermann; M. Stratmann; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Taneja; T. Toll; D. Trbojevic; T. Ullrich; R. Venugopalan; S. Vigdor; W. Vogelsang; C. Weiss; B. -W. Xiao; F. Yuan; Y. -H. Zhang; L. Zheng

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the U.S., established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.

  8. Breakthrough: RHIC Explores Matter at the Dawn of Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paul Sorensen

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicist Paul Sorensen describes discoveries made at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. At RHIC, scientists from around the world study what the universe may have looked like in the first microseconds after its birth, helping us to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does -- from the smallest particles to the largest stars.

  9. An Alternate Ring-Ring Design for eRHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present here a new ring-ring design of eRHIC, a polarized electron-ion collider based on RHIC at BNL. This alternate eRHIC design utilizes high repetition rate colliding beams and is likely able to deliver the performance to meet the requirements of the science program with low technical risk and modest accelerator R&D. The expected performance includes high luminosities over multiple collision points and a broad CM energy range with a maximum value up to 2x10^34 cm-2s-1 per detector, and polarization higher than 70% for the colliding electron and light ion beams. This new design calls for reuse of decommissioned facilities in the US, namely, the PEP-II high energy ring and one section of the SLAC warm linac as a full energy electron injector.

  10. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider spin flipper commissioning plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Makdisi, Y.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.; Roser, T.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The commissioning of the RHIC spin flipper in the RHIC Blue ring during the RHIC polarized proton run in 2009 showed the detrimental effects of global vertical coherent betatron oscillation induced by the 2-AC dipole plus 4-DC dipole configuration. This global orbital coherent oscillation of the RHIC beam in the Blue ring in the presence of collision modulated the beam-beam interaction between the two RHIC beams and affected Yellow beam lifetime. The experimental data at injection with different spin tunes by changing the snake current also demonstrated that it was not possible to induce a single isolated spin resonance with the global vertical coherent betatron oscillation excited by the two AC dipoles. Hence, RHIC spin flipper was re-designed to eliminate the coherent vertical betatron oscillation outside the spin flipper by adding three additional AC dipoles. This paper presents the experimental results as well as the new design.

  11. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  12. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  13. Rapidity Dependent Strangeness Measurements in BRAHMS Experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Krakow, Poland 4 Smoluchkowski Inst. of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland 5 Johns Hopkins Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) permits the study of highly excited nuclear matter in the extreme high energy regime ( sNN =200 GeV), an order of magnitude higher energy than previously available energy at SPS

  14. HIGH PERFORMANCE EBIS FOR RHIC* , E. Beebe, O. Gould, A. Kponou, R. Lockey, A. Pikin, D. Raparia, J. Ritter, L. Snydstrup,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaffs for injection of beams into the Booster synchrotron for RHIC and the NASA Space RadiationHIGH PERFORMANCE EBIS FOR RHIC* J. Alessi# , E. Beebe, O. Gould, A. Kponou, R. Lockey, A. Pikin, D being built at Brookhaven to provide increased capabilities for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

  15. Elliptic flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the perfect fluid hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sascha Vogel; Giorgio Torrieri; Marcus Bleicher

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the recently measured $v_2$ fluctuation in the context of establishing the degree of fluidity of the matter produced in heavy ion collisions. We argue that flow observables within systems with a non-negligible mean free path should acquire a "dynamical" fluctuation, due to the random nature of each collision between the system's degrees of freedom. Because of this, $v_2$ fluctuations can be used to estimate the Knudsen number of the system produced at RHIC. To illustrate this quantitatively, we apply the UrQMD model, with scaled cross sections, to show that collisions at RHIC have a Knudsen number at least one order of magnitude above the expected value for an interacting hadron gas. Furthermore, we argue that the Knudsen number is also bound from above by the $v_2$ fluctuation data, because too large a Knudsen number would break the observed scaling of $v_2$ fluctuations due to the onset of turbulent flow. We propose, therefore that $v_2$ fluctuation measurements, together with an understanding of the turbulent regime for relativistic hydrodynamics, will provide an upper as well as a lower limit for the Knudsen number.

  16. DESCRIPTION OF THE RHIC SEQUENCER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOTTAVIO,T.; FRAK,B.; MORRIS,J.; SATOGATA,T.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The movement of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) through its various states (eg. injection, acceleration, storage, collisions) is controlled by an application called the Sequencer. This program orchestrates most magnet and instrumentation systems and is responsible for the coordinated acquisition and saving of data from various systems. The Sequencer system, its software infrastructure, support programs, and the language used to drive it are discussed in this paper. Initial operational experience is also described.

  17. Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Ha

    2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order>_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass>~;;30 GeV/c2.

  18. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  19. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B. (eds.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  20. Strange Content of Baryons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hippolyte; for the STAR Collaboration

    2003-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Via the study of strange particle production within the STAR experiment, we try to address the surprising amount of baryon transport at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We report here preliminary results showing that, at mid-rapidity and for the top energy of RHIC, the number of created baryons exceeds the number transported from the colliding nuclei. However, thanks to the large acceptance of the experimental setup, one could expect to observe the transition between the ``soft'' regime (low transverse momentum -$\\pt$- region corresponding to a bulk of hot and dense matter hadronizing) and the perturbative one (higher $\\pt$ region) where the fragmentation of incoming partons is supposed to dominate hadron production.}

  1. MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR CONCURRENT OPERATION OF RHIC AND BLIP.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILINSKI, M.; BELLAVIA, S.; GLENN, J.W.; MAUSNER, L.F.; UNGER, K.L.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven 200MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP (Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer), a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity currents are detected.

  2. Jet-Underlying Event Separation Method for Heavy Ion Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Hanks; A. M. Sickles; B. A. Cole; A. Franz; M. P. McCumber; D. P. Morrison; J. L. Nagle; C. H. Pinkenburg; B. Sahlmueller; P. Steinberg; M. von Steinkirch; M. Stone

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a method for understanding underlying event contributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV utilizing the HIJING event generator. This method, extended from previous work by the ATLAS collaboration, provides a well-defined association of "truth jets" from the fragmentation of hard partons with "reconstructed jets" using the anti-$k_T$ algorithm. Results presented here are based on an analysis of 750M minimum bias HIJING events. We find that there is a substantial range of jet energies and radius parameters where jets are well separated from the background fluctuations (often termed "fake jets") that make jet measurements at RHIC a compelling physics program.

  3. The role of Spectator Fragments at an electron Ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian White; Mark Strikman

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient detection of spectator fragments is key to the main topics at an electron-ion collider (eIC). Any process which leads to emission of fragments or $\\gamma$'s breaks coherence in diffractive processes. Therefore this is equivalent to non-detection of rapidity gaps in pp collisions. For example, in coherent photoproduction of vector mesons their 4-momentum transfer distribution would image the "gluon charge" in the nucleus in the same way that Hofstadter measured its charge structure using elastic scattering of $\\sim$100 MeV electrons. Whereas he could measure the $\\sim$4 MeV energy loss by the electron due to excitation of nuclear energy levels (Figure 1), even the energy spread of the incident beam would prevent such an inclusive selection of quasielastic events at an eIC. The only available tool is fragment detection. Since, in our example, one finds that $\\sim100$ of deexcitations go through $\\gamma$'s or 1 neutron, rarely to 2 neutron and never to protons(due to Coulomb barrier suppression), the eIC design should emphasize their detection.

  4. Jet Tomography at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Dunlop

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the use of hard probes in heavy ion collisions at RHIC is reviewed. The discovery of strong jet quenching at RHIC is a major success. However, in order to make full use of this new phenomenon for full jet emission tomography of the properties of the collision zone further development is needed, both experimentally and theoretically.

  5. Improvement plans for the RHIC/AGS on-line model environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown,K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-line models for Relativistic Ion Collider (RHIC) and the RHIC pre-injectors (the AGS and the AGS Booster) can be thought of as containing our best collective knowledge of these accelerators. As we improve these on-line models we are building the framework to have a sophisticated model-based controls system. Currently the RHIC on-line model is an integral part of the controls system, providing the interface for tune control, chromaticity control, and non-linear chromaticity control. What we discuss in this paper is our vision of the future of the on-line model environment for RHIC and the RHIC preinjectors. Although these on-line models are primarily used as Courant-Snyder parameter calculators using live machine settings, we envision expanding these environments to encompass many other problem domains.

  6. Design of High Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron- Light Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawomir Bogacz; Antje Bruell; Jean Delayen; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolf Ent; Joseph Grames; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Byung Yunn; Yuhong Zhang; C Montag

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

  7. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  8. Strongly interacting matter at RHIC: experimental highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results obtained at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be discussed. Investigations of different nucleus-nucleus collisions in recent years focus on two main tasks, namely, the detailed study of sQGP properties and the exploration of the QCD phase diagram. Results at top RHIC energy provide important information about event shapes as well as transport and thermodynamic properties of the hot medium for various flavors. Heavy-ion collisions are a unique tool for the study of topological properties of theory. Experimental results obtained for discrete QCD symmetries at finite temperatures are discussed. These results confirm indirectly the topologically non-trivial structure of the QCD vacuum. Most results obtained during phase-I of the RHIC beam energy scan (BES) program show smooth behavior vs initial energy. However, certain results suggest the transition in the domain of dominance of hadronic degrees of freedom at center-of-mass energies between 10-20 GeV. Future developments and more precise studies of features of the QCD phase diagram in the framework of phase-II of RHIC BES will be briefly discussed.

  9. RHIC Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory search U.S. Department of Energy logo Home RHIC Science News Images Videos For Scientists RHIC Videos Other Videos 455 Science Friday Science Friday Explains...

  10. Comparison of accelerator codes for a RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of comparison of performances of several tracking or/and analysis codes. The basic purpose of this program was to assess reliability and accuracy of these codes, i.e., to determine the so-called ''error bars'' for the predicted values of tunes and other lattice functions as a minimum and, if possible, to discover potential difficulties with underlying physical models in these codes, inadequate algorithms, residual bugs and the like. Not only have we been able to determine the error bars, which for instance for the tunes at dp/p = +1% are ..delta nu../sub xi/ = 0.0027, ..delta nu../sub y/ = 0.0010, but also our program has brought about improvements of several codes. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg andReindustrializationLivermoreRelativistic

  12. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  13. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF linac will serve as a full-energy injector, and, if needed, provide top

  14. LEIC - A Polarized Low Energy Electron-ion Collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Nissen, Edward W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yunn, Byung C. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Sullivan, Michael K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized electron-ion collider is envisioned as the future nuclear science program at JLab beyond the 12 GeV CEBAF. Presently, a medium energy collider (MEIC) is set as an immediate goal with options for a future energy upgrade. A comprehensive design report for MEIC has been released recently. The MEIC facility could also accommodate electron and proton/ion collisions in a low CM energy range, covering proton energies from 10 to 25 GeV and ion energies with a similar magnetic rigidity, for additional science reach. In this paper, we present a conceptual design of this low energy collider, LEIC, showing its luminosity can reach above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The design specifies that the large booster of the MEIC is converted to a low energy ion collider ring with an interaction region and an electron cooler integrated into it. The design provides options for either sharing the detector with the MEIC or a dedicated low energy detector in a third collision point, with advantages of either a minimum cost or extra detection parallel to the MEIC operation, respectively. The LEIC could be positioned as the first and low cost phase of a multi-stage approach to realize the full MEIC.

  15. Pre-Town Meeting on Spin Physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elke-Caroline Aschenauer; Ian Balitsky; Leslie Bland; Stanley J. Brodsky; Matthias Burkardt; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Abhay Deshpande; Markus Diehl; Leonard Gamberg; Matthias Grosse Perdekamp; Jin Huang; Charles Hyde; Xiangdong Ji; Xiaodong Jiang; Zhong-Bo Kang; Valery Kubarovsky; John Lajoie; Keh-Fei Liu; Ming Liu; Simonetta Liuti; Wally Melnitchouk; Piet Mulders; Alexei Prokudin; Andrey Tarasov; Jian-Wei Qiu; Anatoly Radyushkin; David Richards; Ernst Sichtermann; Marco Stratmann; Werner Vogelsang; Feng Yuan

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized $ep/eA$ collider (Electron--Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center--of--mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\sim 20$ to $\\sim100$~GeV (upgradable to $\\sim 150$ GeV) and a luminosity up to $\\sim 10^{34} \\, \\textrm{cm}^{-2} \\textrm{s}^{-1}$, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three--dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini--review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper~\\cite{Accardi:2012qut}.

  16. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  17. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  18. Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

  19. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  20. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  1. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s quarks up to p(T) similar to 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R(dAu), for the phi meson increases above unity at intermediate p(T), similar to that for pions and protons, while R...

  3. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,6 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,28 A. V. Brandin,26 E. Bruna,51 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,51 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,5 J. Callner...

  4. Forward hadron production in ultraperipheral proton-heavy-ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuka, Gaku

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss hadron production in the forward rapidity region in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at the LHC and proton-gold collisions at RHIC. Our discussion is based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions of virtual photons emitted by a fast moving nucleus with a proton beam. We simulate the virtual photon flux with the STARLIGHT event generator and then particle production with the SOPHIA, DPMJET, and PYTHIA event generators. We show the rapidity distributions of charged and neutral particles, and the momentum distributions of neutral pions and neutrons at forward rapidities. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, we find large cross sections of ultraperipheral collisions for particle production especially in the very forward region, leading to substantial background contributions to investigations of collective nuclear effects and spin physics. Finally we can distinguish between proton-nucleus inelastic interactions and ultraperipheral collisions with additional requirements of either ...

  5. The Multi-Purpose Detector for NICA heavy-Ion Collider at JINR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogachevsky, O. V., E-mail: rogachevsky@jinr.ru [JINR, Veksler and Baldin Laboratory on High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD) is designed to study heavy-ion collisions at the Nuclotron-based heavy Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) at JINR, Dubna. Its main components located inside a superconducting solenoid are a tracking system composed of a silicon microstrip vertex detector followed by a large volume time-projection chamber, a time-of-flight system for particle identification and a barrel electromagnetic calorimeter. A zero degree hadron calorimeter is designed specifically to measure the energy of spectators. In this paper, all parts of the apparatus are described and their tracking and particle identification parameters are discussed in some detail.

  6. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  7. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  8. RHIC Newsroom

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plasma created at RHIC. Sergey Belomestnykh Sergey Belomestnykh Receives Particle Accelerator Science & Technology Award May 07, 2015 Sergey Belomestnykh, a physicist at...

  9. Forward hadron production in ultraperipheral proton-heavy-ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaku Mitsuka

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss hadron production in the forward rapidity region in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at the LHC and proton-gold collisions at RHIC. Our discussion is based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions of virtual photons emitted by a fast moving nucleus with a proton beam. We simulate the virtual photon flux with the STARLIGHT event generator and then particle production with the SOPHIA, DPMJET, and PYTHIA event generators. We show the rapidity distributions of charged and neutral particles, and the momentum distributions of neutral pions and neutrons at forward rapidities. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, we find large cross sections of ultraperipheral collisions for particle production especially in the very forward region, leading to substantial background contributions to investigations of collective nuclear effects and spin physics. Finally we can distinguish between proton-nucleus inelastic interactions and ultraperipheral collisions with additional requirements of either of the charged particles at midrapidity and a certain level of activities at negative forward rapidity.

  10. Vladimir Litvinenko, January 23,2006, RHIC Machine Advisory Committee EBIS Booster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Litvinenko, January 23,2006, RHIC Machine Advisory Committee Linac EBIS Booster AGS RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA #12;Vladimir Litvinenko, January 23,2006, RHIC Machine Electron cooling for RHIC II - Wrap-up Vladimir N. Litvinenko for C-AD team Collider Accelerator Department

  11. Jet Reconstruction at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur; for the STAR Collaboration

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions is expected to provide more sensitive measurements of jet quenching in hot QCD matter at RHIC. In this paper we review recent studies of jets utilizing modern jet reconstruction algorithms and their corresponding background subtraction techniques.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF ION BEAM FROM LASER ION SOURCE FOR RHIC Takeshi Kanesue, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , vaporized and becomes plasma which is called laser ablation plasma then plasma expand adiabatically perpendicular to the target surface. Properties of Laser ablation plasma such as charge state distribution, and emittance of Au ions extracted from laser ablation plasma was measured. SINGLY CHARGED ION PRODUCTION We

  13. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last year that constituent quarks are the fundamental elements of particle production in all 3 systems, led to the conclusion that the two-component ansatz which has been used to represent $E_T$ distributions as a function of centrality is simply a proxy for the number of constituent quark participants as well as to an explanation of the surprising elliptical flow results from U+U collisions. An extensive discussion of the latest measurements in Au+Au of net-charge and net-proton distributions represented by Cumulants of the distributions and plans for a Beam Energy Scan at RHIC to look for a QCD critical point is presented and compared to the claim implied by a press release during the 2011 ISSP.

  14. Latest Results from BNL and RHIC--2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A selection of results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from 2012 to 2013 is presented together with a few newsworthy developments in this period. The move of the g-2 magnet from BNL to Fermilab for the "fifth muon g-2 experiment" inspired a brief discussion of the original g-2 experiments at CERN. Highlights of the past year include a change in the measurement of the suppression of large transverse momentum ($p_T$) particles in the Quark Gluon Plasma to a measure of the fractional shift in the observed $p_T$ spectrum from the expected A+A spectrum for independent collisions as an estimate of the energy loss in the medium. The p+Pb run at LHC in early 2013 spurred new or improved measurements in d+Au at RHIC which included the observation of elliptical flow in d+Au collisions and measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy which demonstrated that constituent quarks are the fundamental element of particle production in all 3 systems. Measurements of identified hadrons in d+Au show a huge Cronin effect for protons but no effect for mesons. An important step for the future was the acquisition by BNL of the superconducting solenoid used in the BABAR experiment at SLAC for use in future experiments at RHIC and possibly eRHIC, starting with an upgrade of the PHENIX experiment called sPHENIX.

  15. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the center of discussions. First dedicated LHeC workshop was held in 2008, with a number of dedicated workshops following it. Intense accelerator R&D program is needed to address the challenges posed by the EIC.

  16. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at small-$x$ in future Electron - Ion Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goncalves, V P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of exclusive processes in the future electron-ion ($eA$) colliders will be an important tool to investigate the QCD dynamics at high energies as they are in general driven by the gluon content of the target which is strongly subject to parton saturation effects. In this paper we compute the coherent and incoherent cross sections for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process relying on the color dipole approach and considering different models for the dipole - proton scattering amplitude. The dependencies of the cross sections with the energy, photon virtuality, nuclear mass number and squared momentum transfer are analysed in detail.

  17. Concepts for ELIC - A High Luminosity CEBAF Based Electron-Light Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ya. Derbenev, A. Bogacz, G. Krafft, R. Li, L. Merminga, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CEBAF accelerator based electron-light ion collider (ELIC) of rest mass energy from 20 to 65 GeV and luminosity from 10^33 to 10^35 cm6-2s^-1 with both beams polarized is envisioned as a future upgrade to CEBAF. A two step upgrade scenario is under study: CEBAF accelerator-ring-ring scheme (CRR) as the first step, and a multi-turn ERL-ring as the second step, to attain a better electron emittance and maximum luminosity. In this paper we report results of our studies of the CRR version of ELIC.

  18. Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castilla Loeza, Alejandro [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

  19. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

  20. Longitudinal Decorrelation of Anisotropic Flows in Heavy-ion Collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-Gang Pang; Guang-You Qin; Victor Roy; Xin-Nian Wang; Guo-Liang Ma

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations in the initial transverse energy-density distribution lead to anisotropic flows as observed in central high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Studies of longitudinal fluctuations of the anisotropic flows can shed further light on the initial conditions and dynamical evolution of the hot quark-gluon matter in these collisions. Correlations between anisotropic flows with varying pseudorapidity gaps in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are investigated using both an event-by-event (3+1)-D ideal hydrodynamical model with fluctuating initial conditions and the a multiphase transport (AMPT) Monte Carlo model for high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Anisotropic flows at different pseudorapidities are found to become significantly decorrelated with increasing pseudo-rapidity gaps due to longitudinal fluctuations in the initial states of heavy-ion collisions. The longitudinal correlation of the elliptic flow shows a strong centrality dependence while the correlation of the triangular flow is independent of the centrality. Longitudinal fluctuations as a source of the decorrelation are further shown to consist of a twist or gradual rotation in flow angles between the forward and backward direction and additional fluctuations on top of the twist. Within the AMPT model, longitudinal correlations of anisotropic flows are also found to depend on the value of partonic cross sections. The implicatiosn of constraining the initial conditions and shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the partonic matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are also discussed.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-ferrite rhic injection Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collider-Accelerator Department, Superconducting Accelerator and RHIC Electron Cooling Group Collection: Physics 44 DoE Review, June 10, 2003 S.Peggs 1 Beam...

  2. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  3. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  4. A Reaction Plane Detector for PHENIX at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Richardson; Y. Akiba; N. Anderson; A. A. Bickley; T. Chujo; B. A. Cole; S. Esumi; J. S. Haggerty; J. Hanks; T. K. Hemmick; M. Hutchison; Y. Ikeda; M. Inaba; J. Jia; D. Lynch; Y. Miake; A. C. Mignerey; T. Niida; E. O'Brien; R. Pak; M. Shimomura; P. W. Stankus; T. Todoroki; K. Watanabe; R. Wei; W. Xie; W. A. Zajc; C. Zhang

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A plastic scintillator paddle detector with embedded fiber light guides and photomultiplier tube readout, referred to as the Reaction Plane Detector (RXNP), was designed and installed in the PHENIX experiment prior to the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The RXNP's design is optimized to accurately measure the reaction plane (RP) angle of heavy-ion collisions, where, for mid-central $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions, it achieved a $2^{nd}$ harmonic RP resolution of $\\sim$0.75, which is a factor of $\\sim$2 greater than PHENIX's previous capabilities. This improvement was accomplished by locating the RXNP in the central region of the PHENIX experiment, where, due to its large coverage in pseudorapidity ($1.0<|\\eta|<2.8$) and $\\phi$ (2$\\pi$), it is exposed to the high particle multiplicities needed for an accurate RP measurement. To enhance the observed signal, a 2-cm Pb converter is located between the nominal collision region and the scintillator paddles, allowing neutral particles produced in the heavy-ion collisions to contribute to the signal through conversion electrons. This paper discusses the design, operation and performance of the RXNP during the 2007 RHIC run.

  5. Global Observables at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Milov

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Main characteristics of the charged particle dN_ch/deta and transverse energy dE_T/deta production measured in Heavy Ion collisions at RHIC energies are presented in this article. Transformation of the pseudo-rapidity shape, relation to the incident energy and centrality profile are described in a systematic way. Centrality profile is shown to be closely bound to the number of nucleons participating in the collisions, at the same time an alternative approach to study the centrality behavior is also discussed.

  6. Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC? (410th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, Peter (Chemistry Dept) [Chemistry Dept

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisions of two beams of heavy-ion particles, atoms stripped of their electrons, speeding around BNL’s immense Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have long been expected to create a “quark-gluon plasma” in which the quarks and gluons that make up the protons and neutrons in the ions would move freely in a plasma-like system. But the final particles, detectable in the four experiments placed around the RHIC ring, tend to hide information about the earlier, hotter stage. So it is a challenge to elucidate the nature of the primordial system. What surprised scientists, however, was how strongly the quarks and gluons seemed to interact during the collision. This strong interaction makes the system produced at RHIC behave almost like a perfect fluid, one in which the hot matter formed shows a high degree of collectivity among the particles, rather than a gas, in which individual molecules move about randomly. Evidence from the four RHIC detectors has shown that the system formed at RHIC is potentially the most perfect fluid found in nature, at least since a few microseconds after the Big Bang, a state which RHIC was built to re-create. This result is all the more amazing since the system is so small, the collisions forming over distances 100 times smaller than a proton, and forms so quickly, in times on the order of a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second (10-24 seconds). It was even interesting enough to the wider physics community to warrant first place in the American Institute of Physics’ year-end review of top physics stories.

  7. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page RHIC accelerator facility. Top view of the BRAHMS detectors and magnets. BRAHMS beam-beam counter arrays. The points are particles from GEANT simulations hitting the active detector volumes. . . . 11 Silicon strip... Calculated response of the ZDC to protons, electrons and muons. . . 22 ZDC module-photomultiplier assembly. 24 W-Cherenkov ZDC prototype spectra when hit with 100 and 160 GeV protons at CERN. 26 10 Measured ZDC energy resolution versus energy. 28 Because...

  8. Higher moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at RHIC energies in STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nihar Ranjan Sahoo; for the STAR Collaboration

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the higher order moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions for the Au+Au collisions at \\sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV in the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The energy and centrality dependence of higher moments and their products (such as $\\sigma^2/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are presented. The data are also compared to Poisson expectations and Hadron Resonance Gas model calculations.

  9. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  10. Multiphase transport model for relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Pal, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that for producing a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons, which is believed to have existed during the first microsecond after the Big Bang. Experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with center-of-mass energy up to ?sNN = 200 GeV in Au... will have an even higher temperature and a nearly vanishing net baryon chemical potential. Many observables have beenmeasured at RHIC, such as the rapidity distributions of various particles and their transverse momentum spectra up to very high...

  11. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  12. RHIC | Black Holes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in...

  13. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  14. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  15. Energy dependence of elliptic flow over a large pseudorapidity range in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOBOS Collaboration

    2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the measurement of the energy dependence of elliptic flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Data taken at collision energies of $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =$ 19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV are shown over a wide range in pseudorapidity. These results, when plotted as a function of $\\eta'=|\\eta|-y_{beam}$, scale with approximate linearity throughout $\\eta'$, implying no sharp changes in the dynamics of particle production as a function of pseudorapidity or increasing beam energy.

  16. Energy dependence of directed flow over a wide range of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back; for the PHOBOS Collaboration

    2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =$ 19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  17. RHIC Operation and Plans for Upgrades Wolfram Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã? design 10Ã? achieved #12;Wolfram Fischer 7 Achieved parameters Mode No of bunches Ions/bunch [ 1 0 9] enhanced luminosity 60e9 Au intensity design luminosity Beamexperiments #12;Wolfram Fischer 10 RHIC Run-41 RHIC Operation and Plans for Upgrades Wolfram Fischer C-AD Machine Advisory Committee Meeting 10

  18. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  19. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616... at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is to quantify the properties of the QCD matter created in heavy-ion collisions at high energy [1]. One key property is the medium energy density, which can be probed by its effect on a fast parton propagating through...

  20. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the existence of a new state of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. This state has now been observed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory [2]. Many interesting... of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 6University of California, Los Angeles...

  1. Luminosity Tuning at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittmer, W

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the interaction point (IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) due to the asymmetric lattice. In addition in the LHC both beams share a common beam pipe through the inner triplet magnets (in these region changes of the magnetic field act on both beams). To control and adjust the beta-functions without perturbation of other optics functions, quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the so-called "tuning knobs" for the IP beta-functions. For a specific correction one of these knobs is scaled by a common multiplier. The different methods which were used to compute such knobs are discussed: (1) matching in MAD, (2)i...

  2. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC* Ilan Ben-Zvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameter and collision generated noise. 2 BEAM LOSS ISSUES The design of an electron cooling system for gold ions at RHIC is greatly affected by two beam lifetime issues: One...

  3. Estimation of dibaryon (OO) yields at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Dao Lu

    2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The yields of dibaryon (Omega-Omega) in relativistic heavy ion collisions, especially at RHIC energies, are estimated by statistical model. The yields of hyperon Omega- and the ratio of dibaryon to Omega are also given.

  4. UPGRADING RHIC FOR HIGHER LUMINOSITY* W. MacKay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL, USA V. Parkhomchuk, BINP, Russia Abstract While RHIC has only just started running for its heavy ion physics program, in the first run last summer, we achieved 10% of...

  5. Recent Results from RHIC&Some Lessons for Cosmic-RayPhysicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) studies nuclear matter under a variety of conditions. Cold nuclear matter is probed with deuteron-gold collisions, while hot nuclear matter (possibly a quark-gluon plasma (QGP)) is created in heavy-ion collisions. The distribution of spin in polarized nucleons is measured with polarized proton collisions, and photoproduction is studied using the photons that accompany heavy nuclei. The deuteron-gold data shows less forward particle production than would be expected from a superposition of pp collisions, as expected due to saturation/shadowing. Particle production in AA collisions is well described by a model of an expanding fireball in thermal equilibrium. Strong hydrodynamic flow and jet quenching shows that the produced matter interacts very strongly. These phenomena are consistent with new non-perturbative interactions near the transition temperature to the QGP. This report discusses these results, and their implications for cosmic-ray physicists.

  6. Evolution of event-by-event ET fluctuations over collision centrality in RHIC interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armendariz, Raul [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are presented for two analyses of transverse energy (ET) production measured with the electromagnetic calorimeters (EMC) of the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment (PHENIX), in relativistic nuclear interactions in Au+Au heavy-ion collisions created by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Event-by-event ET distributions made across collision centrality were used in (1) measurements of 200 GeV , and (2) measurements of 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV ET distribution relative fluctuations {sigma}/ and {sigma}2/, where {sigma} is the standard deviation, and {sigma}2 the variance of each semi-inclusive distribution. Event centrality was selected in 5% wide bins and each bin represented by a modeled mean number of participant nucleons .

  7. System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  8. RHIC | Image Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arrow See the RHIC collection on Flickr | Note: to see photo descriptions, click "show info" in the player window after pressing play....

  9. A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

  10. July 25, 2006 RHIC Stochastic Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (abandoned at SppS and Tevatron) ­ Not part of RHIC base line design #12;July 25, 2006 Heavy ions should before (red) and after (blue) cooling, Wall Current Monitor Schottky spectrum before cooling: blue trace "hot" beam best ·Good for counteracting IBS ·Effective for tails of distribution ·E-cooling cools "cold

  11. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  12. How Nuclear Diffuseness Affects RHIC Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Werner

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact that nuclei have diffuse surfaces (rather than being simple spheres) has dramatic consequences on the interpretation of RHIC heavy-ion data. The effect is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. One may actually divide the collision zone into a central part ("core"), with expected high energy densities, and a peripheral part ("corona"), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We will discuss that many complicated "features" observed at RHIC become almost trivial after subtracting the corona background. We are focussing on AuAu collisions at 200 GeV.

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical background for the search of the CEP using observables related to fluctuations and correlations. While new data are pouring in from the RHIC low energy scan program, many recent advances have also been made in the phenomenological and lattice gauge theory sides in order to have a better theoretical understanding of the wealth of new data. This workshop tried to create a synergy between the experimental, phenomenological and lattice QCD aspects of the fluctuation and correlation related studies of the RHIC low energy scan program. The workshop brought together all the leading experts from related fields under the same forum to share new ideas among themselves in order to streamline the continuing search of CEP in the RHIC low energy scan program.

  14. Beam commissioning results for the RFQ and MEBT of the EBIS based preinjector for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Zaltsman, A.; Tamura, J.; Schempp, A.; Zhang, C.; Schmidt, J.S.; Vossberg, M.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The EBIS based preinjector for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is now being commissioned at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In 2008, the RFQ for the project was delivered and commissioned using Test EBIS, which was built to demonstrate the high current EBIS's performance. A dedicated beamline after the RFQ was assembled to confirm the RFQ's performance, and the beam energy was measured by a bending dipole magnet. In November 2009, the RFQ was moved to the final location and the vanes were realigned. The beam commissioning with the RHIC-EBIS was started again during March 2010. The RFQ accelerates ions from 17 keV/u to 300 keV/u and operates at 100.625 MHz. It is followed by a short Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT), which consists of four quadrupoles and one buncher cavity. Some temporary diagnostics for this commissioning include an emittance probe, TOF system, fast Faraday cup, and beam current measurement units. As of September 2010, the RFQ and the MEBT show expected performance with He{sup +}, Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams. Further commissioning for higher intensity beams is in progress.

  15. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto [Collider Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  16. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in ?S[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Previous experimental results based on data (?15 × 10[superscript 6] events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to ...

  17. Adjusting the IP $\\beta$ Functions in RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittmer, W; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Van Zeijts, J

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta functions at the IP can be adjusted without perturbation of other optics functions via several approaches. In this paper we describe a scheme based on a vector knob, which assigns fixed values to the different tuning quadrupoles and scales them by a common multiplier. The values for the knob vector were calculated for a lattice without any errors using MADX. Previous studies for the LHC [1] have shown that this approach can meet the design goals. A specific feature of the RHIC lattice is the nested power supply system. To cope with the resulting problems a detailed response matrix analysis has been carried out and different sets of knobs were calculated and compared. The knobs were tested at RHIC during the 2004 run and preliminary results are discussed. Simultaneously a new approach to measure the beam sizes of both colliding beams at the IP, based on the tunability provided by the knobs, was developed and tested.

  18. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND WORKSHOP ON EXPERIMENTS AND DETECTORS FOR A RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC), LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, MAY 25-29, 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Hans Georg

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.1 seconds per track on a VAX 780, approximately linear into approximately 500 x VAX 780 speed (roughly a kiloVAX)coupled by Ethernet to a VAX online computer as. part of its

  20. Understanding the composition of nucleon spin with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deshpande, A.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has just finished 14 years of operation. A significant fraction of these operating years were with polarized proton collisions at 62.4, 200, and 500 GeV center of mass, investigating various aspects of nucleon spin through longitudinal and transversely polarized collisions. These data have helped to address some of the most puzzling and fundamental questions in quantum chromodynamics including: what fraction of the nucleon’s spin originates in the gluon’s helicity contribution?, how polarized are the sea quarks?, and what if any, is the evidence for transverse motion of quarks inmore »polarized protons? These questions have been addressed by the PHENIX detector collaboration. We present in this review highlights of the PHENIX results and discuss their impact.« less

  1. Charmed hadron production at low transverse momentum in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Abelev

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of charmed hadron production from hadronic ($D^{0}\\rightarrow K\\pi$) and semileptonic ($\\mu$ and $e$) decays in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Analysis of the spectra indicates that charmed hadrons have a different radial flow pattern from light or multi-strange hadrons. Charm cross sections at mid-rapidity are extracted by combining the three independent measurements, covering the transverse momentum range that contributes to $\\sim$90% of the integrated cross section. The cross sections scale with number of binary collisions of the initial nucleons, a signature of charm production exclusively at the initial impact of colliding heavy ions. The implications for charm quark interaction and thermalization in the strongly interacting matter are discussed.

  2. Latest flow results from PHENIX at RHIC - Quarks and Nuclear Physics Conference Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Richardson; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), key insights into the bulk properties of the hot and dense partonic matter arise from the study of azimuthal anisotropy (v_2) of the produced particles. The v_2 values indicate that the matter undergoes rapid thermalization and behaves hydrodynamically at low p_T. Furthermore, the quark scaling of v_2 for different particle species suggests that thermalization occurs at the quark level and that v_2 is the same for all quark flavors. Recently, higher order harmonic measurements (v_3, v_4) have shown the potential for insights into the medium's initial geometry and fluctuations. This proceeding discusses some of the PHENIX Collaboration's latest flow results and their implications.

  3. COOLING DYNAMICS STUDIES AND SCENARIOS FOR THE RHIC COOLER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss various electron cooling dynamics studies for RHIC. We also present simulations [1] of various possibilities of using electron cooling at RHIC, which includes cooling at the top energy, pre-cooling at low energy, aspects of transverse and longitudinal cooling and their impact on the luminosity. Electron cooling at various collision energies both for heavy ions and protons is also discussed.

  4. Scaling of elliptic flow, recombination, and sequential freeze-out of hadrons in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Min; Fries, Rainer J.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    partons deconfine and chiral symmetry is restored [1]. One major finding by the experimental program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Labora- tory is the large azimuthal anisotropy of hadron transverse- momentum (p..., Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2RIKEN/BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA (Received 9 June 2010; revised manuscript received 31 August 2010; published 21 September 2010) The scaling...

  5. Electron Cooling Studies for RHIC-II October 16, 2006 Electron Cooling studies for RHIC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cooling Studies for RHIC-II October 16, 2006 Electron Cooling studies for RHIC-II I.A.1 magnetized cooling I.A.1.3 Parameters of electron cooler I.A.1.4 Suppression of recombination with undulators: experiments vs theory I.A.3.3 IBS for ion beam distribution under electron cooling I.A.4 Recombination I.A.4

  6. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herschcovitch,A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Poole, H. J.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).

  7. Core-Corona Separation in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Werner

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple geometrical considerations show that the collision zone in high energy nuclear collisions may be divided into a central part (``core''), with high energy densities, and a peripheral part (``corona''), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We present calculations which allow to separate these two contributions, and which show that the corona contribution is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. We will discuss consequences concerning results obtained in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS).

  8. Proceedings of the symposium on RHIC detector R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makdisi, Y.; Stevens, A.J. [eds.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Development of Analog Memories for RHIC Detector Front-end Electronic Systems; Monolithic Circuit Development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Highly Integrated Electronics for the STAR TPC; Monolithic Readout Circuits for RHIC; New Methods for Trigger Electronics Development; Neurocomputing methods for Pattern Recognition in Nuclear Physics; The Development of a Silicon Multiplicity Detector System; The Vertex Detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration; Simulations of Silicon Vertex Tracker for STAR Experiment at RHIC; Calorimeter/Absorber Optimization for a RHIC Dimuon Experiment (RD-10 Project); Applications of the LAHET simulation Code to Relativistic Heavy Ion Detectors; Highly Segmented, High Resolution Time-of-Flight System; Research and Development on a Sub 100 Picosecond Time-of-Flight System Based on Silicon Avalance Diodes; Behavior of TPC`s in a High Particle Flux Environment; Generic R&D on Undoped Cesium Iodide and Lead Fluoride; and A Transition Radiation Detector for RHIC Featuring Accurate Tracking and dE/dx Particle Identification. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Collective Dynamics at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aihong Tang

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The property of the ``perfect liquid'' created at RHIC is probed with anisotropic flow measurements. Different initial conditions and their consequences on flow measurements are discussed. The collectivity is shown to be achieved fast and early. The thermalization is investigated with the ratio of $v_4/v_2^2$. Measurements from three sectors of soft physics (HBT, flow and strangeness) are shown to have a simple, linear, length scaling. Directed flow is found to be independent of system size.

  10. DEEPLY INELASTIC SCATTERING OFF NUCLEI AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, we discussed the physics case for an eA collider. We emphasized the novel physics that might be studied at small x. The interesting physics at intermediate x's has been discussed elsewhere [3]. Plans for an electron-ion collider include, as a major part of the program, the possibility of doing polarized electron-polarized proton/light ion scattering. A discussion of the combined case for high energy electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton scattering will be published separately [66].

  11. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  12. Feedback damper system for quadrupole oscillations after transition at RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Schultheiss, C.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The heavy ion beam at RHIC undergoes strong quadrupole oscillations just after it crosses transition, which leads to an increase in bunch length making rebucketing less effective. A feedback system was built to damp these quadrupole oscillations and in this paper the characteristics of the system and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  13. The PHOBOS Perspective on Discoveries at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back et al

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the conclusions that can be drawn from the data taken thus far with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. In the most central Au+Au collisions at the highest beam energy, evidence is found for the formation of a very high energy density system whose description in terms of simple hadronic degrees of freedom is inappropriate. Furthermore, the constituents of this novel system are found to undergo a significant level of interaction. The properties of particle production at RHIC energies are shown to follow a number of simple scaling behaviors, some of which continue trends found at lower energies or in simpler systems. As a function of centrality, the total number of charged particles scales with the number of participating nucleons. When comparing Au+Au at different centralities, the dependence of the yield on the number of participants at higher pT (~4 GeV/c) is very similar to that at low transverse momentum. The measured values of charged particle pseudorapidity density and elliptic flow were found to be independent of energy over a broad range of pseudorapidities when effectively viewed in the rest frame of one of the colliding nuclei, a property we describe as "extended longitudinal scaling''. Finally, the centrality and energy dependences of several observables were found to factorize to a surprising degree.

  14. Bulk viscosity, chemical equilibration and flow at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schaefer; Kevin Dusling

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of bulk viscosity on p_T spectra and elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We argue that direct effect of the bulk viscosity on the evolution of the velocity field is small, but corrections to the freezeout distributions can be significant. These effects are dominated by chemical non-equilibration in the hadronic phase. We show that a non-zero bulk viscosity in the range $\\zeta/s \\lsim 0.05$ improves the description of spectra and flow at RHIC.

  15. RHIC Spin Flipper Commissioning Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Meot, F.; Dawson, C.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.; Makdisi, Y.; Meng, W.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The commissioning of the RHIC spin flipper in the RHIC Blue ring during the RHIC polarized proton run in 2009 showed the detrimental effects of global vertical coherent betatron oscillation induced by the 2-AC dipole plus 4-DC dipole configuration. This global orbital coherent oscillation of the RHIC beam in the Blue ring in the presence of collision modulated the beam-beam interaction between the two RHIC beams and affected Yellow beam polarization. The experimental data at injection with different spin tunes by changing the snake current also demonstrated that it was not possible to induce a single isolated spin resonance with the global vertical coherent betatron oscillation excited by the two AC dipoles. Hence, a new design was proposed to eliminate the coherent vertical betatron oscillation outside the spin flipper by adding three additional AC dipoles. This paper presents the experimental results as well as the new design.

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin effort (Thomas Roser is the spokesperson). Waldo Mackay, the Project Manager for spin, leads a weekly accelerator meeting on spin issues on Wednesdays. Finally, Phenix, STAR, and the pp2pp Collaboration have regular collaboration meetings including spin, and spin working groups.

  17. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  18. RHIC spin flipper commissioning results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

  19. Charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Jay Lawrence

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) collides Au ions at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon pair, which produces the most energetic collisions yet seen in the laboratory. RHIC has also collided proton ...

  20. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Xu, Zhe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading-order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and therefore radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  1. ANALYSIS OF BEAM INDUCED PRESSURE INCREASES IN RHIC WARM VACUUM SECTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing intensity of gold and proton beams during recent RHIC operations, pressure rises of several decades were observed at a few RHIC warm vacuum sections. The pressure increases were analyzed and compared with the beam parameters such as ion species, bunch intensity, total intensity, number ofbunches, bunch spacing and beam loss. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by either beam loss and/or electron multipacting.

  2. Triangular flow in heavy ion collisions in a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Xu; Che Ming Ko

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained a new set of parameters in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model that are able to describe both the charged particle multiplicity density and elliptic flow measured in Au+Au collisions at center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), although they still give somewhat softer transverse momentum spectra. We then use the model to predict the triangular flow due to fluctuations in the initial collision geometry and study its effect relative to those from other harmonic components of anisotropic flows on the di-hadron azimuthal correlations in both central and mid-central collisions.

  3. Bose-Einstein condensation of pions in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Begun; Wojciech Florkowski

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse in detail the possibility of Bose-Einstein condensation of pions produced in heavy-ion collisions at the beam energy $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. Our approach is based on the chemical non-equilibrium thermal model of hadron production which has been generalised to include separately the contribution from the local zero-momentum state. In order to study both the hadronic multiplicities and the transverse-momentum spectra, we use the Cracow freeze-out model which parameterises the flow and space-time geometry of the system at freeze-out in a very economic way. Our analysis indicates that about 5% of all pions may form the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  4. Research and development of RHIC injection kicker upgrade with nano second FID pulse generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Hahn, H.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.J.; Pai, C.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Our recent effort to test a 50 kV, 1 kA, 50 ns pulse width, 10 ns pulse rise time FID pulse generator with a 250 ft transmission cable, resistive load, and existing RHIC injection kicker magnet has produced unparalleled results. This is the very first attempt to drive a high strength fast kicker magnet with a nano second high pulsed power (50 MVA) generator for large accelerator and colliders. The technology is impressive. We report here the result and future plan of RHIC Injection kicker upgrade.

  5. RHIC | STAR Detector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about the collision. STAR TPC The Heart of STAR STAR's "heart" is the Time Projection Chamber which tracks and identifies particles emerging from heavy ion collisions. As each...

  6. UPGRADE OF RHIC VACUUM SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LUMINOSITY OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; SMART, L.A.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, rapid pressure rises of several decades were observed at most warm sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping and anti-grazing ridges have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and logging were enhanced. Preventive measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed and summarized.

  7. Justification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas inside the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volume, the influx and accumulation of residual gas ions reduces the number of working ions in a trap for internal elements, technology of processing and equipment should be adequate. The components of the gasJustification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. A. Pikin 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas

  8. Viscosity and boost invariance at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bozek

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the longitudinal hydrodynamic evolution of the fireball created in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. Nonzero shear viscosity reduces the colling rate of the system and hinders the acceleration of the longitudinal flow. As a consequence, the initial energy density needed to reproduce the experimental data at RHIC energies is significantly reduced. At LHC energies, we expect that shear viscosity helps to conserve a Bjorken plateau in the rapidity distributions during the expansion.

  9. Net-proton measurements at RHIC and the QCD phase diagram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedangadas Mohanty

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two measurements related to the proton and anti-proton production near midrapidity in center of mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. At intermediate impact parameters the slope parameter of the directed flow versus rapidity (dv1/dy) for the net-protons shows a non-monotonic variation as a function of the beam energy. This non-monotonic variation is characterized by the presence of a minimum in dv1/dy between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV and a change in the sign of dv1/dy twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. At small impact parameters the product of the moments of net-proton distribution, kurtosis x variance and skewness x standard deviation are observed to be significantly below the corresponding measurements at large impact parameter collisions for 19.6 and 27 GeV. The kurtosis x variance and skewness x standard deviation at these beam energies deviate from the expectations from Poisson statistics and that from a Hadron Resonance Gas model. Both these measurements have implications towards the understanding of the QCD phase structures, the first order phase transition and the critical point in the high baryonic chemical potential region of the phase diagram.

  10. Electron Cooling for RHIC V. Parkhomchuk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C-A/AP/47 April 2001 Electron Cooling for RHIC V. Parkhomchuk Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics I Upton, NY 11973 #12;C-A/AP/47 April 2001 Electron Cooling for RHIC V. Parkhomchuk Budker Institute National Laboratory Upton, NY 11973 #12;ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC Review of the Principles of Electron

  11. Open Charm Production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Dong

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental measurements on open charm production in proton-proton, proton (deuteron)-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC are reviewed. A comparison with theoretical predictions is made. Some unsettled issues in open charm production call for precise measurements on directly reconstructed open charm hadrons.

  12. Transverse Energy Production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qun Li; Yang Pang; Nu Xu

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mechanism of transverse energy (E_T) production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The time evolution starting from the initial energy loss to the final E_T production is closely examined in transport models. The relationship between the experimentally measured E_T distribution and the maximum energy density achieved is discussed.

  13. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  14. atp-gated p2x4 ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using specific Sgula, Philippe 5 Ion Colliders CERN Preprints Summary: High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the...

  15. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that each prediction should be summarized on at most two pages, and that predictions should be presented, whenever possible, in figures which display measurable quantities. Full model descriptions were not accepted--the authors were encouraged to indicate the relevant references for the interested reader. Participants had the possibility to submit multiple contributions on different topics, but it was part of the subsequent editing process to ensure that predictions on neighboring topics were merged wherever possible. The contributions summarized here are organized in several sections,--though some of them contain material related with more than one section--roughly by going from low transverse momentum to high transverse momentum and from abundant to rare measurements. In the low transverse momentum regime, we start with predictions on multiplicity distributions, azimuthal asymmetries in particle production and hadronic flavor observables, followed by correlation and fluctuation measurements. The contributions on hard probes at the LHC start with predictions for single inclusive high transverse momentum spectra, and jets, followed by heavy quark and quarkonium measurements, leptonic probes and photons. A final section 'Others' encompasses those predictions which do not fall naturally within one of the above-mentioned categories, or discuss the more speculative phenomena that may be explored at the LHC.

  16. Monolithic readout circuits for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, P.; Harder, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several CMOS ASICs have been developed for a proposed RHIC experiment. This paper discusses why ASIC implementation was chosen for certain functions, circuit specifications and the design techniques used to meet them, and results of simulations and early prototypes. By working closely together from an early stage in the planning process, in-house ASIC designers and detector and data acquisition experimenters can achieve optimal use of this important technology.

  17. Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20

  18. MULTIPARTICLE PRODUCTION AT RHIC AND LHC: A CLASSICAL POINT OF VIEW.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRASNITZ,A.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of our ongoing nonperturbative numerical study of a classical effective theory describing low-x partons in the central region of a heavy-ion collision. In particular, we give estimates of the initial transverse energies and multiplicities for a wide range of collision regimes, including those at RHIC and at LHC.

  19. Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaoheng [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  20. Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

  1. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  2. Jet measurements in p+p and d+Au collisions with STAR at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Kapitan; for the STAR Collaboration

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions is a promising tool for the quantitative study of properties of the dense medium produced at RHIC. In addition to baseline measurements in p+p, results from d+Au collisions are needed to disentangle initial state nuclear effects from medium-induced k_T broadening and jet quenching. We present mid-rapidity inclusive jet p_T spectra and di-jet correlations (k_T) in 200~GeV p+p and d+Au collisions from the 2007-2008 RHIC run.

  3. Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

  4. Charm and bottom production in inclusive double Pomeron exchange in heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE, IF-UFRGS Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive double Pomeron exchange cross section for heavy-quark pair production is calculated for nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The present estimate is based on hard diffractive factorization, corrected by absorptive corrections and nuclear effects. The theoretical uncertainties for nuclear collisions are investigated and a comparison to other approaches is presented. The production channels giving a similar final state configuration are discussed as well.

  5. Medium induced jet absorption at relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Drees; Haidong Feng; Jiangyong Jia

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense medium created in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) significantly suppresses particle production from hard scattering processes and their characteristic back-to-back angular correlation. We present a simple model of jet absorption in dense matter which incorporates a realistic nuclear geometry. Our calculations are performed at the jet level and assume independent jet fragmentation in the vacuum. This model describes quantitatively the centrality dependence of the observed suppression of the high $p_T$ hadron yield and of the back-to-back angular correlations. The azimuthal anisotropy of high $p_T$ particle production can not be accounted for using a realistic nuclear geometry.

  6. Jet suppression of pions and single electrons at Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic

    2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet suppression is considered to be a powerful tool to study the properties of a QCD medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. However, theoretical predictions obtained by using jet energy loss in static QCD medium show disagreement with experimental data, which is known as the heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC. We calculate the suppression patterns of pions and single electrons for Au+Au collisions at RHIC by including the energy loss in a finite size dynamical QCD medium, with finite magnetic mass effects taken into account. In contrast to the static case, we here report a good agreement with the experimental results, where this agreement is robust with respect to magnetic mass values. Therefore, the inclusion of dynamical QCD medium effects provides a reasonable explanation of the heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC.

  7. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

  8. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  9. Central Exclusive Production at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, Leszek [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science , AGH - University of Science and Technology, Krakow, (Poland); Guryn, Wlodek [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Turnau, Jacek [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow, (Poland)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity |#17;| < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  10. Central Exclusive Production at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Wlodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity |#17;| more »1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.« less

  11. Viscosity at RHIC: Theory and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic behavior and the associated discussions of viscosity at RHIC has inspired a r enaissance in modeling viscous hydrodynamics. An explanation of Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics is presented here, with an emphasis on the tangible benefits compared to Navier Stokes.

  12. Event generator for RHIC spin physics. RIKEN BNL Research Center Proceedings, Volume 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, N.; Schaefer, A. [eds.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume archives the reports from the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Event Generator for RHIC Spin Physics II'' held during the week March 15, 1999 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It was the second meeting on the subject following a first one in last September. This workshop has been initiated to establish a firm collaboration between theorists and experimentalists involved in RHIC spin physics with the aim of developing a reliable, high-precision event generator for RHIC spin physics. Needless to say, adequate event generators are indispensible tools for high energy physics programs in general, especially in the process of: planning the experimental programs, developing algorithms to extract the physics signals of interest, estimating the background in the extracted results, and connecting the final particle kinematics to the fundamental i.e. partonic level processes. Since RHIC is the first polarized collider, dedicated efforts are required to obtain a full-fledged event generator which describes spin dependent reactions in great detail. The RHIC spin project will be in the transition from R&D and construction phase to operation phase in the year 2000. As soon as data will be available, it should be analysed, interpreted and compared with theoretical predictions to extract its physical significance. Without mutual understanding between theorists and experimentalists on the technical details, it is hard to perform detailed comparisons in a consistent framework. The importance of this fact has been recognized especially during the analyses of hadron induced reactions observed at CERN, Fermilab and DESY. Since the use of event generator is indispensible for the analyses, it should be developed in a way that both experimentalists and theorists can agree upon.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

  14. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  15. Photon collider Higgs factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Telnov

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  16. PHENIX EXPERIMENT AT RHIC: DECADAL PLAN 2004-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAJC,W.ET. AL.

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX Collaboration has developed a plan for the detailed investigation of quantum chromodynamics in the next decade. The demonstrated capabilities of the PHENIX experiment to measure rare processes in hadronic, leptonic and photonic channels, in combination with RHIC's unparalleled flexibility as a hadronic collider, provides a physics program of extraordinary breadth and depth. A superlative set of measurements to elucidate the states of both hot and cold nuclear matter, and to measure the spin structure of the proton has been identified. The components of this plan include: (1) Definitive measurements that will establish the nature of the matter created in nucleus+nucleus collisions, that will determine if the description of such matter as a quark-gluon plasma is appropriate, and that will quantify both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium features of the produced medium. (2) Precision measurements of the gluon structure of the proton, and of the spin structure of the gluon and sea-quark distributions of the proton via polarized proton+proton collisions. (3) Determination of the gluon distribution in cold nuclear matter using proton+nucleus collisions. Each of these fundamental fields of investigation will be addressed through a program of correlated measurements in some or all of the following channels: (1) Particle production at high transverse momentum, studied via single particle inclusive measurements of identified charged and neutral hadrons, multi-particle correlations and jet production. (2) Direct photon, photon+jet and virtual photon production. (3) Light and heavy vector mesons. (4) Heavy flavor production. These measurements, together with the established PHENIX abilities to identify hadrons at low transverse momentum, to perform detailed centrality selections, and to monitor polarization and luminosity with high precision create a superb opportunity for performing world-class science with PHENIX for the next decade. A portion of this program is achievable using the present capabilities of PHENIX experimental apparatus, but the physics reach is considerably extended and the program made even more compelling by a proposed set of upgrades which include: (1) An aerogel and time-of-flight system to provide complete {pi}/K/p separation for momenta up to 10 GeV/c. (2) A vertex detector to detect displaced vertices from the decay of mesons containing charm or bottom quarks. (3) A hadron-blind detector to detect and track electrons near the vertex. (4) A micro-TPC to extend the range of PHENIX tracking in azimuth and pseudo-rapidity. (5) A forward detector upgrade for an improved muon trigger to preserve sensitivity at the highest projected RHIC luminosities. (6) A forward calorimeter to provide photon+jet studies over a wide kinematic range. The success of the proposed program is contingent upon several factors external to PHENIX. Implementation of the upgrades is predicated on the availability of R&D funds to develop the required detector technologies on a timely, and in some cases urgent, basis. The necessity for such funding, and the physics merit of the proposed PHENIX program, has been endorsed in the first meeting of BNL's Detector Advisory Committee in December, 2002. Progress towards the physics goals depends in an essential way on the development of the design values for RHIC luminosity, polarization and availability. An analysis based on the guidance from the Collider Accelerator Department indicates that moderate increases in the yearly running time lead to very considerable increases in progress toward the enunciated goals. Efficient access to the rarest probes in the proposed program is achieved via the order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity provided by RHIC-II.

  17. Heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC: analysis of the underlying effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppressions of light and heavy flavor observables are considered to be excellent probes of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Suppression predictions of quark and gluon jets appear to suggest a clear hierarchy according to which neutral pions should be more suppressed than D mesons, which in turn should be more suppressed than single electrons. However, joint comparison of neutral pion (light probe) and non-photonic single electron (heavy probe) suppression data at RHIC unexpectedly showed similar jet suppression for these two probes, which presents the well-known heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC. We here analyze which effects are responsible for this unexpected result, by using the dynamical energy loss formalism. We find that the main effect is a surprising reversal in the suppression hierarchy between neutral pions and D mesons, which is due to the deformation of the suppression patterns of light partons by fragmentation functions. Furthermore, we find that, due to the decay functions, the single electron suppression approaches the D meson suppression. Consequently, we propose that these two effects, taken together, provide a clear intuitive explanation of this longstanding puzzle.

  18. RHIC and LHC jet suppression in non-central collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic; Bojana Blagojevic

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding properties of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a major goal of RHIC and LHC experiments. An excellent tool to study these properties is jet suppression of light and heavy flavor observables. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we here extend our dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Specifically, we here generate predictions for all available centrality ranges, for both LHC and RHIC experiments, and for four different probes (charged hadrons, neutral pions, D mesons and non-prompt $J/\\psi$). We obtain a very good agreement with all available non-central data, and also generate predictions for suppression measurements that will soon become available. Finally, we discuss implications of the obtained good agreement with experimental data with different medium models that are currently considered.

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had excellent presentations throughout and productive discussions, which showed the importance and unique value of the RHIC high-p{sub T} program. We are grateful to all participants for coming to BNL. The support provided by the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for this workshop has been magnificent, and we are most grateful for it. We also thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing additional support and for the facilities to hold this workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Pamela Esposito for her most efficient and tireless work in organizing and running the workshop.

  20. RHIC PRESSURE RISE AND ELECTRON CLOUD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S Y; Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Drees, P; Afischer, W; Gassner, D; Gullotta, J; He, P; Hseuh, H; Chuang, H; Iriso-Aziz, U; Lee, R; Mackay, W; Woerter, B; Ptitsyn, V; Ponnaiyan, V; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smart, L; Trbojevic, D

    2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In RHIC high intensity operation, two types of pressure rise are currently of concern. The first type is at the beam injection, which seems to be caused by the electron multipacting, and the second is the one at the beam transition, where the electron cloud is not the dominant cause. The first type of pressure rise is limiting the beam intensity and the second type might affect the experiments background for very high total beam intensity. In this article, the pressure rises at RHIC are described, and preliminary study results are reported. Some of the unsettled issues and questions are raised, and possible counter measures are discussed.

  1. Superconducting wire and cable for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Greene, A.; McChesney, D.; Morgillo, A.; Shah, R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); DelRe, S.; Epstein, G.; Hong, S.; Lichtenwalner, J. [Oxford Superconducting Technology, Carteret, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets in the RHIC accelerator ring are to be fabricated from 30-strand superconducting cable. The RHIC wire has a diameter of 0.65 mm, copper-to-superconductor ratio of 2.25, filament diameter of 6 {mu}m and high critical current density. Primary emphasis during manufacturing has been on uniformity of materials, processes and performance. Near final results are presented on a production program which has extended over two years. Measured parameters are described which are important for design of superconducting accelerator magnets.

  2. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat,F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE.

  3. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley; ,

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  4. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and 1 in preparation), and 14 invited talks and 10 contributed talks at major conferences. These are listed at end of this report.

  5. RHIC Enhanced Luminosity Program Wolfram Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiments ~ 5% maintenance and access goal 100h/week #12;Wolfram Fischer 9 Enhanced Design Parameters #12;Wolfram Fischer 10 Enhanced Design Parameters (~2008*) Parameter unit Achieved Enhanced design Au1 RHIC Enhanced Luminosity Program Wolfram Fischer Science and Technology Review by the Office

  6. 405th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Vadim Ptitsyn

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "E-RHIC - Future Electron-Ion Collider at BNL. While RHIC scientists continue their quest to look deep into nuclear phenomena resulting from collisions of ion beams and beams of polarized protons, new design work is under way for a possible extension of RHIC to include e-RHIC, a 10-billion electron volt, high-intensity polarized proton beam.

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRETZER,S.MORRISON,D.VENUGOPALAN,R.VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  8. acid-sensing ion channel-1b: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of mTORC1 In the m Sabatini, David M. 2 Ion Colliders CERN Preprints Summary: High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the...

  9. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  10. Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic jet-energy loss model that is coupled to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic fields and interpolates between a wide class of running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired models is compared to recent data on the azimuthal and transverse momentum dependence of high-pT pion nuclear modification factors and high-pT elliptic flow measured at RHIC and LHC. We find that RHIC data are surprisingly consistent with various scenarios considered. However, extrapolations to LHC energies favor running coupling pQCD-based models of jet-energy loss. While conformal holographic models are shown to be inconsistent with data, recent non-conformal generalizations of AdS holography may provide an alternative description.

  11. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  12. The "Hot" Science of RHIC Status and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "Hot" Science of RHIC Status and Future Berndt Mueller Brookhaven National Laboratory Associate #12;RHIC NSRL LINAC Booster AGS Tandems STAR 6:00 o'clock PHENIX 8:00 o'clock (PHOBOS) 10:00 o Friday, April 5, 13 #12;RHIC NSRL LINAC Booster AGS Tandems STAR 6:00 o'clock PHENIX 8:00 o'clock (PHOBOS

  13. Analysis of RHIC beam dump pre-fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been speculated that the beam may cause instability of the RHIC Beam Abort Kickers. In this study, we explore the available data of past beam operations, the device history of key modulator components, and the radiation patterns to examine the correlations. The RHIC beam abort kicker system was designed and built in the 90's. Over last decade, we have made many improvements to bring the RHIC beam abort kicker system to a stable operational state. However, the challenge continues. We present the analysis of the pre-fire, an unrequested discharge of kicker, issues which relates to the RHIC machine safety and operational stability.

  14. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission of France ARMINES (France) Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany German Academic Exchange Service Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany National...

  15. The Electron-Ion Collider Science Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Milner

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, physicists are in the position to precisely study a fully relativistic quantum field theory: Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD). QCD is a central element of the Standard Model and provides the theoretical framework for understanding the strong interaction. This demands a powerful new electron microscope to probe the virtual particles of QCD. Ab initio calculations using lattice gauge theory on the world's most powerful supercomputers are essential for comparison with the data. The new accelerator and computing techniques demand aggressive development of challenging, innovative technologies.

  16. Photon collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Telnov

    2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy photon colliders (gamma-gamma, gamma-electron) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e+e- linear colliders. In this report we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case the gamma-gamma luminosity luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach (1/3)L_{e+e-}. Typical cross sections of interesting processes in gamma-gamma collisions are higher than those in e+e- collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in gamma-gamma collisions will be more than that in e+e- collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ``an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based at TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  17. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barish, Barry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we describe the key features of the recently completed technical design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 200-500 GeV linear electron-positron collider (expandable to 1 TeV) that is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) technology. The machine parameters and detector characteristics have been chosen to complement the Large Hadron Collider physics, including the discovery of the Higgs boson, and to further exploit this new particle physics energy frontier with a precision instrument. The linear collider design is the result of nearly twenty years of R&D, resulting in a mature conceptual design for the ILC project that reflects an international consensus. We summarize the physics goals and capability of the ILC, the enabling R&D and resulting accelerator design, as well as the concepts for two complementary detectors. The ILC is technically ready to be proposed and built as a next generation lepton collider, perhaps to be built in stages beginning as a Hig...

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the formation of quarkonium in nuclear medium as well as the strong interacting quark-gluon matter produced in heavy ion collisions; and heavy quarkonium properties from the first principle lattice calculations. The heavy quarkonium production at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) was also discussed at the meeting. The highlight of the meeting was the apparent success of the NRQCD approach at next-to-leading order in the description of the quarkonium production in proton-proton, electron-proton and electron positron collisions. Still many questions remain open in lattice calculations of in-medium quarkonium properties and in the area of cold nuclear matter effects.

  19. Jet studies in 200 GeV p+p and d+Au collisions from the STAR experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Kapitan; for the STAR Collaboration

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC makes it a promising tool for the quantitative study of the QCD at high energy density. Measurements in d+Au collisions are important to disentangle initial state nuclear effects from medium-induced k_T broadening and jet quenching. Furthermore, comparison to measurements in p+p gives access to cold nuclear matter effects. Inclusive jet p_T spectra and di-jet correlations (k_T) in 200 GeV p+p and d+Au collisions from the 2007-2008 RHIC run are presented.

  20. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  1. Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Division Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders W.A.AC03-76SFOOO98. STOCHASTIC COOLING IN MUON COLLIDERS Williamcan consider the stochastic cooling option as more than a

  2. Diffraction at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons with ``soft`` hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

  3. Diffraction at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lessons with soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

  4. Construction progress of the RHIC electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer W.; Altinbas, Z.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; et al

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In polarized proton operation the RHIC performance is limited by the head-on beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation two electron lenses are under construction. We give an overview of the construction progress. Guns, collectors and the warm electron beam transport solenoids with their power supplies have been constructed. The superconducting solenoids that guide the electron beam during the interaction with the proton beam are near completion. A test stand has been set up to verify the performance of the gun, collector and some of the instrumentation. The infrastructure is being prepared for installation, and simulations continue to optimize the performance.

  5. RECENT RESULTS WITH AU IONS EXTRACTED FROM AN EBIS USING AN 8A ELECTRON BEAM AT BNL *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source (EBIS), which is a prototype for an EBIS that could meet requirements for a RHIC preinjector. RHIC INTRODUCTION At Brookhaven National Laboratory an EBIS is being developed to provide gold ions with charge state 32+ sufficient for injection into the Booster without stripping. Requirements for the intensity

  6. Early results from the BRAHMS experiments at RHIC: Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles from Au + Au

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics, Kraków, Poland. 4. M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland Physics, Bormio (Italy) January 21­26, 2002. #12;1. Introduction By colliding heavy ions at high energies one can create hadronic matter at high energy densities. At the energy of 1 AGeV, which is available

  7. Disentangling coherent and incoherent quasielastic $J/?$ photoproduction on nuclei by neutron tagging in ultraperipheral ion collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guzey; M. Strikman; M. Zhalov

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider $J/\\psi$ photoproduction in ion--ion ultraperipheral collisions (UPCs) at the LHC and RHIC in the coherent and incoherent quasielastic channels with and without accompanying forward neutron emission and analyze the role of nuclear gluon shadowing at small $x$, $x=10^{-4}-10^{-2}$, in these processes. We find that despite the good agreement between large nuclear gluon shadowing and the ALICE data in the coherent channel, in the incoherent channel, the leading twist approximation predicts the amount of nuclear suppression which is by approximately a factor of $1.5$ exceeds that seen in the data. We hypothesize that part of the discrepancy can be accounted for by the incoherent inelastic process of $J/\\psi$ photoproduction with nucleon dissociation. To separate the high-photon-energy and low-photon-energy contributions to the $d \\sigma_{AA\\to AAJ/\\psi}(y)/dy$ cross section, we consider ion--ion UPCs accompanied by neutron emission due to electromagnetic excitation of one or both colliding nuclei. We describe the corresponding PHENIX data and make predictions for the LHC kinematics. In addition, in the incoherent quasielastic case, we show that the separation between the low-photon-energy and high-photon-energy contributions can be efficiently performed by measuring the correlation between the directions of $J/\\psi$ and the emitted neutrons.

  8. Heavy Quarkonium Production at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Matthew

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    are not fully in agreement with predicted observables from either model. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is well suited to further explore heavy quarkonium production. The Heavy Flavor program...

  9. Exploring the Universe Within

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    John Marburger

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction.

  10. Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  11. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; P. S. Bhupal Dev; Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  12. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  13. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Zisman

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  14. Diffraction at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L.L. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this talk is to outline lessons with soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

  15. Cold nuclear matter effects on the color singlet J/psi production in d-Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zefang Jiang; Shengqin Feng; Zhongbao Yin; Yafei Shi; Xianbao Yuan

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a Modified DKLMT model (called M-DKLMT model) to study the cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects on the color singlet J/psi production in dAu collisions at RHIC. The cold nuclear effect of dipole-nucleus interactions has been investigated by introducing a nuclear geometric effect function f({\\xi}) to study the nuclear geometry distribution effect in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The dependencies of nuclear modification factors (RdA) on rapidity and centrality are studied and compared to experimental data. It is found that the M-DKLMT model can well describe the experimental results at both forward- and mid-rapidity regions in dAu collisions at RHIC.

  16. The quarkonium saga in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tserruya, Itzhak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J/psi suppression was proposed more than 25 years ago as an unambiguous signature for the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma in relativistic heavy ion collisions. After intensive efforts, both experimental and theoretical, the quarkonium saga remains exciting, producing surprising results and not fully understood. This talk focuses on recent results on quarkonium production at RHIC and the LHC.

  17. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  18. Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

  19. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  20. An overview of the CUJET model: Jet Flavor Tomography applied at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet Flavor Tomography is a powerful tool used to probe the properties of Quark Gluon Plasma formed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. A new Monte Carlo model of jet quenching developed at Columbia University, CUJET, was applied to predict the jet flavor and centrality dependence of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$. The predictions for fragments $f=\\pi,D,B,e$, derived from quenched jet flavors $a=g,u,c,b$ in central and peripheral collisions at RHIC and LHC, exhibit novel features such as a level crossing pattern in $R_{AA\\rightarrow a\\rightarrow f}$ over a broad transverse momentum range which can test jet-medium dynamics in quark gluon plasmas and help discriminate between current energy loss models. Furthermore, the inclusion of running coupling effects seems to change the jet energy dependence of the jet energy loss to a non trivial constant behavior, with a visible impact on the predictions for $R_{AA}$.

  1. Importance of different energy loss effects in jet suppression at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojana Blagojevic; Magdalena Djordjevic

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet suppression is considered to be an excellent probe of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Our theoretical predictions of jet suppression, which are based on our recently developed dynamical energy loss formalism, show a robust agreement with various experimental data, which spans across different probes, experiments (RHIC and LHC) and experimental conditions (i.e. all available centrality regions). This formalism includes several key ingredients, such as inclusion of dynamical scattering centers, finite size QCD medium, collisional energy loss, finite magnetic mass and running coupling. While these effects have to be included based on theoretical grounds, it is currently unclear what is their individual importance in accurately interpreting the experimental data, in particular because other approaches to suppression predictions commonly neglect some - or all - of these effects. To address this question, we here study the relative importance of these effects in obtaining accurate suppression predictions for D mesons (clear energy loss probe) at top RHIC and LHC energies. We obtain that several different ingredients are responsible for the accurate predictions, i.e. the robust agreement with the data is a cumulative effect of all the ingredients, though inclusion of the dynamical scattering centers has the largest relative importance.

  2. Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Results based on a generic jet-energy loss model that interpolates between running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired holographic prescriptions are compared to recent data on the high-p_T pion nuclear modification factor and the high-p_T elliptic flow in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC. The jet-energy loss model is coupled to various (2+1)d (viscous hydrodynamic) fields. The impact of energy-loss fluctuations is discussed. While a previously proposed AdS/CFT jet-energy loss model with a temperature-independent jet-medium coupling is shown to be inconsistent with the LHC data, we find a rather broad class of jet-energy independent energy-loss models $dE/dx= \\kappa(T) x^z T^{2+z}$ that can account for the current data with different temperature-dependent jet-medium couplings $\\kappa(T)$ and path-length dependence exponents of $0\\le z \\le 2$.

  3. Bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; J. Noronha; F. Grassi

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between shear and bulk viscosities on the flow harmonics, $v_n$'s, at RHIC is investigated using the newly developed relativistic 2+1 hydrodynamical code v-USPhydro that includes bulk and shear viscosity effects both in the hydrodynamic evolution and also at freeze-out. While shear viscosity is known to attenuate the flow harmonics, we find that the inclusion of bulk viscosity decreases the shear viscosity-induced suppression of the flow harmonics bringing them closer to their values in ideal hydrodynamical calculations. Depending on the value of the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\zeta/s$, in the quark-gluon plasma, the bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics may require a re-evaluation of the previous estimates of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, of the quark-gluon plasma previously extracted by comparing hydrodynamic calculations to heavy ion data.

  4. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lietava, R; Pisútová, N; Tomasik, Boris; Lietava, Roman; Pisut, Jan; Pisutova, Neva; Tomasik, Boris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  5. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Lietava; Jan Pisut; Neva Pisutova; Boris Tomasik

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  6. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  7. Overview of PHENIX Results from the First RHIC Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Zajc; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from the PHENIX experiment for the first RHIC run with Au-Au collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 130 GeV are presented. The systematic variation with centrality of charged particle multiplicity, transverse energy, elliptic flow, identified particle spectra and yield ratios, and production of charged particles and neutral pions at high transverse momenta are presented. Results on two-pion correlations and electron spectra are also provided, along with a discussion of plans for the second run at RHIC.

  8. Jet production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouttenus, Teppo T. (Teppo Tapani)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic jets feature in many final states of interest in modern collider experiments. They form a significant Standard Model background for many proposed new physics processes and also probe QCD interactions at several ...

  9. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  10. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Abelleira Fernandez; C. Adolphsen; P. Adzic; A. N. Akay; H. Aksakal; J. L. Albacete; B. Allanach; S. Alekhin; P. Allport; V. Andreev; R. B. Appleby; E. Arikan; N. Armesto; G. Azuelos; M. Bai; D. Barber; J. Bartels; O. Behnke; J. Behr; A. S. Belyaev; I. Ben-Zvi; N. Bernard; S. Bertolucci; S. Bettoni; S. Biswal; J. Blümlein; H. Böttcher; A. Bogacz; C. Bracco; J. Bracinik; G. Brandt; H. Braun; S. Brodsky; O. Brüning; E. Bulyak; A. Buniatyan; H. Burkhardt; I. T. Cakir; O. Cakir; R. Calaga; A. Caldwell; V. Cetinkaya; V. Chekelian; E. Ciapala; R. Ciftci; A. K. Ciftci; B. A. Cole; J. C. Collins; O. Dadoun; J. Dainton; A. De. Roeck; D. d'Enterria; P. DiNezza; M. D'Onofrio; A. Dudarev; A. Eide; R. Enberg; E. Eroglu; K. J. Eskola; L. Favart; M. Fitterer; S. Forte; A. Gaddi; P. Gambino; H. García Morales; T. Gehrmann; P. Gladkikh; C. Glasman; A. Glazov; R. Godbole; B. Goddard; T. Greenshaw; A. Guffanti; V. Guzey; C. Gwenlan; T. Han; Y. Hao; F. Haug; W. Herr; A. Hervé; B. J. Holzer; M. Ishitsuka; M. Jacquet; B. Jeanneret; E. Jensen; J. M. Jimenez; J. M. Jowett; H. Jung; H. Karadeniz; D. Kayran; A. Kilic; K. Kimura; R. Klees; M. Klein; U. Klein; T. Kluge; F. Kocak; M. Korostelev; A. Kosmicki; P. Kostka; H. Kowalski; M. Kraemer; G. Kramer; D. Kuchler; M. Kuze; T. Lappi; P. Laycock; E. Levichev; S. Levonian; V. N. Litvinenko; A. Lombardi; J. Maeda; C. Marquet; B. Mellado; K. H. Mess; A. Milanese; J. G. Milhano; S. Moch; I. I. Morozov; Y. Muttoni; S. Myers; S. Nandi; Z. Nergiz; P. R. Newman; T. Omori; J. Osborne; E. Paoloni; Y. Papaphilippou; C. Pascaud; H. Paukkunen; E. Perez; T. Pieloni; E. Pilicer; B. Pire; R. Placakyte; A. Polini; V. Ptitsyn; Y. Pupkov; V. Radescu; S. Raychaudhuri; L. Rinolfi; E. Rizvi; R. Rohini; J. Rojo; S. Russenschuck; M. Sahin; C. A. Salgado; K. Sampei; R. Sassot; E. Sauvan; M. Schaefer; U. Schneekloth; T. Schörner-Sadenius; D. Schulte; A. Senol; A. Seryi; P. Sievers; A. N. Skrinsky; W. Smith; D. South; H. Spiesberger; A. M. Stasto; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Sultansoy; Y. P. Sun; B. Surrow; L. Szymanowski; P. Taels; I. Tapan; T. Tasci; E. Tassi; H. Ten. Kate; J. Terron; H. Thiesen; L. Thompson; P. Thompson; K. Tokushuku; R. Tomás García; D. Tommasini; D. Trbojevic; N. Tsoupas; J. Tuckmantel; S. Turkoz; T. N. Trinh; K. Tywoniuk; G. Unel; T. Ullrich; J. Urakawa; P. VanMechelen; A. Variola; R. Veness; A. Vivoli; P. Vobly; J. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. Wallon; G. Watt; C. Weiss; U. A. Wiedemann; U. Wienands; F. Willeke; B. -W. Xiao; V. Yakimenko; A. F. Zarnecki; Z. Zhang; F. Zimmermann; R. Zlebcik; F. Zomer

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  11. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  12. TEST EBIS Operation and Component Development for the RHIC EBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and silicon, which are extracted directly from the Booster ring, the first of three synchrotrons in the RHICTEST EBIS Operation and Component Development for the RHIC EBIS Edward N. Beebe, James G. Alessi, David Graham, Ahovi Kponou, Alexander Pikin, Krsto Prelec, John Ritter, Vladimir Zajic Brookhaven

  13. Moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in Au+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Garg

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC is important to search for the existence of the critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Lattice QCD have shown that the predictions of the susceptibility of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions can be sensitive to the various moments (mean ($\\mu$) =${}$, variance ($\\sigma^2$) = ${}$, skewness (S) = $\\frac{}{\\sigma^3}$ and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) =$\\frac{}{\\sigma^4} -3$) of conserved quantities like net-baryon number ($\\Delta$B), net-electric charge ($\\Delta$Q) and net-strangeness ($\\Delta$S). Any non-monotonic behavior of the higher moments would confirm the existence of the QCD critical point. The recent results of the higher moments of net-charge multiplicity distributions for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$ varying from 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The energy and centrality dependence of the higher moments and their products (S$\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are shown for the net-charge multiplicity distributions. Furthermore, the results are compared with the values obtained from the heavy-ion collision models, where there is no QCD phase transition and critical point.

  14. Measurement of pi0 and eta Mesons with PHENIX in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Sahlmueller; for the PHENIX collaboration

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The pi0 meson has been a crucial proble for observing jet quenching in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Measurements of the eta meson in the same collisions have also shed light on a possible dependence of the observed suppression on the particle species. The preliminary pi0 nuclear modification factor R_AA from the 2004 RHIC run allowed a first systematic comparison between a precise measurement with high statistics and theoretical calculations, constraining model parameters such as the initial gluon density dN^g/dy, and the transport coefficient qhat. The final pi0 spectra and R_AA are shown as well as the first eta results obtained with both PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeters.

  15. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  16. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  17. Azimuthal jet flavor tomography with CUJET2.0 of nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiechen Xu; Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A perturbative QCD based jet tomographic Monte Carlo model, CUJET2.0, is presented to predict jet quenching observables in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC/BNL and LHC/CERN energies. This model generalizes the DGLV theory of flavor dependent radiative energy loss by including multi-scale running strong coupling effects. It generalizes CUJET1.0 by computing jet path integrations though more realistic 2+1D transverse and longitudinally expanding viscous hydrodynamical fields contrained by fits to low $p_T$ flow data. The CUJET2.0 output depends on three control parameters, $(\\alpha_{max},f_E,f_M)$, corresponding to an assumed upper bound on the vacuum running coupling in the infrared and two chromo-electric and magnetic QGP screening mass scales $(f_E \\mu(T), f_M \\mu(T))$ where $\\mu(T)$ is the 1-loop Debye mass. We compare numerical results as a function of $\\alpha_{max}$ for pure and deformed HTL dynamically enhanced scattering cases corresponding to $(f_E=1,2, f_M=0)$ to data of the nuclear modification factor, $R^f_{AA}(p_T,\\phi; \\sqrt{s}, b)$ for jet fragment flavors $f=\\pi,D, B, e$ at $\\sqrt{s}=0.2-2.76$ ATeV c.m. energies per nucleon pair and with impact parameter $b=2.4, 7.5$ fm. A $\\chi^2$ analysis is presented and shows that $R^\\pi_{AA}$ data from RHIC and LHC are consistent with CUJET2.0 at the $\\chi^2/d.o.f< 2$ level for $\\alpha_{max}=0.23-0.30$. The corresponding $\\hat{q}(E_{jet}, T)/T^3$ effective jet transport coefficient field of this model is computed to facilitate comparison to other jet tomographic models in the literature. The predicted elliptic asymmetry, $v_2(p_T;\\sqrt{s},b)$ is, however, found to significantly underestimated relative to RHIC and LHC data. We find the $\\chi^2_{v_2}$ analysis shows that $v_2$ is very sensitive to allowing even as little as 10\\% variations of the path averaged $\\alpha_{max}$ along in and out of reaction plane paths.

  18. Recent results in relativistic heavy ion collisions: from ``a new state of matter'' to "the perfect fluid"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental Physics with Relativistic Heavy Ions dates from 1992 when a beam of 197Au of energy greater than 10A GeV/c first became available at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) soon followed in 1994 by a 208Pb beam of 158A GeV/c at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research). Previous pioneering measurements at the Berkeley Bevalac in the late 1970's and early 1980's were at much lower bombarding energies (~ 1 A GeV/c) where nuclear breakup rather than particle production is the dominant inelastic process in A+A collisions. More recently, starting in 2000, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has produced head-on collisions of two 100A GeV beams of fully stripped Au ions, corresponding to nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy, sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV, total c.m. energy 200A GeV. The objective of this research program is to produce nuclear matter with extreme density and temperature, possibly resulting in a state of matter where the quarks and gluons normally confined inside individual nucleons (r < 1 fm) are free to act over distances an order of magnitude larger. Progress from the period 1992 to the present will be reviewed, with reference to previous results from light ion and proton-proton collisions where appropriate. Emphasis will be placed on the measurements which formed the basis for the announcements by the two major laboratories: "A new state of matter", by CERN on Feb 10, 2000 and "The perfect fluid", by BNL on April 19, 2005.

  19. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  20. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yagmur Tourun

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  1. Jet Production Studies at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Hirosky

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of jet production, measurement techniques, and recent physics results from colliders is presented. Analyses utilizing jets and boson plus jets final states are included and implications of the data are discussed. The results presented here are a snapshot of those available at the time of the PIC 2012 conference in September 2012.

  2. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  3. tt Charge asymmetry at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapelain, Antoine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status for the measurements of the ttbar charge asymmetry at the Tevatron and LHC colliders.

  4. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from nuclear collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Turbide; Charles Gale; Evan Frodermann; Ulrich Heinz

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The hot and dense strongly interacting matter created in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC energies is modeled with relativistic hydrodynamics, and the spectra of real and virtual photons produced at mid-rapidity in these events are calculated. Several different sources are considered, and their relative importance is compared. Specifically, we include jet fragmentation, jet-plasma interactions, the emission of radiation from the thermal medium and from primordial hard collisions. Our calculations consistently take into account jet energy loss, as evaluated in the AMY formalism. We obtain results for the spectra, the nuclear modification factor (R_AA), and the azimuthal anisotropy (v_2) that agree with the photon measurements performed by the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC.

  6. RHIC injector complex online model status and plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoefer,V.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An online modeling system is being developed for the RHIC injector complex, which consists of the Booster, the AGS and the transfer lines connecting the Booster to the AGS and the AGS to RHIC. Historically the injectors have been operated using static values from design specifications or offline model runs, but tighter beam optics constraints required by polarized proton operations (e.g, accelerating with near-integer tunes) have necessitated a more dynamic system. An online model server for the AGS has been implemented using MAD-X [1] as the model engine, with plans to extend the system to the Booster and the injector transfer lines and to add the option of calculating optics using the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC [2]) as the model engine.

  7. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  8. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  9. Charmonium absorption and charmed hadron production in hadronic reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wei

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for understanding charm production in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where a quark-gluon plasma is expected to be formed during the initial hot dense stage....

  10. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  11. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  12. Systematic Study of Directed Flow at RHIC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alice C. Mignerey; for the Phobos Collaboration

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed flow, v1, of charged hardons has been measured in Au-Au collisions at RHIC for center-of-mass energies sqrt(sNN) = 19.6, 130, 62.4, and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector. The large acceptance of PHOBOS for charged particles allows measurements over the full range of pseudorapidity |eta| energies. Comparison is made to a mixed harmonic method for the highest energy, and compared to similar results from the STAR collaboration.

  13. Shooting String Holography of Jet Quenching at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrej Ficnar; Steven S. Gubser; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a new formula for jet energy loss using finite endpoint momentum shooting strings initial conditions in SYM plasmas to overcome the difficulties of previous falling string holographic scenarios. We apply the new formula to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow parameter v2 of light hadrons at RHIC and LHC. We show furthermore that Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature corrections to the AdS5 geometry improve the agreement with the recent data.

  14. Monolithic circuit development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Newport, D.F.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 91 is presented in this paper. The work includes preamplifier, analog memory, and analog-digital converter development for Dimuon Pad Readout, and evaluation and development of preamplifier-shapers for silicon strip readout. The approaches for implementation are considered as well as measured data for the various circuits that have been developed.

  15. Calirimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, S.H.; Murtagh, M.J.; Starks, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Liu, X.T.; Petitt, G.A.; Zhang, Z. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta (United States); Ewell, L.A.; Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States); Costales, J.B.; Namboodiri, M.N., Sangster, T.C.; Thomas, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gavron, A.; Waters, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kehoe, W.L.; Steadman, S.G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Awes, T.C.; Obenshain, F.E.; Saini, S.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, J.; Fung, S.Y.; Kang, J.H. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Kreke, J.; He, Xiaochun, Sorensen, S.P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Cornell, E.C.; Maguire, C.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The RD-10 R&D effort on calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC experiment had an extended run in 1991 using the A2 test beam at the AGS. Measurements were made of the leakage of particles behind various model hadron calorimeters. Behavior of the calorimeter/absorber as a muon-identifier was studied. First comparisons of results from test measurements to calculated results using the GHEISHA code were made

  16. 423rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mei Bai

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

  17. Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Ruan, L.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 6University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA... Collider (RHIC) is believed to result in a novel state of hot and dense matter with properties strikingly different from that of a hadron gas or ordinary nuclear matter [2]. The bulk properties of particle production are studied using identified...

  18. Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Luo

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  19. Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  20. Full Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Full jet reconstruction has traditionally been thought to be difficult in heavy ion events due to large multiplicity backgrounds. The search for new physics in high luminosity p+p collisions at the LHC similarly requires the precise measurement of jets over large backgrounds caused by pile up; this has motivated the development of a new generation of jet reconstruction algorithms which are also applicable in the heavy ion environment. We review the latest results on jet-medium interactions as seen in A+A collisions at RHIC, focusing on the new techniques for full jet reconstruction.

  1. Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas P been investigated using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopies and spectrally and angularly resolved fast imaging. The emission results highlight a difference in neutral atom and ion

  2. 9-D polarized proton transport in the MEIC figure-8 collider ring: first steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, V. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin tracking studies in the MEIC figure-8 collider ion ring are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the lattice. They provide numerical illustrations of some of the aspects of the figure-8 concept, including spin-rotator based spin control, and lay out the path towards a complete spin tracking simulation of a figure-8 ring.

  3. Response to Last MAC Recommendations 01/23/06 RHIC Machine Advisory Committee V.Ptitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and protons. Response: The progress on e-cooling R&D will be reported in following talks. For e.Ptitsyn Electron cooling Recommendations: Electron-cooling R&D should be pursued with high priority in the context of e-RHIC. In addition the e- cooling dynamics in e-RHIC together with IBS and beam-beam effects should

  4. Comparison of the Window-Frame RHIC-abort kicker with C-type Kicker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Severance, Michael [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McMahan, Brandon [Westhampton High School, NY (United States)

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The high intensity proton bunches (~2.5x1011 p/bunch ) circulating in RHIC increase the temperature of the ferrite-made RHIC-abort-kickers above the Curie point, as a result the kickers cannot provide the required field to abort the beam at the beam dump. A team of experts in the CAD department worked on modifying the design of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker to minimize the hysteresis losses responsible for the increase of the ferrite’s temperature. In this technical note we report some results from the study of two possible modifications of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker and we compare these results with those of a propose C-type RHIC-abort kicker. We also include an Appendix where we describe a method which may further reduce the hysteresis losses of the window-frame kicker.

  5. Transverse energy measurement in sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62.4 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Sahoo; Subhasis Chattopadhaya; Alexandre A. P. Suaide; Marcia Maria de Moura; D. P. Mahapatra

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse energy distributions ($E_{T}$) have been measured for Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62.4$ GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. They have been obtained from two measurements, the hadronic transverse energy ($E_{T}^{had}$) and the electromagnetic transverse energy($E_{T}^{em}$). $E_{T}^{had}$ has been measured from the tracks obtained by Time Projection Chamber (TPC) excluding the electrons and positrons. $E_{T}^{em}$ has been obtained by the STAR Barrel Electromagetic Calorimeter (BEMC) which measures the energy of electrons, positrons and photons. The measure of transverse energy gives an estimate of the energy density of the fireball produced in heavy ion collisions. $E_{T}$ per participant pair gives information about the production mechanism of particles.

  6. Mixed Heavy Quark Hybrid Mesons, Decay Puzzles, and RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the energy of the lowest Charmonium and Upsilon states with hybrid admixtures using the method of QCD Sum Rules. Our results show that the $\\Psi'(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon(3S)$ states both have about a 50% admixture of hybrid and meson components. From this we find explanations of both the famous $\\rho-\\pi$ puzzle for Charmonium, and the unusual pattern of $\\sigma$ decays that have been found in $\\Upsilon$ decays. Moreover, this picture can be used for predictions of heavy quark production with the octet model for RHIC.

  7. Test of Chemical freeze-out at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Takahashi; for the STAR Collaboration

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a systematic test applying statistical thermal model fits in a consistent way for different particle ratios, and different system sizes using the various particle yields measured in the STAR experiment. Comparison between central and peripheral Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions with data from p+p collisions provides an interesting tool to verify the dependence with the system size. We also present a study of the rapidity dependence of the thermal fit parameters using available data from RHIC in the forward rapidity regions and also using different parameterization for the rapidity distribution of different particles.

  8. Central Diffractive Processes at the Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Stirling, W. J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Khoze, V. A. [Department of Physics and IPPP, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ryskin, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg, 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Central exclusive production (CEP) processes in high-energy hadron collisions offer a very promising framework for studying both novel aspects of QCD and new physics signals. We report on the results of a theoretical study of the CEP of heavy quarkonia ({chi} and {eta}) at the Tevatron, RHIC and LHC (see for details [1]-[3]). These processes provide important information on the physics of bound states and can probe the current ideas and methods of QCD, such as effective field theories and lattice QCD.

  9. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  10. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding the adding up of Feynman diagrams tedious? Hidden symmetries found in the sums of diagrams suggest there is a better way to predict the results of particle collisions - in the past two years, spin-offs of a new theory, known as the Twistor String Theory, have led to the development of efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams which can be useful for work at the Tevatron, the LHC and for future research at the International Linear Collider. Come see what this 'twistor' is all about!

  11. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  12. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MAP; MICE Collaborations

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  13. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  14. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

  15. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

  16. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

  17. 27. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 27. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's facilities, and end with some remarks on future possibilities. 27.2. Beam Dynamics The first concern of beam27. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 27. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS Revised July 2011 by D × L (t)dt. (27.1) Today's colliders all employ bunched beams. If two bunches containing n1 and n2

  18. 25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's facilities, and end with some remarks on future possibilities. 25.2. Beam Dynamics The first concern of beam25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS Revised July 2011 by D × L (t)dt. (25.1) Today's colliders all employ bunched beams. If two bunches containing n1 and n2

  19. Heavy flavor production at RHIC and LHC energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In a leading order pQCD model, we have studied the heavy flavor production in p+p collisions at RHIC and LHC energy. Leading order pQCD models require a K-factor. At RHIC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV, we fix K such that the model reproduces the integrated charm yield, $dN^{c\\bar{c}}/dy$, estimated by the STAR and the PHENIX collaboration in p+p collisions. The model then explains the STAR data on the transverse momentum distribution of open charm mesons $(D^0)$ and decay electrons in p+p collisions. The p+p predictions, scaled by the number of binary collisions, also explain the electron spectra in STAR p+d collisions and PHENIX Au+Au collisions in different centrality bins. Assuming that at LHC energy K-factor is of the order of unity, we have used the model to predict the transverse momentum distribution of $D$ and $B$ mesons and also of electrons from semileptonic decay of $D\\to e$ and $B\\to e$, in p+p collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=14 TeV.

  20. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roblin, Yves [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Aturban, Mohamed A. [Old Dominion University; Ranjan, D. [Old Dominion University; Zubair, Mohammed [Old Dominion University

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  1. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider | The Case for Continuing Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    make up 99 percent of visible matter in the universe today, everything from stars to planets to people. In addition to giving us a new way to explore and understand the nature of...

  2. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS ISSUES FOR FUTURE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be very high in order to avoid excessive power budgets. This requires the use of a superconduct- ing linac. Energy recovery has already been successfully demonstrated at the...

  3. Event simulation for colliders - A basic overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Reuschle

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will discuss the basic calculational concepts to simulate particle physics events at high energy colliders. We will mainly focus on the physics in hadron colliders and particularly on the simulation of the perturbative parts, where we will in turn focus on the next-to-leading order QCD corrections.

  4. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt, E-mail: winterbe@unr.edu [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Reno, Nevada 89557-0220 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB{sup 11}) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  5. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

  6. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments at RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where the colli- sion energy is much higher than at SPS, have also shown possible effects due to the formation of a partonic matter @4#. To find the signal for the quark-gluon plasma in relativis- tic... in the hadronic matter @11?18#. The observed abnormal suppres- sion of J/c in central Pb1Pb collisions at SPS may require the formation of the quark-gluon plasma in these collisions @19,3#. For heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies, unlike in pre- vious fixed...

  7. Partonic effects on the elliptic flow at relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain an elliptic flow that is comparable to the measured ones in heavy ion collisions at both SPS and RHIC energies @18#. In transport models including only the parton cascade, the elliptic flow has been shown to be sensitive to the parton... scattering cross section, and a large value can be obtained with a large cross section @20,21#. On the other hand, transport models based on hadronic and/or string de- grees of freedom in general give a smaller elliptic flow @9# than that observed at RHIC...

  8. Towards an understanding of the RHIC single electron data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Gossiaux; J. Aichelin

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High transverse momentum ($p_T$) single non-photonic electrons which have been measured in the RHIC experiments come dominantly from heavy meson decay. The ratio of their $p_T$ spectra in pp and AA collisions ($R_{AA}(p_T)$) reveals the energy loss of heavy quarks in the environment created by AA collisions. Using a fixed coupling constant and the Debye mass ($m_D\\approx gT$) as infrared regulator perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations are not able to reproduce the data, neither the energy loss nor the azimuthal $(v_2)$ distribution. Employing a running coupling constant and replacing the Debye mass by a more realistic hard thermal loop (HTL) calculation we find a substantial increase of the collisional energy loss which brings the $v_2(p_T)$ distribution as well as $R_{AA}(p_T)$ to values close to the experimental ones without excluding a contribution from radiative energy loss.

  9. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  10. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  11. Variation of jet quenching from RHIC to LHC and thermal suppression of QCD coupling constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a joint jet tomographic analysis of the data on the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ from PHENIX at RHIC and ALICE at LHC. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant. Our results show that the observed slow variation of $R_{AA}$ from RHIC to LHC indicates that the QCD coupling constant is suppressed in the quark-gluon plasma produced at LHC.

  12. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=9.2 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au + Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were...

  13. Resonance recombination model and quark distribution functions in the quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravagli, L.; van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observed constituent quark number scaling (CQNS) at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To address this problem we combine our earlier developed quark recombination model with quark phase-space distributions computed from relativistic Langevin...

  14. Charmonium in medium: From correlators to experiment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xingbo; Rapp, Ralf.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reproduce the centrality dependence of inclusive J/psi yields in nuclear collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reasonably well. However, the "strong-binding" scenario associated with the internal...

  15. Measurement of charged particle multiplicity distribution in Au + Au collisions up to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarin, Pradeep, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Au+Au collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) herald a new era of opportunities for studying hadronic matter under conditions of high energy density and nucleon density. The theory of strong interactions, ...

  16. Physics studies at a future linear collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabassam, Hajrah

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN, we will obtain a new understanding of the physics beyond our current limits. New discoveries will be made; but we will require a deeper understanding, which the ...

  17. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s.

  18. Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    muon collider has superconducting solenoids as an integralLBNL-44303 SCMAG-690 Superconducting Solenoids for the MuonDE-AC03-76SFOOO98. J Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon

  19. Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS and CBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan has been developed to inject ion beams from the Brookhaven Tandem or a cyclotron added to the Tandem into the AGS. This beam could then be injected into a relativistic heavy ion collider. The availability of many CBA components adds to the attractiveness of this proposal.

  20. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

  1. Jet Analysis in Heavy Ion Collisions in CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tonjes; for the CMS collaboration

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, jets have been a useful tool to probe the properties of the hot, dense matter created. At the Large Hadron Collider, collisions of Pb+Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.5 TeV will provide a large cross section of jets at high $E_T$ above the minimum bias heavy ion background. Simulations of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's capability to measure jets in heavy ion collisions are presented. In particular, $\\gamma$-jet measurements can estimate the amount of energy lost by a jet interacting strongly with the medium, since the tagged photon passes through unaffected.

  2. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  3. Beam optics and the pp2pp experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pile P. H.; Guryn, W.; Lee, J.H.; Tepikian, S.; Yip, K.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly installed forward detector system at the STAR experiment at RHIC measures small angle elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons on polarized protons. The detector system makes use of a pair of Roman Pot (RP) detectors, instrumented with silicon detectors, and located on either side of the STAR intersection region downstream of the DX and D0 dipoles and quadrupole triplets. The parallel to point optics is designed so that scattering angles are determined from position measurements at the RP's with small error. The RP setup allows measurement of position and angle for a subset of the scattered protons. With this position/angle correlations at the RP's can be compared with optics model predictions to get a measure of the accuracy of the quadrupole triplet current settings. The current in each quadrupole in the triplets is comprised of sums and differences of up to six power supplies and an overall 1% error in the triplet field strengths results in a 4% error in four-momentum transfer squared. This technique is also useful to check the polarity of the skew elements located in each quadrupole triplet. Results of the analysis will be presented.

  4. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  5. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  6. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments.

  7. Wesley Smith, U. Wisconsin, January 11, 2007 Aspen Winter Conference: Experimental QCD -1 QCD results from collidersQCD results from collidersQCD results from colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesley Smith, U. Wisconsin, January 11, 2007 Aspen Winter Conference: Experimental QCD - 1 QCD results from collidersQCD results from collidersQCD results from colliders 2007 Aspen Winter Conference This talk is available on: http://www.hep.wisc.edu/wsmith/files/exp_qcd_smith_aspen07.pdf #12;Wesley Smith

  8. Pion and photon production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of neutral pions and direct photons are closely connected experimentally, on the other hand they probe quite different aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this short review of the $\\pi^0$ results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC our focus is on the $\\phi$-integrated nuclear modification factor, its energy and system size dependence, and the impact of these results on parton energy loss models. We also discuss the current status of high $p_T$ and thermal direct photon measurements both in $p$ + $p$ and Au+Au collisions. Recognizing the advantages of measuring not only the "signal", but also all the "references" needed for proper interpretation in the same experiments (with same or similar systematics) we argue that RHIC should regularly include $d$ + A and even $d$ + $d$ collisions into its system size and energy scan.

  9. 2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidel, Sally

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas was held on the campus of the University of New Mexico from 29 September to 3 October, 2009. This was a joint meeting of the American Linear Collider Physics Group and the ILC Global Design Effort. Two hundred fifty people attended. The number of scientific contributions was 333. The complete agenda, with links to all of the presentations, is available at physics.unm.edu/LCWA09/. The meeting brought together international experts as well as junior scientists, to discuss the physics potential of the linear collider and advances in detector technology. The validation of detector designs was announced, and the detector design groups planned the next phase of the effort. Detector R&D teams reported on progress on many topics including calorimetry and tracking. Recent accelerator design considerations were discussed in a special session for experimentalists and theorists.

  10. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  11. Long-Range Pseudorapidity Correlations at High pT in sqrt(S_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions with STAR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codrington, Martin John Michael

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the related discovery of the quenching of the away-side jet in these collisions, the role of jets as key probes of the QGP was re-affirmed. The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) detector system, which is suited...

  12. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Steinberg

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  13. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  14. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  15. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF THE FRICTION FORCE FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate calculation of electron cooling times requires an accurate description of the dynamical friction force. The proposed RHIC cooler will require {approx}55 MeV electrons, which must be obtained from an RF linac, leading to very high transverse electron temperatures. A strong solenoid will be used to magnetize the electrons and suppress the transverse temperature, but the achievable magnetized cooling logarithm will not be large. In this paper, we explore the magnetized friction force for parameters of the RHIC cooler, using the VORPAL code [l]. VORPAL can simulate dynamical friction and diffusion coefficients directly from first principles [2]. Various aspects of the fiction force are addressed for the problem of high-energy electron cooling in the RHIC regime.

  16. Operational experience with a near-integer working point at RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    During the RHIC polarized proton run in N 2006 it became evident that the luminosity performance is limited by the beam-beam effect. With a working point between 213 and 7/10, and the necessity to mirror the tunes of the two RHIC rings at the diagonal, the beam with a horizontal tune closest to 213 showed poor lifetime. To overcome this limitation, a near-integer working point has been proposed. Tracking studies performed at both working points showed a larger dynamic aperture near the integer tune than above 2/3. In Run-8, this new working point was commissioned in one ring of RHIC, while the other ring was operated at the same working point as in Run-6. In this paper we report the commissioning process and operational experience with this new working point.

  17. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  18. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  19. Silicon Vertex Tracker for PHENIX Upgrade at RHIC: Capabilities and Detector Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachid Nouicer; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    From the wealth of data obtained from the first three years of RHIC operation, the four RHIC experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, have concluded that a high density partonic matter is formed at central Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. The research focus now shifts from initial discovery to a detailed exploration of partonic matter. Particles carrying heavy flavor, i.e. charm or beauty quarks, are powerful tool for study the properties of the hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. At the relatively low transverse momentum region, the collective motion of the heavy flavor will be a sensitive signal for the thermalization of light flavors. An upgrade of RHIC (RHIC-II) is intended for the second half of the decade, with a luminosity increase to about 20-40 times the design value of 8x1026 cm-2 s-1 for Au+Au, and 2x1032 cm-2 s-1 for polarized proton beams. The PHENIX collaboration plans to upgrade its experiment to exploit with an enhanced detector new physics then in reach. For this purpose, we are constructing the Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX). The VTX detector will provide us the tool to measure new physics observables that are not accessible at the present RHIC or available only with very limited accuracy. The VTX detector consists of four layers of barrel detectors located in the region of pseudorapidity |eta| technology choices used in the design, performance of individual silicon sensor and silicon detector prototype.

  20. NNLO Benchmarks for Gauge and Higgs Boson Production at TeV Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Alekhin; J. Blümlein; P. Jimenez-Delgado; S. Moch; E. Reya

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive production cross sections for $W^+, W^-$ and $Z^0$-bosons form important benchmarks for the physics at hadron colliders. We perform a detailed comparison of the predictions for these standard candles based on recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) parton parameterizations and new analyses including the combined HERA data, compare to all available experimental results, and discuss the predictions for present and upcoming RHIC, SPS, Tevatron and LHC energies. The rates for gauge boson production at the LHC can be rather confidently predicted with an accuracy of better than about 10% at NNLO. We also present detailed NNLO predictions for the Higgs boson production cross sections for Tevatron and LHC energies (1.96, 7, 8, 14 TeV), and propose a possible method to monitor the gluon distribution experimentally in the kinematic region close to the mass range expected for the Higgs boson. The production cross sections of the Higgs boson at the LHC are presently predicted with an accuracy of about 10--17%. The inclusion of the NNLO contributions is mandatory for achieving such accuracies since the total uncertainties are substantially larger at NLO.

  1. Transverse energy dependence of J/Psi suppression in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction for transverse energy dependence of $J/\\psi$ to Drell-Yan ratio in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy was obtained in a model which assume 100% absorption of $J/\\psi$ above a threshold density. The threshold density was obtained by fitting the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energy. At RHIC energy, hard processes may be important. Prediction of $J/\\psi$ suppression with and without hard processes were obtained. With hard processes included, $J/\\psi$'s are strongly suppressed.

  2. Off-momentum beta-beat correction in the RHIC proton run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; White, S.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we will review the techniques to measure the off-momentum {beta}-beat and the correction algorithms with the chromatic arc sextupoles in RHIC. We will focus on the measurement and correction of the off-momentum {beta}*-beat at the interaction points. The off-momentum {beta}* is measured with the quadrupole strength change and a high resolution phase lock loop tune meter. The results of off-momentum {beta}* correction performed in a dedicated beam experiment in the 2012 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run are presented.

  3. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  4. Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    . Of course, the lesson of high energy physics has been that higher energies have generally revealed new that the full exploration of the Standard Model was likely to require a very high energy hadron collider important, it is not possible to postpone indefinitely new physics associated with the Higgs boson. To see

  5. Challenges for highest energy circular colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

  6. QCD parton model at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, R.K.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the example of vector boson production, the application of the QCD improved parton model at collider energies is reviewed. The reliability of the extrapolation to SSC energies is assessed. Predictions at ..sqrt..S = 0.54 TeV are compared with data. 21 references.

  7. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make sense to wait for the results of each accelerator before planning the next one. Thus, we would wait for the results from the Tevatron before planning the LHC experiments, and wait for the LHC before planning any later stage. In reality accelerators require a long time to construct, and they require such specialized resources and human talent that delay can cripple what would be promising opportunities. In any event, we believe that the case for the linear collider is so compelling and robust that we can justify this facility on the basis of our current knowledge, even before the Tevatron and LHC experiments are done. The physics prospects for the linear collider have been studied intensively for more than a decade, and arguments for the importance of its experimental program have been developed from many different points of view. This book provides an introduction and a guide to this literature. We hope that it will allow physicists new to the consideration of linear collider physics to start from their own personal perspectives and develop their own assessments of the opportunities afforded by a linear collider.

  8. Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN?s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  9. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

  10. DESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN The bending section in EBIS HEBT line consists of two identical H type magnets with a slit betweenDESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE Takeshi Kanesue magnet body should be laminated. In this paper, design methods of the dipole magnet to optimize magnetic

  11. Version 7.1, February 22, 2007 RHIC II White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harmonic cavity 2) Ring magnets, power supplies, vacuum system 3) Beam instrumentation 4) Operational at this point, but not with e-cooling). * START construction of the electron beam "Figure 8" elements at IP2 are integrated, and electron cooling commissioning can start. RHIC Electron Cooling Parameters Remarks

  12. Jet tomography of AA-collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, B G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our recent results on jet tomography of AA-collisions at RHIC and LHC. We focus on flavor dependence of the nuclear modification factor. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant.

  13. Dynamical kurtosis of net and total proton distributions in STAR at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiming Li

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the energy and centrality dependence of dynamical kurtosis for Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV at RHIC. The dynamical kurtosis of net-proton is compared to that of total-proton. The results are also compared with AMPT model calculations.

  14. Parametrization for chemical freeze-out conditions from net-charge fluctuations measured at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bluhm; P. Alba; W. Alberico; R. Bellwied; V. Mantovani Sarti; M. Nahrgang; C. Ratti

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss details of our thermal model applied to extract chemical freeze-out conditions from fluctuations in the net-electric charge and net-proton number measured at RHIC. A parametrization for these conditions as a function of the beam energy is given.

  15. Results from BRAHMS experiment at RHIC Pawel Staszel 7 for the BRAHMS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Nuclear Physics, Krakow, Poland, 4 Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, 5 Johns Hopkins University-rapidity is found to be 0.64 ± 0.06 for the lower, and around 0.75 for the top RHIC energy. These val- ues to balance at mid-rapidity as the bombarding energy increases, they also indicate that net-bayron free mid

  16. Measurement of the analyzing power in pp elastic scattering in the peak CNI region at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Okada; I. G. Alekseev; A. Bravar; G. Bunce; S. Dhawan; R. Gill; W. Haeberli; O. Jinnouchi; A. Khodinov; A. Kponou; Y. Makdisi; W. Meng; A. Nass; N. Saito; H. Spinka; E. J. Stephenson; D. N. Svirida; T. Wise; A. Zelenski

    2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurements of the A_N absolute value and shape in the -t range from 0.0015 to 0.010GeV/c^2 with a precision better than 0.005 for each A_N data point using a polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet target and the 100 GeV RHIC proton beam.

  17. HBT puzzle at RHIC AMPT model with String Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    /RsideSmall radii Small duration time dt by Stephen Johnson at RWW02 One way out: Hydro Softest point in EOS Measured extensively in heavy ion collisions reasonably described by models (hydro-ph/01120062 recent hydro studies: #12;HIJING energy in strings(soft) and minijet partons(hard) ZPC (Zhang

  18. Thermal charm production in a quark-gluon plasma in Pb-Pb collisions at root S(NN)=5.5 TeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ben-Wei; Ko, Che Ming; Liu, Wei.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an extended volume of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have indeed shown that the results are consistent with the formation of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma during the initial stage... survive in the quark-gluon plasma at temperatures up to about twice the deconfinement temperature [6,7], J/? production in relativistic heavy ion collisions may still be suppressed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC [8?10]. However, if the initial...

  19. Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming; Zhang, B. W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .75.?q One of the most interesting observations in central heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the suppressed production of hadrons with large transverse momentum [1,2]. This phenomenon has been attributed... transverse momentum pions at RHIC can indeed be described. Initial jet distributions and heavy ion collision dynamics. To see the effect of conversions between quark and gluon jets on their energy losses in QGP, we consider central Au+Au collisions...

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that saturation/CGC effects tend to decrease the Odderon intercept, possibly providing an explanation for the lack of experimental evidence for the Odderon so far. This has added further motivation for pursuing searches for the Odderon. During the workshop the status of the Odderon in QCD and its phenomenology were reviewed. The participants also agreed on the most promising observables for the Odderon search at RHIC, which we list. The conclusion of the workshop is that the best available setup to address experimental questions related to the search for the Odderon at RHIC is the proposed combination of STAR experiment and Roman pots of pp2pp experiment, described in the proposal ''Physics with Tagged Forward Protons with the STAR detector at RHIC''.

  1. Hydro-inspired parameterizations of freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Popular parameterizations of the freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. Similarities and differences between the blast-wave model and the single-freeze-out model, both used recently to interpret the RHIC data, are outlined. A non-boost-invariant extension of the single-freeze-out model is proposed and applied to describe the recent BRAHMS data.

  2. TARGETRY FOR A MU+MU- COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRK,H.G.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirement for high luminosity in a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider leads one to conclude that a prodigious source of pions is needed followed by an efficient capture/decay channel. Significant targetry issues are raised by these demands. Among these are (1) the best target configuration to tolerate a high-rep rate, high-power proton beam ({approx} 10{sup 14} ppp at 15 Hz), (2) the pion spectra of the produced pions and (3) the best configuration for maximizing the quantity of captured pions. In this paper, the current thinking of the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider collaboration for solutions to these issues is discussed. In addition, we give a description of the R&D program designed to provide a proof-of-principle for a muon capture system capable of meeting the demands of a future high-luminosity machine.

  3. Steffen A. Bass CTEQ 2004 Summer School #1 Dynamic Modeling of RHIC CollisionsDynamic Modeling of RHIC Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Steffen A.

    -ion collisions? · Introduction: the basics of kinetic theory · Examples of transport models and their application-equilibrium QGP and hydrodynamic expansion hadronization hadronic phase and freeze-out · rigorous calculation and data Transport-Theory: · only observe the final state · rely on QGP signatures predicted by Theory

  4. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, G. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Limon, P. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Syphers, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Ryutov, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California; Hu, S. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Zylstra, A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Casey, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Manuel, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Rinderknecht, H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilks, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betti, R. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Froula, D. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Knauer, J. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Meyerhofer, D. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Drake, R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kuranz, C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Young, R. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, CNRS–CEA–Université Paris VI–Ecole Polytechnique (France)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ?Te ×?ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10?) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; et al

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore »by the well-known ?Te ×?ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10?) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less

  7. The Dark Penguin Shines Light at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primulando, Reinard; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling -- given by the Dark Penguin -- in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the $8$ and $14$ TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the $100$ TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold fo...

  8. Stopping and Baryon Transport in Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Videbaek

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  9. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator facilities, e.g. LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC,generation and transport in the LCLS photoinjector. Figure 2vertical offsets through the LCLS photoinjector. With such a

  10. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator facilities, e.g. LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC,generation and transport in the LCLS photoinjector. Figure 2vertical offsets through the LCLS photoinjector. With such a

  11. Outline Layout Ion Sources Acceleration Accumulation Collision Detectors References Brief Overview of Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    of Particle Accelerators Eugene S. Evans1 February 17, 2010 1 University of California, Berkeley Eugene S. Evans Brief Overview of Particle Accelerators #12;Outline Layout Ion Sources Acceleration Accumulation Collider at CERN Eugene S. Evans Brief Overview of Particle Accelerators #12;Outline Layout Ion Sources

  12. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

  13. The dipole corrector magnets for the RHIC fast global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Arnold, L.; Folz, C.; Hulsart, R.; Jain, A.; Karl, R.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Tuozzolo, J.; White, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently completed RHIC fast global orbit feedback system uses 24 small 'window-frame' horizontal dipole correctors. Space limitations dictated a very compact design. The magnetic design and modelling of these laminated yoke magnets is described as well as the mechanical implementation, coil winding, vacuum impregnation, etc. Test procedures to determine the field quality and frequency response are described. The results of these measurements are presented and discussed. A small fringe field from each magnet, overlapping the opposite RHIC ring, is compensated by a correction winding placed on the opposite ring's magnet and connected in series with the main winding of the first one. Results from measurements of this compensation scheme are shown and discussed.

  14. $J/?$ production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC and the nuclear absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a QCD based nuclear absorption model, with few parameters fixed to reproduce experimental $J/\\psi$ yield in 200 GeV pp/pA and 450 GeV pA collisions can explain the preliminary PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy, $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV. However, the model does not give satisfactory description to the preliminary PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions. The analysis suggest that in Au+Au collisions, $J/\\psi$ are suppressed in a medium unlike the medium produced in SPS energy nuclear collisions or in RHIC energy Cu+Cu collisions.

  15. SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, S.M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Leung, K.K. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  17. Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moortgat-Pick, G; Battaglia, M; Belanger, G; Fujii, K; Kalinowski, J; Heinemeyer, S; Kiyo, Y; Olive, K; Simon, F; Uwer, P; Wackeroth, D; Zerwas, P M; Arbey, A; Asano, M; Bechtle, P; Bharucha, A; Brau, J; Brummer, F; Choi, S Y; Denner, A; Desch, K; Dittmaier, S; Ellis, J; Ellwanger, U; Englert, C; Freitas, A; Ginzburg, I; Godfrey, S; Greiner, N; Grojean, C; Grunewald, M; Heisig, J; Hocker, A; Kanemura, S; Kawagoe, K; Kogler, R; Krawczyk, M; Kronfeld, A S; Kroseberg, J; Liebler, S; List, J; Mahmoudi, F; Mambrini, Y; Matsumoto, S; Mnich, J; Monig, K; Muhlleitner, M M; Poschl, R; Porod, W; Porto, S; Rolbiecki, K; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, M; Serpico, P; Stanitzki, M; Stål, O; Stefaniak, T; Stockinger, D; Wagner, A; Weiglein, G; Wilson, G W; Zeune, L; Moortgat, F; Xella, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  18. Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Moortgat-Pick; H. Baer; M. Battaglia; G. Belanger; K. Fujii; J. Kalinowski; S. Heinemeyer; Y. Kiyo; K. Olive; F. Simon; P. Uwer; D. Wackeroth; P. M. Zerwas; A. Arbey; M. Asano; P. Bechtle; A. Bharucha; J. Brau; F. Brummer; S. Y. Choi; A. Denner; K. Desch; S. Dittmaier; U. Ellwanger; C. Englert; A. Freitas; I. Ginzburg; S. Godfrey; N. Greiner; C. Grojean; M. Grunewald; J. Heisig; A. Hocker; S. Kanemura; K. Kawagoe; R. Kogler; M. Krawczyk; A. S. Kronfeld; J. Kroseberg; S. Liebler; J. List; F. Mahmoudi; Y. Mambrini; S. Matsumoto; J. Mnich; K. Monig; M. M. Muhlleitner; R. Poschl; W. Porod; S. Porto; K. Rolbiecki; M. Schmitt; P. Serpico; M. Stanitzki; O. Stål; T. Stefaniak; D. Stockinger; G. Weiglein; G. W. Wilson; L. Zeune; F. Moortgat; S. Xella

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  19. Is the centrality dependence of the elliptic flow $v_2$ and of the average $$ in RHIC experiments more than a Core-Corona Effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Aichelin; K. Werner

    2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we have shown that the centrality dependence of the multiplicity of different hadron species observed in RHIC and SPS experiments can be well understood in a simple model, dubbed core-corona model. There it is assumed that those incoming nucleons which scatter only once produce hadrons as in pp collisions whereas those which scatter more often form an equilibrated source which decays according to phase space. In this article we show that also kinematical variables like $v_2/\\epsilon_{part} (N_{part})$ as well as $v_2^i/\\epsilon_{part} (N_{part})$ and $$ of identified particles are well described in this model. The correlation of $$ between peripheral heavy ion collisions and pp collisions for different hadrons, reproduced in this model, questions whether hydrodynamical calculations are the proper tool to describe non-central heavy ion collision. The model explains as well the centrality dependence of $v_2/\\epsilon_{part}$ of charged particles, considered up to now as an observable which allows to determine the viscosity of the quark gluon plasma. The observed dependence of $v_2^i/\\epsilon_{part}(N_{part})$ on the particle species is a simple consequence of the different ratios of core to corona particles.

  20. A Proposal for the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) to the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Campbell; R. Hollis; A. Iordanova; E. Kistenev; X. Jiang; Y. Kwon; J. Lajoie; J. Perry; R. Seto; A. Sukhanov; A. Timilsina; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX MPC-EX detector is a Si-W preshower extension to the existing PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeters (MPC). The MPC-EX will consist of eight layers of alternating W absorber and Si mini-pad sensors and will be installed in time for RHIC Run-15. Covering a large pseudorapidity range, 3.1 energies > 80 GeV, a factor of four improvement over current capabilities. Not only will the MPC-EX strengthen PHENIX's existing forward neutral pion and jet measurements, it also provides the necessary neutral pion rejection to make a prompt photon measurement feasible in both p+A and p+p collisions. With this neutral pion rejection, prompt (direct + fragmentation) photon yields at high p_T, p_T > 3 GeV, can be statistically extracted using a double ratio method. In p+A collisions direct photons at forward rapidities are optimally sensitive to the gluon distribution because, unlike pions, direct photons are only produced by processes that are directly sensitive to the gluon distribution at leading order. A measurement of the forward prompt photon R_pA will cleanly access and greatly expand our understanding of the gluon nuclear parton distribution functions and provide important information about the initial state in heavy ion collisions. In transversely polarized p+p collisions the MPC-EX will make possible a measurement of the prompt photon single spin asymmetry A_N, and will help elucidate the correlation of valence partons in the proton with the proton spin.

  1. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebrun, Ph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  2. EBIS PREINJECTOR CONSTRUCTION STATUS* , D. Barton, E. Beebe, S. Bellavia, O. Gould, A. Kponou, R. Lambiase, E. Lessard,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract A new heavy ion preinjector is presently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory the preinjector to the heavy ion injection point of the Booster Synchrotron. This preinjector will replace two for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL

  3. Buda-Lund hydro model and the elliptic flow at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ellipsoidally symmetric Buda-Lund hydrodynamic model describes naturally the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity dependence of the elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 130$ and 200 GeV. The result confirms the indication of quark deconfinement in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, obtained from Buda-Lund hydro model fits to combined spectra and HBT radii of BRAHMS, PHOBOS, PHENIX and STAR.

  4. Strange particles production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the RHIC BES energy region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Cong-Cong; Feng, Sheng-Qin; Yin, Zhong-Bao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE is utilized to investigate strange particle productions in Au + Au collision at $\\sqrt{s}$=62.4 GeV in different centralities and at $\\sqrt{s}$= 39, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV in the most central collision, respectively. It is shown that the transverse momentum distributions of strange particles by the PACIAE model fit well the RHIC BES experimental results.

  5. EXPERIENCE IN REDUCING ELECTRON CLOUD AND DYNAMIC PRESSURE RISE IN WARM AND COLD REGIONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS,L.; ALLESI, J.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; GULLOTTA, J.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; HUANG, H.; LEE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MACKAY, W.W.; MONTAG, C.; NICOLETTI, A.; OERTER, B.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; SMART, L.; SYNDSTRUP, L.; TEPIKIAN, S.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The large scale application of non-evaporable getter coating in RHIC has been effective in reducing the electron cloud. Since beams with higher intensity and smaller bunch spacing became possible in operation, the emittance growth is of concern. Study results are reported together with experiences of machine improvements: saturated NEG coatings, anti-grazing ridges in warm sections, and the pre-pumping in cryogenic regions.

  6. Lattice design for head-on beam-beam compensation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for head-on beam-beam compensation will be installed in IP 10 at RHIC. Compensation of the beam-beam effect experienced at IP 8 requires betatron phase advances of {Delta}{psi} = k {center_dot} {pi} between the proton-proton interaction point at IP 8, and the electron lens at IP 10. This paper describes the lattice solutions for both the BLUE and the YELLOW ring to achieve this goal.

  7. RHIC 12x150A current lead temperature controller: design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi, C.; Seberg, S.; Ganetis, Hamdi, K.; Louie, W.; Heppner, G.; Jamilkowski, J.; Bruno, D.; DiLieto, A.; Sirio, C.; Tuozzolo, J.; Sandberg, J.; Unger, K.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 60 12 x 150A current leads distributed in six RHIC service buildings; each lead delivers power supply current from room temperature to cryogenic temperature in RHIC. Due to the humid environment, condensation occurs frequently and ice forms quickly during operation, especially during an extensive storage period. These conditions generate warnings and alarms to which personnel must respond and establish temporary solutions to keep the machine operating. In here, we designed a temperature control system to avoid such situations. This paper discusses its design, implementation, and some results. There are six service buildings in the RHIC complex; each building has two valve boxes that transfer room-temperature current cables from the power supplies into superconducting leads, and then transport them into the RHIC tunnel. In there, the transition between the room-temperature lead into superconducting lead is critical and essential; smooth running during the physics store is crucial for the machine's continuing operation. One of the problems that often occurred previously was the icing of these current leads that could result in a potential leakage current onto ground, thereby preventing a continuous supply of physics store. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical example on a power lead. Among the modifications of the design of the valve box, we list below the new requirements for designing the temperature controller to prevent icing occurring: (1) Remotely control, monitor, and record each current lead's temperature in real time. Prevent icing or overheating of a power lead. (2) Include a temperature alarm for the high/low level threshold. In this paper we discuss the design, implementation, upgrades to, and operation of this new system.

  8. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

  9. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  10. On his second visit to Brookhaven Lab, on April 21,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Nuclear & Particle Physics Steve Vigdor, Collider-Acceler- ator Department Chair Thomas Roser, PHENIX STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- a particle accelera- tor at BNL of the heli- um nucleus: antihelium-4. This new particle, also known as the anti-alpha, is the heaviest anti

  11. Systematic Studies of Jet Quenching in Hot Nuclear Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Andrea

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    at machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) we can create and investigate tiny bubbles of Quark Gluon Plasma for very short periods of time before they cool and decay. We can use so-called QCD jets i...

  12. A Complete Onium Program with R2D at RHIC II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Witt

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Following on the discovery of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at RHIC, a program of detailed quarkonia measurements is crucial to understanding the nature of deconfinement. Lattice QCD calculations suggest a sequential melting of the quarkonia states in the deconfined medium. Such a melting would lead to a suppression in the measured charmonium and bottomonium yields. However, distinguishing a true suppression from shadowing, absorption, and recombination effects requires detailed measurements of the charmonium states (J/psi, psi', and chi_c) and bottomonium states (Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S)). Also, since measurements are needed not only in A+A, but also in p+p for determining primary yields and in p+A for evaluating absorption, the detector should perform well in all collision environments. To fully realize the program outlined above, a new detector will be required at RHIC-II. We present a proposal for a complete quarkonia program and the abilities of a new detector, R2D, to meet the stated requirements. Comparisons will be made with proposed upgrades to existing RHIC detectors and with the upcoming LHC program.

  13. Jet Substructure at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher K. Vermilion

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I explore many aspects of jet substructure at the Large Hadron Collider, ranging from theoretical techniques for jet calculations, to phenomenological tools for better searches with jets, to software for implementing and comparing such tools. I begin with an application of soft-collinear effective theory, an effective theory of QCD applied to high-energy quarks and gluons. This material is taken from Ref. 1, in which we demonstrate factorization and logarithmic resummation for a certain class of observables in electron-positron collisions. I then explore various phenomenological aspects of jet substructure in simulated events. After observing numerous features of jets at hadron colliders, I describe a method -- jet pruning -- for improving searches for heavy particles that decay to one or more jets. This material is a greatly expanded version of Ref. 2. Finally, I give an overview of the software tools available for these kinds of studies, with a focus on SpartyJet, a package for implementing and comparing jet-based analyses I have collaborated on. Several detailed calculations and software examples are given in the appendices. Sections with no new content are italic in the Table of Contents.

  14. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  15. J/Psi suppression in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Sa, BW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - though all these signals have been observed in heavy ion collisions at CERN SPS, alternative explanations without in- voking the formation of the quark-gluon plasma have also been proposed. As the QGP is expected to be produced at RHIC... experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ~RHIC!, which allows collisions at much high energies than those available previously, are expected to provide a better oppor- tunity to create the quark-gluon plasma and to study its prop- erties. Since...

  16. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  17. Energy Content of Colliding Plane Waves using Approximate Noether Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Saira Waheed

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the energy content of colliding plane waves using approximate Noether symmetries. For this purpose, we use approximate Lie symmetry method of Lagrangian for differential equations. We formulate the first-order perturbed Lagrangian for colliding plane electromagnetic and gravitational waves. It is shown that in both cases, there does not exist

  18. CLIC Drive Beam and LHC Based Fel-Nucleus Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Braun; R. Corsini; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of a CLIC-LHC based FEL-nucleus collider is investigated. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all requirements of an ideal photon source for the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method. The physics potential of the proposed collider is illustrated for a beam of Pb nuclei.

  19. EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  1. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  2. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the TEVATRON. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the TEVATRON, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific TEVATRON operation and has a state-specific TEVATRON model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global TEVATRON clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast TEVATRON-wide link from which the power supplies will read the realtime corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers which can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we will describe this device and its use to control the TEVATRON tunes as well as other possible applications.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF POLARIZED PARTON DESTRIBUTIONS IN THE RHIC ERA" (VOLUME 86).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DESHPANDE,A.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the polarized gluon distribution is a central goal of the RHIC spin program. Recent achievements in polarization and luminosity of the proton beams in RHIC, has enabled the RHIC experiments to acquire substantial amounts of high quality data with polarized proton beams at 200 and 62.4 GeV center of mass energy, allowing a first glimpse of the polarized gluon distribution at RHIC. Short test operation at 500 GeV center of mass energy has also been successful, indicating absence of any fundamental roadblocks for measurements of polarized quark and anti-quark distributions planned at that energy in a couple of years. With this background, it has now become high time to consider how all these data sets may be employed most effectively to determine the polarized parton distributions in the nucleon, in general, and the polarized gluon distribution, in particular. A global analysis of the polarized DIS data from the past and present fixed target experiments jointly with the present and anticipated RHIC Spin data is needed.

  4. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  5. Collider Phenomenology with Split-UED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Park, Seong Chan; /Tokyo U., IPMU; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the collider implications of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. The non-vanishing fermion mass in the bulk, which is consistent with the KK-parity, largely modifies the phenomenology of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions. We scrutinize the behavior of couplings and study the discovery reach of the Tevatron and the LHC for level-2 Kaluza-Klein modes in the dilepton channel, which would indicates the presence of the extra dimensions. Observation of large event rates for dilepton resonances can result from a nontrivial fermion mass profile along the extra dimensions, which, in turn, may corroborate extra dimensional explanation for the observation of the positron excess in cosmic rays. The Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions scenario has received great attention. Recently non-vanishing bulk fermion masses have been introduced without spoiling the virtue of KK-parity. The fermion profiles are no longer simple sine/cosine functions and depend upon the specific values of bulk parameters. The profiles of fermions are split along the extra dimensions while the wave functions of the bosons remain the same as in UED. A simple introduction of a KK-parity conserving bulk fermion mass has significant influences on collider aspects as well as astrophysical implications of UED. For instance, the DM annihilation fraction into certain SM fermion pairs is either enhanced or reduced (compared to the MUED case) so that one can perhaps explain the PAMELA positron excess while suppressing the anti-proton flux. In this paper, we have concentrated on collider phenomenology of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. We have revisited the KK decomposition in detail and analyzed wave function overlaps to compute relevant couplings for collider studies. We have discussed general collider implication for level-1 KK modes and level-2 KK with non-zero bulk mass and have computed LHC reach for the EW level-2 KK bosons, {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2}, in the dilepton channel. The LHC should able to cover the large parameter space (up to M{sub V{sub 2}} {approx} 1.5 TeV for {mu}L {ge} 1) even with early data assuming {approx}100 pb{sup -1} or less. The existence of double resonances is one essential feature arising from extra dimensional models. Whether or not one can see double resonances depends both on how degenerate the two resonances are and on the mass resolution of the detector. The very high P{sub T} from the decay makes resolution in dimuon channel worse than in dielectron final state. This is because one can reconstruct electron from ECAL but muon momentum reconstruction relies on its track, which is barely curved in this case. Further indication for SUED might be the discovery of W'-like signature of mass close to Z{sub 2}. The MUED predicts a somewhat lower event rate due to 1-loop suppressed coupling of level-2 bosons to SM fermion pair, while it exists at tree level in SUED. Therefore in UED, one has to rely on indirect production of level-2 bosons, whose collider study requires complete knowledge of the model: the mass spectrum and all the couplings. On the other hand, in the large {mu} limit of SUED, the dependence on mass spectrum is diminished since level-2 KK bosons decay only into SM fermion pairs. This allows us to estimate the signal rate from their direct production, so that they can be discovered at the early phase of the LHC. The indirect production mechanism only increases production cross sections, improving our results. Once a discovery has been made, one should try to reconstruct events and do further measurements such as spin and coupling determination, with more accumulated data, which might discriminate KK resonances from other Z' models. The coupling measurement is directly related to the determination of the bulk masses. A challenging issue might be the existence of two resonances which are rather close to each other.

  6. D-sJ(2317) meson production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions RID A-2398-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, L. W.; Ko, Che Ming; Liu, W.; Nielsen, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of D-sJ(2317) mesons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is studied. Using the quark coalescence model, we first determine the initial number of D-sJ(2317) mesons produced during hadronization...

  7. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  8. A precise in situ calibration of the RHIC H-Jet polarimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poblaguev, A. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new methods of calibration of the hydrogen jet target polarimeter (H-Jet) at RHIC are discussed. First method is based on the measurement of low amplitude signal time of fast particles penetrating through detector. The second, geometry based, method employs correlation between z-coordinate of the recoil proton and its kinetic energy. Both methods can be used for in situ calibration of the H-Jet polarimeter. These two methods are compared with a traditional calibration of the H-Jet which uses ?-sources.

  9. Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

  10. Phase-Space Coalescence for heavy and light quarks at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Greco

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the application and successes of a phase-space coalescence plus fragmentation model that has been applied for hadronization at RHIC. The physical concept is discussed together with the practical implementation. The robustness of main predictions is reviewed together with several open issues like relevance of three dimensional calculation, finite width of the wave functions, effects of quark masses, energy-entropy conservation, space-momentum correlation. Eventually the relevance of coalescence also for the study of the microscopic interaction of heavy quarks is highlighted.

  11. Measurement of leptonic and hadronic decays of omega- and phi-mesons at RHIC by PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Riabov

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC measured production of the \\omega- and \\phi- mesons in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 63 and 200 GeV. Particle properties were studied using hadronic and di-electron decay channels. Transverse momentum (mass) spectra measured in different decay modes are found to be in agreement with each other within the errors. Nuclear modification factors R_{AA} measured for both mesons are consistent with results previously obtained for other neutral mesons. Position of the meson mass peaks and their widths reconstructed in hadronic decay channels are in agreement with their properties measured in vacuum.

  12. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of ? s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of ? s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  13. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly apportioned at both a national and global level, is essential if the project is to be realised. Finally, models for running costs and decommissioning at the conclusion of the ILC project are proposed. This document represents an interim report of the bodies and individuals studying these questions inside the structure set up and supervised by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). It represents a request for comment to the international community in all relevant disciplines, scientific, technical and most importantly, political. Many areas require further study and some, in particular the site selection process, have not yet progressed sufficiently to be addressed in detail in this document. Discussion raised by this document will be vital in framing the final proposals due to be published in 2012 in the Technical Design Report being prepared by the Global Design Effort of the ILC.

  14. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the Tevatron. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the Tevatron, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite-state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific Tevatron operation and has a state-specific Tevatron model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global Tevatron clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine, which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast Tevatron-wide link from which the power supplies will read the real time corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers that can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we describe this device and its use to control the Tevatron tunes as well as other possible applications. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  15. Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Baur

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

  16. Grid Interface Challenges and Candidate Solutions for the Compact Linear Collider’s (CLIC) Klystron Modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguglia, D; Watson, A; Clare, J; Wheeler, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a linear electron-positron accelerator under study at CERN, in view of exploring a new leptons collision energy region (0.5TeV to 5TeV). This complex requires ~1600 klystrons fed by highly efficient and controllable power electronics for a convenient power connection to the utility grid. This paper presents the challenges and evaluates several possible structures for the power system. Discussion are provided regarding the candidate topologies according to the converters’ ratings / number and considering reliability, modularity, and redundancy.

  17. TESLA*HERA as Lepton (Photon)-Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Yavas; A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New facilities for particle and nuclear physics research, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

  18. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  19. SPADs for Vertex Tracker detectors in Future Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilella, E; Vila, A; Dieguez, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics aims at the future linear colliders impose such stringent requirements on detector systems that exceed those met by any previous technology. Amongst other novel technologies, SPADs (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) detectors are being developed to track high energy particles at ILC (International Linear Collider) and CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). These sensors offer outstanding qualities, such as an extraordinary high sensitivity, ultra-fast response time and virtually infinite gain, in addition to compatibility with standard CMOS technologies. As a result, SPAD detectors enable the direct conversion of a single particle event onto a CMOS digital signal in the sub-nanosecond time scale, which leads to the possibility of single BX (bunch crossing) resolution at some particle colliders. However, SPAD detectors suffer from two main problems, namely the noise pulses generated by the sensor and the low fill-factor. The noise pulses worsen the detector occupancy, while the low fill-factor reduces the detec...

  20. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  1. A deterministic, gigabit serial timing, synchronization and data link for the RHIC LLRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.; Smith, K.S.; Severino, F.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical capability of the new RHIC low level rf (LLRF) system is the ability to synchronize signals across multiple locations. The 'Update Link' provides this functionality. The 'Update Link' is a deterministic serial data link based on the Xilinx RocketIO protocol that is broadcast over fiber optic cable at 1 gigabit per second (Gbps). The link provides timing events and data packets as well as time stamp information for synchronizing diagnostic data from multiple sources. The new RHIC LLRF was designed to be a flexible, modular system. The system is constructed of numerous independent RF Controller chassis. To provide synchronization among all of these chassis, the Update Link system was designed. The Update Link system provides a low latency, deterministic data path to broadcast information to all receivers in the system. The Update Link system is based on a central hub, the Update Link Master (ULM), which generates the data stream that is distributed via fiber optic links. Downstream chassis have non-deterministic connections back to the ULM that allow any chassis to provide data that is broadcast globally.

  2. The Tricky Azimuthal Dependence of Jet Quenching at RHIC and LHC via CUJET2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiechen Xu; Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High transverse momentum neutral pion and charged hadron suppression pattern with respect to reaction plane at RHIC and LHC energies in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are studied in a perturbative QCD based model, CUJET2.0. CUJET2.0 has dynamical DGLV radiation kernel and Thoma-Gyulassy elastic energy loss, with both being generalized to including multi-scale running strong coupling as well as energy loss probability fluctuations, and the full jet path integration is performed in a low $p_T$ flow data constrained medium which has 2+1D viscous hydrodynamical expanding profile. We find that in CUJET2.0, with only one control parameter, $\\alpha_{max}$, the maximum coupling strength, fixed to be 0.26, the computed nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are consistent with RHIC and LHC data at average $\\chi^2/d.o.f.<1.5$ level. Simultaneous agreements with high $p_T$ azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ data are acquired given average $\\alpha_{max}$ over in-plane and out-of-plane paths varying as less as 10\\%, suggests a non-trivial dependence of the high $p_T$ single particle $v_2$ on the azimuthally varied strong coupling.

  3. Prospects of Heavy Neutrino Searches at Future Lepton Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Ibarra, Alejandro; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at next generation lepton colliders. In particular, we focus on the planned electron-positron colliders, operating in two different beam modes, namely, $e^+e^-$ and $e^-e^-$. In the $e^+e^-$ beam mode, we consider various production and decay modes of the heavy neutrino ($N$), and find that the final state with $e+2j+\\slashed{E}$, arising from the $e^+e^-\\to N\

  4. Model for J/psi absorption in hadronic matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 13.75.Lb I. INTRODUCTION A dense partonic system, often called the quark-gluon plasma ~QGP!, is expected to be formed in heavy ion colli- sions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ~RHIC!, which will soon start to operate at the Brookhaven...

  5. EBTS: DESIGN AND EXPERIMENTAL A. Pikin, J. Alessi, E. Beebe, A. Kponou, K. Prelec,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kuznetsov , M. Tiunov Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA Budker Institute of Nuclear Stand (EBTS), which is a prototype of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Electron Beam Ion for single turn injection into the Booster ring of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron without

  6. Radiative charge transfer in cold and ultracold Sulfur atoms colliding with Protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G Shen; P C Stancil; J G Wang; J F McCann; B M McLaughlin

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative decay processes at cold and ultra cold temperatures for Sulfur atoms colliding with protons are investigated. The MOLPRO quantum chemistry suite of codes was used to obtain accurate potential energies and transition dipole moments, as a function of internuclear distance, between low-lying states of the SH$^{+}$ molecular cation. A multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation together with the Davidson correction is used to determine the potential energy curves and transition dipole moments, between the states of interest, where the molecular orbitals (MO's) are obtained from state-averaged multi configuration-self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations. The collision problem is solved approximately using an optical potential method to obtain radiative loss, and a fully two-channel quantum approach for radiative charge transfer. Cross sections and rate coefficients are determined for the first time for temperatures ranging from 10 $\\mu$ K up to 10,000 K. Results are obtained for all isotopes of Sulfur, colliding with H$^{+}$ and D$^{+}$ ions and comparison is made to a number of other collision systems.

  7. Pseudo-Critical Enhancement of Thermal Photons in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrik van Hees; Min He; Ralf Rapp

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the spectra and elliptic flow of thermal photons emitted in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions (URHICs) at RHIC and LHC. The thermal emission rates are taken from complete leading-order rates for the QGP and hadronic many-body calculations including baryons and antibaryons, as well as meson-exchange reactions (including Bremsstrahlung). We first update previous thermal fireball calculations by implementing a lattice-QCD based equation of state and extend them to compare to recent LHC data. We then scrutinize the space-time evolution of Au-Au collisions at RHIC by employing an ideal hydrodynamic model constrained by bulk- and multistrange-hadron spectra and elliptic flow, including a non-vanishing initial flow. We systematically compare the evolutions of temperature, radial flow, azimuthal anisotropy and four-volume, and exhibit the temperature profile of thermal photon radiation. Based on these insights, we put forward a scenario with a "pseudo-critical enhancement" of thermal emission rates, and investigate its impact on RHIC and LHC direct photon data.

  8. THE ERL HIGH-ENERGY COOLER FOR RHIC* I. Ben-Zvi** for the electron cooling team***,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]. The design evolved during the past 5 years. The present design will use classical (non-magnetized) electron presents many challenges to the design of the cooler. The cooling is slowed down by the high- energyTHE ERL HIGH-ENERGY COOLER FOR RHIC* I. Ben-Zvi** for the electron cooling team***, C-AD, BNL

  9. Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajni,; Kumar, Suneel; Puri, Rajeev K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, Punjab (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragments in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of the fragments, composite mass of the reacting system, and the impact parameter of the reaction. It has been observed that a reduced cross section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with an increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

  10. Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajni; Suneel Kumar; Rajeev K. Puri

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragment in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of fragments, composite mass of reacting system, and the impact parameter of reaction. It has been observed that reduced cross-section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

  11. Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of strong suppression of inclusive hadron distributions and di-hadron correlations at high $p_{T}$, while providing evidence for partonic energy loss, also suffer from geometric biases due to the competition of energy loss and fragmentation. The measurements of fully reconstructed jets is expected to lack these biases as the energy flow is measured independently of the fragmentation details. In this article, we review the recent results from the heavy ion collisions collected by the STAR experiment at RHIC on direct jet reconstruction utilizing the modern sequential recombination and cone jet reconstruction algorithms together with their background subtraction techniques. In order to assess the jet reconstruction biases a comparison with the jet cross section measurement in $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions to account for nuclear geometric effects is performed. Comparison of the inclusive jet cross section obtained in central Au+Au events with that in $p+p$ collisions, published previously by STAR, suggests that unbiased jet reconstruction in the complex heavy ion environment indeed may be possible.

  12. Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

  13. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope The Helium Ion Microscope promises to advance biological, geochemical, biogeochemical, and surfaceinterface studies using its combined...

  14. Helium Ion Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium Ion Microscope Helium Ion Microscope Bruce Arey discusses the capabilities of EMSL's new helium ion microscope housed in EMSL's Quiet Wing....

  15. Measurement of the total cross section of uranium-uranium collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=192.8$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Fischer; A. J. Baltz; M. Blaskiewicz; D. Gassner; K. A. Drees; Y. Luo; M. Minty; P. Thieberger; M. Wilinski; I. A. Pshenichnov

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion cross sections totaling several hundred barns have been calculated previously for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These total cross sections are more than an order of magnitude larger than the geometric ion-ion cross sections primarily due to Bound-Free Pair Production (BFPP) and Electro-Magnetic Dissociation (EMD). Apart from a general interest in verifying the calculations experimentally, an accurate prediction of the losses created in the heavy ion collisions is of practical interest for the LHC, where some collision products are lost in cryogenically cooled magnets and have the potential to quench these magnets. In the 2012 RHIC run uranium ions collided with each other at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 192.8$ GeV with nearly all beam losses due to collisions. This allows for the measurement of the total cross section, which agrees with the calculated cross section within the experimental error.

  16. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Brüning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Cetinkaya, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; De Roeck, A; d'Enterria, D; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinol, L; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Ten Kate, H; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  17. Heavy quark production from jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Fries, Rainer J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA (Received 13 May 2008; published 12 September 2008) Recently, it has been demonstrated that the chemical composition of jets in heavy ion collisions is significantly altered... observables that could be measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [14]. In Ref. [12] it was found that conversions of light quarks to gluons could help solve the puzzle of very similar nuclear modification...

  18. Jet Quenching in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions by QCD Synchrotron-like Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Shuryak; I. Zahed

    2002-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider synchrotron-like radiation in QCD by generalizing Schwinger's treatment of quantum synchrotron radiation in QED to the case of a constant chromomagnetic field. We suggest a novel mechanism for {\\em jet quenching} in heavy ion collisions, whereby high-$p_t$ partons get depleted through strong (classical) color fields. The latters are encountered in the color glass condensate or in the form of expanding shells of exploding sphalerons. Unlike bremsstrahlung radiation through multiple soft rescattering, synchrotron radiation converts a jet into a wide shower of soft gluons. We estimate the energy loss through this mechanism and suggest that it contributes significantly to the unexpectedly strong jet quenching observed at RHIC.

  19. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  20. Holographic light quark jet quenching at RHIC and LHC via the shooting strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrej Ficnar; Steven S. Gubser; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new shooting string holographic model of jet quenching of light quarks in strongly coupled plasmas is presented to overcome the phenomenological incompatibilities of previous falling string holographic scenarios that emerged when confronted with the recent LHC data. This model is based on strings with finite momentum endpoints that start close to the horizon and lose energy as they approach the boundary. This framework is applied to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA of light hadrons at RHIC and LHC, showing that this model improves greatly the comparison with the recent light hadron suppression data. The effects of the Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature corrections to the AdS5 geometry further improve the agreement with the data.

  1. Buda-Lund hydro model for ellipsoidally symmetric fireballs and the elliptic flow at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

    2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ellipsoidally symmetric extension of Buda-Lund hydrodynamic model is shown here to yield a natural description of the pseudorapidity dependence of the elliptic flow $v_2(\\eta)$, as determined recently by the PHOBOS experiment for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 130$ and 200 GeV. With the same set of parameters, the Buda-Lund model describes also the transverse momentum dependence of $v_2$ of identified particles at mid-rapidity. The results confirm the indication for quark deconfinement in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, obtained from a successful Buda-Lund hydro model fit to the single particle spectra and two-particle correlation data, as measured by the BRAHMS, PHOBOS, PHENIX and STAR collaborations.

  2. Reaction Plane and Beam Energy Dependence Of The Balance Function at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Wang; for the STAR collaboration

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The balance function, which measures the correlation between opposite sign charge pairs, is sensitive to the mechanisms of charge formation and the subsequent relative diffusion of the balancing charges. The study of the balance function can provide information about charge creation time as well as the subsequent collective behavior of particles. In this paper, we present a reaction-plane-dependent balance function study for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV and compare with results from recent three particle correlation measurements. We also report balance functions for relative pseudorapidity ($\\Delta \\eta$), relative rapidity ($\\Delta y$), and relative azimuthal angle ($\\Delta \\phi$) from the recent RHIC beam energy scan data.

  3. Can $J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ broadening signal the deconfinement transition at RHIC?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the latest NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. It is shown that a QCD based nuclear absorption model, where $J/\\psi$'s are absorbed in nuclear medium could explain the latest NA50 data on the centrality dependence of the $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ratio. The model also explains the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ over minimum bias ratio and the $p_T$ broadening of $J/\\psi$'s. A QGP based threshold model where all the $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed above a threshold density, also explains the data sets with smeared threshold density. Even at RHIC energy, centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression or $p_T$ broadening could not distinguish between the two models.

  4. Commissioning of a beta* knob for dynamic IR correction at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert-Demolaize G.; Marusic, A.; Tepikian, S.; White, S.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to the recent optics correction technique demonstrated at CERN and applied at RHIC, it is important to have a separate tool to control the value of the beta functions at the collision point ({beta}*). This becomes even more relevant when trying to reach high level of integrated luminosity while dealing with emittance blow-up over the length of a store, or taking advantage of compensation processes like stochastic cooling. Algorithms have been developed to allow modifying independently the beta function in each plane for each beam without significant increase in beam losses. The following reviews the principle of such algorithms and their experimental implementation as a dynamic {beta}-squeeze procedure.

  5. Jet absorption and corona effect at RHIC. Extracting collision geometry from experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. Pantuev

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a possible existence of a finite formation time of strongly interacting plasma in nuclear collisions at RHIC from recent experimental data. To show this, we use a simple model based on Monte Carlo simulation of nucleus-nucleus collisions with realistic nuclear density distribution. The most striking feature of the experimental data - an absence of absorption of high transverse momentum pions in the reaction plane direction for mid-peripheral collisions - points to the presence of a surface zone with no absorption and strong suppression in the inner core. A natural interpretation of such a zone could be the plasma formation time T~2-3 fm/c. The existence of a formation time could dramatically change our understanding of many experimentally observed features. With this assumption we describe the angular anisotropy of high transverse momentum pions with respect to the reaction plane and the centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

  6. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Abelleira Fernandez; C. Adolphsen; A. N. Akay; H. Aksakal; J. L. Albacete; S. Alekhin; P. Allport; V. Andreev; R. B. Appleby; E. Arikan; N. Armesto; G. Azuelos; M. Bai; D. Barber; J. Bartels; O. Behnke; J. Behr; A. S. Belyaev; I. Ben-Zvi; N. Bernard; S. Bertolucci; S. Bettoni; S. Biswal; J. Blümlein; H. Böttcher; A. Bogacz; C. Bracco; G. Brandt; H. Braun; S. Brodsky; O. Brüning; E. Bulyak; A. Buniatyan; H. Burkhardt; I. T. Cakir; O. Cakir; R. Calaga; V. Cetinkaya; E. Ciapala; R. Ciftci; A. K. Ciftci; B. A. Cole; J. C. Collins; O. Dadoun; J. Dainton; A. De. Roeck; D. d'Enterria; A. Dudarev; A. Eide; R. Enberg; E. Eroglu; K. J. Eskola; L. Favart; M. Fitterer; S. Forte; A. Gaddi; P. Gambino; H. García Morales; T. Gehrmann; P. Gladkikh; C. Glasman; R. Godbole; B. Goddard; T. Greenshaw; A. Guffanti; V. Guzey; C. Gwenlan; T. Han; Y. Hao; F. Haug; W. Herr; A. Hervé; B. J. Holzer; M. Ishitsuka; M. Jacquet; B. Jeanneret; J. M. Jimenez; J. M. Jowett; H. Jung; H. Karadeniz; D. Kayran; A. Kilic; K. Kimura; M. Klein; U. Klein; T. Kluge; F. Kocak; M. Korostelev; A. Kosmicki; P. Kostka; H. Kowalski; G. Kramer; D. Kuchler; M. Kuze; T. Lappi; P. Laycock; E. Levichev; S. Levonian; V. N. Litvinenko; A. Lombardi; J. Maeda; C. Marquet; S. J. Maxfield; B. Mellado; K. H. Mess; A. Milanese; S. Moch; I. I. Morozov; Y. Muttoni; S. Myers; S. Nandi; Z. Nergiz; P. R. Newman; T. Omori; J. Osborne; E. Paoloni; Y. Papaphilippou; C. Pascaud; H. Paukkunen; E. Perez; T. Pieloni; E. Pilicer; B. Pire; R. Placakyte; A. Polini; V. Ptitsyn; Y. Pupkov; V. Radescu; S. Raychaudhuri; L. Rinolfi; R. Rohini; J. Rojo; S. Russenschuck; M. Sahin; C. A. Salgado; K. Sampei; R. Sassot; E. Sauvan; U. Schneekloth; T. Schörner-Sadenius; D. Schulte; A. Senol; A. Seryi; P. Sievers; A. N. Skrinsky; W. Smith; H. Spiesberger; A. M. Stasto; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Sultansoy; Y. P. Sun; B. Surrow; L. Szymanowski; P. Taels; I. Tapan; A. T. Tasci; E. Tassi; H. Ten. Kate; J. Terron; H. Thiesen; L. Thompson; K. Tokushuku; R. Tomás García; D. Tommasini; D. Trbojevic; N. Tsoupas; J. Tuckmantel; S. Turkoz; T. N. Trinh; K. Tywoniuk; G. Unel; J. Urakawa; P. VanMechelen; A. Variola; R. Veness; A. Vivoli; P. Vobly; J. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. Wallon; G. Watt; C. Weiss; U. A. Wiedemann; U. Wienands; F. Willeke; B. -W. Xiao; V. Yakimenko; A. F. Zarnecki; Z. Zhang; F. Zimmermann; R. Zlebcik; F. Zomer

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ range extended by four orders of magnitude as compared to previous lepton-nucleus DIS experiments for novel investigations of neutron's and nuclear structure, the initial conditions of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation and further quantum chromodynamic phenomena. The LHeC may be realised either as a ring-ring or as a linac-ring collider. Optics and beam dynamics studies are presented for both versions, along with technical design considerations on the interaction region, magnets and further components, together with a design study for a high acceptance detector. Civil engineering and installation studies are presented for the accelerator and the detector. The LHeC can be built within a decade and thus be operated while the LHC runs in its high-luminosity phase. It thus represents a major opportunity for progress in particle physics exploiting the investment made in the LHC.

  7. $J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ spectra in RHIC and LHC energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In a hydrodynamic model, we have studied $J/\\psi$ production in Au+Au/Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. At the initial time, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the fluid. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are dissolved if the local fluid temperature exceeds a threshold temperature $T_{J/\\psi}$. Sequential melting of charmonium states ($\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$), with melting temperatures $T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.2T_c$, $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2T_c$ and feed-down fraction $F\\approx 0.3$, explains the PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions. $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra and the nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions are also well explained in the model. The model however over predict centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions by 20-30%. The $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra are under predicted by 20-30%. The model predict that in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=5500 GeV, $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed by a factor of $\\sim$ 10. The model predicted $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ distribution in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC is similar to that in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

  8. Core-Corona Separation in Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Klaus [SUBATECH, University of Nantes-IN2P3/CNRS-EMN, Nantes 44000 (France)

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple geometrical considerations show that the collision zone in high energy nuclear collisions may be divided into a central part ('core'), with high energy densities, and a peripheral part ('corona'), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We present calculations that allow us to separate these two contributions, and which show that the corona contribution is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. We will discuss consequences concerning results obtained in heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Super Proton Synchrotron.

  9. Low Energy Nuclear Structure from Ultra-relativistic Heavy-Light Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Ruiz Arriola; Wojciech Broniowski

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for specific signals in ultra-relativistic heavy-light ion collisions addressing intrinsic geometric features of nuclei may open a new window to low energy nuclear structure. We discuss specifically the phenomenon of {\\alpha}-clustering in $^{12}$C when colliding with $^{208}$Pb at almost the speed of light.

  10. Jet and Leading Hadron Production in High-energy Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Nian Wang

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet tomography has become a powerful tool for the study of properties of dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. I will discuss recent progresses in the phenomenological study of jet quenching, including momentum, colliding energy and nuclear size dependence of single hadron suppression, modification of dihadron correlations and the soft hadron distribution associated with a quenched jet.

  11. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  13. A concept of the photon collider beam dump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Shekhtman; V. I. Telnov

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

  14. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

    2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  15. Ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  16. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

  17. TESLA*HERA Based gamma-p and gamma-A Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

    2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Main parameters and physics search potential of gamma-p and gamma-A colliders, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

  18. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here is devoted to research which I have done within the BRAHMS collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the period from January 1999 until October 2001. The Texas A&M group in the BRAHMS experiment is responsible...

  19. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  20. A Detector Scenario for the MuonCollider Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    : Meson Lab at Fermilab: Power Supplies (two floors) Cooling Apparatus Muon Beamline shielding shieldingA Detector Scenario for the Muon­Collider Cooling Experiment C. Lu, K.T. McDonald and E.J. Prebys the emittance of the muon beam to 3% accuracy before and after the muon cooling apparatus. 1 #12; Possible site

  1. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  2. Neutralinos in Vector Boson Fusion at High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin, Asher; Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovering dark matter at high energy colliders continues to be a compelling and well-motivated possibility. Weakly interacting massive particles are a particularly interesting class in which the dark matter particles interact with the standard model weak gauge bosons. Neutralinos are a prototypical example that arise in supersymmetric models. In the limit where all other superpartners are decoupled, it is known that for relic density motivated masses, the rates for neutralinos are too small to be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but that they may be large enough for a 100 TeV collider to observe. In this work we perform a careful study in the vector boson fusion channel for pure winos and pure higgsinos. We find that given a systematic uncertainty of 1% (5%), with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the LHC is sensitive to winos of 240 GeV (125 GeV) and higgsinos of 125 GeV (55 GeV). A future 100 TeV collider would be sensitive to winos of 1.1 TeV (750 GeV) and higgsinos of 530 GeV (180 GeV) with a 1% (5%) uncert...

  3. Pair Production of Tau Sneutrinos at Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Ari; O. Cakir

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pair production of tau sneutrinos in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions and their subsequent decays are studied in a framework of the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We present an analysis for the parameter space (BR vs. mass) which could be explored at the future high energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ colliders.

  4. Pb-Pb collisions at root s(NN)=2.76 TeV in a multiphase transport model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at ?sNN = 200 GeV from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This multiplicity density was reproduced by the HIJING2.0 model with a more modern set of parton distribution functions [5] and has helped to constrain the gluon shadowing parameter... in the model [6]. Furthermore, the elliptic flow in noncentral collisions was found to have values similar to those in collisions at RHIC energies [2]. According to Ref. [7] the similarity between the elliptic flows at LHC and RHIC is consistent...

  5. Higgs-boson production at the Photon Collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Niezurawski

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis feasibility of the precise measurement of the Higgs-boson production cross section gamma+gamma->higgs->b+bbar at the Photon Collider at TESLA is studied in detail. The study is based on the realistic luminosity spectra simulation. The heavy quark background is estimated using the dedicated code based on NLO QCD calculations. Other background processes, which were neglected in the earlier analyses, are also studied. Also the contribution from the overlaying events, gamma+gamma->hadrons, is taken into account. The non-zero beam crossing angle and the finite size of colliding bunches are included in the event generation. The analysis is based on the full detector simulation with realistic b-tagging, and the criteria of event selection are optimized separately for each considered Higgs-boson mass. For the Standard-Model Higgs boson with mass of 120 to 160 GeV the partial width \\Gamma(h->gamma+gamma)BR(h->b+bbar) can be measured with a statistical accuracy of 2.1-7.7% after one year of the Photon Collider running. The systematic uncertainties of the measurement are estimated to be of the order of 2%. For MSSM Higgs bosons A and H, for M_A=200-350 GeV and tan(beta)=7, the statistical precision of the cross-section measurement is estimated to be 8--34%, for four considered MSSM parameters sets. As heavy neutral Higgs bosons in this scenario may not be discovered at LHC or at the first stage of the e+e- collider, an opportunity of being a discovery machine is also studied for the Photon Collider.

  6. Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

    1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

  7. Nuclear shadowing and prompt photons at relativistic hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Brenner Mariotto; V. P. Goncalves

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of prompt photons at high energies provides a direct probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions. In particular, one expect that it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions. In this letter we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of prompt photons and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ at RHIC and LHC energies. We demonstrate that the study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution.

  8. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  9. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  10. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  11. Quarkonia Disintegration due to time dependence of the $q \\bar{q}$ potential in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Bagchi; Ajit M. Srivastava

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid thermalization in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions leads to fast changing potential between a heavy quark and antiquark from zero temperature potential to the finite temperature one. Time dependent perturbation theory can then be used to calculate the survival probability of the initial quarkonium state. In view of very short time scales of thermalization at RHIC and LHC energies, we calculate the survival probability of $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ using sudden approximation. Our results show that quarkonium decay may be significant even when temperature of QGP remains low enough so that the conventional quarkonium melting due to Debye screening is ineffective.

  12. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  13. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  14. Heavy Ion Event Displays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

  15. Direct photon production of d+A and A+A collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Benwei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vitev, Ivan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct photon productions in minimum bias d+Cu and d+Au and central Cu+Cu and Au+Au at center of mass energies {radical}s = 62.4 GeV and 200GeV at RHIC are investigated systematically by taking into account jet quenching effect, medium-induced photon bremsstrahlung and jet-photon conversion in the hot QGP as well as known cold nuclear matter effects such as the isospin effect, the Cronin effect, shadowing effect, EMC effect and cold nuclear matter energy loss. It is shown that at high p{sub T} the nuclear modification factor for direct photon R{sub AA}(p{sub T}) is suppressed and dominated by cold nuclear matter effects, and there is no large enhancement due to medium-induced photon bremsstrahlung and jet-photon conversion in the hot QGP. Comparison of numerical simulations with experimental data rules out large Cronin enhancement and incoherent photon emission in medium, though large error bars in currently experimental data can not provide tight constraints on other nuclear matter effects.

  16. Soft vs Hard: Particle Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Aditya Nath; Pareek, Pooja; Behera, Nirbhay K; Sahoo, Raghunath; Nandi, Basanta K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of pseudorapidity density of charged particles and transverse energy is studied for a wide range of collision energies for heavy-ion collisions at midrapidity. A two-component model approach has been adopted to quantify the soft and hard components of particle production, coming from nucleon participants and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, respectively. Within experimental uncertainties, the hard component contributing to the particle production has been found to be nearly independent of collisions energy from RHIC to LHC. The suppression of high-$p_{\\rm T}$ hadrons and jets in the medium created in heavy-ion collisions seem to play a role in the nearly independent collision energy behavior of hard components in particle production. We also use MC event generators, like HIJING and AMPT to study the possible effects of the suppression of high $p_{T}$ partons inside the medium and the effect of the threshold momentum for minijets, contributing to hard scattering processes.

  17. Net-charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions at chemical freeze-out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore net charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The distributions for strangeness, electric charge and baryon number are derived. We show that, within this model, net charge probability distributions and the resulting fluctuations can be computed directly from the measured yields of charged and multi-charged hadrons. The influence of multi-charged particles and quantum statistics on the shape of the distribution is examined. We discuss the properties of the net proton distribution along the chemical freeze-out line. The model results presented here can be compared with data at RHIC energies and at the LHC to possibly search for the relation between chemical freeze-out and QCD cross-over lines in heavy ion collisions.

  18. Anisotropic flow in Cu plus Au collisions at root s(N N)=200GeV RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compressedmatter formed in noncentral heavy-ion collisions [2,3] and is sensitive to the properties of producedmatter in these collisions. For heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), it has been shown that this sensitivity exists...AGeV at RHIC. Use is made of both the default version and the version with string melting, that is, a version allowing hadrons that are expected to be formed from initial strings to convert to their valence quarks and antiquarks [10...

  19. Tomography of a quark gluon plasma at RHIC and LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Gossiaux; R. Bierkandt; J. Aichelin

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently published model for the collisional energy loss of heavy quarks (Q) in a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) with a running coupling constant, we study the interaction between heavy quarks and plasma particles in detail. We discuss correlations between the simultaneously produced $c$ and $\\bar{c}$ quarks, study how central collisions can be experimentally selected, predict observable correlations and extend our model to the energy domain of the large hadron collider (LHC). We finally compare the predictions of our model with that of other approaches like AdS/CFT.

  20. Direct searches of extra Higgs boson at future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study direct searches of additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC with the collision energy of 14 TeV as well as the International Linear Collider (ILC) with the collision energy of 1 TeV. As a benchmark model, we consider two Higgs doublet models with a softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetry, where the $t\\bar t$ decay mode of additional neutral Higgs bosons can be dominant if their masses are heavy enough. Thus, the multi-top-quarks events become an important probe of the extended Higgs sector at future colliders. We estimate the discovery reach at the LHC and the ILC, and find that the search at the ILC can survey the parameter regions where the LHC cannot cover.

  1. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  2. Two-dimensional AMR simulations of colliding flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niklaus, Markus; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colliding flows are a commonly used scenario for the formation of molecular clouds in numerical simulations. Due to the thermal instability of the warm neutral medium, turbulence is produced by cooling. We carry out a two-dimensional numerical study of such colliding flows in order to test whether statistical properties inferred from adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations are robust with respect to the applied refinement criteria. We compare probability density functions of various quantities as well as the clump statistics and fractal dimension of the density fields in AMR simulations to a static-grid simulation. The static grid with 2048^2 cells matches the resolution of the most refined subgrids in the AMR simulations. The density statistics is reproduced fairly well by AMR. Refinement criteria based on the cooling time or the turbulence intensity appear to be superior to the standard technique of refinement by overdensity. Nevertheless, substantial differences in the flow structure become apparent. In...

  3. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  4. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  5. Centrality dependence of charged hadron and strange hadron elliptic flow from root s(NN)=200 GeVAu+Au collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. -R Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, R.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Lgo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Tratmer, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present STAR results on the elliptic flow upsilon(2) Of charged hadrons, strange and multistrange particles from,root s(NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The detailed study of the centrality...

  6. In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Liaoyuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the major mid-rapidity tracking devices of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) plays an important role in measuring trajectory and energy of high energy charged particles...

  7. Pion interferometry in Au plus Au and Cu plus Cu collisions at s(NN)=62.4 and 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Walker, M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at s(NN)=62.4 GeV and Cu+Cu collisions at s(NN)=62.4 and 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiplicity and transverse...

  8. END-TO-END SIMULATIONS FOR THE EBIS PREINJECTOR* D. Raparia#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Frankfurt/Main, Germany Abstract The EBIS Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the second year Collider (RHIC), and for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The preinjector will provide all ions, and intensities of ~2.0 mA. End-to-end simulations (from EBIS to the Booster injection) as well as error

  9. Experimental studies of di-jet survival and surface emission bias in Au plus Au collisions via angular correlations with respect to back-to-back leading hadrons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agakishiev, H.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tribedy, P.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report first results from an analysis based on a new multi-hadron correlation technique, exploring jet-medium interactions and di-jet surface emission bias at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Pairs of back-to-back high...

  10. In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Liaoyuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the major mid-rapidity tracking devices of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) plays an important role in measuring trajectory and energy of high energy charged particles...

  11. 90-50-10 Celebration: Ernest Courant

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ernest Courant

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL hosts a celebration titled ?90-50-10? to celebrate the 90th birthday of Ernest Courant (of ?strong focusing? fame), the 50th anniversary of the startup of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS, home of three Nobel Prizes), and the 10th anniversary of first collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  12. APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTA-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Liability Act CH Chicago CLP Contract Laboratory Protocol CO Certificates to Operate CSF Central Steam&M Operation and Maintenance OU Operable Unit ORPS Occurrence Reporting Processing System P2 Pollution and Recovery Act RI/FS Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study RHIC Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ROD Record

  13. Community Advisory Council February 14, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) in Virginia was recently upgraded, RHIC (Relativistic Heavy facilities were marked to either continue operations, be upgraded, or to be designed and built. CEBAF Ion Collider) at BNL is operating, and FRIB (Facility for Rare Isotope Beams) in Michigan

  14. nature physics | VOL 3 | NOVEMBER 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 753 research hIGhLIGhTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    the reach of current, and also next- generation, nuclear research facilities. Estimated losses Phys's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) also includes a heavy-ion programme: part of its running time will be given, and now R. Bruce and colleagues have used RHIC data to check on a likely mechanism of beam loss in the LHC

  15. Searches For New Physics with High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Sauvan

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results of searches for new phenomena performed at high energy colliders are reviewed. The results reported are based on data samples of up to 1 fb^-1 and 4 fb^-1 collected at HERA and at the Tevatron, respectively. No significant evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been found and limits at the 95% confidence level have been set on the mass and couplings of several possible new particles.

  16. Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

  17. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  18. Testing the noncommutative standard model at a future photon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohl, Thorsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics to noncommutative geometries have been proposed as a low-energy limit of string models. Independent of this motivation, one may consider such a model as an effective field theory with higher-dimensional operators containing an antisymmetric rank-two background field. We study the signals of such a Noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM) and analyze the discovery potential of a future photon collider, considering angular distributions in fermion pair production.

  19. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb{sup {minus}1} at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production.

  20. FNAL Booster intensity, extraction, and synchronization control for collider operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ducar, R.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Tawzer, S.R.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz machine cycle rate. In addition to the normal Booster single turn extraction mode, collider operations require that the Booster inject into the Main Ring a small number of beam bunches for coalescing into a single high intensity bunch. These bunches must be synchronized such that the center bunch arrives in the RF bucket which corresponds to the zero phase of the coalescing cavity. The system implemented has the ability to deliver a precise fraction of the available 84 Booster beam bunches to Main Ring or to the P-Bar Debuncher via the newly installed AP-4 beam line for tune-up and studies. It is required that all of the various intensity and extraction scenarios be accommodated with minimal operator intervention.