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1

Interaction region design for a RHIC-based medium-energy electron-ion collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a first step in a staged approach towards a RHIC-based electron-ion collider, installation of a 4 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) in one of the RHIC interaction regions is currently under investigation. To minimize costs, the interaction region of this collider has to use the present RHIC magnets for focusing of the high-energy ion beam. Meanwhile, electron low-beta focusing needs to be added in the limited space available between the existing separator dipoles. We discuss the challenges and present the current design status of this e-A interaction region.

Montag,C.; Beebe-Wang, J.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ion Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Fischer, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Five Years of Tracking Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five years have passed since the first collisions of Au nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on Long Island. With nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies of up to sqrt(s_NN)=200GeV RHIC provides the highest energy heavy ion collisions at any existing collider. To study the dynamics of nuclear matter at extreme temperatures and pressures hundreds of produced particles need to be tracked and identified, which provides a sizable challenge to the four experiments. This article tries to summarize these first years of RHIC operation from the detector point of view and give a glimpse at the future of the accelerator and its experiments.

A. Franz

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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8

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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9

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

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10

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality Assurance Is AQuiet magnet

11

SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2007 RUN WITH GOLD IONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold ions for the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of this chain of accelerators is reviewed with a focus on improvements in the quality of beam delivered to RHIC. In particular, more uniform stripping foils between Booster and AGS7 and a new bunch merging scheme in AGS have provided beam bunches with reduced longitudinal emittance for RHIC.

GARDNER,C.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BENJAMIN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Colliding Nuclei at High Energy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Emerging QCD Frontier: The Electron Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The self-interactions of gluons determine all the unique features of QCD and lead to a dominant abundance of gluons inside matter already at moderate $x$. Despite their dominant role, the properties of gluons remain largely unexplored. Tantalizing hints of saturated gluon densities have been found in $e$+p collisions at HERA, and in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Saturation physics will have a profound influence on heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. But unveiling the collective behavior of dense assemblies of gluons under conditions where their self-interactions dominate will require an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC): a new facility with capabilities well beyond those In this paper I outline the compelling physics case for $e$+A collisions at an EIC and discuss briefly the status of machine design concepts. of any existing accelerator.

Thomas Ullrich

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

RHIC - Exploring the Universe Within  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. What physicists learn from these collisions may help us understand more about why the physical world works the way it does, from the smallest subatomic particles, to the largest stars.

BNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (431st Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the celebration of Brookhaven Lab's 60th anniversary, Robert P. Crease, the Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University and BNL's historian, will present the second of two talks on the Lab's history. In "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," Dr. Crease will focus on the creation of the world's most powerful colliding accelerator for nuclear physics. Known as RHIC, the collider, as Dr. Crease will recount, was formally proposed in 1984, received initial construction funding from the U.S. Department of Energy in 1991, and started operating in 2000. In 2005, the discovery at RHIC of the world's most perfect liquid, a state of matter that last existed just moments after the Big Bang, was announced, and, since then, this perfect liquid of quarks and gluons has been the subject of intense study.

Crease, Robert P. (Ph.D, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University) [Ph.D, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Executive Summary Understanding the glue that binds us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Physics Possibilities at the Intensity Frontier . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1 charge. This causes the gluons to interact with each other, generating nearly all the mass of the nucleon

Homes, Christopher C.

22

Future of Jets, Heavy Flavor, and EM Probes at RHIC and RHIC II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exciting results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have been presented at this Workshop. However, fundamental questions remain to be addressed in the future regarding whether the system is deconfined, chiral symmetry is restored, a color glass condensate exists in the initial state, and how the system evolves through eventual hadronization. Jets, heavy flavors and electromagnetic probes are sensitive to the initial high density stage of RHIC collisions, and should provide new insight. Significant additional capabilities will be added with a luminosity upgrade of RHIC (to RHIC II), upgrades of present detectors and a possible, new comprehensive detector at RHIC II.

John W. Harris

2005-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au + Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p + p, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au + Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

STAR Coll

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

RHIC | Physics of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlackA NewThe

26

Hydrodynamics at RHIC -- how well does it work, where and how does it break down?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the successes and limitations of the ideal fluid dynamic model in describing hadron emission spectra from Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

Ulrich W. Heinz

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Breakthrough: RHIC Explores Matter at the Dawn of Time  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Physicist Paul Sorensen describes discoveries made at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. At RHIC, scientists from around the world study what the universe may have looked like in the first microseconds after its birth, helping us to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does -- from the smallest particles to the largest stars.

Paul Sorensen

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier - Understanding the glue that binds us all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the U.S., established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.

A. Accardi; J. L. Albacete; M. Anselmino; N. Armesto; E. C. Aschenauer; A. Bacchetta; D. Boer; W. K. Brooks; T. Burton; N. -B. Chang; W. -T. Deng; A. Deshpande; M. Diehl; A. Dumitru; R. Dupré; R. Ent; S. Fazio; H. Gao; V. Guzey; H. Hakobyan; Y. Hao; D. Hasch; R. Holt; T. Horn; M. Huang; A. Hutton; C. Hyde; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Klein; B. Kopeliovich; Y. Kovchegov; K. Kumar; K. Kumeri?ki; M. A. C. Lamont; T. Lappi; J. -H. Lee; Y. Lee; E. M. Levin; F. -L. Lin; V. Litvinenko; T. W. Ludlam; C. Marquet; Z. -E. Meziani; R. McKeown; A. Metz; R. Milner; V. S. Morozov; A. H. Mueller; B. Müller; D. Müller; P. Nadel-Turonski; H. Paukkunen; A. Prokudin; V. Ptitsyn; X. Qian; J. -W. Qiu; M. Ramsey-Musolf; T. Roser; F. Sabatié; R. Sassot; G. Schnell; P. Schweitzer; E. Sichtermann; M. Stratmann; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Taneja; T. Toll; D. Trbojevic; T. Ullrich; R. Venugopalan; S. Vigdor; W. Vogelsang; C. Weiss; B. -W. Xiao; F. Yuan; Y. -H. Zhang; L. Zheng

2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Alternate Ring-Ring Design for eRHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present here a new ring-ring design of eRHIC, a polarized electron-ion collider based on RHIC at BNL. This alternate eRHIC design utilizes high repetition rate colliding beams and is likely able to deliver the performance to meet the requirements of the science program with low technical risk and modest accelerator R&D. The expected performance includes high luminosities over multiple collision points and a broad CM energy range with a maximum value up to 2x10^34 cm-2s-1 per detector, and polarization higher than 70% for the colliding electron and light ion beams. This new design calls for reuse of decommissioned facilities in the US, namely, the PEP-II high energy ring and one section of the SLAC warm linac as a full energy electron injector.

Zhang, Yuhong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electromagnetic Probes at RHIC-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarize how future measurements of electromagnetic (e.m.) probes at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), in connection with theoretical analysis, can advance our understanding of strongly interacting matter at high energy densities and temperatures. After a brief survey of the important role that e.m. probes data have played at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, CERN) and RHIC to date, we identify key physics objectives and observables that remain to be addressed to characterize the (strongly interacting) Quark-Gluon Plasma (sQGP) and associated transition properties at RHIC. These include medium modifications of vector mesons via low-mass dileptons, a temperature measurement of the hot phases via continuum radiation, as well as gamma-gamma correlations to characterize early source sizes. We outline strategies to establish microscopic matter and transition properties such as the number of degrees of freedom in the sQGP, the origin of the hadron masses and manifestations of chiral symmetry restoration, which will require accompanying but rather well-defined advances in theory. Increased experimental precision, order of magnitude higher statistics than currently achievable, as well as a detailed scan of colliding species and energies are then mandatory to achieve sufficient discrimination power in theoretical interpretations. This increased precision can be achieved with hardware upgrades to the large RHIC detectors (PHENIX and STAR) along with at least a factor of ten as increase in luminosity over the next few years as envisioned for RHIC-II.

G. David; R. Rapp; Z. Xu

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Opportunities for Drell-Yan Physics at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drell-Yan (DY) physics gives the unique opportunity to study the parton structure of nucleons in an experimentally and theoretically clean way. With the availability of polarized proton-proton collisions and asymmetric d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have the basic (and unique in the world) tools to address several fundamental questions in QCD, including the expected gluon saturation at low partonic momenta and the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. A Drell-Yan program at RHIC is tied closely to the core physics questions of a possible future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. The more than 80 participants of this workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment, trying to address imminent questions for the near and mid-term future.

Aschenauer, E.; Bland, L.; Crawford, H.; Goto, Y.; Eyser, O.; Kang, Z.; Vossen, A.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

DESCRIPTION OF THE RHIC SEQUENCER SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The movement of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) through its various states (eg. injection, acceleration, storage, collisions) is controlled by an application called the Sequencer. This program orchestrates most magnet and instrumentation systems and is responsible for the coordinated acquisition and saving of data from various systems. The Sequencer system, its software infrastructure, support programs, and the language used to drive it are discussed in this paper. Initial operational experience is also described.

DOTTAVIO,T.; FRAK,B.; MORRIS,J.; SATOGATA,T.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Workshop on the RHIC performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given.

Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

RHIC stochastic cooling motion control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order>_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass>~;;30 GeV/c2.

Ritter, Ha

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Future of Hard and Electromagnetic Probes at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential near- and long-term physics opportunities with jets, heavy flavors and electromagnetic probes at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. Much new physics remains to be unveiled using these probes, due to their sensitivity to the initial high density stage of RHIC collisions, when quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation is expected. Additional physics will include addressing deconfinement, chiral symmetry restoration, properties of the strongly-coupled QGP and a possible weakly-interacting QGP, color glass condensate in the initial state, and hadronization. To fully realize the physics prospects of the RHIC energy regime, new detector components must be added to existing experiments, the RHIC machine luminosity upgraded, and a possible new detector with significantly extended coverage and capabilities added.

John W. Harris

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR CONCURRENT OPERATION OF RHIC AND BLIP.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Brookhaven 200MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP (Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer), a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity currents are detected.

WILINSKI, M.; BELLAVIA, S.; GLENN, J.W.; MAUSNER, L.F.; UNGER, K.L.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

The role of Spectator Fragments at an electron Ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient detection of spectator fragments is key to the main topics at an electron-ion collider (eIC). Any process which leads to emission of fragments or $\\gamma$'s breaks coherence in diffractive processes. Therefore this is equivalent to non-detection of rapidity gaps in pp collisions. For example, in coherent photoproduction of vector mesons their 4-momentum transfer distribution would image the "gluon charge" in the nucleus in the same way that Hofstadter measured its charge structure using elastic scattering of $\\sim$100 MeV electrons. Whereas he could measure the $\\sim$4 MeV energy loss by the electron due to excitation of nuclear energy levels (Figure 1), even the energy spread of the incident beam would prevent such an inclusive selection of quasielastic events at an eIC. The only available tool is fragment detection. Since, in our example, one finds that $\\sim100$ of deexcitations go through $\\gamma$'s or 1 neutron, rarely to 2 neutron and never to protons(due to Coulomb barrier suppression), the eIC design should emphasize their detection.

Sebastian White; Mark Strikman

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

Spencer R. Klein

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

Strongly interacting matter at RHIC: experimental highlights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experimental results obtained at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be discussed. Investigations of different nucleus-nucleus collisions in recent years focus on two main tasks, namely, the detailed study of sQGP properties and the exploration of the QCD phase diagram. Results at top RHIC energy provide important information about event shapes as well as transport and thermodynamic properties of the hot medium for various flavors. Heavy-ion collisions are a unique tool for the study of topological properties of theory. Experimental results obtained for discrete QCD symmetries at finite temperatures are discussed. These results confirm indirectly the topologically non-trivial structure of the QCD vacuum. Most results obtained during phase-I of the RHIC beam energy scan (BES) program show smooth behavior vs initial energy. However, certain results suggest the transition in the domain of dominance of hadronic degrees of freedom at center-of-mass energies between 10-20 GeV. Future developments and more precise studies of features of the QCD phase diagram in the framework of phase-II of RHIC BES will be briefly discussed.

V. A. Okorokov

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Design of High Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron- Light Ion Collider at CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

Slawomir Bogacz; Antje Bruell; Jean Delayen; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolf Ent; Joseph Grames; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Byung Yunn; Yuhong Zhang; C Montag

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman, 1960Real Property Management IntegratedReference

45

Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

Kondratenko, Anatoliy [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Filatov, Yury [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kondratenko, M. A. [Scientific and Technical Laboratory Zaryad, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electron-Ion Collider - taking us to the next QCD frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I demonstrate that the proposed Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be an ideal and unique future facility to address many overarching questions about QCD and strong interaction physics at one place. The EIC will be the world's first polarized electron-proton (and light ion), as well as the first electron-nucleus collider at flexible collision energies. With its high luminosity and beam polarization, the EIC distinguishes itself from HERA and the other fixed target electron-hadron facilities around the world. The EIC is capable of taking us to the next QCD frontier to explore the glue that binds us all.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Gatling gun: high average polarized current injector for eRHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This idea was originally developed in 2001 for, at that time, an ERL-based (and later recirculating-ring) electron-ion collider at JLab. Naturally the same idea is applicable for any gun requiring current exceeding capability of a single cathode. ERL-based eRHIC is one of such cases. This note related to eRHIC was prepared at Duke University in February 2003. In many case photo-injectors can have a limited average current - it is especially true about polarized photo-guns. It is know that e-RHIC requires average polarized electron current well above currently demonstrated by photo-injectors - hence combining currents from multiple guns is can be useful option for eRHIC.

Litvinenko, V.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF linac will serve as a full-energy injector, and, if needed, provide top

Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pre-Town Meeting on Spin Physics at an Electron-Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A polarized $ep/eA$ collider (Electron--Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center--of--mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\sim 20$ to $\\sim100$~GeV (upgradable to $\\sim 150$ GeV) and a luminosity up to $\\sim 10^{34} \\, \\textrm{cm}^{-2} \\textrm{s}^{-1}$, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three--dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini--review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper~\\cite{Accardi:2012qut}.

Elke-Caroline Aschenauer; Ian Balitsky; Leslie Bland; Stanley J. Brodsky; Matthias Burkardt; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Abhay Deshpande; Markus Diehl; Leonard Gamberg; Matthias Grosse Perdekamp; Jin Huang; Charles Hyde; Xiangdong Ji; Xiaodong Jiang; Zhong-Bo Kang; Valery Kubarovsky; John Lajoie; Keh-Fei Liu; Ming Liu; Simonetta Liuti; Wally Melnitchouk; Piet Mulders; Alexei Prokudin; Andrey Tarasov; Jian-Wei Qiu; Anatoly Radyushkin; David Richards; Ernst Sichtermann; Marco Stratmann; Werner Vogelsang; Feng Yuan

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

Not Available

1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: From RHIC to LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, RHIC to LHC energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behaviour when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, $\\frac{dE_{\\rm{T}}/d\\eta}{dN_{\\rm{ch}}/d\\eta} ~\\equiv \\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$) at mid-rapidity for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.5$ TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of $\\frac{E_{\\rm{T}}}{N_{\\rm{ch}}}$.

Raghunath Sahoo; Aditya Nath Mishra

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Sun,22 Y. Sun,38 Z. Sun,21 B. Surrow,23 T. J. M. Symons,22 A. Szanto de Toledo,37 J. Takahashi,7 A. H. Tang,3 Z. Tang,38 T. Tarnowsky,33 D. Thein,42 J. H. Thomas,22 J. Tian,39 A. R. Timmins,2 S. Timoshenko,26 Tlusty ,11 M. Tokarev,12 T. A. Trainor,48...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Forward hadron production in ultraperipheral proton-heavy-ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss hadron production in the forward rapidity region in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at the LHC and proton-gold collisions at RHIC. Our discussion is based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions of virtual photons emitted by a fast moving nucleus with a proton beam. We simulate the virtual photon flux with the STARLIGHT event generator and then particle production with the SOPHIA, DPMJET, and PYTHIA event generators. We show the rapidity distributions of charged and neutral particles, and the momentum distributions of neutral pions and neutrons at forward rapidities. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, we find large cross sections of ultraperipheral collisions for particle production especially in the very forward region, leading to substantial background contributions to investigations of collective nuclear effects and spin physics. Finally we can distinguish between proton-nucleus inelastic interactions and ultraperipheral collisions with additional requirements of either ...

Mitsuka, Gaku

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Latest Results from BNL and RHIC--2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A selection of results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from 2012 to 2013 is presented together with a few newsworthy developments in this period. The move of the g-2 magnet from BNL to Fermilab for the "fifth muon g-2 experiment" inspired a brief discussion of the original g-2 experiments at CERN. Highlights of the past year include a change in the measurement of the suppression of large transverse momentum ($p_T$) particles in the Quark Gluon Plasma to a measure of the fractional shift in the observed $p_T$ spectrum from the expected A+A spectrum for independent collisions as an estimate of the energy loss in the medium. The p+Pb run at LHC in early 2013 spurred new or improved measurements in d+Au at RHIC which included the observation of elliptical flow in d+Au collisions and measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy which demonstrated that constituent quarks are the fundamental element of particle production in all 3 systems. Measurements of identified hadrons in d+Au show a huge Cronin effect for protons but no effect for mesons. An important step for the future was the acquisition by BNL of the superconducting solenoid used in the BABAR experiment at SLAC for use in future experiments at RHIC and possibly eRHIC, starting with an upgrade of the PHENIX experiment called sPHENIX.

M. J. Tannenbaum

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Forward hadron production in ultraperipheral proton-heavy-ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss hadron production in the forward rapidity region in ultraperipheral proton-lead collisions at the LHC and proton-gold collisions at RHIC. Our discussion is based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions of virtual photons emitted by a fast moving nucleus with a proton beam. We simulate the virtual photon flux with the STARLIGHT event generator and then particle production with the SOPHIA, DPMJET, and PYTHIA event generators. We show the rapidity distributions of charged and neutral particles, and the momentum distributions of neutral pions and neutrons at forward rapidities. According to the Monte Carlo simulations, we find large cross sections of ultraperipheral collisions for particle production especially in the very forward region, leading to substantial background contributions to investigations of collective nuclear effects and spin physics. Finally we can distinguish between proton-nucleus inelastic interactions and ultraperipheral collisions with additional requirements of either of the charged particles at midrapidity and a certain level of activities at negative forward rapidity.

Gaku Mitsuka

2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

STAR Highlights on Heavy Ion Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RHIC-STAR is a mid-rapidity collider experiment for studying high energy nuclear collisions. The main physics goals of STAR experiment are 1) studying the properties of the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, 2) explore the QCD phase diagram structure. In these proceedings, we will review the recent results of heavy ion physics at STAR.

Shusu Shi

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Concepts for ELIC - A High Luminosity CEBAF Based Electron-Light Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CEBAF accelerator based electron-light ion collider (ELIC) of rest mass energy from 20 to 65 GeV and luminosity from 10^33 to 10^35 cm6-2s^-1 with both beams polarized is envisioned as a future upgrade to CEBAF. A two step upgrade scenario is under study: CEBAF accelerator-ring-ring scheme (CRR) as the first step, and a multi-turn ERL-ring as the second step, to attain a better electron emittance and maximum luminosity. In this paper we report results of our studies of the CRR version of ELIC.

Ya. Derbenev, A. Bogacz, G. Krafft, R. Li, L. Merminga, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Has the QCD Critical Point Been Signaled by Observations at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ({eta}/s) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ({radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV). A very low value is found; {eta}/s{approx}0.1, which is close to the conjectured lower bound (1/4{pi}). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Lacey, Roy A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Chung, P.; Holzmann, W. G.; Issah, M.; Taranenko, A. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Danielewicz, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Stoecker, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet D60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tests of an RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity for an Electron-Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the scheme of developing a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab, we have designed a compact superconducting rf dipole cavity at 750 MHz to crab both electron and ion bunches and increase luminosities at the interaction points (IP) of the machine. Following the design optimization and characterization of the electromagnetic properties such as peak surface fields and shunt impedance, along with field nonuniformities, multipole components content, higher order modes (HOM) and multipacting, a prototype cavity was built by Niowave Inc. The 750 MHz prototype crab cavity has been tested at 4 K and is ready for re-testing at 4 K and 2 K at Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the detailed results of the rf tests performed on the 750 MHz crab cavity prototype.

Castilla Loeza, Alejandro [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive scattering probabilities are small, and any integrated detector/interaction region design needs to provide uniform coverage to detect spectator and diffractive products. This is because e-p and even more e-A colliders have a large fraction of their science related to what happens to the nucleon or ion beams. As a result, the philosophy of integration of complex detectors into an extended interaction region faces challenging constraints. Designs feature crossing angles between the protons or heavy ions during collisions with electrons, to remove potential problems for the detector induced by synchrotron radiation. Designs allocate quite some detector space before the final-focus ion quads, at the cost of luminosity, given that uniform detection coverage is a must for deep exclusive and diffractive processes. The integrated EIC detector/interaction region design at JLab focused on establishing full acceptance for such processes over a wide range of proton energies (20-100 GeV) with well achievable interaction region magnets. The detector design at BNL uses the higher ion beam energies to achieve good detection efficiency for instance for protons following a DVCS reaction, for proton beam energies starting from 100 GeV. Following a recommendation of the 2007 US Nuclear Science Long-Range Planning effort, the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics (DOE/NP) has allocated accelerator R&D funds to lay the foundation for a polarized EIC. BNL, in association with JLab and DOE/NP, has also established a generic detector R&D program to address the scientific requirements for measurements at a future EIC.

Rolf Ent

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Global Observables at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main characteristics of the charged particle dN_ch/deta and transverse energy dE_T/deta production measured in Heavy Ion collisions at RHIC energies are presented in this article. Transformation of the pseudo-rapidity shape, relation to the incident energy and centrality profile are described in a systematic way. Centrality profile is shown to be closely bound to the number of nucleons participating in the collisions, at the same time an alternative approach to study the centrality behavior is also discussed.

A. Milov

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Bound-free pair production cross section in heavy-ion colliders from the equivalent photon approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact calculations of the electron-positron pair production by a single photon in the Coulomb field of a nucleus with simultaneous capture of the electron into the K-shell are discussed for different nuclear charges. Using the equivalent photon method of Weizsaecker and Williams, a simple expression for the bound-free production of electron-positron pairs by colliding very-high-energy fully stripped heavy ions is derived for nuclei of arbitrary charge.

Andreas Aste

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Higher moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at RHIC energies in STAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the higher order moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions for the Au+Au collisions at \\sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV in the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The energy and centrality dependence of higher moments and their products (such as $\\sigma^2/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are presented. The data are also compared to Poisson expectations and Hadron Resonance Gas model calculations.

Nihar Ranjan Sahoo; for the STAR Collaboration

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Finally the ZDCs should be able to withstand a radiation dose of 10s rad. , which is the expected exposure during several years of RHIC operation. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is not a particularly radiation tolerant plastic. It is known to lose... material (PMMA plastic). In order to rnaxinuze effectiveness of light collection by fibers whole sandwich-like con- struction is tilted at 45 angle. The ZDCs are segmented longitudmally into the three modules, each 2 nuclear lengths thick...

Makeev, Andrei

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC Hideki Hamagaki Center for Nuclear Study University of Tokyo #12;2/10/2005 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ICPAQGP 05 Hideki Hamagaki 2 Prologue · EM probe and where they are produced; #12;2/10/2005 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ICPAQGP 05 Hideki Hamagaki

Hamagaki, Hideki

73

Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC Hideki Hamagaki Center for Nuclear Study Graduate School of Science the University of Tokyo #12;2006/06/29 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ATHIC 2006 Hideki;2006/06/29 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ATHIC 2006 Hideki Hamagaki 3 Prologue ­ scope of EM measurements · EM

Hamagaki, Hideki

74

ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recent Results from RHIC&Some Lessons for Cosmic-RayPhysicists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) studies nuclear matter under a variety of conditions. Cold nuclear matter is probed with deuteron-gold collisions, while hot nuclear matter (possibly a quark-gluon plasma (QGP)) is created in heavy-ion collisions. The distribution of spin in polarized nucleons is measured with polarized proton collisions, and photoproduction is studied using the photons that accompany heavy nuclei. The deuteron-gold data shows less forward particle production than would be expected from a superposition of pp collisions, as expected due to saturation/shadowing. Particle production in AA collisions is well described by a model of an expanding fireball in thermal equilibrium. Strong hydrodynamic flow and jet quenching shows that the produced matter interacts very strongly. These phenomena are consistent with new non-perturbative interactions near the transition temperature to the QGP. This report discusses these results, and their implications for cosmic-ray physicists.

Klein, Spencer R.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evolution of event-by-event ET fluctuations over collision centrality in RHIC interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented for two analyses of transverse energy (ET) production measured with the electromagnetic calorimeters (EMC) of the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment (PHENIX), in relativistic nuclear interactions in Au+Au heavy-ion collisions created by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Event-by-event ET distributions made across collision centrality were used in (1) measurements of 200 GeV , and (2) measurements of 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV ET distribution relative fluctuations {sigma}/ and {sigma}2/, where {sigma} is the standard deviation, and {sigma}2 the variance of each semi-inclusive distribution. Event centrality was selected in 5% wide bins and each bin represented by a modeled mean number of participant nucleons .

Armendariz, Raul [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

STAR Coll

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

July 25, 2006 RHIC Stochastic Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abandoned at SppS and Tevatron) ­ Not part of RHIC base line design #12;July 25, 2006 Heavy ions should before (red) and after (blue) cooling, Wall Current Monitor Schottky spectrum before cooling: blue trace "hot" beam best ·Good for counteracting IBS ·Effective for tails of distribution ·E-cooling cools "cold

80

A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Soft Physics from RHIC to LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RHIC program was intended to identify and study the quark-gluon plasma formed in the collision of heavy nuclei. The discovery of the "perfect liquid" is an essential step towards the understanding of the medium formed in these collisions. Much of data relevant to this was provided by the study of "soft" observables, which involve many particles of low momentum produced in nearly every event, rather than high momentum particles produced in rare events. The main results related to soft physics at RHIC are discussed, as well as their implications for the physics of the LHC heavy ion program.

Peter Steinberg

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

Open heavy flavor production at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is an extreme experimental challenge but provides important information on the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Heavy-quarks are believed to be produced in the initial stages of the collision, and are essential on the understanding of parton energy loss in the dense medium created in such environment. Moreover, heavy-quarks can help to investigate fundamental properties of QCD in elementary p+p collisions. In this work we review recent results on heavy flavor production and their interaction with the hot and dense medium at RHIC.

A. A. P. Suaide

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical background for the search of the CEP using observables related to fluctuations and correlations. While new data are pouring in from the RHIC low energy scan program, many recent advances have also been made in the phenomenological and lattice gauge theory sides in order to have a better theoretical understanding of the wealth of new data. This workshop tried to create a synergy between the experimental, phenomenological and lattice QCD aspects of the fluctuation and correlation related studies of the RHIC low energy scan program. The workshop brought together all the leading experts from related fields under the same forum to share new ideas among themselves in order to streamline the continuing search of CEP in the RHIC low energy scan program.

Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto [Collider Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

85

RHIC progress and future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

Montag,C.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND WORKSHOP ON EXPERIMENTS AND DETECTORS FOR A RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC), LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, MAY 25-29, 1987  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.1 seconds per track on a VAX 780, approximately linear into approximately 500 x VAX 780 speed (roughly a kiloVAX)coupled by Ethernet to a VAX online computer as. part of its

Ritter, Hans Georg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in ?S[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous experimental results based on data (?15 × 10[superscript 6] events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to ...

Balewski, Jan T.

88

The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electromagnetic interactions at RHIC and LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At LHC energies the Lorentz factor will be 3400 for the Pb + Pb collisions and the electromagnetic interactions will play important roles. Cross sections for the electromagnetic particle productions are very large and can not be ignored for the lifetimes of the beams and background. In this article, we are going to study some of the electromagnetic processes at RHIC and LHC and show the cross section calculations of the electron-positron pair production with the giant dipole resonance of the ions.

M. C. Guclu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenterandGasAlternating Gradient Synchrotron

91

X-Ray Entangled Photon Production in Collisions of Laser Beams with Relativistic Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is suggested to produce, with the help of colliding laser photons with bunches of relativistic ions having two energy levels, both intense beams of monochromatic polarized X-ray fluorescence photons and significant number of X-ray entangled photons, via double Doppler transformation. Nonlinear susceptibility of the ions, the cross section and the rate of production of such photons at RHIC are estimated. Such beams of X-ray photons can be detected and applied to solve various problems, in a manner similar to the usage of optical photons.

K. A. Ispirian; M. K. Ispiryan

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

92

Feedback damper system for quadrupole oscillations after transition at RHIC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heavy ion beam at RHIC undergoes strong quadrupole oscillations just after it crosses transition, which leads to an increase in bunch length making rebucketing less effective. A feedback system was built to damp these quadrupole oscillations and in this paper the characteristics of the system and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Schultheiss, C.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

93

Particle production at RHIC energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents recent results from the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC; including results on particle production in rapidity space extending from y=0 to y ~ 3 and on the transverse momentum distribution of fully identified charged particles. These results were obtained from the 5% most central Au-Au collisions recorded during RHIC Run-2 at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV.

R. Debbe; for the BRAHMS collaboration

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

RHIC spin flipper commissioning results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT RHIC ENERGIES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents recent results from the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC; including results on particle production in rapidity space extending from y = 0 to y {approx} 3 and on the transverse momentum distribution of fully identified charged particles. These results were obtained from the 5% most central Au-Au collisions recorded during RHIC Run-2 at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV.

DEBBE,R.FOR THE BRAHMS COLLABORATION

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Research and development of RHIC injection kicker upgrade with nano second FID pulse generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our recent effort to test a 50 kV, 1 kA, 50 ns pulse width, 10 ns pulse rise time FID pulse generator with a 250 ft transmission cable, resistive load, and existing RHIC injection kicker magnet has produced unparalleled results. This is the very first attempt to drive a high strength fast kicker magnet with a nano second high pulsed power (50 MVA) generator for large accelerator and colliders. The technology is impressive. We report here the result and future plan of RHIC Injection kicker upgrade.

Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Hahn, H.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.J.; Pai, C.; Tuozzolo, J.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Net-proton measurements at RHIC and the QCD phase diagram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two measurements related to the proton and anti-proton production near midrapidity in center of mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. At intermediate impact parameters the slope parameter of the directed flow versus rapidity (dv1/dy) for the net-protons shows a non-monotonic variation as a function of the beam energy. This non-monotonic variation is characterized by the presence of a minimum in dv1/dy between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV and a change in the sign of dv1/dy twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. At small impact parameters the product of the moments of net-proton distribution, kurtosis x variance and skewness x standard deviation are observed to be significantly below the corresponding measurements at large impact parameter collisions for 19.6 and 27 GeV. The kurtosis x variance and skewness x standard deviation at these beam energies deviate from the expectations from Poisson statistics and that from a Hadron Resonance Gas model. Both these measurements have implications towards the understanding of the QCD phase structures, the first order phase transition and the critical point in the high baryonic chemical potential region of the phase diagram.

Bedangadas Mohanty

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

A hardware overview of the RHIC LLRF platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC Low Level RF (LLRF) platform is a flexible, modular system designed around a carrier board with six XMC daughter sites. The carrier board features a Xilinx FPGA with an embedded, hard core Power PC that is remotely reconfigurable. It serves as a front end computer (FEC) that interfaces with the RHIC control system. The carrier provides high speed serial data paths to each daughter site and between daughter sites as well as four generic external fiber optic links. It also distributes low noise clocks and serial data links to all daughter sites and monitors temperature, voltage and current. To date, two XMC cards have been designed: a four channel high speed ADC and a four channel high speed DAC. The new LLRF hardware was used to replace the old RHIC LLRF system for the 2009 run. For the 2010 run, the RHIC RF system operation was dramatically changed with the introduction of accelerating both beams in a new, common cavity instead of each ring having independent cavities. The flexibility of the new system was beneficial in allowing the low level system to be adapted to support this new configuration. This hardware was also used in 2009 to provide LLRF for the newly commissioned Electron Beam Ion Source.

Hayes, T.; Smith, K.S.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Justification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas inside the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume, the influx and accumulation of residual gas ions reduces the number of working ions in a trap for internal elements, technology of processing and equipment should be adequate. The components of the gasJustification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. A. Pikin 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Transverse Energy Production at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the mechanism of transverse energy (E_T) production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The time evolution starting from the initial energy loss to the final E_T production is closely examined in transport models. The relationship between the experimentally measured E_T distribution and the maximum energy density achieved is discussed.

Qun Li; Yang Pang; Nu Xu

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Coherent Electromagnetic Heavy Ion Reactions: (1) Exact Treatment of Pair Production and Ionization; (2) Mutual Coulomb Dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some recent theoretical results on coherent electromagnetic processes in ultrarelativistic heavy ion reactions are surveyed. In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, Coulomb induced cross sections are huge, much larger than geometric. For the RHIC case of 100 GeV x 100 GeV colliding gold ions the predicted cross section for bound-electron positron pairs is about 110 barns. The corresponding cross section for continuum electron-positron pairs has recently been recalculated to be 34,000 barns, consistent with the result of the classic formula of Landau and Lifshitz. The cross section for Coulomb dissociation of the nucleus is about 95 barns, and the cross section for ionization of a single electron on one of the ions is about 100,000 barns.

Baltz, A. J.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

A NEW GENERATION OF EBIS: HIGH CURRENT DEVICES FOR ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW GENERATION OF EBIS: HIGH CURRENT DEVICES FOR ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS* E. Beebe, J. Alessi of magnitude compared to fixed target operation of existing accelerators.[1] RHIC, for example, requires 3.4x10 20 times higher than electron beams utilized in devices at accelerators at Dubna, Saclay

105

Quadrupole beam-based alignment in the RHIC interaction regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements. BBA data has been collected over the past two runs for all three of the active experimental IRs at RHIC, updating results from the 2005 run which were taken with incorrectly installed offsets. The technique was successfully applied to expose a systematic misuse of the BPM survey offsets in the control system. This is likely to benefit polarized proton operations as polarization transmission through acceleration ramps depends on RMS orbit control in the arcs, but a quantitative understanding of its impact is still under active investigation. Data taking is ongoing as are refinements to the BBA technique aimed at reducing systematic errors and properly accounting for dispersive effects. Further development may focus on non-triplet BPMs such as those located near snakes, or arc quadrupoles that do not have individually shunted power supplies (a prerequisite for the current method) and as such, will require a modified procedure.

Ziegler, J.; Satogata, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimization of Higher Order Mode Dampers in the 56MHz SRF Cavity for RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed for a luminosity upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), including requirements for Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. In this paper, we describe our optimization of the damper's performance, and modifications made to its original design. We also show the effects of the damper geometry on the cavity's HOM impedance. To reduce the likelihood of magnetic breakdown, we lowered the magnetic field enhancement at the ports to a value less than the highest field in the cavity. We simulated all monopole and dipole HOMs up to 1GHz with their frequencies, mode configurations, R/Qs, and shunt impedances, verifying that all modes are well-damped with the optimized design and configuration. The 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity is a quarterwave resonator designed to have a gap voltage of 2.5 MV. Our plans are to place this beam-driven resonator at a common section of RHIC to provide a storage RF potential for both rings. The large bucket of the cavity will reduce spill due to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS), and thus increase the luminosity for the detectors. It is very important to damp all the cavity's Higher Order Modes (HOMs) to avoid beam instabilities. The design chosen for the HOM damper is a magnetically coupled loop located at the rear end of the cavity. The loop and its port geometry must be optimized to assure sufficient damping, avoid a large enhancement of the local magnetic field. A high-pass filter is included in the circuit to reduce the power extraction from the fundamental mode. The number of HOM dampers used and their configuration also are important factors for the damping and cooling system. A small loop area will couple out less power from the cavity's fundamental mode, thus reducing the voltage and power dissipation in the damper's filter circuit; however, it might not be sufficient for HOM damping. This problem is resolved by increasing the number of the HOM dampers and carefully choosing their location. Details of the high-pass filter will be discussed in another paper.

Wu, Q.; Ben-Zvi, I.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

MULTIPARTICLE PRODUCTION AT RHIC AND LHC: A CLASSICAL POINT OF VIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results of our ongoing nonperturbative numerical study of a classical effective theory describing low-x partons in the central region of a heavy-ion collision. In particular, we give estimates of the initial transverse energies and multiplicities for a wide range of collision regimes, including those at RHIC and at LHC.

KRASNITZ,A.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

Wang, Shaoheng [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

System size and energy dependence of $?$ meson production at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a system size and energy dependence of $\\phi$ meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that the number of participant scaled $\\phi$ meson yields in heavy ion collisions over that of p+p collisions are larger than 1 and increase with collision energy. We compare the results with those of open-strange particles and discuss the physics implication.

J. H. Chen

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20

Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Gamma-Gamma Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a gamma collider, we need to discuss the laser optics in thegamma collider will be given later, coupled with some discussions of the requisite opticsoptics and an adequate laser for Compton conversion. With this approach, the luminosity for the gamma-

Kim, K.-J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Medium induced jet absorption at relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dense medium created in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) significantly suppresses particle production from hard scattering processes and their characteristic back-to-back angular correlation. We present a simple model of jet absorption in dense matter which incorporates a realistic nuclear geometry. Our calculations are performed at the jet level and assume independent jet fragmentation in the vacuum. This model describes quantitatively the centrality dependence of the observed suppression of the high $p_T$ hadron yield and of the back-to-back angular correlations. The azimuthal anisotropy of high $p_T$ particle production can not be accounted for using a realistic nuclear geometry.

Axel Drees; Haidong Feng; Jiangyong Jia

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Event generator for RHIC spin physics. RIKEN BNL Research Center Proceedings, Volume 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume archives the reports from the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Event Generator for RHIC Spin Physics II'' held during the week March 15, 1999 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It was the second meeting on the subject following a first one in last September. This workshop has been initiated to establish a firm collaboration between theorists and experimentalists involved in RHIC spin physics with the aim of developing a reliable, high-precision event generator for RHIC spin physics. Needless to say, adequate event generators are indispensible tools for high energy physics programs in general, especially in the process of: planning the experimental programs, developing algorithms to extract the physics signals of interest, estimating the background in the extracted results, and connecting the final particle kinematics to the fundamental i.e. partonic level processes. Since RHIC is the first polarized collider, dedicated efforts are required to obtain a full-fledged event generator which describes spin dependent reactions in great detail. The RHIC spin project will be in the transition from R&D and construction phase to operation phase in the year 2000. As soon as data will be available, it should be analysed, interpreted and compared with theoretical predictions to extract its physical significance. Without mutual understanding between theorists and experimentalists on the technical details, it is hard to perform detailed comparisons in a consistent framework. The importance of this fact has been recognized especially during the analyses of hadron induced reactions observed at CERN, Fermilab and DESY. Since the use of event generator is indispensible for the analyses, it should be developed in a way that both experimentalists and theorists can agree upon.

Saito, N.; Schaefer, A. [eds.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC Retreat 2007 took place on July 16-17 2007 at the Foxwoods Resort in CT, about 3 weeks after the end of the RHIC Run-7. The goal of the Retreat is traditionally to plan the upcoming run in the light of the results from the previous one, by providing a snapshot of the present understanding of the machine and a forum for free and frank discussion. A particular attention was paid to the challenge of increasing the time at store, and the related issue of system reliability. An interesting Session covered all new developments aimed to improve the machine performance and luminosity. In Section 2 we summarize the results from Run-7 for RHIC and the injectors and discuss the present objectives of the RHIC program and performance. Sections 3-6 are summaries of the Retreat sessions focused on preparation for deuteron gold and polarized protons, respectively, machine availability and new developments.

Pilat,F.; Gardner, C.; Montag, C.; Roser, T.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Photon collider Higgs factories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

V. I. Telnov

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

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121

PHENIX EXPERIMENT AT RHIC: DECADAL PLAN 2004-2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHENIX Collaboration has developed a plan for the detailed investigation of quantum chromodynamics in the next decade. The demonstrated capabilities of the PHENIX experiment to measure rare processes in hadronic, leptonic and photonic channels, in combination with RHIC's unparalleled flexibility as a hadronic collider, provides a physics program of extraordinary breadth and depth. A superlative set of measurements to elucidate the states of both hot and cold nuclear matter, and to measure the spin structure of the proton has been identified. The components of this plan include: (1) Definitive measurements that will establish the nature of the matter created in nucleus+nucleus collisions, that will determine if the description of such matter as a quark-gluon plasma is appropriate, and that will quantify both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium features of the produced medium. (2) Precision measurements of the gluon structure of the proton, and of the spin structure of the gluon and sea-quark distributions of the proton via polarized proton+proton collisions. (3) Determination of the gluon distribution in cold nuclear matter using proton+nucleus collisions. Each of these fundamental fields of investigation will be addressed through a program of correlated measurements in some or all of the following channels: (1) Particle production at high transverse momentum, studied via single particle inclusive measurements of identified charged and neutral hadrons, multi-particle correlations and jet production. (2) Direct photon, photon+jet and virtual photon production. (3) Light and heavy vector mesons. (4) Heavy flavor production. These measurements, together with the established PHENIX abilities to identify hadrons at low transverse momentum, to perform detailed centrality selections, and to monitor polarization and luminosity with high precision create a superb opportunity for performing world-class science with PHENIX for the next decade. A portion of this program is achievable using the present capabilities of PHENIX experimental apparatus, but the physics reach is considerably extended and the program made even more compelling by a proposed set of upgrades which include: (1) An aerogel and time-of-flight system to provide complete {pi}/K/p separation for momenta up to 10 GeV/c. (2) A vertex detector to detect displaced vertices from the decay of mesons containing charm or bottom quarks. (3) A hadron-blind detector to detect and track electrons near the vertex. (4) A micro-TPC to extend the range of PHENIX tracking in azimuth and pseudo-rapidity. (5) A forward detector upgrade for an improved muon trigger to preserve sensitivity at the highest projected RHIC luminosities. (6) A forward calorimeter to provide photon+jet studies over a wide kinematic range. The success of the proposed program is contingent upon several factors external to PHENIX. Implementation of the upgrades is predicated on the availability of R&D funds to develop the required detector technologies on a timely, and in some cases urgent, basis. The necessity for such funding, and the physics merit of the proposed PHENIX program, has been endorsed in the first meeting of BNL's Detector Advisory Committee in December, 2002. Progress towards the physics goals depends in an essential way on the development of the design values for RHIC luminosity, polarization and availability. An analysis based on the guidance from the Collider Accelerator Department indicates that moderate increases in the yearly running time lead to very considerable increases in progress toward the enunciated goals. Efficient access to the rarest probes in the proposed program is achieved via the order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity provided by RHIC-II.

ZAJC,W.ET. AL.

2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

RHIC and LHC jet suppression in non-central collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding properties of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a major goal of RHIC and LHC experiments. An excellent tool to study these properties is jet suppression of light and heavy flavor observables. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we here extend our dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Specifically, we here generate predictions for all available centrality ranges, for both LHC and RHIC experiments, and for four different probes (charged hadrons, neutral pions, D mesons and non-prompt $J/\\psi$). We obtain a very good agreement with all available non-central data, and also generate predictions for suppression measurements that will soon become available. Finally, we discuss implications of the obtained good agreement with experimental data with different medium models that are currently considered.

Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic; Bojana Blagojevic

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC: analysis of the underlying effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suppressions of light and heavy flavor observables are considered to be excellent probes of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Suppression predictions of quark and gluon jets appear to suggest a clear hierarchy according to which neutral pions should be more suppressed than D mesons, which in turn should be more suppressed than single electrons. However, joint comparison of neutral pion (light probe) and non-photonic single electron (heavy probe) suppression data at RHIC unexpectedly showed similar jet suppression for these two probes, which presents the well-known heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC. We here analyze which effects are responsible for this unexpected result, by using the dynamical energy loss formalism. We find that the main effect is a surprising reversal in the suppression hierarchy between neutral pions and D mesons, which is due to the deformation of the suppression patterns of light partons by fragmentation functions. Furthermore, we find that, due to the decay functions, the single electron suppression approaches the D meson suppression. Consequently, we propose that these two effects, taken together, provide a clear intuitive explanation of this longstanding puzzle.

Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had excellent presentations throughout and productive discussions, which showed the importance and unique value of the RHIC high-p{sub T} program. We are grateful to all participants for coming to BNL. The support provided by the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for this workshop has been magnificent, and we are most grateful for it. We also thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing additional support and for the facilities to hold this workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Pamela Esposito for her most efficient and tireless work in organizing and running the workshop.

Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

RHIC BPM SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of recently-added DSP profile scan capability, and improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for 10 Hz triplet vibration, nonlinear dynamics, and echo studies.

SATOGATA, T.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley; ,

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE.

Pilat,F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Dilepton Production at Fermilab and RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some recent results from several fixed-target dimuon production experiments at Fermilab are presented. In particular, we discuss the use of Drell-Yan data to determine the flavor structure of the nucleon sea, as well as to deduce the energy-loss of partons traversing nuclear medium. Future dilepton experiments at RHIC could shed more light on the flavor asymmetry and possible charge-symmetry-violation of the nucleon sea. Clear evidence for scaling violation in the Drell-Yan process could also be revealed at RHIC.

J. C. Peng; P. L. McGaughey; J. M. Moss

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Direct photon production at RHIC and LHC energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct photon spectra and elliptic flow v2 in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are investigated within a relativistic transport approach incorporating both hadronic and partonic phases - the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD). The results suggest that a large v2 of the direct photons - as observed by the PHENIX Collaboration - signals a significant contribution of photons produced in interactions of secondary mesons and baryons in the late stages of the collision. In order to further differentiate the origin of the direct photon azimuthal asymmetry, we compare our predictions for the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield to the recent measurements by the PHENIX Collaboration and provide predictions for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies with respect to the direct photon spectra and v2(pT) for 0-40% centrality.

Linnyk, O; Cassing, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Strangeness production in small and large collisions systems at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of strange and multi-strange hadrons in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 200 GeV measured by STAR. We will compare these preliminary results to leading-order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD models widely believed to describe the production mechanisms. In particular we will point out recent changes of the model calculations which improve the agreement with our data significantly and will discuss the physics consequences. In larger collision systems, produced with heavy ions at RHIC, we observe the centrality dependence of strange and multi-strange particle production. The non-linear dependency between (anti)-hyperon yields and the system size \\Npart seems to indicate that the correlation volume does not scale exactly with \\Npart in contradiction to previous assumptions by thermal models.

Mark Heinz

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical properties of super-hadronic matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preliminary charge balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are compared to a model where quarks are produced in two waves. If a chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is created the strength and diffusive spread of the first wave should be governed by the chemical composition of the QGP, while the second wave should be determined by the increased number of quarks required to make the observed final-state hadrons. A simple model parameterizes the chemistry of the super-hadronic matter and the two correlation lengths for the two waves. Calculations are compared to preliminary data from the STAR Collaboration. The chemistry of the super-hadronic matter appears to be within 20\\% of expectations from lattice gauge theory.

Scott Pratt; Claudia Ratti; William Patrick McCormack

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

KRETZER,S.MORRISON,D.VENUGOPALAN,R.VOGELSANG,W.

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Central collisions of heavy ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

Fung, Sun-yiu.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and 1 in preparation), and 14 invited talks and 10 contributed talks at major conferences. These are listed at end of this report.

Fuqiang Wang

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Particle Production in High-energy Heavy-ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle production mechanisms in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed in connection with recent experimental data from RHIC. Implications on mini-jet production, parton saturation and jet quenching are discussed.

Xin-Nian Wang

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

405th Brookhaven Lecture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

"E-RHIC - Future Electron-Ion Collider at BNL. While RHIC scientists continue their quest to look deep into nuclear phenomena resulting from collisions of ion beams and beams of polarized protons, new design work is under way for a possible extension of RHIC to include e-RHIC, a 10-billion electron volt, high-intensity polarized proton beam.

Vadim Ptitsyn

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Rapidity Dependence of Elliptic Flow at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measured elliptic flow (v2) of identified particles as a function of pT and centrality at RHIC suggests the created medium in Au+Au collisions achieves early local thermal equilibrium that is followed by hydrodynamic expansion. It is not known if the eta dependence on v2 is a general feature of elliptic flow or reflects other changes in the particle spectra in going from mid-rapidity to foward rapidities. The BRAHMS experiment provides a unique capability compared to the other RHIC experiments to measure v2 for identified particles over a wide rapidity range. From Run 4 Au+Au collision at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200GeV, identified elliptic flow is studied using the BRAHMS spectrometers, which cover 0

Erik Johnson

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

Azimuthal Jet Tomography at RHIC and LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generic jet-energy loss model that is coupled to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic fields and interpolates between a wide class of running coupling pQCD-based and AdS/CFT-inspired models is compared to recent data on the azimuthal and transverse momentum dependence of high-pT pion nuclear modification factors and high-pT elliptic flow measured at RHIC and LHC. We find that RHIC data are surprisingly consistent with various scenarios considered. However, extrapolations to LHC energies favor running coupling pQCD-based models of jet-energy loss. While conformal holographic models are shown to be inconsistent with data, recent non-conformal generalizations of AdS holography may provide an alternative description.

Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of RHIC beam dump pre-fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been speculated that the beam may cause instability of the RHIC Beam Abort Kickers. In this study, we explore the available data of past beam operations, the device history of key modulator components, and the radiation patterns to examine the correlations. The RHIC beam abort kicker system was designed and built in the 90's. Over last decade, we have made many improvements to bring the RHIC beam abort kicker system to a stable operational state. However, the challenge continues. We present the analysis of the pre-fire, an unrequested discharge of kicker, issues which relates to the RHIC machine safety and operational stability.

Zhang, W.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Photon collider at TESLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High energy photon colliders (gamma-gamma, gamma-electron) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e+e- linear colliders. In this report we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case the gamma-gamma luminosity luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach (1/3)L_{e+e-}. Typical cross sections of interesting processes in gamma-gamma collisions are higher than those in e+e- collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in gamma-gamma collisions will be more than that in e+e- collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ``an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based at TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

Valery Telnov

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-ferrite rhic injection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RHIC Brookhaven National Laboratory Summary: routinely provide a beam of 0.7x1011 bunch intensity with 50% polarization at RHIC injection energy... Demonstrated the capability of...

143

Statistical hadronization model description for rapidity densities at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapidity densities in Au-Au collisions at center-of-mass energies 200 and 130 A GeV measured at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider by STAR and PHENIX collaborations are analyzed within the statistical hadronization model at chemical freeze-out. We find that the model can describe the experimental rapidity densities well. The corresponding chemical freeze-out parameters are determined and they are seen to be in agreement with what we expect from our previous analyzes at lower beam energies at AGS and SPS.

Jaakko Manninen

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Applying Effective Theories to Collider Phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol GagikovichTheories to Collider Phenomenology Copyright 2010 by GrigolTheories to Collider Phenomenology by Grigol Gagikovich

Ovanesyan, Grigol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Diffraction at collider energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lessons with ``soft`` hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

Frankfurt, L.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Diffraction at collider energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lessons with soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy.

Frankfurt, L.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The RHIC SPIN Program: Achievements and Future Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time and again, spin has been a key element in the exploration of fundamental physics. Spin-dependent observables have often revealed deficits in the assumed theoretical framework and have led to novel developments and concepts. Spin is exploited in many parity-violating experiments searching for physics beyond the Standard Model or studying the nature of nucleon-nucleon forces. The RHIC spin program plays a special role in this grand scheme: it uses spin to study how a complex many-body system such as the proton arises from the dynamics of QCD. Many exciting results from RHIC spin have emerged to date, most of them from RHIC running after the 2007 Long Range Plan. In this document we present highlights from the RHIC program to date and lay out the roadmap for the significant advances that are possible with future RHIC running.

Elke-Caroline Aschenauer; Alexander Bazilevsky; Markus Diehl; James Drachenberg; Kjeld Oleg Eyser; Renee Fatemi; Carl Gagliardi; Zhongbo Kang; Yuri V. Kovchegov; John Lajoie; Jeong-Hun Lee; Emanuele-R. Nocera; Daniel Pitonyak; Alexei Prokudin; Rodolfo Sassot; Ralf Seidl; Ernst Sichtermann; Matt Sievert; Bernd Surrow; Marco Stratmann; Werner Vogelsang; Anselm Vossen; Scott W. Wissink; Feng Yuan

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

The RHIC SPIN Program: Achievements and Future Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time and again, spin has been a key element in the exploration of fundamental physics. Spin-dependent observables have often revealed deficits in the assumed theoretical framework and have led to novel developments and concepts. Spin is exploited in many parity-violating experiments searching for physics beyond the Standard Model or studying the nature of nucleon-nucleon forces. The RHIC spin program plays a special role in this grand scheme: it uses spin to study how a complex many-body system such as the proton arises from the dynamics of QCD. Many exciting results from RHIC spin have emerged to date, most of them from RHIC running after the 2007 Long Range Plan. In this document we present highlights from the RHIC program to date and lay out the roadmap for the significant advances that are possible with future RHIC running.

Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Diehl, Markus; Drachenberg, James; Eyser, Kjeld Oleg; Fatemi, Renee; Gagliardi, Carl; Kang, Zhongbo; Kovchegov, Yuri; Lajoie, John; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Nocera, Emanuele-R; Pitonyak, Daniel; Prokudin, Alexei; Sassot, Rodolfo; Seidl, Ralf; Sichtermann, Ernst; Sievert, Matt; Surrow, Bernd; Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner; Vossen, Anselm; Wissink, Scott W; Yuan, Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Electron-Ion Collider Science Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the first time, physicists are in the position to precisely study a fully relativistic quantum field theory: Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD). QCD is a central element of the Standard Model and provides the theoretical framework for understanding the strong interaction. This demands a powerful new electron microscope to probe the virtual particles of QCD. Ab initio calculations using lattice gauge theory on the world's most powerful supercomputers are essential for comparison with the data. The new accelerator and computing techniques demand aggressive development of challenging, innovative technologies.

Richard G. Milner

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecentRegional companies eyeRelationshipsFunding

151

Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Construction progress of the RHIC electron lenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In polarized proton operation the RHIC performance is limited by the head-on beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation two electron lenses are under construction. We give an overview of the construction progress. Guns, collectors and the warm electron beam transport solenoids with their power supplies have been constructed. The superconducting solenoids that guide the electron beam during the interaction with the proton beam are near completion. A test stand has been set up to verify the performance of the gun, collector and some of the instrumentation. The infrastructure is being prepared for installation, and simulations continue to optimize the performance.

Fischer W.; Altinbas, Z.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Physics Reach at Future Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

Krawczyk, Maria [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoz-dota 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Neutrinos and Collider Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Exploring the Universe Within  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction.

John Marburger

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

Michael S. Zisman

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

Report on CLAS12 Software Workshop Broad view of the state-of-the-art in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, RHIC and Atlas Computing Facility Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). Formation of quark Ernst, Director, RHIC and Atlas Computing Facility Data Formats CLAS Collaboration Meeting, June 17 Michael Ernst, Director, RHIC and Atlas Computing Facility Parallel processing. Done with athenaMP. Single

Gilfoyle, Jerry

158

Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

Brookhaven Lab

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

Symmetric Achromatic Low-Beta Collider Interaction Region Design Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially-designed symmetric Chromaticity Compensation Block (CCB) induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCB?s placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

Morozov, Vasiliy S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Production of bound {$?^{+}?^{-}$}-systems in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dimuonium (the bound system of two muons, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$-atom) has not been observed yet. In this paper we discuss the electromagnetic production of dimuonium at RHIC and LHC in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The production of parastates is analyzed in the equivalent photon approximation. For the treatment of orthostates, we develop a three photon formalism. We determine the production rates at RHIC and LHC with an accuracy of a few percent and discuss problems related to the observation of dimuonium.

I. F. Ginzburg; U. D. Jentschura; S. G. Karshenboim; F. Krauss; V. G. Serbo; G. Soff

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cold nuclear matter effects on the color singlet J/psi production in d-Au collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a Modified DKLMT model (called M-DKLMT model) to study the cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects on the color singlet J/psi production in dAu collisions at RHIC. The cold nuclear effect of dipole-nucleus interactions has been investigated by introducing a nuclear geometric effect function f({\\xi}) to study the nuclear geometry distribution effect in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The dependencies of nuclear modification factors (RdA) on rapidity and centrality are studied and compared to experimental data. It is found that the M-DKLMT model can well describe the experimental results at both forward- and mid-rapidity regions in dAu collisions at RHIC.

Zefang Jiang; Shengqin Feng; Zhongbao Yin; Yafei Shi; Xianbao Yuan

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

The RHIC Spin Program: Achievements and Future Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document summarizes recent achievements of the RHIC spin program and their impact on our understanding of the nucleon's spin structure, i.e. the individual parton (quark and gluon) contributions to the helicity structure of the nucleon and to understand the origin of the transverse spin phenomena. Open questions are identified and a suite of future measurements with polarized beams at RHIC to address them is laid out. Machine and detector requirements and upgrades are briefly discussed.

E. C. Aschenauer; A. Bazilevsky; K. Boyle; K. O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; C. Gagliardi; M. Grosse-Perdekamp; John Lajoie; Zhongbo Kang; Yuri Kovchegov; John Koster; Itaru Nakagawa; Rodolfo Sassot; Ralf Seidl; Ernst Sichtermann; Marco Stratmann; Werner Vogelsang; Anselm Vossen; Scott W. Wissink; Feng Yuan

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Results from hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Pondrom, L.G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Positrons for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

Ecklund, S.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to today's large NP accelerators like GSI-FAIR, RHIC economical for 1-2 GWe baseload power plants. Heavy chambers. · Competitive economics: projected in several power plant studies and with no high levelSlide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Briefing for the National Academy

169

Hadron collider physics at UCR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

[New technology for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

McIntyre, P.M.

1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

171

EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

172

System size and energy dependence of high pT hadron production measured with PHENIX experiment at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHENIX has measured high transverse momentum (pT) identified hadrons in different collision species and energies in the last five RHIC runs. The systematic study of the high pT hadron production provides an idea on interaction of hard scattered partons and the matter created in relativistic heavy ion collision. The eta/pi0 ratio is measured in Au+Au collisions, which gives a hint on the system thermalization and particle production. A future measurement of hadron and photon measurement is discussed.

Takao Sakaguchi

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Central collisions of heavy ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

Fung, Sun-yiu.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Selected Experimental Highlights from Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits partonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity in effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescences or recombinations.

Huan Z. Huang

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

Roman Lietava; Jan Pisut; Neva Pisutova; Boris Tomasik

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy and System Size Dependence of Strangeness Production from SPS to RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strange particle production is an important experimental observable that allows the study of the strongly interacting matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The STAR experiment at RHIC has a unique capability of measuring identified strange particles over a wide range of acceptance providing a rich set of data to perform a systematic study. In addition to the data from Au+Au collisions, strange particles from p+p and d+Au collisions are also available for comparison and normalization. A new set of data from Cu+Cu reactions at 62 GeV and 200 GeV provides the chance to compare the system size dependence observed in Au+Au collisions with this smaller system size. In addition to the comparison of the yields, a statistical thermal model was used to extract freeze-out characteristics for the different system sizes and collision energies.

Jun Takahashi; for the STAR collaboration

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hard and soft probe - medium interactions in a 3D hydro+micro approach at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize a 3D hybrid hydro+micro model for a comprehensive and consistent description of soft and hard particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. In the soft sector we focus on the dynamics of (multi-)strange baryons, where a clear strangeness dependence of their collision rates and freeze-out is observed. In the hard sector we study the radiative energy loss of hard partons in a soft medium in the multiple soft scattering approximation. While the nuclear suppression factor $R_{AA}$ does not reflect the high quality of the medium description (except in a reduced systematic uncertainty in extracting the quenching power of the medium), the hydrodynamical model also allows to study different centralities and in particular the angular variation of $R_{AA}$ with respect to the reaction plane, allowing for a controlled variation of the in-medium path-length.

Bass, S A; Ruppert, J; Nonaka, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - ags booster beam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LN 2 RHIC... Cryo Operation RHIC Cryo Standby(or off) RHIC Systems Test (no colliding beams) RHIC with colliding... beams RHIC Research with Au-Au (100x100 GeVn) RHIC Research...

179

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion collisions are an ideal tool to explore the QCD phase diagram. The goal is to study the equation of state (EOS) and to search for possible in-medium modifications of hadrons. By varying the collision energy a variety of regimes with their specific physics interest can be studied. At energies of a few GeV per nucleon, the regime where experiments were performed first at the Berkeley Bevalac and later at the Schwer-Ionen-Synchrotron (SIS) at GSI in Darmstadt, we study the equation of state of dense nuclear matter and try to identify in-medium modifications of hadrons. Towards higher energies, the regime of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the Super-Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, we expect to produce a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The physics goal is to identify the QGP and to study its properties. By varying the energy, different forms of matter are produced. At low energies we study dense nuclear matter, similar to the type of matter neutron stars are made of. As the energy is increased the main constituents of the matter will change. Baryon excitations will become more prevalent (resonance matter). Eventually we produce deconfined partonic matter that is thought to be in the core of neutron stars and that existed in the early universe. At low energies a great variety of collective effects is observed and a rather good understanding of the particle production has been achieved, especially that of the most abundantly produced pions and kaons. Many observations can be interpreted as time-ordered emission of various particle species. It is possible to determine, albeit model dependent, the equation of state of nuclear matter. We also have seen indications, that the kaon mass, especially the mass of the K{sup +}, might be modified by the medium created in heavy ion collisions. At AGS energies and above, emphasis shifts towards different aspects. Lattice QCD calculations predict the transition between a Quark-Gluon Plasma and a hadronic state at a critical temperature, T{sub c}, of about 150 to 190 MeV at vanishing baryon density. The energy density at the transition point is about 1:0 GeV/fm{sup 3}. It is generally assumed that chiral symmetry restoration happens simultaneously. In the high-energy regime, especially at RHIC, a rich field of phenomena [3] has revealed itself. Hot and dense matter with very strong collectivity has been created. There are indications that collectivity develops at the parton level, i.e. at a very early stage of the collision, when the constituents are partons rather than hadrons. Signs of pressure driven collective effects are our main tool for the study of the EOS. There are also strong indications that in the presence of a medium hadronization occurs through the process of quark coalescence and not through quark fragmentation, the process dominant for high-energy p+p reactions. We limit this report to the study of hadrons emitted in heavy ion reactions. The report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the phenomena observed from hadrons produced at low energies, whereas the second part concentrates on the search for signs of a partonic state at high energies.

Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Muon collider interaction region design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR) presents a number of challenges arising from low {beta}* < 1 cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV c.o.m. muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

Alexahin, Y.I.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Alexakhin, V.Y.; /Dubna, JINR

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Muon Collider Task Force Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in Au+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC is important to search for the existence of the critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Lattice QCD have shown that the predictions of the susceptibility of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions can be sensitive to the various moments (mean ($\\mu$) =${}$, variance ($\\sigma^2$) = ${}$, skewness (S) = $\\frac{}{\\sigma^3}$ and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) =$\\frac{}{\\sigma^4} -3$) of conserved quantities like net-baryon number ($\\Delta$B), net-electric charge ($\\Delta$Q) and net-strangeness ($\\Delta$S). Any non-monotonic behavior of the higher moments would confirm the existence of the QCD critical point. The recent results of the higher moments of net-charge multiplicity distributions for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$ varying from 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The energy and centrality dependence of the higher moments and their products (S$\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are shown for the net-charge multiplicity distributions. Furthermore, the results are compared with the values obtained from the heavy-ion collision models, where there is no QCD phase transition and critical point.

P. Garg

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

B. V. Ivanov

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

Yagmur Tourun

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

QCD hydrodynamics for LHC and RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The realistic and detailed description of an energetic heavy ion reaction requires a Multi Module Model, where the different stages of the reaction are each described with a suitable theoretical approach. One fluid dynamical models provide an adequate and accurate description of the middle stages of the reaction. In addition, fluid dynamical calculations require initial and freeze out conditions. In this work we concentrate on the modeling of the initial stages of the reaction, before the local thermal equilibrium is achieved, and on the freeze out process. We discuss the possibility of the fast simultaneous hadronization and chemical freeze out of supercooled QGP, as a possible solution of the HBT 'puzzle'.

Csernai, L. P. (László P.); Gorenste?n, M. I. (Mark Isaakovich); Magas, V. K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

RHIC injector complex online model status and plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An online modeling system is being developed for the RHIC injector complex, which consists of the Booster, the AGS and the transfer lines connecting the Booster to the AGS and the AGS to RHIC. Historically the injectors have been operated using static values from design specifications or offline model runs, but tighter beam optics constraints required by polarized proton operations (e.g, accelerating with near-integer tunes) have necessitated a more dynamic system. An online model server for the AGS has been implemented using MAD-X [1] as the model engine, with plans to extend the system to the Booster and the injector transfer lines and to add the option of calculating optics using the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC [2]) as the model engine.

Schoefer,V.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

A STATE VARIABLE DESCRIPTION OF THE RHIC RF CONTROL LOOPS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam transfer function changes during the RHIC ramp. The response of the RF control loops changes as a result. A state-variable description of the beam and the RF control loops was developed. This description was used to generate a set of feedback matrices that keeps the response of the RF control loops constant during the ramp. This paper describes the state-variable description and its use in determining the K matrices.

SCHULTHEISS,C.; BRENNAN,J.M.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

The low energy frontier: What is exciting about physics below the top RHIC energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These proceedings summarize my plenary talk at Quark Matter 2011 with a focus on the future perspectives of the low energy programs at RHIC, FAIR, NICA and CERN.

Marcus Bleicher

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

Hershcovitch, A; Brennan, J M; Chawla, A; Fischer, W; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W; Todd, R; Custer, A; Erickson, M; Jamshidi, N; Kobrin, P; Laping, R; Poole, H J; Jimenez, J M; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Yin-Vallgren, C; Sochugov, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ``Heavy Ion Physics``; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

423rd Brookhaven Lecture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

Mei Bai

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Constraining scenarios of the soft/hard transition for the pion electromagnetic form factor with expected data of 12-GeV Jefferson Lab experiments and of the Electron-Ion Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been shown previously [PRD 88 (2013) 093005, arXiv:1310.1770] that a non-perturbative relativistic constituent-quark model for the $\\pi$-meson electromagnetic form factor allows for a quantitative description of the soft/hard transition, resulting in the correct Quantum-Chromodynamical asymptotics, including normalization, from the low-energy data without further parameter tuning. This happens universally whenever the constituent-quark mass is switched off. The energy range where the transition happens is therefore determined by the quark-mass running at intermediate energies and is not tightly constrained theoretically. Here we consider possible ways to pin down this energy range with coming experimental data. We demonstrate that expected experimental uncertainties of the 12-GeV Jefferson-Lab data are larger than the span of predictions of the model, so these data might be used for testing the model but not for determination of the soft/hard transition scale. Contrary, the projected Electron-Ion Colli...

Troitsky, S V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Xiaofeng Luo

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Luo, Xiaofeng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission characteristics and dynamics of the stagnation layer in colliding laser produced plasmas P been investigated using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopies and spectrally and angularly resolved fast imaging. The emission results highlight a difference in neutral atom and ion

Harilal, S. S.

198

International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finding the adding up of Feynman diagrams tedious? Hidden symmetries found in the sums of diagrams suggest there is a better way to predict the results of particle collisions - in the past two years, spin-offs of a new theory, known as the Twistor String Theory, have led to the development of efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams which can be useful for work at the Tevatron, the LHC and for future research at the International Linear Collider. Come see what this 'twistor' is all about!

Dixon, Lance

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Central collisions of heavy ions. Progress report, October 1, 1990--September 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R&D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals.

Fung, Sun-yiu

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Probing Higgs Boson Interactions At Future Colliders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present in this thesis a detailed analysis of Higgs boson interactions at future colliders. In particular we examine, in a model independent way, the… (more)

Biswal, Sudhansu Sekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Subcritical Fission Reactor Based on Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beams of Linear Collider after main collision can be utilized to build an accelerator--driven sub--critical reactor.

I. F. Ginzburg

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Physics Program with Tagged Forward Protons at STAR/RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new effort to explore the diffractive regime in polarized p+p collisions in a broad high energy range ( ?(s) = 200 - 500 GeV) has been initiated with the STAR detector at RHIC. Staged implementation of multiple Roman Pot stations for tagging the forward proton in the diffractive processes will enable searches for the centrally produced for the possible gluon bound state via double Pomeron exchange process and the theoretically expected Odderon state in QCD by studying spin-dependent elastic scattering in a wide t-range with polarized p+p.

Lee, J.H.; for the STAR Collaboration

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Test of Chemical freeze-out at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a systematic test applying statistical thermal model fits in a consistent way for different particle ratios, and different system sizes using the various particle yields measured in the STAR experiment. Comparison between central and peripheral Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions with data from p+p collisions provides an interesting tool to verify the dependence with the system size. We also present a study of the rapidity dependence of the thermal fit parameters using available data from RHIC in the forward rapidity regions and also using different parameterization for the rapidity distribution of different particles.

Jun Takahashi; for the STAR Collaboration

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mixed Heavy Quark Hybrid Mesons, Decay Puzzles, and RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate the energy of the lowest Charmonium and Upsilon states with hybrid admixtures using the method of QCD Sum Rules. Our results show that the $\\Psi'(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon(3S)$ states both have about a 50% admixture of hybrid and meson components. From this we find explanations of both the famous $\\rho-\\pi$ puzzle for Charmonium, and the unusual pattern of $\\sigma$ decays that have been found in $\\Upsilon$ decays. Moreover, this picture can be used for predictions of heavy quark production with the octet model for RHIC.

Leonard S. Kisslinger

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

209

ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC* Ilan Ben-Zvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironment > Voluntary Reporting ProgramCOOLING FOR RHIC* Ilan

210

Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

Chao, A.W. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Palmer, R.B. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Evans, L.; Gareyte, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Siemann, R.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Heavy flavor production at RHIC and LHC energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a leading order pQCD model, we have studied the heavy flavor production in p+p collisions at RHIC and LHC energy. Leading order pQCD models require a K-factor. At RHIC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV, we fix K such that the model reproduces the integrated charm yield, $dN^{c\\bar{c}}/dy$, estimated by the STAR and the PHENIX collaboration in p+p collisions. The model then explains the STAR data on the transverse momentum distribution of open charm mesons $(D^0)$ and decay electrons in p+p collisions. The p+p predictions, scaled by the number of binary collisions, also explain the electron spectra in STAR p+d collisions and PHENIX Au+Au collisions in different centrality bins. Assuming that at LHC energy K-factor is of the order of unity, we have used the model to predict the transverse momentum distribution of $D$ and $B$ mesons and also of electrons from semileptonic decay of $D\\to e$ and $B\\to e$, in p+p collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=14 TeV.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

Roblin, Yves [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Aturban, Mohamed A. [Old Dominion University; Ranjan, D. [Old Dominion University; Zubair, Mohammed [Old Dominion University

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

HEAVY ION PHYSICS WITH THE ATLAS DETECTOR.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soon after the LHC is commissioned with proton beams the ATLAS experiment will begin studies of Pb-Pb collisions with a center of mass energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 5.5 TeV. The ATLAS program is a natural extension of measurements at RHIC in a direction that exploits the higher LHC energies and the superb ATLAS calorimeter and tracking coverage. At LHC energies, collisions will be produced with even higher energy density than observed at RHIC. The properties of the resulting hot medium can be studied with higher energy probes, which are more directly interpreted through modification of jet properties emerging from these collisions, for example. Other topics which are enabled by the 30-fold increase in center of mass energy include probing the partonic structure of nuclei with hard photoproduction (in UltraPeripheral collisions) and in p-Pb collisions. Here we report on evaluation of ATLAS capabilities for Heavy Ion Physics.

WHITE, S.

2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider | The Case for Continuing Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051 Modification MOThe Case for

216

ACCELERATOR PHYSICS ISSUES FOR FUTURE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07) (See4AJ01)59AJ76)74AJ01)BROWNE,8 - MarchACCELERATOR

217

The Large Hadron Electron Collider Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Large Hadron Electron Collider, the LHeC, is being prepared, to which an introduction was given for the plenary panel discussion on the future of deep inelastic scattering held at DIS09. This is briefly summarised here. The CDR will comprise designs of the ep/eA collider, based on ring and linear electron accelerators, of the interaction region, designed for simultaneous $ep$ and $pp$ operation, of a new, modular detector, and it will present basics on the physics motivation for a high luminous Tera scale electron-nucleon collider as a complement to the LHC.

Max Klein

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

Xu, Nu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

muon collider has superconducting solenoids as an integralLBNL-44303 SCMAG-690 Superconducting Solenoids for the MuonDE-AC03-76SFOOO98. J Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PHYSICS AT HIGH LUMINOSITY MUON COLLIDERS AND A FACILITY OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included.

PARSA,Z.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

3-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hazardous substances o NYSDEC certificates for two registered gasoline vapor recovery systems o Eight pumping stations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and a freshwater wetlands permit

223

Measurement of charged particle multiplicity distribution in Au + Au collisions up to 200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Au+Au collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) herald a new era of opportunities for studying hadronic matter under conditions of high energy density and nucleon density. The theory of strong interactions, ...

Sarin, Pradeep, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

DOE Secretary Steven Chu has selected the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Bulletin DOE Secretary Steven Chu has selected the staff of the RHIC/ ATLAS Computing Facility of the ear- ly universe by collid- ing heavy ions such as gold -- and the ATLAS experiment, located

Johnson, Peter D.

225

Ultraviolet energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(s_NN/s_0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence proportional to ln^3(s_NN/s_0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The production of particles with pseudorapidities beyond the beam rapidity is also discussed.

Wolschin, Georg

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044910 (2010) Production of exotic atoms at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

one of the ions in the collider ("bound-free" pair production). In particular the process of pair several insights in the production mechanism which have not been explored in the literature. OurPHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 044910 (2010) Production of exotic atoms at energies available at the CERN

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

227

PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

KING,B.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Two Decades of Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results is discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

Mike Lisa; Scott Pratt; Ron Soltz; Urs Wiedemann

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Quirky Collider Signals of Folded Supersymmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the collider signals associated with scalar quirks ('squirks') in folded supersymmetric models. As opposed to regular superpartners in supersymmetric models these particles are uncolored, but are instead charged under a new confining group, leading to radically different collider signals. Due to the new strong dynamics, squirks that are pair produced do not hadronize separately, but rather form a highly excited bound state. The excited 'squirkonium' loses energy to radiation before annihilating back into Standard Model particles. We calculate the branching fractions into various channels for this process, which is prompt on collider time-scales. The most promising annihilation channel for discovery is W+photon which dominates for squirkonium near its ground state. We demonstrate the feasibility of the LHC search, showing that the mass peak is visible above the SM continuum background and estimate the discovery reach.

Burdman, Gustavo; Chacko, Z.; Goh, Hock-Seng; Harnik, Roni; Krenke, Christopher A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 Linear Collider Workshop of the Americas was held on the campus of the University of New Mexico from 29 September to 3 October, 2009. This was a joint meeting of the American Linear Collider Physics Group and the ILC Global Design Effort. Two hundred fifty people attended. The number of scientific contributions was 333. The complete agenda, with links to all of the presentations, is available at physics.unm.edu/LCWA09/. The meeting brought together international experts as well as junior scientists, to discuss the physics potential of the linear collider and advances in detector technology. The validation of detector designs was announced, and the detector design groups planned the next phase of the effort. Detector R&D teams reported on progress on many topics including calorimetry and tracking. Recent accelerator design considerations were discussed in a special session for experimentalists and theorists.

Seidel, Sally

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

International linear collider reference design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

Aarons, G.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solenoid and monocusp ion source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Top quark studies at hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

Calzetta, E. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Effects of non-causal artifacts in a hadronic rescattering model for RHIC collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been shown that calculations based on a hadronic rescattering model agree reasonably well with experimental results from RHIC Au+Au collisions. Because of the large particle densities intrinsically present at the early time steps of Monte Carlo calculations attempting to model RHIC collisions undesirable artifacts resulting in non-causality may be present. The effects of such artifacts on observables calculated from the rescattering model are studied in the present work in two ways: 1) varying the time step and 2) using the subdivision method. It is shown that although non-causal artifacts are present in the rescattering model they have no appreciable effects on the calculated observables, thus strengthing the confidence in the results of this rescattering model for RHIC energies.

T. J. Humanic

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

NNLO Benchmarks for Gauge and Higgs Boson Production at TeV Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inclusive production cross sections for $W^+, W^-$ and $Z^0$-bosons form important benchmarks for the physics at hadron colliders. We perform a detailed comparison of the predictions for these standard candles based on recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) parton parameterizations and new analyses including the combined HERA data, compare to all available experimental results, and discuss the predictions for present and upcoming RHIC, SPS, Tevatron and LHC energies. The rates for gauge boson production at the LHC can be rather confidently predicted with an accuracy of better than about 10% at NNLO. We also present detailed NNLO predictions for the Higgs boson production cross sections for Tevatron and LHC energies (1.96, 7, 8, 14 TeV), and propose a possible method to monitor the gluon distribution experimentally in the kinematic region close to the mass range expected for the Higgs boson. The production cross sections of the Higgs boson at the LHC are presently predicted with an accuracy of about 10--17%. The inclusion of the NNLO contributions is mandatory for achieving such accuracies since the total uncertainties are substantially larger at NLO.

S. Alekhin; J. Blümlein; P. Jimenez-Delgado; S. Moch; E. Reya

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Silicon Vertex Tracker for PHENIX Upgrade at RHIC: Capabilities and Detector Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the wealth of data obtained from the first three years of RHIC operation, the four RHIC experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, have concluded that a high density partonic matter is formed at central Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. The research focus now shifts from initial discovery to a detailed exploration of partonic matter. Particles carrying heavy flavor, i.e. charm or beauty quarks, are powerful tool for study the properties of the hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. At the relatively low transverse momentum region, the collective motion of the heavy flavor will be a sensitive signal for the thermalization of light flavors. An upgrade of RHIC (RHIC-II) is intended for the second half of the decade, with a luminosity increase to about 20-40 times the design value of 8x1026 cm-2 s-1 for Au+Au, and 2x1032 cm-2 s-1 for polarized proton beams. The PHENIX collaboration plans to upgrade its experiment to exploit with an enhanced detector new physics then in reach. For this purpose, we are constructing the Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX). The VTX detector will provide us the tool to measure new physics observables that are not accessible at the present RHIC or available only with very limited accuracy. The VTX detector consists of four layers of barrel detectors located in the region of pseudorapidity |eta| technology choices used in the design, performance of individual silicon sensor and silicon detector prototype.

Rachid Nouicer; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

410th Brookhaven Lecture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

Peter Steinberg

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PHYSICS WITH AND PHYSICS OF COLLIDING ELECTRON BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributed so much to the physics of colliding beams, theyto reap so little from the physics with colliding beams.Conference on High-Energy Physics, Vienna" September 1968 (

Pellegrini, Claudio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS and CBA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan has been developed to inject ion beams from the Brookhaven Tandem or a cyclotron added to the Tandem into the AGS. This beam could then be injected into a relativistic heavy ion collider. The availability of many CBA components adds to the attractiveness of this proposal.

Barton, M.Q.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Challenges for highest energy circular colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Of course, the lesson of high energy physics has been that higher energies have generally revealed new that the full exploration of the Standard Model was likely to require a very high energy hadron collider important, it is not possible to postpone indefinitely new physics associated with the Higgs boson. To see

Murayama, Hitoshi

247

QCD Interconnection Studies at Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy objects like the W, Z and t are short-lived compared with typical hadronization times. When pairs of such particles are produced, the subsequent hadronic decay systems may therefore become interconnected. We study such potential effects at Linear Collider energies.

Valery A. Khoze; Torbjörn Sjöstrand

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Background Simulations for the International Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on superconducting technology to collide bunches of electrons and positrons. The baseline configuration (about 31 km in a clean experimental environment with low backgrounds. The LHC will likely discover the Higgs boson accelerator directly. DESY FLC, 22603 Hamburg, Germany, adrian.vogel@desy.de 1 #12;Figure 1: Overall view

249

Transverse energy dependence of J/Psi suppression in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction for transverse energy dependence of $J/\\psi$ to Drell-Yan ratio in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy was obtained in a model which assume 100% absorption of $J/\\psi$ above a threshold density. The threshold density was obtained by fitting the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energy. At RHIC energy, hard processes may be important. Prediction of $J/\\psi$ suppression with and without hard processes were obtained. With hard processes included, $J/\\psi$'s are strongly suppressed.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC spin program is now fully underway. Several runs have been successfully completed and are producing exciting first results. Luminosity and polarization have improved remarkably and promising advances toward the higher RHIC energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV have been made. At this energy in particular, it will become possible to perform measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries. Parity violation occurs in weak interactions, and in combination with the unique polarization capabilities at RHIC fascinating new opportunities arise. In particular, parity-violating single- and double-spin asymmetries give new insights into nucleon structure by allowing probes of up and down sea and anti-quark polarizations. Such measurements at RHIC are a DOE performance milestone for the year 2013 and are also supported by a very large effort from RIKEN. With transverse polarization, charged-current interactions may be sensitive to the Sivers effect. Parity-violating effects at RHIC have been proposed even as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. With the era of measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries at RHIC now rapidly approaching, we had proposed a small workshop that would bring together the main experts in both theory and experiment. We are very happy that this worked out. The whole workshop contained 17 formal talks, both experiment (10) and theory (7), and many fruitful discussions. The physics motivations for, the planned measurements were reviewed first. The RHIC machine prospects regarding polarized 500 GeV running were discussed, as well as the plans by the RHIC experiments for the vital upgrades of their detectors needed for the W physics program. We also had several talks on the topic of ''semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering'', which provides different access to related physics observables. On the theory side, new calculations were presented, for example in terms of QCD all-order resummations of perturbation theory. Also, new observables, such as jet and W+charrn final states and spin asymmetries in Z production, were proposed and discussed. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations. We are grateful to all participants and speakers for coming to the Center, and for their excellent work. The support provided for this workshop by Dr. N. Samios and his RIKEN-BNL Research Center has been magnificent, and we are very grateful for it. We thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing the facilities to hold the workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Jane Lysik for her efficient work on organizing and running the workshop.

VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN?s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make sense to wait for the results of each accelerator before planning the next one. Thus, we would wait for the results from the Tevatron before planning the LHC experiments, and wait for the LHC before planning any later stage. In reality accelerators require a long time to construct, and they require such specialized resources and human talent that delay can cripple what would be promising opportunities. In any event, we believe that the case for the linear collider is so compelling and robust that we can justify this facility on the basis of our current knowledge, even before the Tevatron and LHC experiments are done. The physics prospects for the linear collider have been studied intensively for more than a decade, and arguments for the importance of its experimental program have been developed from many different points of view. This book provides an introduction and a guide to this literature. We hope that it will allow physicists new to the consideration of linear collider physics to start from their own personal perspectives and develop their own assessments of the opportunities afforded by a linear collider.

Ronan (Editor), M.T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

254

Pion and photon production in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of neutral pions and direct photons are closely connected experimentally, on the other hand they probe quite different aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this short review of the $\\pi^0$ results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC our focus is on the $\\phi$-integrated nuclear modification factor, its energy and system size dependence, and the impact of these results on parton energy loss models. We also discuss the current status of high $p_T$ and thermal direct photon measurements both in $p$ + $p$ and Au+Au collisions. Recognizing the advantages of measuring not only the "signal", but also all the "references" needed for proper interpretation in the same experiments (with same or similar systematics) we argue that RHIC should regularly include $d$ + A and even $d$ + $d$ collisions into its system size and energy scan.

G. David

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Dynamical kurtosis of net and total proton distributions in STAR at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the energy and centrality dependence of dynamical kurtosis for Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV at RHIC. The dynamical kurtosis of net-proton is compared to that of total-proton. The results are also compared with AMPT model calculations.

Zhiming Li

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT HIGH RAPIDITY IN p+p COLLISIONS AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the recent analysis of identified charged particle production at high rapidity performed on data collected from p+p collisions at RHIC ({radical}s = 200 GeV). The extracted invariant cross-sections compare well to NLO pQCD calculations. However, a puzzling high yield of protons at high rapidity and p{sub T} has been found.

DEBBE,R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Version 7.1, February 22, 2007 RHIC II White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harmonic cavity 2) Ring magnets, power supplies, vacuum system 3) Beam instrumentation 4) Operational at this point, but not with e-cooling). * START construction of the electron beam "Figure 8" elements at IP2 are integrated, and electron cooling commissioning can start. RHIC Electron Cooling Parameters Remarks

258

Parametrization for chemical freeze-out conditions from net-charge fluctuations measured at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss details of our thermal model applied to extract chemical freeze-out conditions from fluctuations in the net-electric charge and net-proton number measured at RHIC. A parametrization for these conditions as a function of the beam energy is given.

M. Bluhm; P. Alba; W. Alberico; R. Bellwied; V. Mantovani Sarti; M. Nahrgang; C. Ratti

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that saturation/CGC effects tend to decrease the Odderon intercept, possibly providing an explanation for the lack of experimental evidence for the Odderon so far. This has added further motivation for pursuing searches for the Odderon. During the workshop the status of the Odderon in QCD and its phenomenology were reviewed. The participants also agreed on the most promising observables for the Odderon search at RHIC, which we list. The conclusion of the workshop is that the best available setup to address experimental questions related to the search for the Odderon at RHIC is the proposed combination of STAR experiment and Roman pots of pp2pp experiment, described in the proposal ''Physics with Tagged Forward Protons with the STAR detector at RHIC''.

ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fermilab collider run 1b accelerator performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the performance of Run 1b as of the end of July 1995. This run is the conclusion of Fermilab Collider Run 1, which consists of Run 1a (May 1992 - May 1993) and Run 1b (January 1994 - February 1996). Run 1b is characterized by being the first with the new 400 MeV Linac. At this time the run is not complete. Colliding beam physics is scheduled to resume after the summer 1995 shut down and continue until mid-February 1996. All of the operation to date is at a Tevatron energy of 900 GeV. This report emphasizes performance numbers and the various improvements made to systems to achieve this performance. It will only discuss the underlying physics to a limited extent. The report is divided into sections on: run statistics, I&C issues, proton source performance, antiproton source performance, main ring performance, Tevatron performance, and a summary.

Bharadwaj, V.; Halling, M.; Lucas, P.; McCrory, E.; Mishra, S.; Pruss, S.; Werkema, S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Really large hadron collider working group summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

Dugan, G. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Limon, P. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Syphers, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

1987 DOE review: First collider run operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-..beta.. quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements.

Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.; Edwards, H.; Finley, D.A.; Fowler, W.B.; Harrison, M.; Holmes, S.; Makara, J.N.; Malamud, E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

HBT puzzle at RHIC AMPT model with String Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/RsideSmall radii Small duration time dt by Stephen Johnson at RWW02 One way out: Hydro Softest point in EOS Measured extensively in heavy ion collisions reasonably described by models (hydro-ph/01120062 recent hydro studies: #12;HIJING energy in strings(soft) and minijet partons(hard) ZPC (Zhang

Lin, Zi-wei

265

SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described. 8 refs., 3 figs.

Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, S.M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Leung, K.K. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

B Physics Theory for Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A short overview of theoretical methods for B physics at hadron colliders is presented. The main emphasis is on the theory of two-body hadronic B decays, which provide a rich field of investigation in particular for the Tevatron and the LHC. The subject holds both interesting theoretical challenges as well as many opportunities for flavor studies and new physics tests. A brief review of the current status and recent developments is given. A few additional topics in B physics are also mentioned.

G. Buchalla

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

Future high energy colliders. Formal report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

Moortgat-Pick, G; Battaglia, M; Belanger, G; Fujii, K; Kalinowski, J; Heinemeyer, S; Kiyo, Y; Olive, K; Simon, F; Uwer, P; Wackeroth, D; Zerwas, P M; Arbey, A; Asano, M; Bechtle, P; Bharucha, A; Brau, J; Brummer, F; Choi, S Y; Denner, A; Desch, K; Dittmaier, S; Ellis, J; Ellwanger, U; Englert, C; Freitas, A; Ginzburg, I; Godfrey, S; Greiner, N; Grojean, C; Grunewald, M; Heisig, J; Hocker, A; Kanemura, S; Kawagoe, K; Kogler, R; Krawczyk, M; Kronfeld, A S; Kroseberg, J; Liebler, S; List, J; Mahmoudi, F; Mambrini, Y; Matsumoto, S; Mnich, J; Monig, K; Muhlleitner, M M; Poschl, R; Porod, W; Porto, S; Rolbiecki, K; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, M; Serpico, P; Stanitzki, M; Stål, O; Stefaniak, T; Stockinger, D; Wagner, A; Weiglein, G; Wilson, G W; Zeune, L; Moortgat, F; Xella, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

G. Moortgat-Pick; H. Baer; M. Battaglia; G. Belanger; K. Fujii; J. Kalinowski; S. Heinemeyer; Y. Kiyo; K. Olive; F. Simon; P. Uwer; D. Wackeroth; P. M. Zerwas; A. Arbey; M. Asano; P. Bechtle; A. Bharucha; J. Brau; F. Brummer; S. Y. Choi; A. Denner; K. Desch; S. Dittmaier; U. Ellwanger; C. Englert; A. Freitas; I. Ginzburg; S. Godfrey; N. Greiner; C. Grojean; M. Grunewald; J. Heisig; A. Hocker; S. Kanemura; K. Kawagoe; R. Kogler; M. Krawczyk; A. S. Kronfeld; J. Kroseberg; S. Liebler; J. List; F. Mahmoudi; Y. Mambrini; S. Matsumoto; J. Mnich; K. Monig; M. M. Muhlleitner; R. Poschl; W. Porod; S. Porto; K. Rolbiecki; M. Schmitt; P. Serpico; M. Stanitzki; O. Stål; T. Stefaniak; D. Stockinger; G. Weiglein; G. W. Wilson; L. Zeune; F. Moortgat; S. Xella

2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

QCD Factorization for heavy quarkonium production at collider energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I briefly review several models of the heavy quarkonium production at collider energies, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

Schroeder, C. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydro-inspired parameterizations of freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Popular parameterizations of the freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. Similarities and differences between the blast-wave model and the single-freeze-out model, both used recently to interpret the RHIC data, are outlined. A non-boost-invariant extension of the single-freeze-out model is proposed and applied to describe the recent BRAHMS data.

Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Status and Promise of Particle Interferometry in Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After five years of running at RHIC, and on the eve of the LHC heavy-ion program, we highlight the status of femtoscopic measurements. We emphasize the role interferometry plays in addressing fundamental questions about the state of matter created in such collisions, and present an enumerated list of measurements, analyses and calculations that are needed to advance the field in the coming years.

Selemon Bekele; Fabio Braghin; Zbigniew Chajecki; Paul Chung; John G. Cramer; Tamas Csorgo; Hans Eggers; Sean Gavin; Frederique Grassi; Yogiro Hama; Adam Kisiel; Che-Ming Ko; Tomoi Koide; Gastao Krein; Roy Lacey; Richard Lednicky; Michael A. Lisa; Wesley Metzger; Dariusz Miskowiec; Kenji Morita; Sandra S. Padula; Scott Pratt; Wei-Liang Qian; Vladislav Simak; Yuri Sinyukov; Michal Sumbera; Bernardo M. Tavares; Giuseppe Verde; Detlef Zschiesche

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Central collisions of heavy ions. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R&D project was performed.

Fung, Sun-yiu

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

$J/?$ production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC and the nuclear absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that a QCD based nuclear absorption model, with few parameters fixed to reproduce experimental $J/\\psi$ yield in 200 GeV pp/pA and 450 GeV pA collisions can explain the preliminary PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy, $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV. However, the model does not give satisfactory description to the preliminary PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions. The analysis suggest that in Au+Au collisions, $J/\\psi$ are suppressed in a medium unlike the medium produced in SPS energy nuclear collisions or in RHIC energy Cu+Cu collisions.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

Buda-Lund hydro model and the elliptic flow at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ellipsoidally symmetric Buda-Lund hydrodynamic model describes naturally the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity dependence of the elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 130$ and 200 GeV. The result confirms the indication of quark deconfinement in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, obtained from Buda-Lund hydro model fits to combined spectra and HBT radii of BRAHMS, PHOBOS, PHENIX and STAR.

M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

A bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the overall development effort for the RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform [1,2,3], a generic four channel 16 bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) daughter module was developed to provide high speed, wide dynamic range digitizing and processing of signals from DC to several hundred megahertz. The first operational use of this card was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF beam control feedback loops. This paper will describe the design and performance features of this daughter module as a bunch to bucket phase detector, and also provide an overview of its place within the overall LLRF platform architecture as a high performance digitizer and signal processing module suitable to a variety of applications. In modern digital control and signal processing systems, ADCs provide the interface between the analog and digital signal domains. Once digitized, signals are then typically processed using algorithms implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic, general purpose processors (GPPs), digital signal processors (DSPs) or a combination of these. For the recently developed and commissioned RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, we've developed a four channel ADC daughter module based on the Linear Technology LTC2209 16 bit, 160 MSPS ADC and the Xilinx V5FX70T FPGA. The module is designed to be relatively generic in application, and with minimal analog filtering on board, is capable of processing signals from DC to 500 MHz or more. The module's first application was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector (BTB-PD) for the RHIC LLRF system. The same module also provides DC digitizing of analog processed BPM signals used by the LLRF system for radial feedback.

Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Polizzo, S.; Severino, F.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Complete Onium Program with R2D at RHIC II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following on the discovery of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at RHIC, a program of detailed quarkonia measurements is crucial to understanding the nature of deconfinement. Lattice QCD calculations suggest a sequential melting of the quarkonia states in the deconfined medium. Such a melting would lead to a suppression in the measured charmonium and bottomonium yields. However, distinguishing a true suppression from shadowing, absorption, and recombination effects requires detailed measurements of the charmonium states (J/psi, psi', and chi_c) and bottomonium states (Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S)). Also, since measurements are needed not only in A+A, but also in p+p for determining primary yields and in p+A for evaluating absorption, the detector should perform well in all collision environments. To fully realize the program outlined above, a new detector will be required at RHIC-II. We present a proposal for a complete quarkonia program and the abilities of a new detector, R2D, to meet the stated requirements. Comparisons will be made with proposed upgrades to existing RHIC detectors and with the upcoming LHC program.

Richard Witt

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Proposal for the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) to the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The PHENIX MPC-EX detector is a Si-W preshower extension to the existing PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeters (MPC). The MPC-EX will consist of eight layers of alternating W absorber and Si mini-pad sensors and will be installed in time for RHIC Run-15. Covering a large pseudorapidity range, 3.1 80 GeV, a factor of four improvement over current capabilities. Not only will the MPC-EX strengthen PHENIX's existing forward neutral pion and jet measurements, it also provides the necessary neutral pion rejection to make a prompt photon measurement feasible in both p+A and p+p collisions. With this neutral pion rejection, prompt (direct + fragmentation) photon yields at high p_T, p_T > 3 GeV, can be statistically extracted using a double ratio method. In p+A collisions direct photons at forward rapidities are optimally sensitive to the gluon distribution because, unlike pions, direct photons are only produced by processes that are directly sensitive to the gluon distribution at leading order. A measurement of the forward prompt photon R_pA will cleanly access and greatly expand our understanding of the gluon nuclear parton distribution functions and provide important information about the initial state in heavy ion collisions. In transversely polarized p+p collisions the MPC-EX will make possible a measurement of the prompt photon single spin asymmetry A_N, and will help elucidate the correlation of valence partons in the proton with the proton spin.

S. Campbell; R. Hollis; A. Iordanova; E. Kistenev; X. Jiang; Y. Kwon; J. Lajoie; J. Perry; R. Seto; A. Sukhanov; A. Timilsina; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On his second visit to Brookhaven Lab, on April 21,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Nuclear & Particle Physics Steve Vigdor, Collider-Acceler- ator Department Chair Thomas Roser, PHENIX STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- a particle accelera- tor at BNL of the heli- um nucleus: antihelium-4. This new particle, also known as the anti-alpha, is the heaviest anti

282

Energy Content of Colliding Plane Waves using Approximate Noether Symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to study the energy content of colliding plane waves using approximate Noether symmetries. For this purpose, we use approximate Lie symmetry method of Lagrangian for differential equations. We formulate the first-order perturbed Lagrangian for colliding plane electromagnetic and gravitational waves. It is shown that in both cases, there does not exist

M. Sharif; Saira Waheed

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop'' scale is also discussed.

Deborah A. Harris; Kevin S. McFarland

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

285

Ground motion data for International Collider models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Stopping and Baryon Transport in Heavy Ion Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

F. Videbaek

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Collider Phenomenology with Split-UED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the collider implications of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. The non-vanishing fermion mass in the bulk, which is consistent with the KK-parity, largely modifies the phenomenology of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions. We scrutinize the behavior of couplings and study the discovery reach of the Tevatron and the LHC for level-2 Kaluza-Klein modes in the dilepton channel, which would indicates the presence of the extra dimensions. Observation of large event rates for dilepton resonances can result from a nontrivial fermion mass profile along the extra dimensions, which, in turn, may corroborate extra dimensional explanation for the observation of the positron excess in cosmic rays. The Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions scenario has received great attention. Recently non-vanishing bulk fermion masses have been introduced without spoiling the virtue of KK-parity. The fermion profiles are no longer simple sine/cosine functions and depend upon the specific values of bulk parameters. The profiles of fermions are split along the extra dimensions while the wave functions of the bosons remain the same as in UED. A simple introduction of a KK-parity conserving bulk fermion mass has significant influences on collider aspects as well as astrophysical implications of UED. For instance, the DM annihilation fraction into certain SM fermion pairs is either enhanced or reduced (compared to the MUED case) so that one can perhaps explain the PAMELA positron excess while suppressing the anti-proton flux. In this paper, we have concentrated on collider phenomenology of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. We have revisited the KK decomposition in detail and analyzed wave function overlaps to compute relevant couplings for collider studies. We have discussed general collider implication for level-1 KK modes and level-2 KK with non-zero bulk mass and have computed LHC reach for the EW level-2 KK bosons, {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2}, in the dilepton channel. The LHC should able to cover the large parameter space (up to M{sub V{sub 2}} {approx} 1.5 TeV for {mu}L {ge} 1) even with early data assuming {approx}100 pb{sup -1} or less. The existence of double resonances is one essential feature arising from extra dimensional models. Whether or not one can see double resonances depends both on how degenerate the two resonances are and on the mass resolution of the detector. The very high P{sub T} from the decay makes resolution in dimuon channel worse than in dielectron final state. This is because one can reconstruct electron from ECAL but muon momentum reconstruction relies on its track, which is barely curved in this case. Further indication for SUED might be the discovery of W'-like signature of mass close to Z{sub 2}. The MUED predicts a somewhat lower event rate due to 1-loop suppressed coupling of level-2 bosons to SM fermion pair, while it exists at tree level in SUED. Therefore in UED, one has to rely on indirect production of level-2 bosons, whose collider study requires complete knowledge of the model: the mass spectrum and all the couplings. On the other hand, in the large {mu} limit of SUED, the dependence on mass spectrum is diminished since level-2 KK bosons decay only into SM fermion pairs. This allows us to estimate the signal rate from their direct production, so that they can be discovered at the early phase of the LHC. The indirect production mechanism only increases production cross sections, improving our results. Once a discovery has been made, one should try to reconstruct events and do further measurements such as spin and coupling determination, with more accumulated data, which might discriminate KK resonances from other Z' models. The coupling measurement is directly related to the determination of the bulk masses. A challenging issue might be the existence of two resonances which are rather close to each other.

Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Park, Seong Chan; /Tokyo U., IPMU; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of ? s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of ? s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

Jabeen, Shabnam

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

Governance of the International Linear Collider Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly apportioned at both a national and global level, is essential if the project is to be realised. Finally, models for running costs and decommissioning at the conclusion of the ILC project are proposed. This document represents an interim report of the bodies and individuals studying these questions inside the structure set up and supervised by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). It represents a request for comment to the international community in all relevant disciplines, scientific, technical and most importantly, political. Many areas require further study and some, in particular the site selection process, have not yet progressed sufficiently to be addressed in detail in this document. Discussion raised by this document will be vital in framing the final proposals due to be published in 2012 in the Technical Design Report being prepared by the Global Design Effort of the ILC.

Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Jets in heavy ion collisions with ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy loss of high-p_T partons provides insight into the transport properties of the medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Evidence for this energy loss was first experimentally established through observation of high-p_T hadron suppression at RHIC. More recently, measurements of fully reconstructed jets have been performed at the LHC. In this summary the latest experimental results from the ATLAS collaboration on jet suppression are presented. In particular the jet suppression in inclusive jet yields, path length dependence of the jet suppression, photon-jet and Z^0-jet correlations, heavy flavor suppression, and jet fragmentation are discussed. These results establish qualitative features of the jet quenching mechanism as experimental fact and provide constraints on models of jet energy loss.

Martin Spousta; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Phase-Space Coalescence for heavy and light quarks at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the application and successes of a phase-space coalescence plus fragmentation model that has been applied for hadronization at RHIC. The physical concept is discussed together with the practical implementation. The robustness of main predictions is reviewed together with several open issues like relevance of three dimensional calculation, finite width of the wave functions, effects of quark masses, energy-entropy conservation, space-momentum correlation. Eventually the relevance of coalescence also for the study of the microscopic interaction of heavy quarks is highlighted.

V. Greco

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemical freeze-out parameters in Beam Energy Scan Program of STAR at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The STAR experiment at RHIC has completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program to understand the phase structure of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The bulk properties of the system formed in Au+Au collisions at different center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV have been studied from the data collected in the year 2010 and 2011. The centrality and energy dependence of mid-rapidity ($|y|$ chemical freeze-out parameters are extracted using measured particle ratios within the framework of a statistical model.

Sabita Das

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Has the QCD Critical Point been Signaled by Observations at RHIC ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ($\\eta/s$) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV). A very low value is found $\\eta/s \\sim 0.1$, which is close to the absolute lower bound ($1/4\\pi$). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Lacey, R A; Alexander, J M; Chung, P; Danielewicz, P; Holzmann, W G; Issah, M; Stöcker, H; Taranenko, A; Lacey, Roy A.; Stocker, Horst

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Has the QCD Critical Point been Signaled by Observations at RHIC ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shear viscosity to entropy ratio ($\\eta/s$) is estimated for the hot and dense QCD matter created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV). A very low value is found $\\eta/s \\sim 0.1$, which is close to the conjectured lower bound ($1/4\\pi$). It is argued that such a low value is indicative of thermodynamic trajectories for the decaying matter which lie close to the QCD critical end point.

Roy A. Lacey; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; W. G. Holzmann; M. Issah; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz; Horst Stocker

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

297

Kaon and pion femtoscopy at top RHIC energy in hydrokinetic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrokinetic model is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both STAR and PHENIX collaborations. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached with both initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and Color Glass Condensate (CGC) models, however, at different energy densities.

Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2011-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

U. Baur

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36'000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m3 static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for non-isothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressors. T...

Lebrun, P

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cryogenics for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 26.7 km circumference superconducting accelerator equipped with high-field magnets operating in superfluid helium below 1.9 K, has now fully entered construction at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The heart of the LHC cryogenic system is the quasi-isothermal magnet cooling scheme, in which flowing two-phase saturated superfluid helium removes the heat load from the 36000 ton cold mass, immersed in some 400 m/sup 3/ static pressurised superfluid helium. The LHC also makes use of supercritical helium for nonisothermal cooling of the beam screens which intercept most of the dynamic heat loads at higher temperature. Although not used in normal operation, liquid nitrogen will provide the source of refrigeration for precooling the machine. Refrigeration for the LHC is produced in eight large refrigerators, each with an equivalent capacity of about 18 kW at 4.5 K, completed by 1.8 K refrigeration units making use of several stages of hydrodynamic cold compressor...

Lebrun, P

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Phenomenology of the minimal $B-L$ Model: the Higgs sector at the Large Hadron Collider and future Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Thesis is devoted to the study of the phenomenology of the Higgs sector of the minimal $B-L$ extension of the Standard Model at present and future colliders. Firstly, the motivations that call for the minimal $B-L$ extension are summarised. In addition, the model is analysed in its salient parts. Moreover, a detailed review of the phenomenological allowed Higgs sector parameter space is given. Finally, a complete survey of the distinctive Higgs boson signatures of the model at both the Large Hadron Collider and the future linear colliders is presented.

Giovanni Marco Pruna

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

Hershcovitch, Ady

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Global QCD Analysis and Collider Phenomenology--CTEQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview is given of recent progress on a variety of fronts in the global QCD analysis of the parton structure of the nucleon and its implication for collider phenomenology, carried out by various subgroups of the CTEQ collaboration.

Wu-Ki Tung; H. L. Lai; J. Pumplin; P. Nadolsky; C. -P. Yuan

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

SPADs for Vertex Tracker detectors in Future Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics aims at the future linear colliders impose such stringent requirements on detector systems that exceed those met by any previous technology. Amongst other novel technologies, SPADs (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) detectors are being developed to track high energy particles at ILC (International Linear Collider) and CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). These sensors offer outstanding qualities, such as an extraordinary high sensitivity, ultra-fast response time and virtually infinite gain, in addition to compatibility with standard CMOS technologies. As a result, SPAD detectors enable the direct conversion of a single particle event onto a CMOS digital signal in the sub-nanosecond time scale, which leads to the possibility of single BX (bunch crossing) resolution at some particle colliders. However, SPAD detectors suffer from two main problems, namely the noise pulses generated by the sensor and the low fill-factor. The noise pulses worsen the detector occupancy, while the low fill-factor reduces the detec...

Vilella, E; Vila, A; Dieguez, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

TESLA*HERA as Lepton (Photon)-Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New facilities for particle and nuclear physics research, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

O. Yavas; A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Prospects of Heavy Neutrino Searches at Future Lepton Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at next generation lepton colliders. In particular, we focus on the planned electron-positron colliders, operating in two different beam modes, namely, $e^+e^-$ and $e^-e^-$. In the $e^+e^-$ beam mode, we consider various production and decay modes of the heavy neutrino ($N$), and find that the final state with $e+2j+\\slashed{E}$, arising from the $e^+e^-\\to N\

Banerjee, Shankha; Ibarra, Alejandro; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mitra, Manimala

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

On Field Emission in High Energy Colliders Initiated by a Relativistic Positively Charged Bunch of Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of the LHC and future colliders aims their operation with high intensity beams, with bunch population, $N_p$, of the order of $10^{11}$. This is dictated by a desire to study very rare processes with maximum data sample. HEP colliders are engineering structures of many kilometers in length, whose transverse compactness is achieved by the application of the superconducting technologies and limitations of cost. However the compactness of the structural elements conceals and potential danger for the stable work of the accelerator. This is because a high intensity beam of positively charged particles (protons, positrons, ions) creates around itself an electric self-field of very high intensity, $10^5 - 10^6$ V/cm. Being located near the conducting surfaces, at the distances of 1-20 mm away from them, the field of such bunches activates the field emission of electrons from the surface. These electrons, in addition to electrons from the ionization of residual gases, secondary electrons and electrons knocked out by synchrotron radiation, contribute to the development of a dense electron cloud in the transport line. The particles of the bunch, being scattered on the dense electron cloud with $N_e\\sim N_p$, leaves the beam and may cause noticeable damage. The paper presents an analysis of the conditions, under which the field emission in the LHC collimator system may become a serious problem. The analogous analysis of a prototype of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, USLC, reveals that a noticeable field emission will accompany positron bunches on their entire path during acceleration.

B. B. Levchenko

2006-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

A deterministic, gigabit serial timing, synchronization and data link for the RHIC LLRF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical capability of the new RHIC low level rf (LLRF) system is the ability to synchronize signals across multiple locations. The 'Update Link' provides this functionality. The 'Update Link' is a deterministic serial data link based on the Xilinx RocketIO protocol that is broadcast over fiber optic cable at 1 gigabit per second (Gbps). The link provides timing events and data packets as well as time stamp information for synchronizing diagnostic data from multiple sources. The new RHIC LLRF was designed to be a flexible, modular system. The system is constructed of numerous independent RF Controller chassis. To provide synchronization among all of these chassis, the Update Link system was designed. The Update Link system provides a low latency, deterministic data path to broadcast information to all receivers in the system. The Update Link system is based on a central hub, the Update Link Master (ULM), which generates the data stream that is distributed via fiber optic links. Downstream chassis have non-deterministic connections back to the ULM that allow any chassis to provide data that is broadcast globally.

Hayes, T.; Smith, K.S.; Severino, F.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Tricky Azimuthal Dependence of Jet Quenching at RHIC and LHC via CUJET2.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High transverse momentum neutral pion and charged hadron suppression pattern with respect to reaction plane at RHIC and LHC energies in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are studied in a perturbative QCD based model, CUJET2.0. CUJET2.0 has dynamical DGLV radiation kernel and Thoma-Gyulassy elastic energy loss, with both being generalized to including multi-scale running strong coupling as well as energy loss probability fluctuations, and the full jet path integration is performed in a low $p_T$ flow data constrained medium which has 2+1D viscous hydrodynamical expanding profile. We find that in CUJET2.0, with only one control parameter, $\\alpha_{max}$, the maximum coupling strength, fixed to be 0.26, the computed nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in central and semi-peripheral AA collisions are consistent with RHIC and LHC data at average $\\chi^2/d.o.f.data are acquired given average $\\alpha_{max}$ over in-plane and out-of-plane paths varying as less as 10\\%, suggests a non-trivial dependence of the high $p_T$ single particle $v_2$ on the azimuthally varied strong coupling.

Jiechen Xu; Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

THE ERL HIGH-ENERGY COOLER FOR RHIC* I. Ben-Zvi** for the electron cooling team***,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. The design evolved during the past 5 years. The present design will use classical (non-magnetized) electron presents many challenges to the design of the cooler. The cooling is slowed down by the high- energyTHE ERL HIGH-ENERGY COOLER FOR RHIC* I. Ben-Zvi** for the electron cooling team***, C-AD, BNL

313

Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragments in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of the fragments, composite mass of the reacting system, and the impact parameter of the reaction. It has been observed that a reduced cross section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with an increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

Rajni,; Kumar, Suneel; Puri, Rajeev K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, Punjab (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Correlation between balance energy and transition energy for symmetric colliding nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the correlation between balance energy and transition energy of fragment in heavy-ion collisions for different systems at incident energies between 40 and 1200 MeV/nucleon using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. With increasing incident energy, the elliptic flow shows a transition from positive (in-plane) to negative (out-of-plane) flow. This transition energy is found to depend on the size of fragments, composite mass of reacting system, and the impact parameter of reaction. It has been observed that reduced cross-section can explain the experimental data. There is a correlation between transition energy and balance energy as their difference decreases with increase in the total mass of colliding nuclei.

Rajni; Suneel Kumar; Rajeev K. Puri

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electron-Transfer from H-2 and Ar to Stored Multiply Charged Argon Ions Produced by Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for collisions of He and Ne with doubly charged ions of the lanthanide series, La +, Ce +, etc. , the ionization poten- tials of multiply charged ions greatly exceed those of atoms or molecules with which they collide, so electron transfer from the neutral...

Kravis, S. D.; Church, David A.; Johnson, B. M.; Meron, M.; Jones, K. W.; Levin, J. C.; Sellin, I. A.; Azuma, Y.; Berrahmansour, N.; Berry, H. G.; Druetta, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

Wagner, Mathias

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Charge Fluctuations as Thermometer for Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a determination of freeze-out conditions in heavy-ion collisions based on ratios of cu- mulants of net electric charge fluctuations obtained from lattice QCD. These ratios can reliably be calculated for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. We first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize the conditions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows us to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature. We apply our method to preliminary data of the STAR and PHENIX collaborations.

Mathias Wagner

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

EMSL - ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ions en Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of airwater interface of sodium fluoride aqueous http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

319

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 72, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists. A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are seventy-two proceeding volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still operational. A 10 teraflops QCDOC computer in under construction and expected to be completed this year.

OGAWA, A.

2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

Transverse beams stability studies at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A charged particle beam travelling at the speed of light produces large electromagnetic wake fields which, through interactions with its surroundings, act back on the particles in the beam. This coupled system may become unstable, resulting in a deterioration of the beam quality. Such effects play a major role in most existing storage rings, as they limit the maximum performance achievable. In a collider, the presence of a second beam significantly changes the dynamics, as the electromagnetic interactions of the two beams on each other are usually very strong and may, also, limit the collider performances. This thesis treats the coherent stability of the two beams in a circular collider, including the effects of the electromagnetic wake fields and of the beam-beam interactions, with particular emphasis on CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As opposed to other colliders, this machine features a large number of bunches per beam each experiencing multiple long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions. Existing models...

Buffat, Xavier; Pieloni, Tatiana

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

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321

A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

RHIC Newsroom  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Media Contact:REPORTFeature

323

RHIC Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhaven National

324

Power Saving Optimization for Linear Collider Interaction Region Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of Interaction Region parameters of a TeV energy scale linear collider has to take into account constraints defined by phenomena such as beam-beam focusing forces, beamstrahlung radiation, and hour-glass effect. With those constraints, achieving a desired luminosity of about 2E34 would require use of e{sup +}e{sup -} beams with about 10 MW average power. Application of the 'travelling focus' regime may allow the required beam power to be reduced by at least a factor of two, helping reduce the cost of the collider, while keeping the beamstrahlung energy loss reasonably low. The technique is illustrated for the 500 GeV CM parameters of the International Linear Collider. This technique may also in principle allow recycling the e{sup +}e{sup -} beams and/or recuperation of their energy.

Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Recent Results from PHENIX Experiment at RHIC: Exploring the QCD Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some important results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD bulk matter at temperatures and densities that sur- pass the limits where hadrons exist as individual entities, so raising to prominence the quark- gluon degrees of freedom. We present measurements of nuclear modification factors for neutral pions, light favors (strange hadrons), direct-photons and non-photonic electrons from decays of particles carrying charm or beauty quarks. We interpret the large suppression of hadron produc- tion at high transverse momenta as resulting from a large energy loss by the precursor parton on its path through the dense matter, primarily driven by gluon radiation. This dense QCD matter responds to energy loss in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. Further, its elliptic flow measurements suggest that the hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. The results are...

Nouicer, Rachid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Buda-Lund hydro model for ellipsoidally symmetric fireballs and the elliptic flow at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ellipsoidally symmetric extension of Buda-Lund hydrodynamic model is shown here to yield a natural description of the pseudorapidity dependence of the elliptic flow $v_2(\\eta)$, as determined recently by the PHOBOS experiment for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 130$ and 200 GeV. With the same set of parameters, the Buda-Lund model describes also the transverse momentum dependence of $v_2$ of identified particles at mid-rapidity. The results confirm the indication for quark deconfinement in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, obtained from a successful Buda-Lund hydro model fit to the single particle spectra and two-particle correlation data, as measured by the BRAHMS, PHOBOS, PHENIX and STAR collaborations.

M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Reaction Plane and Beam Energy Dependence Of The Balance Function at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The balance function, which measures the correlation between opposite sign charge pairs, is sensitive to the mechanisms of charge formation and the subsequent relative diffusion of the balancing charges. The study of the balance function can provide information about charge creation time as well as the subsequent collective behavior of particles. In this paper, we present a reaction-plane-dependent balance function study for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 200 GeV and compare with results from recent three particle correlation measurements. We also report balance functions for relative pseudorapidity ($\\Delta \\eta$), relative rapidity ($\\Delta y$), and relative azimuthal angle ($\\Delta \\phi$) from the recent RHIC beam energy scan data.

Hui Wang; for the STAR collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Can $J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ broadening signal the deconfinement transition at RHIC?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed the latest NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. It is shown that a QCD based nuclear absorption model, where $J/\\psi$'s are absorbed in nuclear medium could explain the latest NA50 data on the centrality dependence of the $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ratio. The model also explains the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ over minimum bias ratio and the $p_T$ broadening of $J/\\psi$'s. A QGP based threshold model where all the $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed above a threshold density, also explains the data sets with smeared threshold density. Even at RHIC energy, centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression or $p_T$ broadening could not distinguish between the two models.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Holographic light quark jet quenching at RHIC and LHC via the shooting strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new shooting string holographic model of jet quenching of light quarks in strongly coupled plasmas is presented to overcome the phenomenological incompatibilities of previous falling string holographic scenarios that emerged when confronted with the recent LHC data. This model is based on strings with finite momentum endpoints that start close to the horizon and lose energy as they approach the boundary. This framework is applied to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA of light hadrons at RHIC and LHC, showing that this model improves greatly the comparison with the recent light hadron suppression data. The effects of the Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature corrections to the AdS5 geometry further improve the agreement with the data.

Andrej Ficnar; Steven S. Gubser; Miklos Gyulassy

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

The fundamental power coupler and pick-up of the 56 MHz SRF cavity for RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental power coupler (FPC) is designed to provide fast tuning the 56MHz SRF cavity in RHIC. The FPC will be inserted from one of the chemical cleaning ports at the rear end of the cavity with magnetic coupling to the RF field. The size and the location of the FPC are decided based on the required operational external Q of the cavity. The cavity is beam driven, and the FPC is designed with variable coupling that would cover a range of power levels. It is thermally isolated from the base temperature of the cavity, which is 4.2K. A 1kW power amplifier will be used to close an amplitude control feedback loop. In this paper, we discuss the coupling factor of the FPC with the chosen design.

Wu, Q.; Bellavia, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pai, C.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

Simulation of the High-Pass Filter for 56MHz Cavity for RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 56MHz Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity for RHIC places high demands High Order Mode (HOM) damping, as well as requiring a high field at gap with fundamental mode frequency. The damper of 56MHz cavity is designed to extract all modes to the resistance load outside, including the fundamental mode. Therefore, the circuit must incorporate a high-pass filter to reflect back the fundamental mode into the cavity. In this paper, we show the good frequency response map obtained from our filter's design. We extract a circuit diagram from the microwave elements that simulate well the frequency spectrum of the finalized filter. We also demonstrate that the power dissipation on the filter over its frequency range is small enough for cryogenic cooling.

Wu, Q.; Ben-Zvi, I.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Jet absorption and corona effect at RHIC. Extracting collision geometry from experimental data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate a possible existence of a finite formation time of strongly interacting plasma in nuclear collisions at RHIC from recent experimental data. To show this, we use a simple model based on Monte Carlo simulation of nucleus-nucleus collisions with realistic nuclear density distribution. The most striking feature of the experimental data - an absence of absorption of high transverse momentum pions in the reaction plane direction for mid-peripheral collisions - points to the presence of a surface zone with no absorption and strong suppression in the inner core. A natural interpretation of such a zone could be the plasma formation time T~2-3 fm/c. The existence of a formation time could dramatically change our understanding of many experimentally observed features. With this assumption we describe the angular anisotropy of high transverse momentum pions with respect to the reaction plane and the centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

V. S. Pantuev

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

$J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ spectra in RHIC and LHC energy collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a hydrodynamic model, we have studied $J/\\psi$ production in Au+Au/Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. At the initial time, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the fluid. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are dissolved if the local fluid temperature exceeds a threshold temperature $T_{J/\\psi}$. Sequential melting of charmonium states ($\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$), with melting temperatures $T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.2T_c$, $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2T_c$ and feed-down fraction $F\\approx 0.3$, explains the PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions. $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra and the nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions are also well explained in the model. The model however over predict centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions by 20-30%. The $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra are under predicted by 20-30%. The model predict that in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=5500 GeV, $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed by a factor of $\\sim$ 10. The model predicted $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ distribution in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC is similar to that in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Pseudo-Critical Enhancement of Thermal Photons in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the spectra and elliptic flow of thermal photons emitted in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions (URHICs) at RHIC and LHC. The thermal emission rates are taken from complete leading-order rates for the QGP and hadronic many-body calculations including baryons and antibaryons, as well as meson-exchange reactions (including Bremsstrahlung). We first update previous thermal fireball calculations by implementing a lattice-QCD based equation of state and extend them to compare to recent LHC data. We then scrutinize the space-time evolution of Au-Au collisions at RHIC by employing an ideal hydrodynamic model constrained by bulk- and multistrange-hadron spectra and elliptic flow, including a non-vanishing initial flow. We systematically compare the evolutions of temperature, radial flow, azimuthal anisotropy and four-volume, and exhibit the temperature profile of thermal photon radiation. Based on these insights, we put forward a scenario with a "pseudo-critical enhancement" of thermal emission rates, and investigate its impact on RHIC and LHC direct photon data.

Hendrik van Hees; Min He; Ralf Rapp

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

A concept of the photon collider beam dump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

L. I. Shekhtman; V. I. Telnov

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment of the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed. 27 refs., 15 figs.

Leskovar, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric colliding nuclei Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

colliding nuclei Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asymmetric colliding nuclei Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 managed for the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TESLA*HERA Based gamma-p and gamma-A Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main parameters and physics search potential of gamma-p and gamma-A colliders, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Detector Scenario for the MuonCollider Cooling Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Meson Lab at Fermilab: Power Supplies (two floors) Cooling Apparatus Muon Beamline shielding shieldingA Detector Scenario for the Muon­Collider Cooling Experiment C. Lu, K.T. McDonald and E.J. Prebys the emittance of the muon beam to 3% accuracy before and after the muon cooling apparatus. 1 #12; Possible site

McDonald, Kirk

343

First events and prospects at the Fermilab collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given including the detector components and the data acquisition system. The first test run, the first events, and the performance of the detector are discussed. Finally the prospects for future running are reviewed.

Binkley, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Pair Production of Tau Sneutrinos at Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pair production of tau sneutrinos in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions and their subsequent decays are studied in a framework of the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We present an analysis for the parameter space (BR vs. mass) which could be explored at the future high energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ colliders.

V. Ari; O. Cakir

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER D. Taqqu Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH Abstract A scheme for obtaining an intense source of low energy muons is described. It is based of the decay muons an intense intermediate energy muon beam is obtained. For the specific case of negative

McDonald, Kirk

346

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER (IPAC12, WEPPD038) The target station a 15-20 T superconducting magnet. The target itself is a free mercury jet, moving at 20 m/s at an small angle to the magnetic axis, so as later to be collected in a mercury pool/beam dump. The replaceable

McDonald, Kirk

347

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER Van Graves , ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Factory is a free-stream mercury jet within a 20-T magnetic field being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton

McDonald, Kirk

348

Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of strong suppression of inclusive hadron distributions and di-hadron correlations at high $p_{T}$, while providing evidence for partonic energy loss, also suffer from geometric biases due to the competition of energy loss and fragmentation. The measurements of fully reconstructed jets is expected to lack these biases as the energy flow is measured independently of the fragmentation details. In this article, we review the recent results from the heavy ion collisions collected by the STAR experiment at RHIC on direct jet reconstruction utilizing the modern sequential recombination and cone jet reconstruction algorithms together with their background subtraction techniques. In order to assess the jet reconstruction biases a comparison with the jet cross section measurement in $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions to account for nuclear geometric effects is performed. Comparison of the inclusive jet cross section obtained in central Au+Au events with that in $p+p$ collisions, published previously by STAR, suggests that unbiased jet reconstruction in the complex heavy ion environment indeed may be possible.

Sevil Salur

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Higgs-boson production at the Photon Collider at TESLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis feasibility of the precise measurement of the Higgs-boson production cross section gamma+gamma->higgs->b+bbar at the Photon Collider at TESLA is studied in detail. The study is based on the realistic luminosity spectra simulation. The heavy quark background is estimated using the dedicated code based on NLO QCD calculations. Other background processes, which were neglected in the earlier analyses, are also studied. Also the contribution from the overlaying events, gamma+gamma->hadrons, is taken into account. The non-zero beam crossing angle and the finite size of colliding bunches are included in the event generation. The analysis is based on the full detector simulation with realistic b-tagging, and the criteria of event selection are optimized separately for each considered Higgs-boson mass. For the Standard-Model Higgs boson with mass of 120 to 160 GeV the partial width \\Gamma(h->gamma+gamma)BR(h->b+bbar) can be measured with a statistical accuracy of 2.1-7.7% after one year of the Photon Collider running. The systematic uncertainties of the measurement are estimated to be of the order of 2%. For MSSM Higgs bosons A and H, for M_A=200-350 GeV and tan(beta)=7, the statistical precision of the cross-section measurement is estimated to be 8--34%, for four considered MSSM parameters sets. As heavy neutral Higgs bosons in this scenario may not be discovered at LHC or at the first stage of the e+e- collider, an opportunity of being a discovery machine is also studied for the Photon Collider.

Piotr Niezurawski

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Time evolution of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas investigated using a pinhole camera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suitable conditions for x-ray amplification in a laser produced plasma.24 When two plasmas collide, variTime evolution of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas investigated using a pinhole camera S for publication 14 February 2001 Time resolved studies of colliding laser produced magnesium plasmas are performed

Harilal, S. S.

352

Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear shadowing and prompt photons at relativistic hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of prompt photons at high energies provides a direct probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions. In particular, one expect that it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions. In this letter we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of prompt photons and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ at RHIC and LHC energies. We demonstrate that the study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution.

C. Brenner Mariotto; V. P. Goncalves

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 1, Search for new phenomena at colliding-beam facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains brief papers and viewgraphs on high energy topics like: supersymmetry; new gauge bosons; and new high energy colliders.

Rogers, J. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

Local Measurement of NonClassical Ion Heating During Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

â??enic flows [9]. In SSX (Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment), Alfvâ??enic ion jets correlated with reconnection, reconnection occurs when two spheromaks collide at a substantial fraction of the Alfvâ??en speed. Thus, e#ects such as compressional heating or conversion of the translational energy of the spheromaks could complicate

357

Local Measurement of Non-Classical Ion Heating During Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´enic flows [9]. In SSX (Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment), Alfv´enic ion jets correlated with reconnection, reconnection occurs when two spheromaks collide at a substantial fraction of the Alfv´en speed. Thus, effects such as compressional heating or conversion of the translational energy of the spheromaks could complicate

358

Collision-Induced Dissociation of Water into Ions Igor A. Wojciechowski and Barbara J. Garrison*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

colliding with water molecules in a vacuum and water ice. Carbon projectiles are demonstrated to produce dynamics simulations of energetic particle bombardment of water ice. The model keeps all the properties on the measurement of the secondary ion yield. For the special matrix of water ice, the formation mechanism

359

Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations. Abstract: Structures for Lossless Ion...

360

Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

STAR Coll

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

secondary ion detection | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion detection secondary ion detection Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

362

Investigating Iron Ions | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating Iron Ions Investigating Iron Ions Computer code provides detailed predictions of highly charged ions in water Using resources at EMSL, scientists obtained...

363

Recent Results from PHENIX Experiment at RHIC: Exploring the QCD Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some important results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD bulk matter at temperatures and densities that sur- pass the limits where hadrons exist as individual entities, so raising to prominence the quark- gluon degrees of freedom. We present measurements of nuclear modification factors for neutral pions, light favors (strange hadrons), direct-photons and non-photonic electrons from decays of particles carrying charm or beauty quarks. We interpret the large suppression of hadron produc- tion at high transverse momenta as resulting from a large energy loss by the precursor parton on its path through the dense matter, primarily driven by gluon radiation. This dense QCD matter responds to energy loss in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. Further, its elliptic flow measurements suggest that the hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. The results are shown as a function of transverse momentum, centrality in different collision systems and energies.

Rachid Nouicer; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

Direct photon production of d+A and A+A collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct photon productions in minimum bias d+Cu and d+Au and central Cu+Cu and Au+Au at center of mass energies {radical}s = 62.4 GeV and 200GeV at RHIC are investigated systematically by taking into account jet quenching effect, medium-induced photon bremsstrahlung and jet-photon conversion in the hot QGP as well as known cold nuclear matter effects such as the isospin effect, the Cronin effect, shadowing effect, EMC effect and cold nuclear matter energy loss. It is shown that at high p{sub T} the nuclear modification factor for direct photon R{sub AA}(p{sub T}) is suppressed and dominated by cold nuclear matter effects, and there is no large enhancement due to medium-induced photon bremsstrahlung and jet-photon conversion in the hot QGP. Comparison of numerical simulations with experimental data rules out large Cronin enhancement and incoherent photon emission in medium, though large error bars in currently experimental data can not provide tight constraints on other nuclear matter effects.

Zhang, Benwei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vitev, Ivan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

None

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

Zisman, Michael S

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

Quigg, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Global polarization measurement in Au plus Au collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

angular momentum. We present the results of Lambda and (Lambda) over bar hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spectra of identified high-p(T) pi(+/-) and p((p)over-bar ) in Cu + Cu collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report new results on identified (anti) proton and charged pion spectra at large transverse momenta (3 < p(T) < 10 GeV/c) from Cu + Cu collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

BulletinVol. 64 -No. 27 August 6, 2010 The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the ACF, the computing facility, also located at BNL, for the ATLAS, was recognized for his outstanding and inno- vative leadership of the RCF, the computing facility- jor computing effort will meet the world-class needs of RHIC and ATLAS. The RCF runs... See Michael

Ohta, Shigemi

372

Proposal for the addition of forward TOF rings to the STAR detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be addressed during a beam energy scan planned for 2010 while the second can be addressed by colliding Uranium ions (238 92U) at RHIC. The Uranium nucleus is an oblate spheroid, so central U+U collisions can be very asymmetric. The conversion of that spatial asymmetry to momentum space can test the validity

Llope, William J.

373

90-50-10 Celebration: Ernest Courant  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

BNL hosts a celebration titled ?90-50-10? to celebrate the 90th birthday of Ernest Courant (of ?strong focusing? fame), the 50th anniversary of the startup of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS, home of three Nobel Prizes), and the 10th anniversary of first collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

Ernest Courant

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As one of the major mid-rapidity tracking devices of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) plays an important role in measuring trajectory and energy of high energy charged particles...

Huo, Liaoyuan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Heavy quark diffusion in pre-equilibrium stage of heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The drag and diffusion coefficients of the heavy quarks have been evaluated in the pre-equilibrium phase which is expected to be formed in the early stages of the evolving fire ball produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The interaction of the probe with the gluon in the pre-equilibrium phase has been treated within the framework of perturbative QCD. For the pre-equilibrium gluon distribution function we have used the KLN and Classical Yang Mills(CYM) models. It is observed that the magnitude of both the transport coefficients have significant values in the pre-equilibrium phase and comparable to the magnitudes obtained for kinetically equilibrated gluonic system. However, these values are larger than the value estimated for a chemically equilibrated quark gluon plasma. The results may have significant impact on the experimental observable like the suppression and elliptic flow of single electron spectra originating from the decays of heavy mesons produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC a...

Das, Santosh K; Mazumder, Surasree; Greco, Vincenzo; Alam, Jan-e

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

$J/?$ suppression in the threshold model at RHIC and LHC energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the QGP based threshold model \\cite{Blaizot:2000ev,Blaizot:1996nq}, in addition to the normal nuclear absorption, $J/\\psi$'s are subjected to an 'anomalous' suppression such that above a threshold density $n_{J/\\psi}$, all the $J/\\psi$'s are melted. In the threshold model we have analysed the recent PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Feedback from decay of the state $\\chi$ is accounted for. $J/\\psi$'s are anomalously suppressed above a threshold density, $n_{J/\\psi}=3.57\\pm 0.17$ $fm^{-2}$. Threshold density for anomalous suppression of the state $\\chi$ is uncertain to a large extent, $n_\\chi=0.32 \\pm 0.32$ $fm^{-2}$. The fraction $F$ of the state $\\chi$ can not be determined unambiguously, depending on the nuclear absorption, it can vary from 20% to 40%. We have also predicted for the suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy. In central Pb+Pb collisions, $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed by a factor of 3-4. Suppression pattern is rather similar to that in Au+Au collisions, if not slighty less in central collisions. Using the PHENIX data on the participant number dependence of the Bjorken energy density, we have also estimated the QGP formation time. For critical temperature $T_c$=192 MeV, estimated QGP formation time ranges between 0.07-0.09 fm/c.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report measurements of single- and double- spin asymmetries for $W^{\\pm}$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson production in longitudinally polarized $p+p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 510$ GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for $W^{\\pm}$ were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the $W$ mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by recent polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range $0.05

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

Formation of a long-lived hot field reversed configuration by dynamically merging two colliding high-{beta} compact toroids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high temperature field reversed configuration (FRC) has been produced in the newly built, world's largest compact toroid (CT) facility, C-2, by colliding and merging two high-{beta} CTs produced using the advanced field-reversed {theta}-pinch technology. This long-lived, stable merged state exhibits the following key properties: (1) apparent increase in the poloidal flux from the first pass to the final merged state, (2) significantly improved confinement compared to conventional {theta}-pinch FRCs with flux decay rates approaching classical values in some cases, (3) strong conversion from kinetic energy into thermal energy with total temperature (T{sub e} + T{sub i}) exceeding 0.5 keV, predominantly into the ion channel. Detailed modeling using a new 2-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, LamyRidge, has demonstrated, for the first time, the formation, translation, and merging/reconnection dynamics of such extremely high-{beta} plasmas.

Guo, H. Y.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Barnes, D.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Sevier, L.; Tuszewski, M.; Anderson, M. G.; Andow, R.; Bonelli, L.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Bystritskii, V.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS, AND BEYOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary

Shiltsev, V.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Radiative Return Capabilities of a High-Energy, High-Luminosity $e^+e^-$ Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy $E_{CM}$ can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at $E_{CM}$ = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy $e^+e^-$ colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L; Wang, Lian-Tao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Colliding Stellar Wind Models with Nonequilibrium Ionization: X-rays from WR 147  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of nonequilibrium ionization are explicitly taken into account in a numerical model which describes colliding stellar winds (CSW) in massive binary sytems. This new model is used to analyze the most recent X-ray spectra of the WR+OB binary system WR 147. The basic result is that it can adequately reproduce the observed X-ray emission (spectral shape, observed flux) but some adjustment in the stellar wind parameters is required. Namely, (i) the stellar wind velocities must be higher by a factor of 1.4 - 1.6; (ii) the mass loss must be reduced by a factor of ~ 2. The reduction factor for the mass loss is well within the uncertainties for this parameter in massive stars, but given the fact that the orbital parameters (e.g., inclination angle and eccentricity) are not well constrained for WR 147, even smaller corrections to the mass loss might be sufficient. Only CSW models with nonequilibrium ionization and equal (or nearly equal) electron and ion postshock temperature are successful. Therefore, the analysis of the X-ray spectra of WR 147 provides evidence that the CSW shocks in this object must be collisionless.

Svetozar A. Zhekov

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7?mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8?nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3?nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ? 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Constraining the Eq. of State of Super-Hadronic Matter from Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equation of state of QCD matter for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (165 MeV) is inferred within a Bayesian framework through the comparison of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and from the Large Hadron Collider to theoretical models. State-of- the-art statistical techniques are applied to simultaneously analyze multiple classes of observables while varying 14 independent model parameters. The resulting posterior distribution over possible equations of state is consistent with results from lattice gauge theory.

Scott Pratt; Evan Sangaline; Paul Sorensen; Hui Wang

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

Wang, J.W.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The liquid helium storage system for the Large Hadron Collider.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cryogenic system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under operation at CERN has a total helium inventory of 140 t. Up to 50 t can be stored in gas storage tanks. The remaining inventory will be stored in a liquid helium storage system consisting of six 15-t liquid helium tanks in 4 locations. The two liquid helium tanks of specific low heat inleak design and the required infrastructure of the first location were recently commissioned. Four additional tanks shall be operational end 2010. The paper describes the features and characteristics of the liquid helium storage system and presents the measurement of the thermal performance of the two first tanks.

Benda, V; Fathallah, M; Goiffon, T; Parente, C; Perez-Duenas, E; Perret, Ph; Pirotte, O; Serio, L; Vullierme, B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Test of Little Higgs Mechanism at Future Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the little higgs scenario, several coupling constants are related to each other to guarantee the stability of the higgs boson mass at one-loop level. This relation is called the little higgs mechanism. We discuss how accurately the relation can be tested at future $e^+e^-$ colliders, with especially focusing on the top sector of the scenario using a method of effective lagrangian. In order to test the mechanism, it is important to measure the Yukawa coupling of the top partner. Higgs associated and threshold productions of the top partner are found to be the best processes for this purpose.

Shigeki Matsumoto

2012-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distribution for Highest Energy Circular Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

Maury Cuna, GHI; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distributions for Highest Energy Circular Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

Maury Cuna, G H I; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal conduction of SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) wire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method suitable for measuring the thermal conductivity of good thermal conductors at low temperatures was implemented. It successfully served its purpose: to detect the effect of doping with manganese the interfilament part of the copper matrix of the superconducting wire used in the magnets of the Superconducting Super Collider. It uses two heaters and one thermometer per sample reducing the accuracy requirement on the thermometers, automatically compensating for zero offsets and reducing the number of critical thermal contacts. Commercially available strain gauges are used as heaters. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Kuchnir, M.; Tague, J.L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Complementarity between collider, direct detection, and indirect detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the capabilities of planned direct detection, indirect detection, and collider experiments in exploring the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM, focusing on the complementarity between the different search techniques. In particular, we consider dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, and LZ. We see that the search sensitivities depend strongly on the WIMP mass and annihilation mechanism, with the result that different search techniques explore orthogonal territory. We also show that advances in each technique are necessary to fully explore the space of Supersymmetric WIMPs.

Matthew Cahill-Rowley

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

393

Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; /Measurment Science Inc.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Net-charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions at chemical freeze-out  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore net charge probability distributions in heavy ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas model. The distributions for strangeness, electric charge and baryon number are derived. We show that, within this model, net charge probability distributions and the resulting fluctuations can be computed directly from the measured yields of charged and multi-charged hadrons. The influence of multi-charged particles and quantum statistics on the shape of the distribution is examined. We discuss the properties of the net proton distribution along the chemical freeze-out line. The model results presented here can be compared with data at RHIC energies and at the LHC to possibly search for the relation between chemical freeze-out and QCD cross-over lines in heavy ion collisions.

P. Braun-Munzinger; B. Friman; F. Karsch; K. Redlich; V. Skokov

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Secondary...

396

Numerical heat conduction in hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows are presented which explore the dependence of the resulting dynamics and the characteristics of the derived X-ray emission on numerical conduction and viscosity. For the purpose of our investigation we present models of colliding flow with plane-parallel and cylindrical divergence. Numerical conduction causes erroneous heating of gas across the contact discontinuity which has implications for the rate at which the gas cools. We find that the dynamics of the shocked gas and the resulting X-ray emission are strongly dependent on the contrast in the density and temperature either side of the contact discontinuity, these effects being strongest where the postshock gas of one flow behaves quasi-adiabatically while the postshock gas of the other flow is strongly radiative. Introducing additional numerical viscosity into the simulations has the effect of damping the growth of instabilities, which in some cases act to increase the volume of shocked gas and can re-he...

Parkin, E R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Discovery Mass Reach for Excited Quarks at Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If quarks are composite particles then excited states are expected. We estimate the discovery mass reach as a function of integrated luminosity for excited quarks decaying to dijets at the Tevatron, LHC, and a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). At the Tevatron the mass reach is 0.94 TeV for Run II (2 fb^-1) and 1.1 TeV for TeV33 (30 fb^-1). At the LHC the mass reach is 6.3 TeV for 100 fb^-1. At a VLHC with a center of mass energy, sqrt(s), of 50 TeV (200 TeV) the mass reach is 25 TeV (78 TeV) for an integrated luminosity of 10^4 fb^-1. However, an excited quark with a mass of 25 TeV would be discovered at a hadron collider with sqrt(s)=100 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 13 fb^-1, illustrating a physics example where a factor of 2 in machine energy is worth a factor of 1000 in luminosity.

Robert M. Harris

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (gamma(dir)) and pi(0) are measured in p + p and Au + Au collisions at center-of-mass energy root(S)(NN) = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A shower...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Submittedto the 1997Particle Accelerator Conference,Vancouver, BC, May 12-16,1997 A Helical Magnet Design for RHIC BNL-69117  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnet Design for RHIC BNL-69117 E. Willen, R. Gupta, A. Jain, E. Kelly, G. Morgan, J. Muratore, R into helical grooves machinedinto athick-walled aluminum cylinder. 1 INTRODUCTION In order to control the spin at the center of eachassembly. The resulting integrated cold massis mounted into a cryostat

Ohta, Shigemi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Ion Monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

N/Z dependence of balance energy throughout the colliding geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the N/Z dependence of balance energy throughout the mass range for colliding geometry varying from central to peripheral ones. Our results indicate that balance energy decreases linearly with increase in N/Z ratio for all the masses throughout the colliding geometry range. Also, the N/Z dependence of balance energy is sensitive to symmetry energy.

Sakshi Gautam; Rajeev K. Puri

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

2780 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2011 Jetlike Emission From Colliding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attractive applications in the field of X-ray lasers, pulsed-laser deposition (PLD), extreme ultraviolet Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas Sivanandan S. Harilal, Mathew P. Polek, and Ahmed Hassanein, Member, IEEE Abstract--We report a large jetlike collimated emission feature from colliding laser-produced plasmas (LPPs

Harilal, S. S.

404

Measurement of the W Boson Mass With the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of the W Boson Mass With the Collider Detector at Fermilab A thesis presented by Andrew With the Collider Detector at Fermilab Andrew Scott Gordon Thesis Advisor: Melissa Franklin Abstract We measure at Fermilab from pp collisions at ps = 1800 GeV. The data weretaken from January 1994 through July 1995

Weitz, David

405

DAPNIA/SEA-00-15 TESLA Linear Collider : Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAPNIA/SEA-00-15 TESLA Linear Collider : Status Report O. Napoly for the TESLA Collaboration CEA) October 24-28, 2000, FNAL, Batavia, IL, USA #12;#12;TESLA Linear Collider : Status Report O. Napoly for the TESLA Collaboration CEA/Saclay, DAPNIA/SEA 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, FRANCE Abstract. We review the current

406

DESIGN OF THE MERCURY HANDLING SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY TARGET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF THE MERCURY HANDLING SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY TARGET (IPAC13, THPFI092) The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free mercury jet within a 20-T magnetic field being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir

McDonald, Kirk

407

Activation of the liquid helium contamination during its passage in the Collider ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactivation of possible contamination of the liquid helium trapped in the arcs of the Collider ring of the Superconducting Super Collider and transported by the liquid helium is estimated. This estimation is used to calculate the dose rate on the filter of the refrigerator plant located at the top of the shaft.

Lopez, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ion funnel ion trap and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Heavy Ion Event Displays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulated collisions of lead ions in the LHC experiments. Additional photos, video and information are available at these links: Lead-ion collision images from the ALICE...

410

ion microprobe | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microprobe ion microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

411

EMSL - secondary ion detection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

secondary-ion-detection en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-struc...

412

E1 Working Group Summary: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are in the middle of a time of exciting discovery, namely that neutrinos have mass and oscillate. In order to take the next steps to understand this potential window onto what well might be the mechanism that links the quarks and leptons, we need both new neutrino beams and new detectors. The new beamlines can and should also provide new laboratories for doing charged lepton flavor physics, and the new detectors can and should also provide laboratories for doing other physics like proton decay, supernovae searches, etc. The new neutrino beams serve as milestones along the way to a muon collider, which can answer questions in yet another sector of particle physics, namely the Higgs sector or ultimately the energy frontier. In this report we discuss the current status of neutrino oscillation physics, what other oscillation measurements are needed to fully explore the phenomenon, and finally, what other new physics can be explored as a result of building of these facilities.

D. Harris

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

Reliability and Maintainability Issues for the Next Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large accelerators for high energy physics research traditionally have been designed using informal best design, engineering, and management practices to achieve acceptable levels of operational availability. However, the Next Linear Collider(NLC) project presents a particular challenge for operational availability due to the unprecedented size and complexity of the accelerator systems required to achieve the physics goals of high center-of-mass energy and high luminosity. Formal reliability and maintainability analysis, design, and implementation will be required to achieve acceptable operational availability for the high energy physics research program. This paper introduces some of the basic concepts of reliability analysis and applies them to the 2.6-cm microwave power system of the two 10-km-long, 250-GeV linacs that are currently proposed for the NLC design.

Wilson, Zane J.; Gold, Saul L.; Koontz, Ron F.; Lavine, Ted L.; /SLAC

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation ...

Henley, D B; Pittard, J M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Multifragmentation at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the role of mass asymmetry of colliding nuclei on the fragmentation at the balance energy and on its mass dependence. The study is done by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240 and by varying the mass asymmetry of the ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. Our results clearly indicate a sizeable effect of the mass asymmetry on the multiplicity of various fragments. The mass asymmetry dependence of various fragments is found to increase with increase in total system mass (except for heavy mass fragments). Similar to symmetric reactions, a power law system mass dependence of various fragment multiplicities is also found to exit for large asymmetries.

Supriya Goyal

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reducing backgrounds in the higgs factory muon collider detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary design of the 125-GeV Higgs Factory (HF) Muon Collider (MC) has identified an enormous background loads on the HF detector. This is related to the twelve times higher muon decay probability at HF compared to that previously studied for the 1.5-TeV MC. As a result of MARS15 optimization studies, it is shown that with a carefully designed protection system in the interaction region, in the machine-detector interface and inside the detector one can reduce the background rates to a manageable level similar to that achieved for the optimized 1.5-TeV case. The main characteristics of the HF detector background are presented for the configuration found.

Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

3-D SPH simulations of colliding winds in eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study colliding winds in the superluminous binary eta Carinae by performing three-dimensional, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. For simplicity, we assume both winds to be isothermal. We also assume that wind particles coast without any net external forces. We find that the lower density, faster wind from the secondary carves out a spiral cavity in the higher density, slower wind from the primary. Because of the phase-dependent orbital motion, the cavity is very thin on the periastron side, whereas it occupies a large volume on the apastron side. The model X-ray light curve using the simulated density structure fits very well with the observed light curve for a viewing angle of i=54 degrees and phi=36 degrees, where i is the inclination angle and phi is the azimuth from apastron.

Atsuo T. Okazaki; Stanley P. Owocki; Christopher M. P. Russell; Michael F. Corcoran

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Problem of Colliding Networks and its Relation to Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex systems, ranging from living cells to human societies, can be represented as attractor networks, whose basic property is to exist in one of allowed states, or attractors. We noted that merging two systems that are in distinct attractors creates uncertainty, as the hybrid system cannot assume two attractors at once. As a prototype of this problem, we explore cell fusion, whose ability to combine distinct cells into hybrids was proposed to cause cancer. By simulating cell types as attractors, we find that hybrids are prone to assume spurious attractors, which are emergent and sporadic states of networks, and propose that cell fusion can make a cell cancerous by placing it into normally inaccessible spurious states. We define basic features of hybrid networks and suggest that the problem of colliding networks has general significance in processes represented by attractor networks, including biological, social, and political phenomena.

Alexei A. Koulakov; Yuri Lazebnik

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

Collective Effects in the SuperB Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some collective effects have been studied for the SuperB high luminosity collider. Estimates of the effect of Intra Beam Scattering (IBS) on the emittance and energy spread growths have been carried up for both the High Energy (HER, positrons) and the Low Energy (LER, electrons) rings. Electron cloud build up simulations for HER were performed with the ECLOUD code, developed at CERN, to predict the cloud formation in the arcs, taking into account possible remediation techniques such as clearing electrodes. The new code CMAD, developed at SLAC, has been used to study the effect of this electron cloud on the beam and assess the thresholds above which the electron cloud instability would set in.

Demma, Theo; /INFN, Rome; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Quarks at Future e+e-, ep, and pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible single productions of fourth SM family u4 and d4 quarks via anomalous interactions at the e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are investigated. Signatures of such anomalous processes are discussed at above colliders comparatively.

Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H.Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yildiz, H. Duran [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Dumlupinar University, Merkez Kampus, Ankara (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

Production Of The ADD Type Kaluza-Klein Excitations At Future e+e-, ep And pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible production of ADD type Kaluza-Klein excitations are investigated at future high energy e+e-, ep and pp colliders. Discovery limits and signatures of such excitations are discussed at above colliders comparatively.

Billur, A. A.; Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar (Turkey); Inan, S. C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Cumhuriyet University, 58140, Sivas (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Production of the Randall-Sundrum Type Kaluza-Klein Excitations at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible production of Randall-Sundrum type Kaluza-Klein excitations are investigated at future high energy e+e-, ep and pp colliders. Discovery limits and signatures of such excitations are discussed at above colliders comparatively.

Billur, A. A.; Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar (Turkey); Inan, S. C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Cumhuriyet University, 58140, Sivas (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Leptons at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible single productions of fourth SM family charged and neutral leptons via anomalous interactions at the future e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are studied. Signatures of such anomalous processes are argued at above colliders comparatively.

Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R.; Karadeniz, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yildiz, H. Duran [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Dumlupinar University, Merkez Campus, Kutahya (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup ?2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup ?2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup ?2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

Yeates, P. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland)] [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland); Fallon, C. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland); Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland) [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland); School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), Dublin 7 (Ireland)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

Gluon EMC effect and fractional energy loss in Upsilon production in dAu collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that the nuclear modification factor R^Upsilon_dAu measured at RHIC can only be reproduced once two supplemental Cold Nuclear Matter effects are taken into account. At backward rapidities, the visible suppression of R^Upsilon_dAu hints at the presence of a gluon EMC effect, analogous to the quark EMC effect -- but likely stronger. At forward and mid rapidities, the data can only be accounted for by a fractional energy loss, recently revived in the literature. Our conclusions do not depend on the detail of the nuclear parton distributions. We thus argue that this may be the first observation of a gluon EMC effect stronger than the quark one.

Ferreiro, E G; Lansberg, J P; Matagne, N; Rakotozafindrabe, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

TESLA Linear-Collider Projekt Abbildung 134: Das hydrogeologische Profil entlang der TESLA-Trasse. Der TESLA-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESLA Linear-Collider Projekt Abbildung 134: Das hydrogeologische Profil entlang der TESLA-Trasse. Der TESLA- Tunnel liegt in wasserdurchlässigen und -undurchlässigen Schichten. Die wasserdurch gesättigt. 230 #12;TESLA Linear-Collider Projekt Voruntersuchungen zum TESLA Linear-Collider Projekt Ein

430

Constraints on the Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching in Nuclear Collisions at RHIC and LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent data on the high-pT pion nuclear modification factor, $R_{AA}(p_T)$, and its elliptic azimuthal asymmetry, $v_2(p_T)$, from RHIC/BNL and LHC/CERN are analyzed in terms of a wide class of jet-energy loss models coupled to different (2+1)d transverse plus Bjorken expanding hydrodynamic fields. We test the consistency of each model by demanding a simultaneous account of the azimuthal, the transverse momentum, and the centrality dependence of the data at both 0.2 and 2.76 ATeV energies. We find a rather broad class of jet-energy independent energy-loss models $dE/dx= \\kappa(T) x^z T^{2+z} \\zeta_q$ that, when coupled to bulk constrained temperature fields T(x,t), can account for the current data at the $\\chi^2energy-loss fluctuations via a convenient scaling factor distributed in a finite range $0energy loss model with a temperature-independent jet-medium coupling as well as a near-$T_c$ dominated, pQCD-inspired energy-loss scenario are shown to be inconsistent with the LHC data, once the parameters are constrained by fitting to RHIC results, we find several new solutions with a temperature-dependent jet-medium coupling. We conclude that the current level of statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measured data does not allow a constraint on the path-length exponent z to a range narrower than [0-2].

Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN PARTON CASCADE AND HADRONIC CASCADE AT SPS AND RHIC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. They also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow.

NARA,Y.

1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

Low energy ion scattering using time-of-flight analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the conservation laws oi' energy and mo- mentum allow one to predict, post collision energies (flight times) of the colliding particles in terms of their scattering angles, mass ratios, and pre-collision energies. For incident ion energies greater than 10 ke... to longer flight times. The resolution of the spectrometer was insuffecient to resolve the major com- ponents of the stainless steel target (18% Cr, 10% Ni, and 68% Fe). The peak corresponding to these components is labeled "SS". Nitrogen and oxygen...

Lyttle, David Scott

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Microfabricated ion frequency standard  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Diagnostics of quark-gluon plasma in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions by hard QCD-processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the possibilities for studying properties of dense QCD-matter, created in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, by hard QCD-production processes, so-called "hard" probes -- heavy quarkonia, hard jets, high mass dimuons. Special attention is paid to the potential of coming heavy ion experiments on Large Hadron Collider to observe the rescattering and energy losses of hard partons in quark-gluon plasma.

I. P. Lokhtin

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

Sakai, Shigeki, E-mail: sakai-shigeki@nissin.co.jp; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)] [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Ion Distribution And Electronic Stopping Power For Au ions In Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Accurate...

438

Overview of recent studies and modifications being made to RHIC to mitigate the effects of a potential failure to the helium distribution system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to cool the superconducting magnets in RHIC, its helium refrigerator distributes 4.5 K helium throughout the tunnel along with helium distribution for the magnet line recoolers, the heat shield, and the associated return lines. The worse case for failure would be a release from the magnet distribution line which operates at 3.5 to 4.5 atmospheres and contains the energized magnet but with a potential energy of 70 MJoules should the insulation system fail or an electrical connection opens. Studies were done to determine release rate of the helium and the resultant reduction in O{sub 2} concentration in the RHIC tunnel and service buildings. Equipment and components were also reviewed for design and reliability and modifications were made to reduce the likelihood of failure and to reduce the volume of helium that could be released.

Tuozzolo, J.; Bruno, D.; DiLieto, A.; Heppner, G.; Karol, R.; Lessard,E.; Liaw, C-J; McIntyre, G; Mi, C.; Reich, J.; Sandberg, J.; Seberg, S.; Smart, L.; Tallerico, T.; Theisen, C.; Todd, R.; Zapasek R.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LHC Quality Assurance Plan is a set of operating principles, requirements, and practices used to support Berkeley Lab's participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project. The LHC/QAP is intended to achieve reliable, safe, and quality performance in the LHC project activities. The LHC/QAP is also designed to fulfill the following objectives: (1) The LHC/QAP is Berkeley Lab's QA program document that describes the elements necessary to integrate quality assurance, safety management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeley Lab's portion of the LHC operations. (2) The LHC/QAP provides the framework for Berkeley Lab LHC Project administrators, managers, supervisors, and staff to plan, manage, perform, and assess their Laboratory work. (3) The LHC/QAP is the compliance document that conforms to the requirements of the Laboratory's Work Smart Standards for quality assurance (DOE O 414.1, 10 CFR 830.120), facility operations (DOE O 5480.19), and safety management (DOE P 450.4).

Gullo, Lisa; Karpenko, Victor; Robinson, Kem; Turner, William; Wong, Otis

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

First electron-cloud studies at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the beam commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 150, 75, 50, and 25-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities, or emittance growth, were observed. Methods have been developed to infer different key beam-pipe surface parameters by benchmarking simulations and pressure rise as well as heat-load observations. These methods allow us to monitor the scrubbing process, i.e., the reduction of the secondary emission yield as a function of time, in order to decide on the most appropriate strategies for machine operation. To better understand the influence of electron clouds on the beam dynamics, simulations have been carried out to examine both the coherent and the incoherent effects on the beam. In this paper we present the methodology and first results for the scrubbing monitoring process at the LHC. We also review simulated instability thresholds and tune footprints for beams of different emittance, interacting with an electr...

Dominguez, O; Arduini, G; Metral, E; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F; Maury Cuna, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ion collider rhic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_\\infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_\\infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation of the line widths and shifts is reduced in a low inclination binary. The extreme case is a binary with i = 0 degrees, for which we would expect no line profile variation.

D. B. Henley; I. R. Stevens; J. M. Pittard

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydrodynamics and High-Energy Physics of WR Colliding Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the main properties of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars is a very intense outflow of gas. No less than 40\\% \\ of WR stars belong to binary systems. Young massive O and B stars are the secondary components of such systems. OB stars also have an intense stellar wind. If the intensities of the stellar winds of WR and OB stars are more or less comparable or if the distance between the components of the binary is large enough, the winds flowing out of WR and OB stars can collide and the shock waves are formed. In the shock the gas is heated to temperature $\\sim 10^7$ K and generates X-ray emission. Stellar wind collision may be responsible not only for the X-ray emission of WR + OB binaries and for their radio, IR and $\\gamma$-ray emision as well. Stellar wind collision, gas heating, particle acceleration, and generation of X-ray, $\\gamma$-ray, radio and IR emission in WR + OB binaries are discussed.

Vladimir V. Usov

1994-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30-50 T Solenoids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Muon ionization cooling to the required normalized rms emittance of 25 microns transverse, and 72 mm longitudinal, can be achieved with liquid hydrogen in high field solenoids, provided that the momenta are low enough. At low momenta, the longitudinal emittance rises from the negative slope of energy loss versus energy. Assuming initial emittances that have been achieved in six dimensional cooling simulations, optimized designs are given using solenoid fields limited to 30, 40, and 50 T. The required final emittances are achieved for the two higher field cases. Preliminary simulations of transverse cooling in hydrogen, at low energies, suggests that muon collider emittance requirements can be met using solenoid fields of 40 T or more. It might also be acceptable with 30 T. But these simulations did not include hydrogen windows,matching or reacceleration, whose performance, with one exception, was based on numerical estimates. Full simulations of more stages are planned. The design and simulation of hydrogen windows must be included, and space charge effects, and absorber heating, calculated.

Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.; Lederman, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Collider searches and cosmology in the MSSM with heavy scalars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a variety of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the scalar partners of the quarks and leptons are predicted to be very heavy and beyond the reach of next-generation colliders. For instance, the realization of electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetry requires new sources of CP-violation, which can only be naturally accommodated with electric dipole moment constraints if the first and second generation scalar fermions are beyond the TeV scale. Also in focus-point supersymmetry and split supersymmetry the scalar fermions are very heavy. In this work, the phenomenology of scenarios with electroweak baryogenesis and in the focus point region at the LHC and ILC is studied, which becomes challenging due to the presence of heavy scalar fermions. Implications for the analysis of baryogenesis and dark matter are deduced. It is found that precision measurements of superpartner properties allow an accurate determination of the dark matter relic density in both scenarios, while important but only incomplete information about the baryogenesis mechanism can be obtained.

Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

[New technology for linear colliders]. Annual progress report and renewal proposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

McIntyre, P.M.

1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

SciTech Connect: Proton-Proton Colliding-Beam Storage Rings for...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

future plans can be based. It is to be emphasized that this is not a proposal for construction. The major results of the study are that 100-100 BeV colliding beam rings can be...

447

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Of Linear Colliders, the GDE Workshop at Bangalore, Mughals, Camels, Elephants and Sundials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this colloquium, the speaker will give a summary of the recent International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE) Workshop at Bangalore and how the High Energy Physics community converged to this meeting after many years of electron-positron linear collider design and experimental work. Given that this workshop for the first time took place in India, the speaker will also show a few pictures and talk briefly about what he learned in that fascinating country.

Loew, Greg

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

450

Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

452

Single Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

Thomas Schenkel

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Single Ion Implantation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

Thomas Schenkel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

454

Acclerator R&D for a Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to perform simulations of beam transport in linear colliders, with an emphasis on emittance dilution, spin polarization transport, and development and testing of beam based tuning algorithms. Our simulations are based on an existing object-oriented particle-tracking library, Bmad. To facilitate the efficient development of simulations, an accelerator design and analysis program based on Bmad has been developed called Tao (Tool for Accelerator Optics). The three beam-based alignment algorithms, Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment (BA), and the Kubo Method have been implemented in Tao. We have studied the effects of magnet misalignments, BPM resolution, beam jitter, stray fields, BPM and steering magnet failure and the effects of various cavity shape wakefields. A parametric study has been conducted in the presence of the above types of errors for all three alignment algorithms. We find that BPM resolution has only modest impact on the effectiveness of beam based alignment. The DFS correction algorithm was found to be very robust in situations where there were BPM and/or steering magnet failures. The wakefields in the main linac are very weak and cause negligible emittance growth. Spin tracking was extended to study all accelerator components between the damping ring and the interaction point, including RF cavities and the helical undulator. We find that there is no significant depolarization in the RTML, main linac or beam delivery system and that the polarization is relatively insensitive to misalignment. We have developed an effective spin rotator. During the final year of the grant we exploited the computing power of our new linux cluster, along with the modeling codes that we had developed, to investigate damping ring physics and design, specifically as it relates to the CESR Test Accelerator project.

Rubin, D.L.; Dugan, G.; Gibbons, L.; Palmer, M.; Patterson, R.; Sagan, D.; Smith, J.C.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Fields, J.; Urban, J.

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lithium Ion Production NDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

456

Lithium ion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

Roy, Prabir K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

JLab Supports International Linear Collider Cavity Development Work |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-TestingJEDI: JobsTimothy|Scientist

459

Hadronic resonance production in d + Au collisions at sqrt s NN = 200 GeV at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0}, K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector at RHIC. The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass (m{sub T}). The of resonances in minimum bias collisions is compared to the of {pi}, K, and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K*/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d + Au collisions are compared to the measurements in minimum bias p + p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0}, K*, and {Sigma}* scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

STAR Coll

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Microfabricated ion trap array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Elimination of influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in Pb+Pb collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study how to eliminate the influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in probing the nuclear symmetry energy. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron-skin size of $^{208}$Pb, the Pb+Pb collisions are performed in semicentral and peripheral collisions with impact parameters of 5 and 9fm and at beam energies from 50 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is shown that combination of neutron and proton collective flows, i.e., neutron-proton differential elliptic flow, neutron-proton elliptic flow difference, neutron-proton differential transverse flow and neutron-proton transverse flow difference, can effectively eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and thus can be as useful sensitive observables in probing nuclear matter symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions...

Wei, Gao-Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

RHIC | A Compelling Case for RHIC's Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhaven NationalThe

463

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

A power-law description of heavy ion collision centrality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum-bias distribution on heavy ion collision multiplicity $n_{ch}$ is well approximated by power-law form $n_{ch}^{-3/4}$, suggesting that a change of variable to $n_{ch}^{1/4}$ may provide more precise access to the structure of the distribution and to A-A collision centrality. We present a detailed centrality study of Hijing-1.37 Monte Carlo data at 200 GeV using the power-law format. We find that the minimum-bias distribution on $n_{participant}^{1/4}$, determined with a Glauber Monte Carlo simulation, is uniform except for a 5% sinusoidal variation. The power-law format reveals precise linear relations between Glauber parameters $n_{part}$ and $n_{bin}$ and the fractional cross section. The power-law format applied to RHIC data facilitates incorporation of extrapolation constraints on data and Glauber distributions to obtain a ten-fold improvement in centrality accuracy for peripheral collisions.

Thomas A. Trainor; Duncan J. Prindle

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Conical Emission in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A broadened or double humped away-side structure was observed in 2-particle azimuthal jet-like correlations at RHIC and SPS. This modification can be explained by conical emission, from either Mach-cone shock waves or Cherenkov gluon radiation, and by other physics mechanisms, such as large angle gluon radiation, jets deflected by radial flow and path-length dependent energy loss. Three-particle jet-like correlations are studied for their power to distinguish conical emission from other mechanisms. This article discusses Mach-cone shock waves, Cherenkov gluon radiation and the experimental evidence for conical emission from RHIC and SPS.

Jason Glyndwr Ulery

2008-07-10T23: