Sample records for ion beam facility

  1. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  2. Improvement of Ion-Beam Energy Resolution in a Solenoid-based Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becchetti, Fred

    Improvement of Ion-Beam Energy Resolution in a Solenoid-based Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences) in The University of Michigan 2010 Doctoral

  3. Control system for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, B.A.; Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new accelerator control system is being implemented as part of the development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), a first generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. The pre- existing accelerator control systems are based on 1970`s technology and addition or alteration of controls is cumbersome and costly. A new, unified control system for the cyclotron and tandem accelerators, the RIB injector, ion sources, and accelerator beam lines is based on a commercial product from Vista Control Systems, Inc. Several other accelerator facilities, as well as numerous industrial sites, are now using this system. The control system is distributed over a number of computers which communicate over Ethernet and is easily extensible. Presently, implementation at the HRIBF is based on VAX/VMS, VAX/ELN, VME, and Allen-Bradley PLC5 programmable logic controller architectures. Expansion to include UNIX platforms and CAMAC hardware support is planned. Operator interface is via X- terminals. The system has proven to be quite powerful, yet is has been easy to implement with a small staff. A Vista users group has resulted in shared software to implement specific controls. This paper details present system features and future implementations at the HRIBF.

  4. An ion source module for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, B., E-mail: cui@ciae.ac.cn; Huang, Q.; Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Chen, L.; Ma, Y. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source module is developed for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility. The ion source module is designed to meet the requirements of remote handling. The connection and disconnection of the electricity, cooling and vacuum between the module and peripheral units can be executed without on-site manual work. The primary test of the target ion source has been carried out and a Li{sup +} beam has been extracted. Details of the ion source module and its primary test results are described.

  5. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 ?A], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 ?A], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  6. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  7. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, University of North Texas, Department of Physics, 1155 Union Circle 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and magnetic applications, surface sputtering and micro-fabrication of materials, development of high-energy ion microprobe systems, and educational and outreach activities.

  8. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  9. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  10. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  11. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  12. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  13. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  14. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  15. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  16. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  17. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Symons, James

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  18. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  20. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  1. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  2. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  3. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  4. Initial commissioning results with the NSCL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Leitner, D.; Ottarson, J.; Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ReA reaccelerator is being added to the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) fragmentation facility in order to provide exotic rare-isotope beams, not available at the Isotope Separation On-Line facilities, in the several-MeV/u energy range. The first stage of the NSCL reaccelerator complex, consisting of an EBIT charge breeder, a room-temperature radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and superconducting linear accelerator modules, has been completed and is being put into operation. Commissioning of the EBIT has started by extracting charge-bred residual gas ions, ions created from a Ne gas jet directed across the EBIT's electron beam and ions captured from an external test ion source. Charge-bred ions from the Ne gas jet have been extracted as a pulse and accelerated through the RFQ and the two cryomodules.

  5. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Igor B., E-mail: stepanovib@tpu.ru; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  6. Intense ion beam propagation in a reactor sized chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.L.; Deutsch, C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams in a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber filled with lowIon Fusion, Intense Ion Beams, Reaction Chamber. P.A.C.S.heavy ion beam propagation in the reaction chamber, Fus.

  7. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  8. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  9. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  10. Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

  11. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  12. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  13. The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Hussein, M. S.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Benjamim, E. A. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Depto. Fisica Particulas, Facultad Fisica, Campus Sur s/n 15786 Santiago de Compostela (Spain) (Spain); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio Tandar, Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Assuncao, M. [UNIFESP-Campus de Diadema, SP (Brazil)] (and others)

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as {sup 6}He,{sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

  14. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  15. ar ion beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulations predict self-consistently the triangular and hollow beam structures which are often observed experimentally with ECRIS ion beams. The...

  16. argon ion beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulations predict self-consistently the triangular and hollow beam structures which are often observed experimentally with ECRIS ion beams. The...

  17. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  18. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  19. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  20. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. Flow-through ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springer, R.W.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and an apparatus for forming a charge neutral ion beam which is useful in producing thin films of material on electrically conductive or non-conductive substrates are provided. 4 figs.

  2. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  3. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  4. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  5. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion Facility Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a position- sensitive ion chamber for online dosimetry, theBeam Exit Window The ion chamber (Fig. 3) monitors the beamthe nitrogen-filled ion chamber leave a trail of ions that

  6. BARC TIFR Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    enterprise using accelerated heavy ion beams is to unravel the complexities of the nuclear world in all repulsion so that the collision process is governed by the nuclear interactions. Using a variety at this centre to pursue research in nuclear, atomic, condensed matter and bio-environmental physics. While

  7. Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recycling Facilities Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling Facilities 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  8. Ion beam extractor with counterbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing; Standiford, Keith; King, Tsu-Jae; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractor system for a plasma ion source has a single (first) electrode with one or more apertures, or a pair of spaced electrodes, a first or plasma forming electrode and a second or extraction electrode, with one or more aligned apertures. The aperture(s) in the first electrode (or the second electrode or both) have a counterbore on the downstream side (i.e. away from the plasma ion source or facing the second electrode). The counterbored extraction system reduces aberrations and improves focusing. The invention also includes an ion source with the counterbored extraction system, and a method of improving focusing in an extraction system by providing a counterbore.

  9. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  10. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  11. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1930, Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley invented the cyclotron. One of his students, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early cyclotrons, accelerating protons to 80 keV using less than 1 kV on a semi-circular accelerating electrode, now called the ''dee''. Soon after, Lawrence constructed the first two-dee 27-Inch (69-cm) Cyclotron, which produced protons and deuterons of 4.8 MeV. In 1939, Lawrence constructed the 60-Inch (150-cm) Cyclotron, which accelerated deuterons to 19 MeV. Just before WWII, Lawrence designed a 184-inch cyclotron, but the war prevented the building of this machine. Immediately after the war ended, the Veksler-McMillan principle of phase stability was put forward, which enabled the transformation of conventional cyclotrons to successful synchrocyclotrons. When completed, the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron produced 340-MeV protons. Following it, more modern synchrocyclotrons were built around the globe, and the synchrocyclotrons in Berkeley and Uppsala, together with the Harvard cyclotron, would perform pioneering work in treatment of human cancer using accelerated hadrons (protons and light ions). When the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron was built, Lawrence asked Robert Wilson, one of his former graduate students, to look into the shielding requirements for of the new accelerator. Wilson soon realized that the 184-Inch would produce a copious number of protons and other light ions that had enough energy to penetrate human body, and could be used for treatment of deep-seated diseases. Realizing the advantages of delivering a larger dose in the Bragg peak when placed inside deep-seated tumors, he published in a medical journal a seminal paper on the rationale to use accelerated protons and light ions for treatment of human cancer. The precise dose localization provided by protons and light ions means lower doses to normal tissues adjacent to the treatment volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at energies that permitted the initiation of several biological studies. It is worth noting that when th

  12. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  13. Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

  14. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  15. LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy » CPO: LosUniqueIon

  16. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  17. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target performance. In this paper the beam ions are protons.

  18. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  19. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  20. External micro ion-beam analysis (X-MIBA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, B.L.; Lee, S.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Walsh, D.S. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-air or external ion beam analysis combined with 10--100 {mu}m spatial resolution, is a truly unique feature of the nuclear microprobe technique. PIXE has been performed externally for many years, but recently, other IBA techniques such as backscattering and nuclear reaction depth profiling measurements have been made in air. Presently, the use of eXternal Micro Ion-Beam Analysis, or X-MIBA, is being attempted at a growing number of microprobe facilities; however, the full potential of this new technique remains relatively unexploited. This paper will review the X-MIBA technique with emphasis on optimization of exit foil geometries, beam focusing and spot size considerations, external IBA techniques, and radiation hazards associated with the direct and scattered beam, nuclear reaction products and radionuclei production in the air. The unique in-air analysis advantages of no pump down, and essentially unrestricted sample size or state (solid, liquid etc.), has resulted in a myriad of applications of this technique at Sandia, which are featured as examples. 52 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator Celgard US Manufacturing Facilities Initiative for Lithium-ion Battery Separator FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D...

  2. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  3. Characterization of ionic liquid ion sources for focused ion beam applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Martinez, Carla S. (Carla Sofia)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique, a beam of ions is reduced to nanometer dimensions using dedicated optics and directed to a substrate for patterning. This technique is widely used in micro- and nanofabrication for ...

  4. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  5. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

  6. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  7. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas. (LEW)

  8. Scanning-helium-ion-beam lithography with hydrogen silsesquioxane resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    A scanning-helium-ion-beam microscope is now commercially available. This microscope can be used to perform lithography similar to, but of potentially higher resolution than, scanning electron-beam lithography. This article ...

  9. Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, David Sun, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

  10. Structural Modification of Nanocrystalline Ceria by Ion Beams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoscale. Citation: Zhang Y, PD Edmondson, T Varga, SJ Moll, F Namavar, C Lan, and WJ Weber.2011."Structural Modification of Nanocrystalline Ceria by Ion Beams."Physical...

  11. alkali ion beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DT capsule a heavy-ion beam. and is presented in Fig.1. unknown authors 4 METHOD FOR EFFICIENCY AND TIME RESPONSE MEASUREMENT ON DIVERSE TARGET ION SOURCES WITH STABLE ALKALI...

  12. Fluctuation of an ion beam extracted from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, N., E-mail: nmiyamot@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Okajima, Y.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argon ion beam fluctuation from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source is observed. The ion beam was measured by an 8 measurement elements beam profile monitor. The amplitude of the beam current fluctuation stayed in the same level from 100 Hz to 1 kHz of the filament heating frequency. The beam current fluctuation frequency measured by the beam profile monitor was equal to the frequency of the AC filament operation. The fluctuation amplitudes of the beam current by AC operation were less than 7% and were in the same level of the DC operation.

  13. advanced isol facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion beam facilities: ISOLDE (CERN, Switzerland) and the IGISOL facility (Jyvaskyla, Finland). The scope of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source has been extended to 27...

  14. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K. [ITER- India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  15. Production of multiply charged ion beams from solid substances with the mVINIS ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Nedeljkovic, T.; Siljegovic, M. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box. 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mVINIS ion source has enabled us to obtain multiply charged ion beams from gases as well as from solid materials. The solid substance ion beams were produced by using two techniques: (a) the evaporation of metals by using the inlet system based on a minioven and (b) the metal-ions-from-volatile-compounds method (MIVOC) by using the modified gas inlet system. Great efforts were made in the production of high current stable ion beams of solids with relatively high melting points (over 1000 deg. C). The B{sup 3+} ion-beam current of over 300 {mu}A was one of the most intensive beams extracted until now. The obtained multiply charged ion-beam spectra of solid substances (B, Fe, and Zn) are presented as well as some of the corresponding experimental results achieved during the modification of polymers, carbon materials, and fullerenes.

  16. PIC MODELING: Measuring Ion Beam Current Density in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    ;Collaborators: R. C. Davidson, P. C. Efthimion, E. P. Gilson (PPPL) S. S. Yu, P. K. Roy, F. M. Bieniosek, W. L) Converging ion beam Chamber Wall #12;3The Neutralized Transport Experiment was a success 400 kV Marx & Fire Injector #12;5Neutralized drift compression modeled with a particle-in-cell code (LSP) K+ ion beam

  17. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  18. VACUUM PRESSURE RISE WITH INTENSE ION BEAMS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; BAI,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; HUANG,H.; MACKAY,W.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; SMART,L.A.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When RHIC is filled with bunches of intense ion beams a pressure rise is observed. The pressure rise exceeds the acceptable limit for operation with the design intensities. Observations of events leading to a pressure rise are summarized. Relevant parameters include ion species, charge per bunch, bunch spacing, and the location in the ring. Effects that contribute to a pressure rise are discussed, including beam gas ionization and ion desorption, loss-induced gas desorption, and electron desorption from electron clouds.

  19. Method and apparatus for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Yuan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Havener, Charles C. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams. A method of purifying an ion beam includes: inputting the ion beam into a gas-filled multipole ion guide, the ion beam including a plurality of ions; increasing a laser-ion interaction time by collisional cooling the plurality of ions using the gas-filled multipole ion guide, the plurality of ions including at least one contaminant; and suppressing the at least one contaminant by selectively removing the at least one contaminant from the ion beam by electron photodetaching at least a portion of the at least one contaminant using a laser beam.

  20. Status of Beta Beam R&D: Radioactive ion production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Status of Beta Beam R&D: Radioactive ion production O b h lf f EURISOL DS*/ISOLDE CERN Etam NOAH Infrastructure Action Structuring the European Research Area" g , y , Status of BetaBeam R&D AHIPA09 etam Status of BetaBeam R&D AHIPA09 etam.noah@esss.se #12;Introduction to betabeams Beta-beam proposal

  1. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis for a Heavy Ion Beam Chamber with Plasma Channelsthe target chamber wall, an adiabatic lens to focus the ionchamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion

  2. Ion beam collimating grid to reduce added defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Walter B. (Oakland, CA); Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A collimating grid for an ion source located after the exit grid. The collimating grid collimates the ion beamlets and disallows beam spread and limits the beam divergence during transients and steady state operation. The additional exit or collimating grid prevents beam divergence during turn-on and turn-off and prevents ions from hitting the periphery of the target where there is re-deposited material or from missing the target and hitting the wall of the vessel where there is deposited material, thereby preventing defects from being deposited on a substrate to be coated. Thus, the addition of a collimating grid to an ion source ensures that the ion beam will hit and be confined to a specific target area.

  3. Spontaneous ion beam formation in the laboratory, space, and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Cassak, P. A.; Galante, M.; Keesee, A. M.; Lusk, G.; Magee, R. M.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; Vandervort, R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway)] [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Eastwood, J. P. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence for the spontaneous formation of multiple double layers within a single divergent magnetic field structure. Downstream of the divergent magnetic field, multiple accelerated ion populations are observed. The similarity of the accelerated ion populations observed in these laboratory experiments to ion populations observed in the magnetosphere and in numerical simulations suggests that the observation of a complex ion velocity distribution alone is insufficient to distinguish between simple plasma expansion and magnetic reconnection. Further, the effective temperature of the aggregate ion population is significantly larger than the temperatures of the individual ion population components, suggesting that insufficiently resolved measurements could misidentify multiple beam creation as ion heating. Ions accelerated in randomly oriented electric fields that mimic heating would have an ion heating rate dependent on the ion charge and mass that is qualitatively consistent with recent experimental observations of ion heating during magnetic reconnection.

  4. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C., E-mail: b-odom@northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  5. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the right chamber (ion chamber) are confined in their ownwatts and that on the ion chamber is 50 watts. A permanent-column and the ion source chamber. The simulation is

  6. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xufei, X., E-mail: xiexufei@pku.edu.cn; Fan, T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20216 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati, CNR, Padova 35100 (Italy); Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching 84518 (Germany); Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Grünauer, F. [Physics Consulting, Zorneding 85604 (Germany); Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  7. The ReA electron-beam ion trap charge breeder for reacceleration of rare isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Nash, S.; Rencsok, R.; Tobos, L.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Wittmer, W.; Wu, X.; Bollen, G.; Leitner, D.; Syphers, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 South Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Collaboration: ReA Team

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ReA is a post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. ReA is designed to reaccelerate rare isotopes to energies of a few MeV/u following production by projectile fragmentation and thermalization in a gas cell. The facility consists of four main components: an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder, an achromatic charge-over-mass (Q/A) separator, a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder was specifically designed to efficiently capture continuous beams of singly charged ions injected at low energy (<60 keV), charge breed in less than 50 ms, and extract highly charged ions to the Q/A separator for charge-state selection and reacceleration through the accelerator structures. The use of highly charged ions to reach high beam energies is a key aspect that makes ReA a compact and cost-efficient post-accelerator. The EBIT is characterized by a high-current electron gun, a long multi-electrode trap structure and a dual magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density necessary for fast charge breeding of short-lived isotopes as well as the high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents an overview and the status of the ReA EBIT, which has extracted for reacceleration tests stable {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ion beams produced from injected gas and more recently {sup 39}K{sup 16+} beams by injecting stable {sup 39,41}K{sup +} ions from an external ion source.

  8. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  9. anaconda ion beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Ion beam CiteSeer Summary: Fast ignition is a method to decrease the energy of a fusion driver 1. At first the matter becomes compressed to high densities due to the...

  10. advanced ion beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Ion beam CiteSeer Summary: Fast ignition is a method to decrease the energy of a fusion driver 1. At first the matter becomes compressed to high densities due to the...

  11. Etching of Graphene Devices with a Helium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herb

    We report on the etching of graphene devices with a helium ion beam, including in situ electrical measurement during lithography. The etching process can be used to nanostructure and electrically isolate different regions ...

  12. Dual ion beam assisted deposition of biaxially textured template layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, James R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Hammond, Robert H.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed towards a process and apparatus for epitaxial deposition of a material, e.g., a layer of MgO, onto a substrate such as a flexible metal substrate, using dual ion beams for the ion beam assisted deposition whereby thick layers can be deposited without degradation of the desired properties by the material. The ability to deposit thicker layers without loss of properties provides a significantly broader deposition window for the process.

  13. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Tigelhoefer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department Of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  14. Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

  15. EBIT - Electronic Beam Ion Trap: N Divison experimental physics annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-faceted research effort of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N-Division of the Physics and Space Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continues to contribute significant results to the physical sciences from studies with low energy very highly charged heavy ions. The EBIT program attracts a number of collaborators from the US and abroad for the different projects. The collaborations are partly carried out through participating graduate students demonstrating the excellent educational capabilities at the LLNL EBIT facilities. Moreover, participants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are engaged in the EBIT project. This report describes EBIT work for 1995 in atomic structure measurements and radiative transition probabilities, spectral diagnostics for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, ion/surface interaction studies, electron-ion interactions studies, retrap and ion collisions, and instrumental development.

  16. alloy ion source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

  17. ambient ion sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

  18. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)] [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  19. IMAGING WITH A MULTIPLANE MULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, W.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. When the he^vy ions penetrate the chamber, the resultingMULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY-ION BEAMS* U. T.Ion Beam Studies and Imaging with a Nultiplane Multiwire Proportional Chamber,"

  20. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrivens, R., E-mail: richard.scrivens@cern.ch; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup ?} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup ?} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  1. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  2. Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

  3. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, PO Box 1533, 85740 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  4. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110 086 (India); Sharma, Kavita [Department of Physics, Bhagwan Parshuram Institute of Technology, Sector-17, Rohini, New Delhi 110 089 (India)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  5. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

  6. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  7. Production of N[sup +] ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kango Leung; Kunkel, W.B.; Walther, S.R.

    1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N[sup +] ion beam using a multicusp ion source having a chamber formed by a cylindrical chamber wall surrounded by a plurality of magnets, a filament centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode having an extraction orifice at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets spaced from said plasma electrode and dividing the chamber into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber, maintaining the chamber wall at a positive voltage relative to the filament and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner within the chamber and near the chamber wall to limit recombination of N[sup +] ions into the N[sub 2][sup +] ions, spacing the magnets of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N[sup 3] ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8[times]10[sup [minus]4] torr) for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beam.

  8. Production of N.sup.+ ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Kunkel, Wulf B. (Berkeley, CA); Walther, Steven R. (Salem, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N.sup.+ ion beam using a multicusp ion source (10) having a chamber (11) formed by a cylindrical chamber wall (12) surrounded by a plurality of magnets (13), a filament (57) centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode (36) having an extraction orifice (41) at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets (21, 22) spaced from said plasma electrode (36) and dividing the chamber (11) into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber (11), maintaining the chamber wall (12) at a positive voltage relative to the filament (57) and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner (45) within the chamber and near the chamber wall (12) to limit recombination of N.sup.+ ions into the N.sub.2.sup.+ ions, spacing the magnets (21, 22) of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N.sup.3 ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8.times.10.sup.-4 torr) for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beam.

  9. First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Gatchell, M.; Rosen, S.; Reinhed, P.; Loefgren, P.; Braennholm, L.; Blom, M.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Baeckstroem, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Kaellberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C{sub n}{sup -}, n= 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C{sub 2}{sup -} molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s {+-} 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10{sup -14} mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  10. Plasma and Ion Beam Injection into an FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.; Bystritskii, V.; Garate, E.; Rostoker, N.; Song, Y.; Drie, A. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, CA, 92697 (United States); Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., Foothill Ranch, CA, 92610 (United States); Isakov, I. [Institute of High Voltage Technology, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on the transverse injection of intense (5-20 A/cm{sup 2}), wide cross-section (10-cm), neutralized, {approx}100-eV H{sup +} plasma and 100-keV H{sup +} ion beams into a preformed B-field reversed configuration (FRC) are described. The FRC background plasma temperature was {approx}5 eV with densities of {approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. In contrast to earlier experiments, the background plasma was generated by separate plasma gun arrays. For the startup of the FRC, a betatron-type 'slow' coaxial source was used. Injection of the plasma beam into the preformed FRC resulted in a 30-40% increase of the FRC lifetime and the amplitude of the reversed magnetic field. As for the ion beam injection experiment into the preformed FRC, there was evidence of beam capture within the configuration.

  11. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer; John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (State College, PA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  12. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education, 200433 Shanghai (China); Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup ?10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup ?4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  13. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  14. Ion counting efficiencies at the IGISOL facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Al-Adili; K. Jansson; M. Lantz; A. Solders; C. Gustavsson; A. Mattera; A. V. Prokofiev; V. Rakopoulos; D. Tarrío; S. Wiberg; M. Österlund; S. Pomp

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility, fission mass yields can be studied at high precision. Fission fragments from a U target are passing through a Ni foil and entering a gas filled chamber. The collected fragments are guided through a mass separator to a Penning trap where their masses are identified. This simulation work focuses on how different fission fragment properties (mass, charge and energy) affect the stopping efficiency in the gas cell. In addition, different experimental parameters are varied (e. g. U and Ni thickness and He gas pressure) to study their impact on the stopping efficiency. The simulations were performed using the Geant4 package and the SRIM code. The main results suggest a small variation in the stopping efficiency as a function of mass, charge and kinetic energy. It is predicted that heavy fragments are stopped about 9% less efficiently than the light fragments. However it was found that the properties of the U, Ni and the He gas influences this behavior. Hence it could be possible to optimize the efficiency.

  15. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  16. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002. There are three specific areas of risk that can be controlled and managed by the EBIS Project team and these are and operations. The BNL ISM clearly indicates that risk management is everybody's business and will be factored

  17. Spin Observables in Reactions with Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Urrego Blanco, Juan Pablo [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized cryogenic target.

  18. 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V.; Wang, Yongqiang; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA – 2013). This conference was held in Marriott Waterfront in Seattle, Washington, USA during June 23–28, 2013.

  19. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  20. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  1. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. T. C. [UKAEA Culham Division, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  2. ION BEAM MACHINING OF NIOBIUM WEAKLY SUPERCONDUCTING MICROBRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    179 ION BEAM MACHINING OF NIOBIUM WEAKLY SUPERCONDUCTING MICROBRIDGES R. ADDE, P. CROZAT, S réduite représentant la structure à usiner. Les propriétés de microponts Josephson en niobium sont ensuite to be machin- ed. We describe and discuss the superconducting properties of niobium Josephson microbridges

  3. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  4. Direct fabrication of nanopores in a metal foil using focused ion beam with in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagoshi, Kotaro; Honda, Junki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A through hole with a diameter less than 100 nm was fabricated in an Ag foil using only a focused ion beam (FIB) system and in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam. During the drilling of the foil by a FIB of Ga{sup +} ions, the transmitted part of the beam was measured with an electrode mounted on the back face of the foil. When the beam current penetrating through the nanopore reached a certain value, irradiation was stopped and the area of the created aperture was measured with a scanning electron microscope. The resulting area was correlated with the current of the penetrating ion beam. This suggests that we can fabricate a nanopore of the desired size by controlling the ion beam via penetrating ion beam measurements. The smallest aperture thus created was circular with diameter of 30 nm.

  5. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  6. LEVIS ion source and beam characterization on PBFA-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Johnson, D.J.; Pointon, T.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the continuing development of the LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source) lithium active ion source for the 15-cm radial focussing ion diode on PBFA-11. We found previously that DC-heating of the anode surface to 150{degrees}C maximum for 5 hours resulted in a pure lithium beam. This paper discusses the characterization of LEVIS source uniformity by Faraday cup arrays and multiple lines of sight for visible light spectroscopy. These diagnostics give some evidence of nonuniformity in both A-K gap electric fields and ion current density. Despite this, however, the measured focal spot size appears smaller than with a passive LiF source operated in the same magnetic field topology. Experiments using a curved anode for vertical beam focussing show reduced ion beam turn-on delay by 5 ns by altering the magnetic field topology as well as anode curvature. Another 3--5 ns reduction was achieved by switching from a passive LiF to the active LEVIS source.

  7. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HI FAN 1160 LBNL-50492 Progress in Bright Ion BeamsMedicine and Fusion at LBNL Joe W. Kwan Lawrence BerkeleyAbstract Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams

  8. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Arijeet, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Mukharjee, C., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rajiv, K., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Bose, Aniruddha, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, S. D., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Phase, D. M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore-452017 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  9. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhant Suerfu; Christopher G. Tully

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials.

  10. Electrostatic dispersion lenses and ion beam dispersion methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An EDL includes a case surface and at least one electrode surface. The EDL is configured to receive through the EDL a plurality of ion beams, to generate an electrostatic field between the one electrode surface and either the case surface or another electrode surface, and to increase the separation between the beams using the field. Other than an optional mid-plane intended to contain trajectories of the beams, the electrode surface or surfaces do not exhibit a plane of symmetry through which any beam received through the EDL must pass. In addition or in the alternative, the one electrode surface and either the case surface or the other electrode surface have geometries configured to shape the field to exhibit a less abrupt entrance and/or exit field transition in comparison to another electrostatic field shaped by two nested, one-quarter section, right cylindrical electrode surfaces with a constant gap width.

  11. Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber IGOR D to acceptable levels. During ion beam propagation in the chamber, electrons are drawn into the beam, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Abstract The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion charge bunch

  12. Microchip and wedge ion funnels and planar ion beam analyzers using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodynamic ion funnels confine, guide, or focus ions in gases using the Dehmelt potential of oscillatory electric field. New funnel designs operating at or close to atmospheric gas pressure are described. Effective ion focusing at such pressures is enabled by fields of extreme amplitude and frequency, allowed in microscopic gaps that have much higher electrical breakdown thresholds in any gas than the macroscopic gaps of present funnels. The new microscopic-gap funnels are useful for interfacing atmospheric-pressure ionization sources to mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility separation (IMS) stages including differential IMS or FAIMS, as well as IMS and MS stages in various configurations. In particular, "wedge" funnels comprising two planar surfaces positioned at an angle and wedge funnel traps derived therefrom can compress ion beams in one dimension, producing narrow belt-shaped beams and laterally elongated cuboid packets. This beam profile reduces the ion density and thus space-charge effects, mitigating the adverse impact thereof on the resolving power, measurement accuracy, and dynamic range of MS and IMS analyzers, while a greater overlap with coplanar light or particle beams can benefit spectroscopic methods.

  13. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  14. Experiments with planar inductive ion source meant for creation of H+ Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Kalvas, T.; Hahto, S.K.; Reijonen, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three type B ion sources with different chamber diameter Dthe ion source A was made so that cylindrical chamber wallcylindrical chamber wall. Extraction of the ion beam and gas

  15. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velardi, L.; Siciliano, M. V.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V. [Department of Physics and I.N.F.N., LEAS Laboratory, University of Salento, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  16. Formation of nanosize structures on a silicon substrate by method of focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ageev, O. A.; Kolomiytsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G., E-mail: kbg@tsure.ru [Technological Institute of the Southern Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental studies of modes in which nanosize structures are formed on a silicon substrate by method of focused ion beams are presented. Dependences of the diameter and depth of the nanosize structures on the ion beam current and time of exposure to the ion beam at a point are obtained. It is demonstrated that the main factor determining the rate of ion-beam milling is the ion beam current. The results of the study can be used in the development of technological processes for the fabrication of components for nanoelectronics and nanosystems engineering.

  17. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

  18. Photon trap for neutralization of negative ions beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, S S; Ivanov, A A; Kotelnikov, I A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For effectively neutralization of the powerful negative ions beams of hydrogen and deuterium the photon target is considered in long time. The attractiveness of the traditional approach (Fabry-Perot resonators) to their creation is limited to a number of stringent technical requirements and large economic costs. In this paper we propose a new concept of non-resonant photon trap (storage) for creation more technologically simple optical neutralizers.

  19. Direct-write milling of diamond by a focused oxygen ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Aiden A; Botman, Aurelien; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in focused ion beam technology have enabled high-resolution, direct-write nanofabrication using light ions. Studies with light ions to date have, however, focused on milling of materials where sub-surface ion beam damage does not inhibit device performance. Here we report on direct-write milling of single crystal diamond using a focused beam of oxygen ions. Material quality is assessed by Raman and luminescence analysis, and reveals that the damage layer generated by oxygen ions can be removed by nonintrusive post-processing methods such as localised electron beam induced chemical etching.

  20. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  1. PARALLEL ION BEAM PROFILE SCAN USING LASER WIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Long, Cary D [ORNL; Dickson, Richard W [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the world s first experiment of a parallel profile scan of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam using a laser wire system. The system was developed at the superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex. The laser wire profile scanner is based on a photo-detachment process and therefore can be conducted on an operational H- beam in a nonintrusive manner. The parallel profile scanning system makes it possible to simultaneously measure profiles of the 1-MW neutron production H- beam at 9 different locations of the linac by using a single light source. This paper describes the design, optical system and software platform development, and measurement results of the parallel profile scanning system.

  2. Standard practice for dosimetry in electron beam and X-Ray (Bremsstrahlung) irradiation facilities for food processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard practice for dosimetry in electron beam and X-Ray (Bremsstrahlung) irradiation facilities for food processing

  3. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

  4. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  5. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  7. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  8. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy$ J Keywords: Ion beam heating Warm dense matter Inertial fusion energy targets Hydrodynamic simulation a b fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids

  9. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Brown, G. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr{sup 34+} and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th{sup 87+} and U{sup 89+}, which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti{sup 20+} through CO{sup 25+}. A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT.

  10. High Power Molten Targets for Radioactive Ion Beam Production: from Particle Physics to Medical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Melo Mendonca, T M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Megawatt-class molten targets, combining high material densities and good heat transfer properties are being considered for neutron spallation sources, neutrino physics facilities and radioactive ion beam production. For this last category of facilities, in order to cope with the limitation of long diffusion times affecting the extraction of short-lived isotopes, a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target loop equipped with a diffusion chamber has been proposed and tested offline during the EURISOL design study. To validate the concept, a molten LBE loop is now in the design phase and will be prototyped and tested on-line at CERN-ISOLDE. This concept was further extended to an alternative route to produce 1013 18Ne/s for the Beta Beams, where a molten salt loop would be irradiated with 7 mA, 160 MeV proton beam. Some elements of the concept have been tested by using a molten fluoride salt static unit at CERNISOLDE. The investigation of the release and production of neon isotopes allowed the measurement of the diffu...

  11. Ion acceleration from thin foil and extended plasma targets by slow electromagnetic wave and related ion-ion beam instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulanov, S. V. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); A. M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M. [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Pegoraro, F. [Physical Department, University of Pisa, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Bulanov, S. S. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States); Leemans, W. P. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When ions are accelerated by the radiation pressure of a laser pulse, their velocity cannot exceed the pulse group velocity which can be considerably smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. This is demonstrated in two cases corresponding to a thin foil target irradiated by high intensity laser light and to the hole boring produced in an extended plasma by the laser pulse. It is found that the beams of accelerated ions are unstable against Buneman-like and Weibel-like instabilities which results in the broadening of the ion energy spectrum.

  12. Radioactive Ions Production Ring for Beta-Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, E; Wehner, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the FP7 EUROnu program, Work Package 4 addresses the issues of production and acceleration of 8Li and 8B isotopes through the Beta-Beam complex, for the production of electron-neutrino. One of the major critical issues is the production of a high enougth ion ßux, to fulÞll the requirements for physics. In alternative to the direct ISOL production method, a new ap- proach is proposed in [1]. The idea is to use a compact ring for Litium ions at 25 MeV and an internal He or D target, in which the radioactive-isotopes production takes place. The beam is expected to survive for several thousands of turns, therefore cooling in 6D is required and, according this scheme, the ionization cooling provided by the target itself and a suitable RF system would be sufÞcient. We present some preliminary work on the Production ring lat- tice design and cooling issues, for the 7Li ions, and propose plans for future studies, within the EUROnu program.

  13. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  14. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Siskind, Barry (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  15. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  16. One-dimensional ordering of ultra-low density ion beams in a storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, H.; Okabe, K.; Yuri, Y.; Mohl, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional ordering of ultra-low density ion beams in ais applicable to an ultra-low density beam where collectiveabout 10 cm. In such an ultra-low density regime, no collec-

  17. Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toprek, Dragan; Formanoy, Iwo; Brandenburg, Sytze [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Laboratory for Nuclear and Plasma Physics, B.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the ''varying quadrupole method,'' are compared with calculations including fringe fields up to third order with the code COSY INFINITY. Calculations and measurements qualitatively agree; the calculations exhibit the large beam losses observed. On the basis of the calculations new settings have been determined, resulting in a significant increase of the transmission. To achieve full transmission a complete redesign of the beam line, in particular of the bending magnets, is needed.

  18. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34102 Basovizza (Italy)

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  19. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER ANDtemperature rise in the tungsten foil. A cross-calibrationis obtained with a 3µm thick tungsten foil calorimeter and

  20. Study of ion beam generation from interaction of 10 µm with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (but acceleration time is longer). Scaling of ion acceleration with CO 2 lasers Gas jet as an ion beam source * Pure (compared to solid targets which become quickly covered in...

  1. TITAN's Digital RFQ Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher, Operation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brunner; M. J. Smith; M. Brodeur; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri A. Lapierre; E. Mané; R. Ringle; M. C. Simon; J. A. Vaz; P. Delheij; M. Good; M. R. Pearson; J. Dilling

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap built as part of the TITAN facility. It consists of a gas-filled, segmented, linear Paul trap and is the first stage of the TITAN setup with the purpose of cooling and bunching radioactive ion beams delivered from ISAC-TRIUMF. This is the first such device to be driven digitally, i.e., using a high voltage ($V_{pp} = \\rm{400 \\, V}$), wide bandwidth ($0.2 < f < 1.2 \\, \\rm{MHz}$) square-wave as compared to the typical sinusoidal wave form. Results from the commissioning of the device as well as systematic studies with stable and radioactive ions are presented including efficiency measurements with stable $^{133}$Cs and radioactive $^{124, 126}$Cs. A novel and unique mode of operation of this device is also demonstrated where the cooled ion bunches are extracted in reverse mode, i.e., in the same direction as previously injected.

  2. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  3. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  4. Experimental test of a microwave ion beam source in oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmussen, J.; Dahimene, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments have demonstrated a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma disk ion source operating with inert gases both with and without an applied static magnetic field. Earlier results were reported using a preliminary, multicusp static magnetic field configuration produced by alternating pole, small, --2.5 kG rare earth magnets surrounding the microwave discharge zone. This electrodeless ion source has been rebuilt incorporating several improvements and has been experimentally tested with different discharge diffusion lengths. The improvements include removing the rare earth magnets from the inside of the microwave cavity and embedding them in the cavity walls. The placement and strength of the magnets allows electron cyclotron resonant surfaces (--875 G) to lie entirely within the discharge zone. Discharges with different diffusion lengths were created by varying the thickness of the disk-shaped discharge zone. The experimental performance with and without a static magnetic field is discussed at the low flow rates of 2--10 sccm and using a 2.5 cm diam double grid set. Experimental test results are compared to similar ion beam sources in oxygen that employ a dc discharge. The expected lifetime, startup, and shutdown problems and maintenance are also reviewed.

  5. Useful Graphs and Charts - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility /

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4. UraniumUsed Fuel

  6. Measurements - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1, 20121 H( 7radialMHD Dynamo/

  7. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

  8. Production of beams of neutron-rich nuclei between Ca and Ni using the ion-guide technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perajarvi, K.; Cerny, J.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Kurpeta, J.; Lee, D.; Moore, I.; Penttila, H.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Since several elements between Z = 20-28 are refractory in their nature, their neutron-rich isotopes are rarely available as low energy Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) in ordinary Isotope Separator On-Line facilities [1-4]. These low energy RIBs would be especially interesting to have available under conditions which allow high-resolution beta-decay spectroscopy, ion-trapping and laser-spectroscopy. As an example, availability of these beams would open a way for research which could produce interesting and important data on neutron-rich nuclei around the doubly magic {sup 78}Ni. One way to overcome the intrinsic difficulty of producing these beams is to rely on the chemically unselective Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique [5]. Quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions, such as {sup 197}Au({sup 65}Cu,X)Y, could be used to produce these nuclei in existing IGISOL facilities, but before they can be successfully incorporated into the IGISOL concept their kinematics must be well understood. Therefore the reaction kinematics part of this study was first performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using its 88'' cyclotron and, based on those results, a specialized target chamber was built[6]. The target chamber shown in Fig. 1 was recently tested on-line at the Jyvaaskylaa IGISOL facility. Yields of mass-separated radioactive projectile-like species such as {sup 62,63}Co are about 0.8 ions/s/pnA, corresponding to about 0.06 % of the total IGISOL efficiency for the products that hit the Ni-degrader. (The current maximum 443 MeV {sup 65}Cu beam intensity at Jyvaaskylaa is about 20 pnA.) This total IGISOL efficiency is a product of two coupled loss factors, namely inadequate thermalization and the intrinsic IGISOL efficiency. In our now tested chamber, about 9 % of the Co recoils are thermalized in the owing He gas (p{sub He}=300 mbar) and about 0.7 % of them are converted into the mass-separated ion beams. In the future, both of these physical/chemical conditions can be suppressed by introducing Ar as a buffer gas and by relying on selective laser re-ionization. This combination will produce isobarically pure beams and it will increase the existing yields by at least a factor of 100, making this overall approach to the study of neutron rich nuclei even more attractive.

  9. Ion beam sputter target and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A.; Goldsmith, Jason; Cook, Bruce; Blau, Peter; Jun, Qu; Milner, Robert

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A target for use in an ion beam sputtering apparatus made of at least two target tiles where at least two of the target tiles are made of different chemical compositions and are mounted on a main tile and geometrically arranged on the main tile to yield a desired chemical composition on a sputtered substrate. In an alternate embodiment, the tiles are of varied thickness according to the desired chemical properties of the sputtered film. In yet another alternate embodiment, the target is comprised of plugs pressed in a green state which are disposed in cavities formed in a main tile also formed in a green state and the assembly can then be compacted and then sintered.

  10. Nanostructuring superconductors by ion beams: A path towards materials engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerbaldo, Roberto; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gozzelino, Laura; Laviano, Francesco [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino c.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy and INFN Sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amato, Antonino; Rovelli, Alberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Cherubini, Roberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with nanostructuring of superconducting materials by means of swift heavy ion beams. The aim is to modify their structural, optical and electromagnetic properties in a controlled way, to provide possibility of making them functional for specific applications. Results are presented concerning flux pinning effects (implantation of columnar defects with nanosize cross section to enhance critical currents and irreversibility fields), confined flux-flow and vortex guidance, design of devices by locally tailoring the superconducting material properties, analysis of disorder-induced effects in multi-band superconductors. These studies were carried out on different kinds of superconducting samples, from single crystals to thin films, from superconducting oxides to magnesium diboride, to recently discovered iron-based superconductors.

  11. Ion beam characteristics of the controlatron/zetatron family of the gas filled neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.S.; Shope, L.A.; O'Neal, M.L.; Boers, J.E.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas filled tube used to produce a neutron flux with the D(T,He/sup 4/)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100 mA. The characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50 kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density onto the target. The perveance of the beam is discussed. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 20 nanopervs. Tube focusing and neutron production characteristics are described.

  12. Excited-Level Lifetimes and Hyperfine-Structure Measurements on Ions using Collinear Laser Ion-Beam Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resolve isotopic beams of Ca+ or Cl+. However, each isotopic mass had a different velocity, and hence Doppler shift, following subsequent acceleration to and within the DSS. Consequently ion isotopes other than the dominant iso- tope had significantly...

  13. Project Title: Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan A. Chen

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na - The importance of the {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and the {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope {sup 22}Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma})14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction is a key uncertainty in the understanding the origin of galactic {sup 26}Al, a target radioisotope for gamma ray astronomy; the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction in turn is the trigger reaction for the transition into the Hot-CNO cycles in novae and X-ray bursts. A graduate student of mine, who has been supported part-time by this grant, completed the evaluation of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction as part of his plans to measure this reaction at TRIUMF for his Ph.D. thesis project. I also hired a part-time undergraduate student for the 2004-05 academic year to assist with the evaluations, including that of the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction. Year 3 (2005-06): The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions - This year's progress was closely coupled to new results coming from our collaboration on the DRAGON spectrometer team at TRIUMF. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions were both measured, and significant modifications to their respective reaction rates were required. Both are required input toward predicting the respective amounts of Titanium-44 and Aluminum-26 produced in our galaxy, in supernovae, massive stars, and nova explosions. The {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reaction rate was successfully completed. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction in particular served as the Ph.D. thesis for Christian Ouellet, and therefore the evaluation of this rate fell naturally within his thesis project. Christian successfully defended his thesis in 2007 and is now working for me on the McMaster DOE-funded Nuclear Data Project. In light of the recent data from his thesis, Christian is now putting the final touches on this evaluation, and will disseminate it through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reaction rate database.

  14. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico)] [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup ?} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  15. Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

  16. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Drazic, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza 34012 (Italy); Holy, V. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic)

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  17. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 2–3 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  18. Ion beam oscillation due to fluctuation of a hot filament driven magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imakita, S.; Kasuya, T.; Kimura, Y.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Miyamoto, N. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co. Ltd., Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam current extracted from a modified Bernas type ion source occasionally exhibits an oscillation at a frequency of several 100 kHz. Increase in the strength of a linear magnetic field induced to the ion source has either decreased or increased the frequency of this oscillation. The frequency showed an increase in proportion to the ion extraction voltage when the frequency decreased with increasing magnetic field. The change of extraction voltage did not affect the frequency when the frequency increased with the increasing magnetic field. Mechanisms causing these oscillations of an ion beam had been investigated.

  19. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1, Block-AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharjee, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of {sup 14}O (71 s), {sup 42}K (12.4 h), {sup 43}K (22.2 h), and {sup 41}Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10{sup 3} particles per second (pps). About 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pps of 1.4 MeV {sup 14}O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  20. Numerical study of the characteristics of the ion and fast atom beams in an end-Hall ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An end-Hall ion source is a cylindrical magnetized device of few centimeters in length able to generate an ion beam with a current of typically 1 A and ion energies in the range of 100 eV. This ion source does not use acceleration grids, has a relatively large ion beam divergence, and is well suited for ion assisted deposition processes. In this paper, a self-consistent two-dimensional quasi-neutral model of an end-Hall ion source is used to understand the parameters controlling the characteristics of the extracted. The model results underline the role of charge exchange collisions on beam properties. The calculated energy distribution functions reveal the existence of groups of slow ions and fast neutrals. Ion mean energy corresponds to roughly 60% of the discharge voltage, while the root mean square deviation from the mean energy corresponds to about 33% of the discharge voltage, as in experiments. The influence of the position of the electron emitting source on the ion angular distribution is also shown.

  1. Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

  2. Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann N. (Albuquerque, NM); Soden, Jerry M. (Placitas, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal.

  3. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  4. DMSE Electron Beam Instruments Facility | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTION ADMSE Electron Beam Instruments

  5. Beam Time Request - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron Institute /

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users LiveBattlingBeamTexas

  6. Development of a machine protection system for the Superconducting Beam Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Church, M.; Neswold, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Superconducting RF Beam Test Facility currently under construction will produce electron beams capable of damaging the acceleration structures and the beam line vacuum chambers in the event of an aberrant accelerator pulse. The accelerator is being designed with the capability to operate with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 1.5 GeV beam energy. It will be able to sustain an average beam power of 72 KW at the bunch charge of 3.2 nC. Operation at full intensity will deposit enough energy in niobium material to approach the melting point of 2500 C. In the early phase with only 3 cryomodules installed the facility will be capable of generating electron beam energies of 810 MeV and an average beam power that approaches 40 KW. In either case a robust Machine Protection System (MPS) is required to mitigate effects due to such large damage potentials. This paper will describe the MPS system being developed, the system requirements and the controls issues under consideration.

  7. Development of picoseconds Time of Flight systems in Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; /Fermilab; Malik, S.; /Rockefeller U.; Pronko, S.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the work is to develop time of flight (TOF) system with about 10 picosecond time resolution in real beam line when start and stop counters separated by some distance. We name the distance as 'base' for the TOF. This 'real' TOF setup is different from another one when start and stop counters located next to each other. The real TOF is sensitive to beam momentum spread, beam divergence, etc. Anyway some preliminary measurements are useful with close placement of start and stop counter. We name it 'close geometry'. The work started about 2 years ago at Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF). The devices tested in 'close geometry' were Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers (MCP PMT) with Cherenkov radiators. TOF counters based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPms) with Cherenkov radiators also in 'close geometry' were tested. We report here new results obtained with the counters in the MTBF at Fermilab, including beam line data.

  8. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S. [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Shizuoka (Japan) and Institute de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) and Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Gunnma (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of {approx} 1.0 {mu}m at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5{mu}m FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  9. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  11. BETA BEAMS: AN ACCELERATOR BASED FACILITY TO EXPLORE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    them decay in a race-track shaped stor- age ring. EURO Beta Beams are based on CERNs infras- tructure to get high neutrino flux at a gamma boost of 100. INTRODUCTION Production of (anti-)neutrinos from beta facility, using the isotope pair 6 He/18 Ne and detector in the Fr´ejus tunnel (France) has been studied

  12. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  13. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  14. Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 5, Venezia-Marghera 30175 (Italy); Rigato, Valentino; Ceccato, Daniele [LNL-INFN, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro-Padova 35020 (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest, for its implications on public health, and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However, it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids, for which diffusion lengths are extremely short, or within heterogeneous rocks, where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission ({mu}PIXE), rarely applied in the field, were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

  15. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitgab, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

  16. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE ORNL MULTICHARGED ION RESEARCH FACILITY HIGH-VOLTAGE PLATFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE ORNL MULTICHARGED ION RESEARCH FACILITY HIGH-VOLTAGE PLATFORM M. E for the 250-kV platform and beamlines for accelerating and transporting ions produced by an all- permanent of the electrical potentials of the installation, that is at the source, platform, and ground potentials, are inter

  17. Interaction of ion-acoustic solitons with electron beam in warm plasmas with superthermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) is studied using the hydrodynamic equations coupled with the Poisson equation in a warm plasma consisting of adiabatic ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in presence of an electron-beam component. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation for ion-acoustic (IA) waves is obtained by linearizing of basic equations. On the other hand, in the nonlinear analysis, an energy-balance like equation involving Sagdeev's pseudo-potential is derived in order to investigate arbitrary amplitude IA solitons. The Mach number range is determined in which, propagation and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed both parametrically and numerically. The variation of amplitude and width of electrostatic (ES) excitations as a result of superthermality (via) and also the physical parameters (ion temperature, soliton speed, electron-beam density and electron-beam velocity) are examined. A typical interaction between IASWs and the electron-beam in plasma is conf...

  18. Space-Charge Limits on the Transport of Ion Beams in a Long Alternating Gradient System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiefenback, M.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    35j. The output voltage droops in time as the charge on thethe ion gun apertures. Any droop in beam energy re­ sults in0.6 msec (0.15% per /zsec droop) is coupled to the various

  19. Ion-Beam Synthesis of Epitaxial Au Nanocrystals in MgO. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relationship to MgO(100). Citation: Thevuthasan S, V Shutthanandan, CM Wang, WJ Weber, W Jiang, AS Cavanagh, J Lian, and LM Wang.2004."Ion-Beam Synthesis of Epitaxial Au...

  20. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    defect formation processes between these layers. Citation: Ishimaru M, Y Zhang, and WJ Weber.2009."Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN."Journal of Applied Physics...

  1. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX) with a High Intensity Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a High Intensity Ion Beam P. K. Roy 1* , S. S. Yu 1 , W. L.12 , 043102 (2005). [6] P. K. Roy et al. , Nucl. Instrum.2005), p.4006. [16] P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu, E. Henestroza, A.

  2. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  3. Ion Chamber Arrays for the Numi Beam at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovic; R. Zwaska; R. Keisler; S. Mendoza; S. Kopp; M. Proga; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; M. Bishai; M. Diwan; B. Viren; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays.

  4. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  5. Proposal for continuously-variable neutrino beam energy for the NuMI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, Mikhail; Kopp, Sacha; /Texas U.; Messier, Mark; /Harvard U.; Harris, Deborah A.; Hylen, Jim; Para, Adam; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NuMI Facility was intended to be flexibly changed between 3 energies of beams, LE, ME, and HE. However, the changeover requires extensive downtime to move and realign horns and the target. We propose to implement a flexible arrangement where the target can be remotely moved in the beamline direction to change the beam energy and the horns remain fixed. In addition to having the attractive feature of keeping the horn optics fixed, the motion of the target can be performed more quickly and hence on a more frequent basis. We discuss potential increases in statistics in the high energy region, systematic cross-checks available, and the improved beam monitoring capabilities with such variable energy beams.

  6. Polyvinyltoluene scintillators for relative ion dosimetry: an investigation with Helium, Carbon and Neon beams.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    facility (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) of the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences Pasteur, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg, France. b National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4

  7. Ion Beam Deposition of Thin Films: Growth Processes and Nanostructure Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofsaess, Hans C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam deposition is a process far from thermodynamic equilibrium and is in particular suited to grow metastable thin films with diamond-like properties, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN). In this contribution the atomistic description of the deposition and growth processes are reviewed and compared to experimental results, obtained from mass selected ion beam deposition. The focus will be set to the nucleation and growth processes of boron nitride as a model system for ion based thin film formation. Furthermore, recent examples for nanostructure formation in ion deposited compound thin films will be presented. Ion beam deposited metal-carbon nano-composite thin films exhibit a variety of different morphologies such as rather homogeneous nanocluster distributions embedded in an a-C matrix, but also the self-organized formation of nanoscale multilayer structures.

  8. Experimental observation of ion beams in the Madison Helicon eXperiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiebold, Matt; Sung, Yung-Ta; Scharer, John E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argon ion beams up to E{sub b} = 165 eV at P{sub rf} = 500 W are observed in the Madison Helicon eXperiment (MadHeX) helicon source with a magnetic nozzle. A two-grid retarding potential analyzer (RPA) is used to measure the ion energy distribution, and emissive and rf-filtered Langmuir probes measure the plasma potential, electron density, and temperature. The supersonic ion beam (M = v{sub i}/c{sub s} up to 5) forms over tens of Debye lengths and extends spatially for a few ion-neutral charge-exchange mean free paths. The parametric variation of the ion beam energy is explored, including flow rate, rf power, and magnetic field dependence. The beam energy is equal to the difference in plasma potentials in the Pyrex chamber and the grounded expansion chamber. The plasma potential in the expansion chamber remains near the predicted eV{sub p} {approx} 5kT{sub e} for argon, but the upstream potential is much higher, likely due to wall charging, resulting in accelerated ion beam energies E{sub b} = e[V{sub beam} - V{sub plasma}] > 10kT{sub e}.

  9. Experimental verification of an ion-induced focus model for the recirculating electron beam injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poukey, J.W.; Mazarakis, M.G. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Platt, R.C. (Science Applications International, Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for the operation of a particular type of electron beam diode used in the Sandia Recirculating Linear Accelerator system. The critical element of the model is ion emission from the anode aperture, which neutralizes enough beam space charge to permit focusing. Recent experimental results are shown which support the model in several respects.

  10. Transport of ion beam in an annular magnetically expanding helicon double layer thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunchao, E-mail: yunchao.zhang@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Bldg 60, Mills Road, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam generated by an annular double layer has been measured in a helicon thruster, which sustains a magnetised low-pressure (5.0?×?10{sup ?4}?Torr) argon plasma at a constant radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power of 300?W. After the ion beam exits the annular structure, it merges into a solid centrally peaked structure in the diffusion chamber. As the annular ion beam moves towards the inner region in the diffusion chamber, a reversed-cone plasma wake (with a half opening angle of about 30°) is formed. This process is verified by measuring both the radial and axial distributions of the beam potential and beam current. The beam potential changes from a two-peak radial profile (maximum value???30?V, minimum value???22.5?V) to a flat (?28?V) along the axial direction; similarly, the beam current changes from a two-peak to one-peak radial profile and the maximum value decreases by half. The inward cross-magnetic-field motion of the beam ions is caused by a divergent electric field in the source. Cross-field diffusion of electrons is also observed in the inner plume and is determined as being of non-ambipolar origin.

  11. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  12. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The ?rst part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  13. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer Andreas Rohrbacher and Robert E. Continettia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    /ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins myoglobin and lysozyme , created by matrix assisted laser,7 and matrix assisted desorption and ionization MALDI 8­11 have become avail- able to allow the mass the samples with a robot- driven capillary,15 a scanning ion beam,16 or spatial resolu- tion was achieved

  14. Magnetic shielding of walls from the unmagnetized ion beam in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate by numerical simulations and experiments that the unmagnetized ion beam formed in a Hall thruster can be controlled by an applied magnetic field in a manner that reduces by 2-3 orders of magnitude deleterious ion bombardment of the containing walls. The suppression of wall erosion in Hall thrusters to such low levels has remained elusive for decades.

  15. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in inter- action processes of short and ultra-short laser pulses with matter. Ion generation from laserHigh energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from the NHELIX laser system at GSI G. SCHAUMANN,1 M.S. SCHOLLMEIER,1 G. RODRIGUEZ-PRIETO,2 A. BLAZEVIC,2 E

  16. Chapter 2 Deuterium Reaction with C(100): IonBeam Scattering Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ­beam scattering techniques are easily calibrated by compari­ #12; 28 son to ion­implanted standards, and nuclear of 1560 ffi C from time­of­flight scattering and recoil­ion spectroscopy (TOF­SARS). However, Chin et al

  17. Focusing of intense and divergent ion beams in a magnetic mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianlin, Ke; Changgeng, Zhou; Rui, Qiu; Yonghong, Hu [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, 621900 Mianyang (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic mass analyzer is used to determine the beam composition of a vacuum arc ion source. In the analyzer, we used the concentric multi-ring electrodes to focus the intense and divergent ion beams. We describe the principle, design, and the test results of the focusing device. The diameter of the beam profile is less than 20 mm when the accelerating voltage is 30 kV and the focusing voltage is about 2.0 kV. The focusing device has been successfully used in the magnetic mass analyzer to separate Ti{sup +}, Ti{sup 2+}, and Ti{sup 3+}.

  18. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; /Fermilab; Assmann, R.; /CERN; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Extracted MCI Beam from an ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, L.T.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Guo, X.H.; Zhang, Z.M.; Feng, Y.C.; Li, J.Y.; Ma, L.; Li, J.; Zhao, H.Y.; He, W.; Li, X.X. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Hitz, D.; Girard, A. [CEA-Grenoble, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, Service des Basses Temperatures, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS), very high performance ECRIS nowadays have been set up one by one around the world, such as the GTS in Grenoble, SERSE in Catania, LECR3 in Lanzhou and etc, which can produce very intense Multiply Charged Ion (MCI) beam. But till now, the study of the extracted MCI beam from an ECRIS remains open. In this article, we present a theoretical and experimental study of the extracted MCI beam. In the theoretical part, the influences of the extraction system on the extracted ion beam quality are mainly analyzed. The aspects that have influences on the extracted ion beam quality have been analyzed. With the instruction of the analysis, the PBGUNS code is used to simulate the influences of some important aspects concerning the extraction system. The influences of the extraction system geometry design, magnetic field, and the space charge effect will be detailedly presented in this article. In the experimental part, with an Electric-Sweep Scanner (ESS) emittance detection system, the influences on the extracted ion beam emittance of some typical parameters of ECRIS have been researched, such as the injected RF power, the RF frequency, the magnetic field and etc. The obtained results and the corresponding explanations are presented. Some of the results are well in accord with some empirical laws, but some other results seem to be disputed.

  20. Optimization of ion-atomic beam source for deposition of GaN ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mach, Jind?ich, E-mail: mach@fme.vutbr.cz; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Voborny, Stanislav; Bartošík, Miroslav; Šikola, Tomáš [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC BUT, Brno University of Technology, Technická 10, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Šamo?il, Tomáš [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the optimization and application of an ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition of ultrathin films in ultrahigh vacuum. The device combines an effusion cell and electron-impact ion beam source to produce ultra-low energy (20–200 eV) ion beams and thermal atomic beams simultaneously. The source was equipped with a focusing system of electrostatic electrodes increasing the maximum nitrogen ion current density in the beam of a diameter of ?15 mm by one order of magnitude (j ? 1000 nA/cm{sup 2}). Hence, a successful growth of GaN ultrathin films on Si(111) 7 × 7 substrate surfaces at reasonable times and temperatures significantly lower (RT, 300?°C) than in conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technologies (?1000?°C) was achieved. The chemical composition of these films was characterized in situ by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and morphology ex situ using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It has been shown that the morphology of GaN layers strongly depends on the relative Ga-N bond concentration in the layers.

  1. Selective compositional mixing in GaAs/AIGaAs superlattice induced by low dose Si focused ion beam implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    of the mixing process was observed at 100 keV implantation energy, with a "pinch-off" (more heavily mixed ion beam (FIB) implantation technology has been especially attractive in this application, since/or transfer technology, the lateral profiles of the ion beam (and of the ions implanted in the solid

  2. Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

  3. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbamonte, Peter M. [University of Illinois] University of Illinois

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The original purpose of this award was to use low?energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real?time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low?energy, inelastic electron scattering (?EELS?) instrument. Consistent with Flynn?s original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low?energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss of ~ 90 meV. This excitation disperses quadratically, exhibits a critical momentum of q{sub c} = 0.11 ?{sup ?1}, and may be identified as the surface collective mode of the helical Dirac liquid. To make a stronger connection between the behavior of this excitation and the known surface physics of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, we are carrying out a doping?dependent study, as a function of Se vacancy content, of this excitation. From this study we will be able to quantify the strength of interactions in the spin?polarized surface states in a manner analogous to our past work on graphene.

  4. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan) [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  5. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also included.

  6. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.I.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Ainsworth, R.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Heo, A.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Honda, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hwang, W.H.; Huang, J.Y.; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Kim, E-S.; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 {mu}m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  7. Beam Ion Instability in ILC Damping Ring with Multi-Gas Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lanfa; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2 pm. The beam ion instability with various beam filling patterns for the latest lattice DTC02 is studied using PIC code. The code has been benchmarked with SPEAR3 experimental data and there is a good agreement between the simulation and observations. It uses the optics from MAD and can handle arbitrary beam filling pattern and vacuum. Different from previous studies, multi-gas species and exact beam filling patterns have been modeled simultaneously in the study. This feature makes the study more realistic. Analyses have been done to compare with the simulations.

  8. Summary of Testing of SuperLig 639 at the TFL Ion Exchange Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot scale facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to test ion exchange resins for removing technetium and cesium from simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW). The facility supports the design of the Hanford River Protection Project for BNFL, Inc. The pilot scale system mimics the full-length of the columns and the operational scenario of the planned ion exchange system. Purposes of the testing include confirmation of the design, evaluation of methods for process optimization and developing methods for waste volume minimization. This report documents the performance of the technetium removal resin.

  9. Ion boundary conditions in semi-infinite fluid models of electron beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modified Bohm criterion is derived for the plasma consisting of the monoenergetic electron beam and thermal electrons. This criterion allows us to define the accurate ion boundary conditions for semi-infinite collisionless fluid models of electron beam–plasma interaction. In the absence of electron beam, these boundary conditions give the classical sheath parameters. When the monoenergetic electron beam propagates through the plasma, the fluid model with proposed boundary conditions gives the results, which are in qualitative agreement with the results obtained earlier in M. Sharifian and B. Shokri, Phys. Plasmas 14, 093503 (2007). However, dynamics and parameters of the plasma sheath are different.

  10. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  11. Sub-10-nm lithography with light-ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) is the workhorse of nanoscale lithography in part because of the high brightness of the Schottky source of electrons, but also benefiting from decades of incremental innovation and ...

  12. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimbucher, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waveform and there are voltage oscillations. Before reachingbunching of the beam. Voltage oscillations in the diode alsoThe period T of the voltage oscillation must be t a < T < t

  13. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  14. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayle, H., E-mail: bayle@bergoz.com [Bergoz Instrumentation, Saint-Genis-Pouilly (France); Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)] [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  15. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  16. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Tianhuan; /Indiana U.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  17. ACCELERATION OF CHARGE BRED RADIOACTIVE IONS AT TRIUMF F. Ames, R. Baartman, P. Bricault, K. Jayamanna, M. McDonald, P. Schmor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    operation and an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) for continuous beam operation. With nearly facility. Mass separated beams of radioactive ions from the on-line ion sources can be directed and from the on-line commissioning. INTRODUCTION At the radioactive beam facility ISAC at TRIUMF

  18. Surface Smoothing of Compound Semiconductor Substrates with Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houzumi, S.; Toyoda, N.; Yamada, I. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, Himeji Institute of Technology, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo, 678-1205 (Japan)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface smoothing by gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) was studied for compound semiconductor such as GaN and SiC. Average cluster size of Ar cluster ions was 2000atoms/cluster measured by time of flight (TOF). Since the total acceleration energy was 20keV, the energy per atom was 10eV/atom. This low-energy characteristic of gas cluster ion beams is desirable for compound semiconductors. GCIB irradiation was employed to remove the scratches of the mechanically polished SiC surface. After irradiation at acceleration energy of 15keV, the scratches was completry removed. The GaN film with initial average roughness of 4nm was also smoothed to that of 1.4nm by Ar cluster ion beams. Furthermore SiC substrates were irradiated with SF6 cluster ions. The sputtering yield of SiC with SF6 cluster ions was enhanced almost 3 times than that with Ar cluster ions.

  19. Ion-beam treatment to prepare surfaces of p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a p-CdTe layer and outer contact layers by ion beam processing comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe device into a chamber and evacuating the chamber; b) orienting the p-CdTe side of the CdS/CdTe layer so that it faces apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality; c) introducing Ar and igniting the area of apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality in a manner so that during ion exposure, the source-to-substrate distance is maintained such that it is less than the mean-free path or diffusion length of the Ar atoms and ions at the vacuum pressure; d) allowing exposure of the p-CdTe side of the device to said ion beam for a period less than about 5 minutes; and e) imparting movement to the substrate to control the real uniformity of the ion-beam exposure on the p-CdTe side of the device.

  20. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagulya, A V; Negodaev, M A; Rusetskii, A S; Chubenko, A P; Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  1. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Bagulya; O. D. Dalkarov; M. A. Negodaev; A. S. Rusetskii; A. P. Chubenko; V. G. Ralchenko; A. P. Bolshakov

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  2. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapson, Christopher, E-mail: chris.rapson@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)] [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Klinger, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  3. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

  4. Ion beams extraction and measurements of plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore ECRIS with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozaki, Dai; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Yano, Keisuke; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Univ., 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an all-permanent magnet large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for broad ion beam processing. The cylindrically comb-shaped magnetic field configuration is adopted for efficient plasma production and good magnetic confinement. To compensate for disadvantages of fixed magnetic configuration, a traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) is used. In the comb-shaped ECRIS, it is difficult to achieve controlling ion beam profiles in the whole inside the chamber by using even single frequency-controllable TWTA (11-13GHz), because of large bore size with all-magnets. We have tried controlling profiles of plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beams by launching two largely different frequencies simultaneously, i.e., multi-frequencies microwaves. Here we report ion beam profiles and corresponding plasma parameters under various experimental conditions, dependence of ion beams against extraction voltages, and influence of different electrode positions on the electron density profile.

  5. Drift Compression of an Intense Neutralized Ion Beam P. K. Roy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Drift Compression of an Intense Neutralized Ion Beam P. K. Roy,1 S. S. Yu,1 E. Henestroza,1 A. Waldron,1 D. R. Welch,2 C. Thoma,2 A. B. Sefkow,3 E. P. Gilson,3 P. C. Efthimion,3 and R. C. Davidson3 1 of a velocity-tailored, intense neutralized K beam at 300 keV, 25 mA has been demonstrated. The compression

  6. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spata, Michael F. [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  7. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  8. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Rusnak, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Saadatmand, K. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Operation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at {pi} radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, John; /Argonne; Conde, Manoel; /Argonne; Gai, Wei; /Argonne; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  10. Ion Beam Radiation Effects in Monazite , X. Deschanels2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ions to simulate the consequences of alpha decay. This article describes the effects, Irradiation effects, Hardness, Density, XRD, Raman spectroscopy; Deposited energy PACS: 81.05.Je, 61.82-d, 61-19] actinides, but relatively few papers dealing with compounds incorporating both tri- and tetravalent elements

  11. Ion beam analysis of materials for water purification: Partitioning of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    -Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 #12;Motivation: limited microscopic understanding of transport in interfacially (solvent) but low permeability to contaminants (solute) · Steady-state transport measurements cannot4 · Freeze-dry to remove water without disturbing the ion distribution · Polysulfone is highly

  12. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam.

  13. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  14. Production of low axial energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.H.Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as: ion projection lithography (IPL) and focused ion beams for the next generation lithographic tools and nuclear science experiments such as radioactive ion beam production. The axial ion energy spread for multicusp source is approximately 6 eV which is too large for IPL and radioactive ion beam applications. The addition of a magnetic filter which consists of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably. The reduction is due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. Axial ion energy spread of the filament driven ion source has been measured using three different techniques. In all cases, it was found to be less than 2 eV. Energy spread of the radio frequency (RF) driven source has also been explored, and it was found to be less than 3 eV with the proper RF-shielding. A new multicusp source configuration has been designed and constructed to further reduce the energy spread. To achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution, a cylindrical magnetic filter has been designed and constructed for a 2-cm-diameter source. This new source configuration, the co-axial source, is new in its kind. The energy spread in this source has been measured to be a record low of 0.6 eV. Because of the novelty of this device, some plasma parameters inside the source have been studied. Langmuir probe has been used to measure the plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density distribution.

  15. Offline trapping of $^{221}$Fr in a magneto-optical trap from implantation of an $^{225}$Ac ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; R. Collister; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; H. Heggen; J. Lassen; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson; S. Raeder; A. Teigelhöfer

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new technique to prepare an offline source of francium for trapping in a magneto-optical trap. Implanting a radioactive beam of $^{225}$Ac, $t_{1/2} = 9.920(3)$ days, in a foil, allows use of the decay products, i.e.$^{221}$Fr, $t_{1/2} = 288.0(4)$ s. $^{221}$Fr is ejected from the foil by the $\\alpha$ decay of $^{225}$Ac. This technique is compatible with the online accumulation of a laser-cooled atomic francium sample for a series of planned parity non-conservation measurements at TRIUMF. We obtain a 34% release efficiency for $^{221}$Fr from the recoil source based on particle detector measurements. We find that laser cooling operation with the source is $8^{+10}_{-5}$ times less efficient than from a mass-separated ion beam of $^{221}$Fr in the current geometry. While the flux of this source is two to three orders of magnitude lower than typical francium beams from ISOL facilities, the source provides a longer-term supply of francium for offline studies.

  16. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P., E-mail: pradipr@barc.gov.in; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, ?2 to ?4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup ?3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  17. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  18. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single crystalline GaN substrates were irradiated at cryogenic temperature with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 7.35x1015 Au/cm2. Cross-sectional TEM observations revealed that damaged layers consisting of amorphous and nanocrystalline phases are formed at the surface and buried depth of the as-irradiated GaN substrate. Atomic radial distribution functions of the amorphous/poly-nanocrystalline regions showed that not only heteronuclear Ga-N bonds but also homonuclear Ga-Ga bonds exist within the first coordination shell. It was found that the ratio of heteronuclear-to-homonuclear bonds, i.e., the degree of chemical disorder is different between the surface and buried damaged layers. The alternation of chemical disorder was attributed to the difference in the defect formation processes between these layers.

  19. Nonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    describe the plasma perturbations well.5 Here, we focus on the general case where the plasma density hasNonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev, and Ronald C. Davidson Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton

  20. Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: MASKLESS FABRICATION OF JUNCTION FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS VIA FOCUSED ION BEAMS Anthony John De Marco, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation directed by: Professor Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland, College Park

  1. Microstructural study of ion-beam deposited giant magnetoresistive spin valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 Detailed microstructural investigation of ion beam deposited exchanged field and R/R of the spin valves. © 1997 American Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 97 32708-X that by sputter deposition.3 This may be beneficial to the integration of the spin-valve element with other head

  2. Consequences of the ion beam irradiation on the chemical durability of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate Kinetics study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Consequences of the ion beam irradiation on the chemical durability of Thorium Phosphate of the long-term specific immobilization of actinides, Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD), as potential-13], and thorium-actinide phosphate-diphosphate solid solutions (-Th4-xAnx(PO4)4P2O7) with associated -TPD

  3. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  4. Focused Ion Beam Production Using a Pyroelectric Crystal and a Resistive Glass Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Focused Ion Beam Production Using a Pyroelectric Crystal and a Resistive Glass Tube T. Z. Fullem, A to accelerate electrons into a metal target has led to the production of compact X-Ray generators [4], [5], [6 tungsten tip (marketed for use in a scanning electron microscope) with an apex radius of 70 nm was mounted

  5. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ; Roger P. (Tucson, AZ)

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  6. Micromilling of Metal Alloys with Focused Ion Beam-Fabricated Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This work combines focused ion beam sputtering and ultra-precision machining as a first step in fabricating microstructure in metals and alloys. Specifically, {approx}25{micro}m diameter micro-end mills are made from cobalt M42 high-speed steel and C2 micrograin tungsten carbide tool blanks by ion beam sputtering. A 20 keV focused gallium beam defines tool cutting edges having radii of curvature < 0.1{micro}m. Micro-end mills having 2, 4 and 5 cutting edges successfully machine small trenches in 6061-T4 aluminum, brass, 4340 steel and polymethyl methacrylate. Machined trench widths are approximately equal to the tool diameters and surface roughnesses (rms) are {approx}150 nm or less. Microtools are robust and operate for more than 6 hours without fracture. Results from ultra-precision machining aluminum at feed rates as high as 50 mm/minute are included.

  7. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: Bryan.Muir@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 ColonelBy Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ?}) are provided. These factors avoid the use of gradient correction factors as used in the TG-51 protocol although a chamber dependent optimal shift in the EPOM is required when using plane-parallel chambers while no shift is needed with cylindrical chambers. The sensitivity of these results to parameters used to model the ion chambers is discussed and the uncertainty related to the practical use of these results is evaluated. Conclusions: These results will prove useful as electron beam reference dosimetry protocols are being updated. The analysis of this work indicates that cylindrical ion chambers may be appropriate for use in low-energy electron beams but measurements are required to characterize their use in these beams.

  8. Self-focusing of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a multi-ions plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors have developed a formulation for the dependence of electron and ion densities on the irradiance of an electromagnetic beam in a plasma with multiply charged ions, corresponding to collisional, ponderomotive, and relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearities and different electron/ion temperatures; consequently, the corresponding expressions for the electron density modification in the presence of an electromagnetic (em) field have been derived. Paraxial approach in the vicinity of intensity maximum has been adopted to analyze the propagation characteristics of an em beam in such plasmas; on the basis of this analysis, critical curves and self-focusing curves have been computed numerically and graphically illustrated. For a numerical appreciation of the analysis, we have specifically carried out the computations for the simultaneous presence of singly and doubly charged ions in the plasma. As an important outcome, it is seen that the nonlinear effects (and hence self-focusing) get suppressed in the presence of multiply ionized ions; the conditions for the three modes of em-beam propagation viz. oscillatory focusing/defocusing and steady divergence have been discussed.

  9. Epitaxial GaN films by hyperthermal ion-beam nitridation of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Ivanov, T.; Neumann, L.; Hoeche, Th.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial GaN film formation on bare 6H-SiC(0001) substrates via the process of transformation of Ga droplets into a thin GaN film by applying hyperthermal nitrogen ions is investigated. Pre-deposited Ga atoms in well defined amounts form large droplets on the substrate surface which are subsequently nitridated at a substrate temperature of 630 Degree-Sign C by a low-energy nitrogen ion beam from a constricted glow-discharge ion source. The Ga deposition and ion-beam nitridation process steps are monitored in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Ex situ characterization by x-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and electron microscopy shows that the thickness of the resulting GaN films depends on the various amounts of pre-deposited gallium. The films are epitaxial to the substrate, exhibit a mosaic like, smooth surface topography and consist of coalesced large domains of low defect density. Possible transport mechanisms of reactive nitrogen species during hyperthermal nitridation are discussed and the formation of GaN films by an ion-beam assisted process is explained.

  10. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, J. J.; Sha, Sh.; Zhang, Zh. L.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C{sup 6+} beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  11. Nuclear Theory and Science of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B Balantekin; J. Carlson; D. J. Dean; G. M. Fuller; R. J. Furnstahl; M. Hjorth-Jensen; R. V. F. Janssens; Bao-An Li; W. Nazarewicz; F. M. Nunes; W. E. Ormand; S. Reddy; B. M. Sherrill

    2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars, and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This article overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas. \\keywords{Nuclear Structure and Reactions. Nuclear Astrophysics. Fundamental Interactions. High Performance Computing. Rare Isotopes. Radioactive Beams.

  12. Design and evaluation of a wide bandwidth logarithmic-ratio beam position monitor processor for the Proton Storage Ring at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Hamilton Blalock

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a facility used for high intensity neutron studies at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility(LAWF), located at the Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, New Mexico. A wide bandwidth beam position processor...

  13. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  14. The universe in the laboratory - Nuclear astrophysics opportunity at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langanke, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzze-ntrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and pathbreaking research in hadronic, nuclear, and atomic physics as well as in applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  15. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  16. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  17. Heavy Ion Beam in Resolution of the Critical Point Problem for Uranium and Uranium Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy; Victor Gryaznov

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Important advantages of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation of matter are discussed in comparison with traditional sources - laser heating, electron beam, electrical discharge etc. High penetration length (~ 10 mm) is of primary importance for investigation of dense matter properties. This gives an extraordinary chance to reach the uniform heating regime when HIB irradiation is being used for thermophysical property measurements. Advantages of HIB heating of highly-dispersive samples are claimed for providing free and relatively slow quasi-isobaric heating without fast hydrodynamic expansion of heated sample. Perspective of such HIB application are revised for resolution of long-time thermophysical problems for uranium and uranium-bearing compounds (UO2). The priorities in such HIB development are stressed: preferable energy levels, beam-time duration, beam focusing, deposition of the sample etc.

  18. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  19. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  20. Temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing in crystalline and amorphous germanium isotope multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radek, M.; Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Posselt, M.; Liedke, B.; Schmidt, B. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Bougeard, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-atom mixing induced by 310 keV gallium (Ga) ion implantation in crystalline and preamorphized germanium (Ge) at temperatures between 164 K and 623 K and a dose of 1?×?10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2} is investigated using isotopic multilayer structures of alternating {sup 70}Ge and {sup nat}Ge layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The distribution of the implanted Ga atoms and the ion-beam induced depth-dependent self-atom mixing was determined by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Three different temperature regimes of self-atom mixing, i.e., low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature regimes are observed. At temperatures up to 423 K, the mixing is independent of the initial structure, whereas at 523?K, the intermixing of the preamorphized Ge structure is about twice as high as that of crystalline Ge. At 623?K, the intermixing of the initially amorphous Ge structure is strongly reduced and approaches the mixing of the crystalline material. The temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing is described by competitive amorphization and recrystallization processes.

  1. The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

  2. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  3. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  4. Extraction of highly charged ions from the electron beam ion trap at LBNL for applications in surface analysis and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Ion Trap at LBNL for Applications in Surfacetransferred from LLNL to LBNL, and is now operating with+ . The research program at LBNL is focused on the following

  5. Investigation into direct conversion with medium energy He-ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guild-Bingham, Avery A.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency was found using a He+ ion beam to be approximately 88% for beam energies ranging from 20 to 80 keV. The 2.4 1012 ? 10% ohm resistor used in the experiment holds-up under the stress of high voltage to 40 kV. Electric current leakage tests... to be confirmed before it is conclusive that the resistor is sufficient for the FFMCR prototype. The leakage tests also indicate that Teflon? is quite sufficient as an insulator for potentials as high as 40 kV. It was apparent that the surface of the Teflon...

  6. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  7. Z-petawatt driven ion beam radiography development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schollmeier, Marius; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-driven proton radiography provides electromagnetic field mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution, and has been applied to many laser-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments. Our report addresses key questions about the feasibility of ion radiography at the Z-Accelerator (%E2%80%9CZ%E2%80%9D), concerning laser configuration, hardware, and radiation background. Charged particle tracking revealed that radiography at Z requires GeV scale protons, which is out of reach for existing and near-future laser systems. However, it might be possible to perform proton deflectometry to detect magnetic flux compression in the fringe field region of a magnetized liner inertial fusion experiment. Experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser to enhance proton yield and energy showed an unexpected scaling with target thickness. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, coupled to fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell simulations running for over 10 ps, explain the scaling by a complex interplay of laser prepulse, preplasma, and ps-scale temporal rising edge of the laser.

  8. SU-D-BRE-04: Evaluating the Dose Accuracy of a 2D Ion Chamber Array in High Dose Rate Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perles, L; Mascia, A; Piskulich, F; Lepage, R; Zhang, Y; Giebeler, A; Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the absolute dose accuracy of the PTW Octavius 729 XDR 2D ion chamber array at a high dose rate pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: A set of 18 plans were created in our treatment planning system, each of which comprising a unique combination of field sizes (FS), length of spread out of Bragg peaks (SOBP) and depths. The parameters used were: FS of 5×5cm{sup 2}, 10×10cm{sup 2} and 15×15cm{sup 2}; flat SOBP of 5cm and 10cm; and isocenter depths of 10cm, 15cm and 20cm, which coincides with the center of the SOBP. The 2D array detector was positioned at the machine isocenter and the appropriate amount of solid water was used to match the planned depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm water equivalent depth. Subsequently, we measured the absolute dose at isocenter using a CC04 ion chamber in a 1D water tank. Both 2D array and CC04 were previously cross calibrated. We also collected the MU rates used by our proton machine from the log files. Results: The relative differences between the CC04 and the 2D array can be summarized into two groups, one with 5 cm SOBP and another with 10 cm SOBP. Plotting these datasets against FS shows that the 2D array response for high dose rate fields (FS of 5×5cm{sup 2} and 5cm SOBP) can be up to 2% lower. Similarly, plotting them against isocenter depths reveals the detector's response can be up to 2% lower for higher energy beams (about 200MeV nominal). The MU rate found in the machine log files for 5cm SOBP's were as high as twice the MU rate for the 10cm SOBP. Conclusion: The 2D array dose response showed a dose rate effect in scanning pencil beam delivery, which needs to be corrected to achieve a better dose accuracy.

  9. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraby, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); DiBattista, M. [Qualcomm Technologies Incorporated, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  10. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Hannah; Auvinen, Jussi; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  11. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah Petersen; Jan Steinheimer; Jussi Auvinen; Marcus Bleicher

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  12. Cloud a particle beam facility to investigate the influence of cosmic rays on clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for solar forcing of the climate during the Holocene and the last ice age, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. However recent observations suggest that cosmic rays may play a key role. Satellite data have revealed a surprising correlation between cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of the Earth covered by low clouds \\cite{svensmark97,marsh}. Since the cosmic ray intensity is modulated by the solar wind, this may be an important clue to the long-sought mechanism for solar-climate variability. In order to test whether cosmic rays and clouds are causally linked and, if so, to understand the microphysical mechanisms, a novel experiment known as CLOUD\\footnotemark\\ has been proposed \\cite{cloud_proposal}--\\cite{cloud_addendum_2}. CLOUD proposes to investigate ion-aerosol-cloud microphysics under controlled laboratory conditions using a beam from a particle accelerator, which provides a precisely adjustable and measurable artificial source of cosmic rays....

  13. Radiobiologic Significance of Response of Intratumor Quiescent Cells In Vivo to Accelerated Carbon Ion Beams Compared With {gamma}-Rays and Reactor Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ando, Koichi; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Koike, Sachiko [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Sakurai, Yoshinori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kashino, Genro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Kinashi, Yuko [Department of Radiation Safety and Control, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira [Department of Radiation Medical Physics, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To clarify the radiosensitivity of intratumor quiescent cells in vivo to accelerated carbon ion beams and reactor neutron beams. Methods and Materials: Squamous cell carcinoma VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label all intratumor proliferating cells. Next, they received accelerated carbon ion or {gamma}-ray high-dose-rate (HDR) or reduced-dose-rate (RDR) irradiation. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons with RDR irradiation. Immediately after HDR and RDR irradiation or 12 h after HDR irradiation, the response of quiescent cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The response of the total (proliferating plus quiescent) tumor cells was determined from the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine nontreated tumors. Results: The difference in radiosensitivity between the total and quiescent cell populations after {gamma}-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with a greater linear energy transfer (LET) value. Clearer repair in quiescent cells than in total cells through delayed assay or a decrease in the dose rate with {gamma}-ray irradiation was efficiently inhibited with carbon ion beams, especially with a greater LET. With RDR irradiation, the radiosensitivity to accelerated carbon ion beams with a greater LET was almost similar to that to reactor thermal and epithermal neutron beams. Conclusion: In terms of tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including quiescent cells, accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with greater LET values, are very useful for suppressing the dependency on the heterogeneity within solid tumors, as well as depositing the radiation dose precisely.

  14. Planarization of amorphous carbon films on patterned substrates using gas cluster ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao [Incubation Center, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Nagato, Keisuke; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya [Department of Engineering Synthesis, School of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tani, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Sakane, Yasuo [Western Digital Media Operations, 1710 Automation Parkway, San Jose, CA 95131 (United States)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface planarization and modification of a patterned surface were demonstrated using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). Grooves with 100-400 nm intervals were formed on amorphous carbon films using focused ion beams to study the special frequency dependence of the planarization. Also, line and space patterns were fabricated on Si substrates, and amorphous carbons were deposited as a model structure of discrete track media. Subsequently, surface planarization using Ar-GCIB was carried out. After GCIB irradiations, all of the grooves were completely removed, and a flat surface was realized. And it showed that GCIB irradiation planarized grooves without huge thickness loss. From the power spectrum density of an atomic force microscope, GCIB preferentially removed grooves with small intervals. It was found from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that surface planarization without severe damage in the amorphous carbon and magnetic layers was carried out with GCIB.

  15. Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

  16. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  17. Simulations and experiments of intense ion beam current density compression in space and timea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    . Leitner,3 S. M. Lidia,3 P. K. Roy,3 P. A. Seidl,3 W. L. Waldron,3 S. S. Yu,3 and D. R. Welch4 1 Sandia longitudinal pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX P. K. Roy et. B. Sefkow,1,b R. C. Davidson,2 E. P. Gilson,3 I. D. Kaganovich,2 A. Anders,3 J. E. Coleman,3 M

  18. LINEAR COLLIDER TEST FACILITY: TWISS PARAMETER ANALYSIS AT THE IP/POST-IP LOCATION OF THE ATF2 BEAM LINE *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LINEAR COLLIDER TEST FACILITY: TWISS PARAMETER ANALYSIS AT THE IP/POST-IP LOCATION OF THE ATF2 BEAM through to the IP, the Twiss parameters need to be measured at the IP or PIP. Up to now, these parameters to extract the Twiss parameters and the emittance thanks to the three coefficients of the fit

  19. Beta Beams for neutrino production: Heat deposition from decaying ions in superconducting magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildner, Elena; Cerutti, Francesco

    This note describes studies of energy deposition in superconducting magnets from secondary ions in the “beta beam” decay ring as described in the base-line scenario of the EURISOL Beta Beam Design Study. The lattice structure proposed in the Design Study has absorber elements inserted between the superconducting magnets to protect the magnet coils. We describe an efficient and small model made to carry out the study. The specially developed options in the beam code “ACCSIM” to track largely off-momentum particles has permitted to extract the necessary information to interface the transport and interaction code “FLUKA” with the aim to calculate the heat deposition in the magnets and the absorbers. The two beta emitters 18Ne10+ and 6He2+ used for neutrino and anti-neutrino production and their daughter ions have been tracked. The absorber system proposed in the Design Study is efficient to intercept the ions decayed in the arc straight sections as foreseen, however, the continuous decay in the dipol...

  20. Beta Beams for Neutrino Production Heat Deposition from Decaying Ions in Superconducting Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildner, Elena; Cerutti, F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes studies of energy deposition in superconducting magnets from secondary ions in the "beta beam" decay ring as described in the base-line scenario of the EURISOL Beta Beam Design Study. The lattice structure proposed in the Design Study has absorber elements inserted between the superconducting magnets to protect the magnet coils. We describe an efficient and small model made to carry out the study. The specially developed options in the beam code "ACCSIM" to track largely off-momentum particles has permitted to extract the necessary information to interface the transport and interaction code "FLUKA" with the aim to calculate the heat deposition in the magnets and the absorbers. The two beta emitters 18Ne10+ and 6He2+ used for neutrino and anti-neutrino production and their daughter ions have been tracked. The absorber system proposed in the Design Study is efficient to intercept the ions decayed in the arc straight sections as foreseen, however, the continuous decay in the dipoles induce ...

  1. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClements, K. G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hole, M. J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  2. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

  3. Ion-Beam-Induced Chemical Mixing at a Nanocrystalline CeO2–Si Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Young, Niel P.; Parish, Chad M.; Moll, Sandra J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of nanocrystalline ceria deposited onto a silicon substrate have been irradiated with 3 MeV Au+ ions to a total dose of 34 displacements per atom to examine the film/substrate interfacial response upon displacement damage. Under irradiation, a band of contrast is observed to form that grows under further irradiation. Scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis suggest that this band of contrast is a cerium silicate phase with an approximate Ce:Si:O composition ratio of 1:1:3 in an amorphous nature. The slightly nonstoichiometric composition arises due to the loss of mobile oxygen within the cerium silicate phase under the current irradiation condition. This nonequilibrium phase is formed as a direct result of ion-beam-induced chemical mixing caused by ballistic collisions between the incoming ion and the lattice atoms. This may hold promise in ion beam engineering of cerium silicates for microelectronic applications e.g., the fabrication of blue LEDs.

  4. Ion-Beam-Induced Chemical Mixing at a Nanocrystalline CeO2 Si Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Dr. Philip [University of Oxford; Young, Neil P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Moll, Sandra [CEA, Saclay, France; Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of nanocrystalline ceria deposited onto a silicon substrate have been irradiated with 3 MeV Au+ ions to a total dose of 34 displacements per atom to examine the film/substrate interfacial response upon displacement damage. Under irradiation, a band of contrast is observed to form that grows under further irradiation. Scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis suggest that this band of contrast is a cerium silicate phase with an approximate Ce:Si:O composition ratio of 1:1:3 in an amorphous nature. The slightly nonstoichiometric composition arises due to the loss of mobile oxygen within the cerium silicate phase under the current irradiation condition. This nonequilibrium phase is formed as a direct result of ion-beam-induced chemical mixing caused by ballistic collisions between the incoming ion and the lattice atoms. This may hold promise in ion beam engineering of cerium silicates for microelectronic applications e.g., the fabrication of blue LEDs.

  5. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 594 waste ion exchange facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building 594 D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: Removal of any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the Waste Ion Exchange Facility; Decontamination of the Waste Ion Exchange Facility to unrestricted use levels; Demolition of Building 594; and Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure) These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The ion exchange system and the resin contained in the system were the primary areas of concern, while the condition of the building which housed the system was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians characterized the Building 594 Waste Ion Exchange Facility in September 1996. The characterization identified a total of three radionuclides present in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility with a total activity of less than 5 {micro}Ci (175 kBq). The radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Cs{sup 137}, and Am{sup 241}. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the resin in the exchange vessels. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem (50 mSv)/yr; the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

  6. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2,Qin, H.3, Rose, D.V.4, Roy, P.K.1, Startsev, E.A.3, Seidl, P.A.1, Sharp, W.M.2, Vay, J-L.1. [Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX): P. K. Roy, et. al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 234801 (2005), and J, compressing beam ~ 2 ns FWHM *cf Roy, et. Al. PRL 95(2005) 23481 2800 K (will be higher after emissivity

  7. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  8. Enhanced Self-Focusing of an Ion Beam Pulse Propagating through a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Enhanced Self-Focusing of an Ion Beam Pulse Propagating through a Background Plasma along.58.Lq, 52.59.Ã?f Neutralization and focusing of charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma form plasma elec- trons. The effects of the enhanced self-focusing are of particular importance

  9. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro, E-mail: dmytro.rafalskyi@lpp.polytechnique.fr; Popelier, Lara; Aanesland, Ane [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF{sub 6} is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition, and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350?V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10?mA for each component at RF power of 100?W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/? ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the applied acceleration voltage.

  10. Heavy ion beam probe advances from the first installation of the diagnostic on an RFP (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J. [Xantho Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam probes have been installed on a variety of toroidal devices, but the first and only application on a reversed field pinch is the diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Simultaneous measurements of spatially localized equilibrium potential and fluctuations of density and potential, previously inaccessible in the core of the reversed field pinch (RFP), are now attainable. These measurements reflect the unique strength of the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) diagnostic. They will help determine the characteristics and evolution of electrostatic fluctuations and their role in transport, and determine the relation of the interior electric field and flows. Many aspects of the RFP present original challenges to HIBP operation and inference of plasma quantities. The magnetic field contributes to a number of the issues: the comparable magnitudes of the toroidal and poloidal fields and edge reversal result in highly three-dimensional beam trajectories; partial generation of the magnetic field by plasma current cause it and hence the beam trajectories to vary with time; and temporal topology and amplitude changes are common. Associated complications include strong ultraviolet radiation and elevated particle losses that can alter functionality of the electrostatic systems and generate noise on the detectors. These complexities have necessitated the development of new operation and data analysis techniques: the implementation of primary and secondary beamlines, adoption of alternative beam steering methods, development of higher precision electrostatic system models, refinement of trajectory calculations and sample volume modeling, establishment of stray particle and noise reduction methods, and formulation of alternative data analysis techniques. These innovative methods and the knowledge gained with this system are likely to translate to future HIBP operation on large scale stellarators and tokamaks.

  11. Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion etching, and chemical mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 Received 2 June's size and location, and reactive ion etching was used to form an SiO2 template. Nickel electroplating

  12. Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  13. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Fanqing

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z = 8 proton magic number for odd Z, Tz=-3/2 nuclei. It is expected that future work on proton-rich nuclides will rely heavily on RIBs and/or mass separators. Currently, radioactive ion beam intensities are sufficient for the study of a reasonable number of very proton-rich nuclides.

  14. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  15. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital (L5-113), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Davis, Stephen [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  16. Interface and process for enhanced transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages at unequal pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a new interface with non-circular conductance limit aperture(s) useful for effective transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages with different gas pressure. In particular, the invention provides an improved coupling of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzers of planar or side-to-side geometry to downstream stages such as mass spectrometry or ion mobility spectrometry. In this case, the non-circular aperture is rectangular; other geometries may be optimum in other applications. In the preferred embodiment, the non-circular aperture interface is followed by an electrodynamic ion funnel that may focus wide ion beams of any shape into tight circular beams with virtually no losses. The jet disrupter element of the funnel may also have a non-circular geometry, matching the shape of arriving ion beam. The improved sensitivity of planar FAIMS/MS has been demonstrated in experiments using a non-contiguous elongated aperture but other embodiments (e.g., with a contiguous slit aperture) may be preferable, especially in conjunction with an ion funnel operated at high pressures.

  17. A prototype compton camera for in-vivo dosimetry of ion beam cancer irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kormoll, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Fiedler, F. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Golnik, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Heidel, K.; Kempe, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Schoene, S.; Sobiella, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Inst. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Zellescher Weg 19, 013069 Dresden (Germany); Enghardt, W. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional in-vivo dose monitoring of ion beam cancer irradiation can improve the quality of treatment. For this purpose we investigate the feasibility of imaging the single photon emissions due to nuclear reactions of projectiles with target nuclei (in-beam SPECT). A suitable imaging technique in the energy range of the emitted gamma rays is the Compton camera. A prototype based on prior simulations is currently under construction. Te system comprises two CdZnTe cross-strip detectors with steering grid and depth-of-interaction capability and one segmented LSO scintillator crystal with modified Anger light readout. We present the concept of the system including the front-end and DAQ electronics as well as first measurements. (authors)

  18. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?°C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  19. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Jiang, Weilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 98163 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ?6?nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  20. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-42 (India); Kaur, Daljeet [Department of Physics, Guru Teg Bahadur Institute of Technology, Rajouri Garden, New Delhi (India); Gahlot, Ajay [Department of Physics, Maharaja Surajmal Institute of Technology, Janakpuri, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Jyotsna [Department of Physics, KIIT College of Engineering, Bhondsi Gurgaon 122102 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  1. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H{sup -} ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarvainen, O.; Rouleau, G.; Keller, R.; Geros, E.; Stelzer, J.; Ferris, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H{sup -} ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H{sup -} beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H{sup -} converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H{sup -} ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H{sup -} ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H{sup -} production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H{sup -} ion beams.

  2. Design of the channel for irradiation of materials with highly charged ion beams obtained from the mVINIS ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siljegovic, M.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Draganic, I.; Cizmic, B.; Jelic, G. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy part of the TESLA Accelerator Installation comprises an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (the mVINIS ion source) and the channel for modification of materials (L3A). The L3A channel is long and has low beam transmission (30%-50%), so it is not suitable for high fluence implantations (over 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}). Therefore, we are planning to introduce an experimental channel (L4), close to the mVINIS Ion Source, where we shall be able to achieve high beam currents on the target and, consequently, irradiation of materials to high fluences. During the ion implantation, we shall be able to measure fluence rate, achieve uniform fluence distribution by a mechanism for x and y sample movements, and control the sample temperature in the range of 0-200 deg. C.

  3. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, Mikhail A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  4. Ion Beam Sputter Fabrication of Micro-Grooving and Micro-Threading Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; KRISHNAN,A.S.M.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents techniques for fabricating microscopic, nonplanar features in a variety of materials. Micro-grooving and micro-threading tools having cutting dimensions of 10-30{micro}m are made by focused ion beam sputtering and used in ultra-precision machining. Tool fabrication involves directing a 20 keV gallium beam at polished cylindrical punches made of cobalt M42 high-speed steel or C2 tungsten carbide. This creates cutting edges having radii of curvature less than 0.4 {micro}m, and rake features similar to conventional lathe tools. Clearance for minimizing frictional drag of a tool results from the sputter yield dependence on ion herd target incidence angle. Numerically controlled, ultra-precision machining with micro-grooving tools results in a close matching between tool width and feature size. Microtools controllably machine 13 {micro}m wide, 4 {micro}m deep, helical grooves in polymethyl methacrylate and 6061-T6 Al cylindrical substrates. Micro-grooving tools also fabricate sinusoidal waveform features in polished metal substrates.

  5. Commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; R. Collister; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. Large laser-cooled samples of francium are produced from a francium ion beam delivered by the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. The ion beam is neutralized on an yttrium foil, which is subsequently heated to transfer the atoms into the magneto-optical trapping region. We have successfully trapped $^{207}$Fr, $^{209}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr, with a maximum of $2.5 \\times 10^5$ $^{209}$Fr atoms. The neutral cold atoms will be used in studies of the weak interaction through measurements of atomic parity non-conservation.

  6. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  7. Introduction of the MC3-II/GP system, medium current ion implanter with enhanced multi-charge beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Masazumi; Sato, Fumiaki; Sano, Makoto; Kawatsu, Sho; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Kudo, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Miyuki; Shinozuka, Masamitsu; Takahashi, Yuji; Ishida, Yuji; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Sugitani, Michiro [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MC3-II/GP is a leading-edge single-wafer medium-current ion implanter, newly developed by SEN Corporation. It demonstrates exceptional productivity based on a high speed wafer-handling station and enhanced beam current. It covers a substantively wider energy range in order to fully meet advanced device requirements. Retaining the superior features of the MC3-II/WR, the MC3-II/GP provides a remarkable increase of multiply-charged beam current coupled with longer ion source lifetime. Another advanced feature of the MC3-II/GP is a 30 second or 14% reduction in auto beam setup time. These improvements enable a fabrication line to reduce the total number of ion implanters and dramatically reduce COO.

  8. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery N. G. Rudawski, B. L. Darby, B. R. Yates, K. S. Jones, R. G. Elliman et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes N. G. Rudawski, B photoelectrochemical cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 084104 (2012) Synthesis and characterization of Nd4+xFe72Co5Ga2B17-x://apl.aip.org/authors #12;Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes N. G. Rudawski,1

  9. Space-Charge Limits on the Transport of Ion Beams in a Long Alternating Gradient System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiefenback, M.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    term stability of the transport of cold, high-current beams,beam. The cold-beam ideal case for this transport is called

  10. H{sup -} beam extraction from a cesium seeded field effect transistor based radio frequency negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, A.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Tanaka, N. [School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    H{sup -} beam was successfully extracted from a cesium seeded ion source operated using a field effect transistor inverter power supply as a radio frequency (RF) wave source. High density hydrogen plasma more than 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} was obtained using an external type antenna with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. The source was isolated by an isolation transformer and H{sup -} ion beam was extracted from a single aperture. Acceleration current and extraction current increased with the increase of extraction voltage. Addition of a small amount of cesium vapor into the source enhanced the currents.

  11. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, Yuan, E-mail: jtext@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Chundong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  12. Development of Fragmented Low-Z Ion Beams for the NA61 Experiment at the CERN SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Bohl, T; Breuker, H; Calviani, M; Manglunki, D; Mataguez, S; Maury, S; Valderanis, C; Cornelis, K; Spanggaard, J; Cettour-Cave, S; Gazdzicki, M; Seyboth, P; Guber, F; Ivashkin, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA61 experiment, aims to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement at low SPS energies and to find signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. A broad range in T-?B phase diagram will be covered by performing an energy (13A-158AGeV/c) and system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) scan. In a first phase, fragmented ion beams of 7Be or 11C produced as secondaries with the same momentum per nucleon when the incident primary Pb-ion beam hits a thin Be target will be used. The H2 beam line that transports the beam to the experiment acts as a double spectrometer which combined with a new thin target (degrader) where fragments loose energy proportional to the square of their charge allows the separation of the wanted A/Z fragments. Thin scintillators and TOF measurement for the low energy points are used as particle identification devices. In this paper results from the first test of the fragmented ion beam done in 2010 will be presented showing that a pure Be beam can be obtained sa...

  13. Passive tailoring of laser-accelerated ion beam cut-off energy by using double foil assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu; Brambrink, E.; Mancic, A.; Romagnani, L.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Robinson, A. P. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Antici, P. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France) [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma « La Sapienza », Via Scarpa 14-16, 00165 Roma (Italy); INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); D'Humières, E. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States) [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); University of Bordeaux—CNRS—CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, 33405 Talence (France); Gaillard, S. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Grismayer, T.; Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pépin, H. [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)] [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A double foil assembly is shown to be effective in tailoring the maximum energy produced by a laser-accelerated proton beam. The measurements compare favorably with adiabatic expansion simulations, and particle-in-cell simulations. The arrangement proposed here offers for some applications a simple and passive way to utilize simultaneously highest irradiance lasers that have best laser-to-ion conversion efficiency while avoiding the production of undesired high-energy ions.

  14. The Research Program at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Pampa Condori, R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Unifesp, Campus de Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A part of the research program developed in the RIBRAS facility over the last four years is presented. Experiments using radioactive secondary beams of light exotic nuclei such as {sup 6}He, {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}Li on several targets have been performed. Elastic angular distributions have been analysed by the Optical Model and four body Continuous Discretized Coupled Channels Calculations (4b-CDCC) and the total reaction cross sections have been obtained. A comparison between the reaction cross sections of {sup 6}He and other stable projectiles with medium-heavy targets was performed. Measurements of the proton transfer reaction {sup 12}C({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 11}B are also presented.

  15. Design of quantum dot lattices in amorphous matrices by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Jaksic, M.; Salamon, K.; Drazic, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Institute of Physics, Bijenicka cesta 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SLO-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sincrotrone Trieste, I-34149 Basovizza (Italy); Charles University in Prague, CZ-12116 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the highly controllable self-assembly of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles in a solid amorphous matrix, induced by ion beam irradiation of an amorphous multilayer. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a possibility to tune the basic structural properties of the quantum dots in a wide range. Furthermore, the sizes, distances, and arrangement type of the quantum dots follow simple equations dependent on the irradiation and the multilayer properties. We present a Monte Carlo model for the simulation and prediction of the structural properties of the materials formed by this method. The presented results enable engineering and simple production of functional materials or simple devices interesting for applications in nanotechnology.

  16. The giant ion sources of neutral-beam injectors for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All large tokamak fusion experiments today use auxiliary heating by multi-megawatt beams of neutral isotopes of hydrogen injected with energies in the neighborhood of 100 keV per atom. This requires reliable operation of large ion sources, each delivering many tens of amperes of protons or deuterons, and soon even tritons. For meaningful experiments these sources must operate with pulse durations measured in seconds, although the duty factor may still be small. It is remarkable that the successful sources developed in Europe, Japan and the US are all very similar in basic design: the plasma is produced by diffuse low-pressure high-current discharges in magnetic multipole buckets'' was distributed thermionically emitting cathodes. This paper briefly reviews the principal considerations and the basic physics of these sources, and summarizes the collective experience to date and describes the impressive recent performance of the US Common Long Pulse Source, as a specific example. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Characterization of zirconia- and niobia-silica mixture coatings produced by ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Tolenis, Tomas; Mazule, Lina; Mirauskas, Julius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Mangote, Benoit; Fu Xinghai; Zerrad, Myriam; Gallais, Laurent; Commandre, Mireille; Kicas, Simonas; Drazdys, Ramutis

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture coatings as well as those of pure zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by ion-beam sputtering were investigated. Refractive-index dispersions, bandgaps, and volumetric fractions of materials in mixed coatings were analyzed from spectrophotometric data. Optical scattering, surface roughness, nanostructure, and optical resistance were also studied. Zirconia-silica mixtures experience the transition from crystalline to amorphous phase by increasing the content of SiO{sub 2}. This also results in reduced surface roughness. All niobia and silica coatings and their mixtures were amorphous. The obtained laser-induced damage thresholds in the subpicosecond range also correlates with respect to the silica content in both zirconia- and niobia-silica mixtures.

  18. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  19. INACTIVATION OF HUMAN KIDNEY CELLS BY HIGH-ENERGY MONOENERGETIC HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakely, E.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measured in the second ion chamber to that measuredin the monitor ion chamber.collector of the second ion chamber (l-cm diameter) is used

  20. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  1. Control of power characteristics of ion flow in plasma-etching reactor based on beam-plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaev, N. V.; Klykov, I. L.; Shustin, E. G., E-mail: shustin@ms.ire.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that on the basis of the earlier revealed effect of generating the ion flow in the beam-plasma discharge from the discharge axis, a plasma processing reactor can be created for low-energy etching of semiconductor structures. The possibility of easily controlling the density and energy of ion flow by means of varying the potential of the discharge collector is demonstrated. The charge compensation of the ion flow incident on the nonconducting surface is implemented using the modulation of the potential of the substrate holder as well as the plasma-potential modulation.

  2. OTR measurements and modeling of the electron beam optics at the E-cooling facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, A.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optics of the electron beam accelerated in the Pelletron, intended for the electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab recycler storage ring, has been studied. The beam profile parameters were measured under the accelerating section using Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) monitor. The monitor employs a highly-reflective 2 inch-diameter aluminum OTR-screen with a thickness of 5 {micro}m and a digital CCD camera. The measurements were done in a pulse-signal mode in the beam current range of 0.03-0.8 A and at pulse durations ranging from 1 {micro}s to 4 {micro}s. Differential profiles measured in pulsed mode are compared with results obtained by modeling of the DC beam dynamics from the Pelletron cathode to the OTR monitor. The modeling was done with SAM, ULTRASAM and BEAM programs. An adjustment of the magnetic fields in the lenses of the accelerating section was done in the simulations. The simulated electron beam optics downstream of the accelerating section was in good agreement with the measurements made with pulsed beam.

  3. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujiwara, Y., E-mail: s1220908@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H. [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan) [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Innovative Plasma Technologies Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Hirano, Y. [Innovative Plasma Technologies Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan) [Innovative Plasma Technologies Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Laboratory of Physics, College of Science and Technologies, Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H. [Innovative Plasma Technologies Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan)] [Innovative Plasma Technologies Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ?0.9 eV and ?8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup ?3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  4. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  5. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenway, W. G.; Kwan, J. W.

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ?1275{degrees}C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ? 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A source with an alumino-silicate coating 6.35 mm in diameter and ?0.25 mm thick, has a lifetime of ?40 hours at ?1275{degrees}C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ?6 ?s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Furthermore, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  6. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  7. Comparison of experimental data and three-dimensional simulations of ion beam neutralization from the Neutralized Transport Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    . Greenway, B. Logan, R. MacGill, D. Shuman et al., Phys. Rev. ST-Accel. Beams 7, 083501 2004 . Preformed-dimensional 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data with perveance,16 it is possible to scale the experi- ment to lower mass ions and particle energy as well

  8. Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beta-induced Alfv´en-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions N. N. Gorelenkov´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta-induced Alfv´en- acoustic Eigenmodes) New BAAE modes (Gorelenkov- bilities: · TAE/RSAEs and (toroidicity-induced/ reversed shear AEs - Alfv´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta

  9. P-113 / X. Li P-113: Ferroelectric LC Aligned on SiO2 Thin Films Using the Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong A. Khokhlov and E. Khokhlov Izovac Ltd, Belarus Abstract The uniform" (before electrical treatment) and "quazi- bookshelf" (after electrical treatment) were studied of investigation of the alignment of FLC materials on the SiO2 films produced by the ion-beam deposition for LC

  10. Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion under 12 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion behaviour of pure iron. Oxygen and hydrogen playing a crucial role during the corrosion process have been specifically investigated. Heavy desaerated water

  11. Focused ion beam micromilling of GaN and related substrate materials ,,sapphire, SiC, and Si...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    Focused ion beam micromilling of GaN and related substrate materials ,,sapphire, SiC, and Si... A. In addition, we report similar results for materials currently utilized as substrates for GaN growth. II-0030 Received 15 October 1998; accepted 18 December 1998 Micromilling of GaN films has been obtained using a Ga

  12. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D., E-mail: leitnerd@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  13. Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Characterization of Pine Pellet and Peanut Hull Pyrolysis of Bio-Oils by Negative-Ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry, Jacqueline M. Jarvis, Amy M. McKenna, Roger N and aqueous phases. Here, each phase is characterized by negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier

  14. Permanent magnet electron beam ion source/trap systems with bakeable magnets for improved operation conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M., E-mail: mike.schmidt@dreebit.com [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, G.; Kentsch, U.; Ritter, E. [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic system of a Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS) generating the necessary magnetic field with a new type of permanent magnet made of high energy density NdFeB-type material operable at temperatures above 100?°C has been investigated and tested. The employment of such kind of magnets provides simplified operation without the time-consuming installation and de-installation procedures of the magnets for the necessary baking of the ion source after commissioning and maintenance work. Furthermore, with the use of a new magnetization technique the geometrical filling factor of the magnetic Dresden EBIS design could be increased to a filling factor of 100% leading to an axial magnetic field strength of approximately 0.5 T exceeding the old design by 20%. Simulations using the finite element method software Field Precision and their results compared with measurements are presented as well. It could be shown that several baking cycles at temperatures higher than 100?°C did not change the magnetic properties of the setup.

  15. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  16. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin [Nuclear Engineering/Nuclear Reactor Program, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard [Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Xu, Jun [Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  17. ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

  18. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  19. Investigation of the specific plasma potential oscillations with geodesic acoustic mode frequencies by heavy ion beam probing in the T-10 tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by heavy ion beam probing in the T-10 tokamak A V Melnikov1 , L G Eliseev1 , A V Gudozhnik1 , S E Lysenko1 of the specific oscillations with frequencies 15-30 kHz on the T-10 tokamak (R= 150cm, a = 30 cm) with Heavy IonHz) have been discovered in the tokamak by Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic in 1993 [1, 2]. During

  20. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  1. A digitizer based compact digital spectrometer for ion beam analysis using field programmable gate arrays and various energy algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jäger, Markus [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Reinert, Tilo [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a compact multi-detector fully digital spectrometer and data acquisition system at a nuclear microprobe for ion beam analysis and imaging. The spectrometer design allows for system scalability with no restriction on the number of detectors. It consists of four-channel high-speed digitizer modules for detector signal acquisition and one low-speed digital-to-analog converter (DAC) module with two DAC channels and additional general purpose inputs/outputs to control ion beam scanning and data acquisition. Each digitizer module of the spectrometer provides its own Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as digital signal processing unit to analyze detector signals as well as to synchronize the ion beam position in hard real-time. With the customized FPGA designs for all modules, all calculation intensive tasks are executed inside the modules, which reduces significantly the data stream to and CPU load on the control computer. To achieve an optimal energy resolution for all detector/preamplifier pulse shape characteristics, a user-definable infinite impulse response filter with high throughput for energy determination was implemented. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and is able to process any type of detector signals such as particle induced x-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, or scanning transmission ion microscopy.

  2. RADIOACTIVE ION BEAM FACILITIES IN EUROPE: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the early Universe, leads us to explore the outer regions of the chart of the nuclei. This implies capturing neutron-rich krypton isotopes, produced in uranium fission. Using a variant of the "converter" method their cyclotron on an internal target to produce neutrons. These then struck a uranium oxide target (mixed

  3. Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron Institute / Texas A&M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor

  4. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  5. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy ion inertial fusion energy. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thisheavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralizedto drift axially). For fusion energy applications, either

  6. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    physics and heavy ion fusion energy drivers, including bothoptions towards inertial fusion energy. Acknowledgements:fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction A

  7. Cross-sectional TEM Observations of Si Wafers Irradiated With Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isogai, Hiromichi; Toyoda, Eiji; Senda, Takeshi; Izunome, Koji [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, TOSHIBA CERAMICS CO., LTD. 6-861-5 Higashikou, Seiroumachi Kitakanbaragun, Niigata (Japan); Kashima, Kazuhiko [New Buisness Creation, TOSHIBA CERAMICS CO., LTD. 30 Soya, Hadano City, Kanagawa (Japan); Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan)

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation by a Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) is a promising technique for precise surface etching and planarization of Si wafers. However, it is very important to understand the crystalline structure of Si wafers after GCIB irradiation. In this study, the near surface structure of a Si (100) wafer was analyzed after GCIB irradiation, using a cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (XTEM). Ar-GCIB, that physically sputters Si atoms, and SF6-GCIB, that chemically etches the Si surface, were both used. After GCIB irradiation, high temperature annealing was performed in a hydrogen atmosphere. From XTEM observations, the surface of a virgin Si wafer exhibited completely crystalline structures, but the existence of an amorphous Si and a transition layer was confirmed after GCIB irradiation. The thickness of amorphous layer was about 30 nm after Ar-GCIB irradiation at 30 keV. However, a very thin (< 5 nm) layer was observed when 30 keV SF6-GCIB was used. The thickness of the transition layer was the same both Ar and SF6-GCIB irradiation. After annealing, the amorphous Si and transition layers had disappeared, and a complete crystalline structure with an atomically smooth surface was observed.

  8. Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, G.B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N.P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L.N.; Singh, M.J.; Patel, P.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Mattoo, S.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India-382428 (India)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the control system for a 5 MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks{sup TM} real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20 ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

  9. Spectroscopy at the high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The following progress report presents some of the x-ray measurements performed during the last year on the Livermore SuperEBIT facility. The measurements include: direct observation of the spontaneous emission of the hyperfine transition in ground state hydrogenlike holmium, {sup 165}Ho{sup 66{plus}}; measurements of the n {equals} 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies in neonlike thorium, Th{sup 80{plus}}, through lithiumlike thorium, Th{sup 87{plus}}, testing the predictions of quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions up to the 0.4{percent} level; measurements of the isotope shift of the n= 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies between lithiumlike through carbonize uranium, {sup 233}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}} and {sup 238}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}}, inferring the variation of the mean- square nuclear charge radius; and high-resolution measurements of the K{alpha} radiation of heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52 {plus}}, using a transmission-type crystal spectrometer, resolving for the first time the ls2p{sup 3}P{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and ls2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transitions individually. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Structural and composition investigations at delayered locations of low k integrated circuit device by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dandan, E-mail: dandan.wang@globalfoundries.com; Kee Tan, Pik; Yamin Huang, Maggie; Lam, Jeffrey; Mai, Zhihong [Technology Development Department, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte. Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report a new delayering technique – gas-assisted focused ion beam (FIB) method and its effects on the top layer materials of integrated circuit (IC) device. It demonstrates a highly efficient failure analysis with investigations on the precise location. After removing the dielectric layers under the bombardment of an ion beam, the chemical composition of the top layer was altered with the reduced oxygen content. Further energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that the oxygen reduction lead to appreciable silicon suboxide formation. Our findings with structural and composition alteration of dielectric layer after FIB delayering open up a new insight avenue for the failure analysis in IC devices.

  11. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF ION BEAM FROM LASER ION SOURCE FOR RHIC Takeshi Kanesue, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , vaporized and becomes plasma which is called laser ablation plasma then plasma expand adiabatically perpendicular to the target surface. Properties of Laser ablation plasma such as charge state distribution, and emittance of Au ions extracted from laser ablation plasma was measured. SINGLY CHARGED ION PRODUCTION We

  13. Experimental study of the ion flux parameters and anode plasma dynamics in the Angara-5-1 facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, V. V.; Grabovski, E. V.; Zukakishvili, G. G.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Medovshchikov, S. F.; Frolov, I. N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the anode plasma dynamics and measurements of the ion flux ejected along the axis of a high-current Z-pinch. Pinch discharges were formed by the implosion of tungsten wire arrays in the Angara-5-1 facility. It is shown that the ion energy spectrum depends on the mass and configuration of wire arrays, as well as on the diameter of the anode aperture. The shape of the ion spectrum indicates that the plasma propagates in the form of a compact plasmoid. Shadow and X-ray images of the plasma show that the axial velocity of the plasma outflowing through the anode aperture is comparable with the velocity of radial plasma compression and, for tungsten ions, can reach a value corresponding to an energy of 100 keV. The experimental data indicate that the ion energy spectrum mainly forms due to the electrodynamical acceleration of the plasma and cumulative jets. A possible mechanism for the production of compact plasma formations in the course of electrodynamic plasma acceleration is discussed.

  14. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  15. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments is to be a phased effort. This effort is to be supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-13 ICS-3000 instrument. With the successful qualification of this first ICS-3000, plans will be developed for the installation of the second 'rad' system in the M-14 Lab module later in fiscal year 2009. When the second 'rad' ICS-3000 system is installed, the DX-500 systems will be removed and retired from service.

  16. Facile synthesis of nanostructured vanadium oxide as cathode materials for efficient Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    -ion batteries Yanyi Liu,a Evan Uchaker,a Nan Zhou,ab Jiangang Li,ac Qifeng Zhanga and Guozhong Cao*a Received 23 and VO2 (B) nanorods were tested as active cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The V2O5 sheet for efficient Li-ion batteries. Introduction The expansion and demands for energy use in the past several

  17. Glass nanoimprint using amorphous Ni-P mold etched by focused-ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Kitadani, Takeshi; Yamashita, Michiru; Takahashi, Masaharu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1, Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); SAWA Plating Co., Ltd., 753 Hoshiro, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0804 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12 Yukihira-cho, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors succeeded in glass-nanoimprint lithography of micropatterns and nanopatterns using an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold. Glasslike carbon has been used as a mold material to mold not only Pyrex glass but also quartz, because it is still stable at a temperature of 1650 deg. C. However, it is difficult to process glasslike carbon substrates into arbitrary shapes by machining. They thought that amorphous Ni-P alloy could be used as a mold material for industrial glass molding. If Ni is electroless plated when mixed with suitable amount of P on a Si wafer, the Ni-P alloy layer becomes amorphous. An appropriate ratio of Ni and P was determined by the results of x-ray-diffraction measurements. The optimized composition ratio of Ni-P was Ni:P=92:8 wt %. Moreover, line and space patterns and dot arrays with linewidths of as little as 500 nm were etched on the mold using focused-ion beam (FIB) and the processing accuracy for the amorphous Ni-P layer was compared with that for the pure Ni layer. The result was that patterns of 500 nm width were etched to a depth of 2 {mu}m on an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold and the processed surfaces were smooth. In contrast, in the case of the pure Ni layer, the processing line was notched and the sidewalls were very rough. The crystal grain seems to hinder the processing of the nanopattern. After FIB etching, the amorphous Ni-P alloy was thermally treated at 400 deg. C to improve the hardness. Finally, line and space patterns and dot arrays on the amorphous Ni-P alloy mold were nanoimprinted on Pyrex glass using a glass-nanoimprint system (ASHE0201) that National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology developed.

  18. A PARALLEL-PROPAGATING ALFVENIC ION-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE HIGH-BETA SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A., E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu, E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves are driven unstable by an isotropic (T{sub {alpha}} = T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}) population of alpha particles drifting parallel to the magnetic field at an average speed U{sub {alpha}} with respect to the protons. We derive an approximate analytic condition for the minimum value of U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability and refine this result using numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion relation. When the alpha-particle number density is {approx_equal} 5% of the proton number density and the two species have similar thermal speeds, the instability requires that {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 1, where {beta}{sub p} is the ratio of the proton pressure to the magnetic pressure. For 1 {approx}< {beta}{sub p} {approx}< 12, the minimum U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability ranges from 0.7v{sub A} to 0.9v{sub A}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. This threshold is smaller than the threshold of {approx_equal} 1.2v{sub A} for the parallel magnetosonic instability, which was previously thought to have the lowest threshold of the alpha-particle beam instabilities at {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 0.5. We discuss the role of the parallel Alfvenic drift instability for the evolution of the alpha-particle drift speed in the solar wind. We also analyze measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups and show that the U{sub {alpha}} values measured in solar-wind streams with T{sub {alpha}} Almost-Equal-To T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} are approximately bounded from above by the threshold of the parallel Alfvenic instability.

  19. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M. [STFC/RAL, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  20. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; R. Keisler; S. Kopp; S. Mendoza; M. Proga; Z. Pavlovich; R. Zwaska; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald; M. Diwan; B. Viren

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1 mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well we review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  1. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

  3. The Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guzey

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed new facility to collide high-energy electrons with beams of polarized protons/light nuclei and unpolarized nuclei. We overview the goals of the project and key measurements at the EIC. We also briefly comment on recent developments of the project.

  4. Beam-ion confinement for different injection geometries This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    energy, torque and particles, so a thorough understanding of beam behavior is crucial for plasma of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About-ion energy and at high plasma temperature, suggesting that fast-ion transport by microturbulence

  5. Sub-50 nm high aspect-ratio silicon pillars, ridges, and trenches fabricated using ultrahigh resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching P. B. Fischer and S. Y. Chou University of Minnesota Department of Electrical Engineering, Minneapolis, Minnesota 554~3 (Received 29 July 1992 and chlorine based reactive ion etching. These nanoscale Si features can be further reduced to 10 nm using

  6. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  7. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  8. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  9. NEGATIVE ION PRODUCTION BY BACK-SCATTERING FROM ALKALI-METAL SURFACES BOMBARDED BY IONS OF HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Peter Juergen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams (and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams (and Neutralization of Negative Hydrogen Ions and Beams,

  10. Facilities: NHMFL 14.5 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: A Pseudoatomic Model of the COPII Cage Obtained from Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Facilities: NHMFL 14.5 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation ultrahigh-resolution 14.5 tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The Mag

  11. Beam Energy Scaling on Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impact on Stainless Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K + Impact on Stainless Steel Michel Kireeff Covo Lawrence+ ions hit the stainless steel target with energy up to 400energies hitting stainless steel target obtained from

  12. Towards an electro-magnetic field separation of deposited material implemented in an ion beam sputter process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malobabic, Sina; Jupe, Marco; Ristau, Detlev [Laser Component Department, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30149 Hannover (Germany) [Laser Component Department, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30149 Hannover (Germany); Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays, Ion Beam Sputter (IBS) processes are very well optimized on an empirical basis. To achieve further progresses, a modification of the IBS process by guiding the coating material using an axial magnetic field and an additional electrical field has been studied. The electro-magnetic (EM) field leads to a significant change in plasma properties and deposition rate distributions, whereas an increase in deposition rate along the centerline of the axial EM field around 150% was observed. These fundamental studies on the prototype are the basis for the development of an applicable and workable design of a separation device.

  13. Spectra of In-like Tungsten, $W^{25+}$, from the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, W; Shi, Z; Fei, Z; R,; Zhao,; Brage, T; Huldt, S; Hutton, R; Zou, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three visible lines of M1 transitions from In-like W were recorded using the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap. The experimental wavelengths were measured as 493.84 $\\pm$ 0.15, 226.97 $\\pm$ 0.13 and 587.63 $\\pm$ 0.23 nm (vacuum wavelengths). These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained using large-scale Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory, in the form of the Flexible Atomic Code, and some explorations with the Muliconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock code GRASP2K.

  14. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  15. New ion-guide for the production of beams of neutron-rich nucleibetween Z = 20 - 28

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perajarvi, Kari; Cerny, Joe; Hakala, Jani; Huikari, Jussi; Jokinen, Ari; Karvonen, Pasi; Kurpeta, Jan; Lee, Dongwon; Moore, Ian; Penttila, Heikki; Popov, Andrei; Aysto, Juha

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown for the first time that quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions can be successfully incorporated into the conventional Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique. This is of particular interest for characterizing the decay properties of refractory elements and is applied to neutron rich nuclei between Z = 20-28. As a first step of this project, the kinematics of quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions, such as {sup 197}Au({sup 65}Cu,X)Y, were studied. Based on these studies, a specialized IGISOL target chamber was designed and built. This chamber was tested in on- and off-line conditions at the Jyvaskyla IGISOL facility. Yields of radioactive, projectile-like species such as {sup 62,63}Co are about 0.8 ions/s/pnA corresponding to a total IGISOL efficiency of about 0.06%.

  16. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki [Dept. of Electron. Sci. Eng., Kyoto Univ. Kyotodaigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Dept. of Electron. Information Eng., Chubu Univ., 1200, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  17. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY J. J. Barnard 1 , J.dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-targetas drivers for inertial fusion energy (IFE), for their high

  18. Energy Amplification and Beam Bunching in a Pulse Line Ion Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ST Accel. Beams 7, [7] P. K. Roy et al. , Phys. of Plasmas12, 043102 (2005). [10] P. K. Roy et al. , Nucl. Instrum.Phy. Res. A 544, [11] P. K. Roy et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.

  19. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency B.G. Logan 1, L.J.fusion at high coupling efficiency B. G. Logan , L . J.Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry

  20. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the ?+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited ?+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  1. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobin, R., E-mail: rjgobin@cea.fr; Bogard, D.; Chauvin, N.; Chel, S.; Delferrière, O.; Harrault, F.; Mattei, P.; Senée, F. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)] [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Cara, P. [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany)] [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Mosnier, A. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France) [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Shidara, H. [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Okumura, Y. [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  2. BEAM OPTICS STUDIES FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC V. Balandin, P. Castro and N. Golubeva, DESY, Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of actual beam parameters) the same Twiss functions which are used in [5]. We consider nei- ther the beam FEL per- formance. · A special choice of Twiss parameters at the entrances of bunch compressors BC2

  3. MONO1001 : A source for singly charged ions applied to the production of multicharged fullerene beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (from pure C60 and C70 powder) will be shown and the influence of several source parameters (HF-power, support gas, gas pressure, ...) will be discussed specifying the conditions necessary for an optimum ion

  4. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science towards Inertial Fusion Energy B.G. Logan 1), D.activities for inertial fusion energy at Lawrence LivermoreIon Fusion in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program [25].

  5. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. L . Olson, J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). "FilamentationHeavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy January 30, 1998 W.Agency Sixteenth I A E A Fusion Energy Conference (Montreal,

  6. Effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manjunatha, H., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu; Kumaraswamy, G. N., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu [Department of Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bengaluru-560035 (India); Damle, R. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru-560056 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past three decades, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have drawn significant attention of researchers due to their prospective commercial applications in high energy-density batteries, electrochemical sensors and super-capacitors. The optimum conductivity required for such applications is about 10{sup ?2} – 10{sup ?4} S/cm, which is hard to achieve in these systems. It is known that the increase in the concentration of salt in the host polymer results in a continuous increase in the ionic conductivity. However, there is a critical concentration of the salt beyond which the conductivity decreases due to formation of ion pairs with no net charge. In the present study, an attempt is made to identify the concentration at which ion pair formation occurs in PEO: RbBr. We have attempted to modify microstructure of the host polymer matrix by low energy ion (Oxygen ion, O{sup +1} with energy 100 keV) irradiation. Ionic conductivity measurements in these systems were carried out using Impedance Spectroscopy before and after irradiation to different fluencies of the oxygen ion. It is observed that the conductivity increases by one order in magnitude. The increase in ionic conductivity may be attributed to the enhanced segmental motion of the polymer chains. The study reveals the importance of ion irradiation as an effective tool to enhance conductivity in SPEs.

  7. Production of rare isotope beams at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G. J.; Tribble, R. E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3366 (United States); Arje, J. [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A and M is currently configuring a scheme for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide and a heavy-ion guide coupled with an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source constructed for charge-breeding. This scheme is part of an upgrade to the facility and is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources used in the project is presented.

  8. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  9. Measurements of the intercombination and forbidden lines from helium-like ions in Tokamaks and Electron Beam Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; von Goeler, S; Stodiek, W; Beiersdorfer, P; Rice, J E; Ince-Cushman, A

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the results from tokamak experiments for the line ratios x/w, y/w, and z/w from helium-like ions with Z in the range from 14 to 28. With exception of the DITE experiments, where these line ratios were found to be in agreement with theoretical predictions, all other tokamak experiments yielded values that were significantly larger than predicted. The reasons for these discrepancies are not yet understood. It is possible that radial profile effects were not properly taken into account in the majority of the tokamak experiments. The paper also gives a short historical review of the X-ray diagnostic developments and also presents very recent data from a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which records spatially resolved spectra with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the plasma. These new data can be Abel inverted, so that it will be possible to determine line ratios at each radial position in the plasma. Effects of radial profiles, which may have affected the chord-integrated measurements of the past, will thus be eliminated in the future.

  10. SIMULATION OF CLUSTER IMPACT INDUCED DESORPTION AND COOLING Surrey Ion Beam Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Roger P.

    caused by a high energy C60 impact can eject a large polystyrene molecule without fragmentation spectrometry (SIMS) as a probing beam is showing great promise for the analysis of large organic molecules on ejection. Unlike the sputtering process this desorption process does not require that the binding energy

  11. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scaletransport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program that explores heavy-ion beam as the driver option for fusion energy production in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plant. The HCX is a beam transport experiment at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linear accelerator driver. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx}0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss. We achieved good envelope control, and re-matching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  12. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  13. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB?SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non?destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three?dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  14. Radial profile measurements of plasma pressure-like fluctuations with the heavy ion beam diagnostic on the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriques, R. B., E-mail: rhenriques@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Coelho, R.; Figueiredo, H.; Fernandes, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic (HIBD) on the tokamak ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Técnico TOKamak) has been modified, in terms of signal conditioning, to measure the local fluctuations of the n{sub e}?{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) product (plasma density times the effective ionization cross-section) along the tokamak minor diameter, in 12 sample volumes in the range of ?0.7a < r < 0.7a, with a maximum delay time of 1 ?s. The corresponding signals show high correlation with the magnetic Mirnov coils in the characteristic MHD frequency range of ISTTOK plasmas and enable the identification of tearing modes. This paper describes the HIBD signal conditioning system and presents a preliminary analysis of the radial profile measurements of local n{sub e}?{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) fluctuations.

  15. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  16. An innovative accelerator-driven inertial electrostatic confinement device using converging ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, T. H.; Wigeland, R. A.

    1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental physics issues facing development of fusion power on a small-scale are assessed with emphasis on the idea of Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC). The authors propose a new concept of accelerator-driven IEC fusion, termed Converging Beam Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (CB-IEC). CB-IEC offers a number of innovative features that make it an attractive pathway toward resolving fundamental physics issues and assessing the ultimate viability of the IEC concept for power generation.

  17. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trushnikov, D. N., E-mail: trdimitr@yandex.ru [The department for Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Mladenov, G. M., E-mail: gmmladenov@abv.bg; Koleva, E. G., E-mail: eligeorg@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Shose, 1784, Sofia (Bulgaria); Technology Centre of Electron Beam and Plasma Technologies and Techniques, 68-70 Vrania, ap.10, Banishora,1309, Sofia (Bulgaria); Belenkiy, V. Ya., E-mail: mtf@pstu.ru; Varushkin, S. V., E-mail: stepan.varushkin@mail.ru [The department for Welding Production and Technology of Constructional Materials, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup ?3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup ?2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  18. Ion beam modifications of near-surface compositions in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, N.Q.; Tang, S.; Yacout, A.M.; Rehn, L.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Stubbins, J.F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the surface and subsurface compositions of ternary alloys during elevated-temperature sputtering with inert-gas ions were investigated. Theoretically, a comprehensive kinetic model which includes all the basic processes, such as preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, Gibbsian segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation, was developed. This phenomenological approach enabled to predict the effects of each individual process or of a combination of processes on the compositional modification in model alloys. Experimentally, measurements of compositional changes at the surface of a Ag-40at%Au -- 20at%Cu alloy during 3-keV Ne{sup +} bombardment at various temperatures were made, using ion scattering spectroscopy. These measurements were interpreted on the basis of the results of theoretical modeling. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Smoothing metallic glasses without introducing crystallization by gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Myers, Michael; Wang, Jing [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Chu, Wei-Kan [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Xie, Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Zare, Arezoo; Lucca, Don A. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)] [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that 30 keV Ar cluster ion bombardment of Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} metallic glass (MG) can remove surface mountain-like features and reduce the root mean square surface roughness from 12 nm to 0.7 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals no crystallization after cluster ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, although damage cascades lead to local melting, the subsequent quenching rate is a few orders of magnitude higher than the critical cooling rate for MG formation, thus the melted zone retains its amorphous nature down to room temperature. These findings can be applied to obtain ultra-smooth MGs without introducing crystallization.

  20. Controlling charge and current neutralization of an ion beam pulse in a background plasma by application of a solenoidal magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    . This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields about 100 G . Analytical formulas are derived,8 magnetic fusion based on field reversed configura- tions fueled by energetic ion beams,9 the physics by application of a solenoidal magnetic field: Weak magnetic field limit I. D. Kaganovich, E. A. Startsev, A. B

  1. Smoothing of Si{sub 0.7}Ge{sub 0.3} virtual substrates by gas-cluster-ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.; Chen, F.; Wang, X.M.; Yu, X.K.; Liu, J.R.; Ma, K.B.; Chu, W.K.; Cheng, H.H.; Yu, I.S.; Ho, Y.T.; Horng, K.Y. [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences and Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The planarization of the SiGe virtual substrate surface is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance strained-Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. In this letter, we report on the smoothing of the inherently crosshatched rough surfaces of SiGe deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates by gas cluster ion beams. Atomic force microscopy measurements show that the average surface roughness (R{sub a}) of the SiGe layer could be reduced considerably from 3.2 to 0.7 nm without any crosshatched pattern. Rutherford backscattering in combination with channeling was used to study the damage produced by cluster bombardment. No visible surface damage was observed for the normal-incidence smoothed SiGe with postsmoothing glancing angle cluster ion beam etching.

  2. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n{sub t}/n{sub d} using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n{sub t}/n{sub d}-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor.

  3. Polarity-inverted ScAlN film growth by ion beam irradiation and application to overtone acoustic wave (000-1)/(0001) film resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Masashi; Yanagitani, Takahiko, E-mail: yana@nitech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Odagawa, Hiroyuki [Kumamoto National College of Technology, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarity inversion in wurtzite film is generally achieved by the epitaxial growth on a specific under-layer. We demonstrate polarity inversion of c-axis oriented ScAlN films by substrate ion beam irradiation without using buffer layer. Substrate ion beam irradiation was induced by either sputtering a small amount of oxide (as a negative ion source) onto the cathode or by applying a RF bias to the substrate. Polarity of the films was determined by a press test and nonlinear dielectric measurement. Second overtone thickness extensional mode acoustic resonance and suppression of fundamental mode resonance, indicating complete polarity inversion, were clearly observed in bilayer highly oriented (000-1)/(0001) ScAlN film.

  4. Local control of magnetic damping in ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayers by interfacial intermixing induced by focused ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J. A.; Burn, D. M.; Sallabank, E. A.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Atkinson, D., E-mail: del.atkinson@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ganguly, A.; Pal, S.; Barman, A., E-mail: del.atkinson@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology and Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Hase, T. P. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of interfacial intermixing on the picosecond magnetization dynamics of ferromagnetic/non-magnetic thin-film bilayers was studied. Low-dose focused-ion-beam irradiation was used to induce intermixing across the interface between a 10?nm Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} layer and a 2–3?nm capping layer of either Au or Cr. Time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect was used to study magnetization dynamics as a function of ion-beam dose. With an Au cap, the damping of the un-irradiated bilayer was comparable with native Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} and increased with increasing ion dose. In contrast, for Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Cr the damping was higher than that for native Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}, but the damping decreased with increasing dose.

  5. Experiments with planar inductive ion source meant for creation ofH+ Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Kalvas, T.; Hahto, S.K.; Reijonen, J.

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article the effect of different engineering parameters of an rf-driven ion sources with external spiral antenna and quartz disk rf-window are studied. Paper consists of three main topics: The effect of source geometry on the operation gas pressure, the effect of source materials and magnetic confinement on extracted current density and ion species and the effect of different antenna geometries on the extracted current density. The operation gas pressure as a function of the plasma chamber diameter, was studied. This was done with three cylindrical plasma chambers with different inner diameters. The chamber materials were studied using two materials, aluminum and alumina (AlO{sub 2}). The removable 14 magnet multicusp confinement arrangement enabled us to compare the effects of the two wall materials with and without the magnetic confinement. Highest proton fraction of {approx} 8% at 2000 W of rf-power and at pressure of 1.3 Pa was measured using AlO{sub 2} plasma chamber and no multicusp confinement. For all the compared ion sources at 1000W of rf-power, source with multicusp confinement and AlO2 plasma chamber yields highest current density of 82.7 mA/cm{sup 2} at operation pressure of 4 Pa. From the same source highest measured current density of 143 mA/cm{sup 2} at 1.3 Pa and 2200W of rf-power was achieved. Multicusp confinement increased the maximum extracted current up to factor of two. Plasma production with different antenna geometries was also studied. Antenna tests were performed using same source geometry as in source material study with AlO{sub 2} plasma chamber and multicusp confinement. The highest current density was achieved with 4.5 loop solenoid antenna with 6 cm diameter. Slightly lower current density with lower pressure was achieved using tightly wound 3 loop spiral antenna with 3.3 cm ID and 6 cm OD.

  6. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  7. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, D. Stutman, K. Tritz, A. Boozer, L. Delgardo-Aparicio, E. Fredrickson, S. Kaye, and R. White

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  8. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF BEAM PROFILES WITH A MULTI-WIRE CHAMBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, J.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the beam with a small ion chamber. Both of these techniquesstudies of the chamber. A for heav;' ion radiotherapy beam

  9. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  10. Development of a radio frequency ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for neutral beam injection system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choe, Kyumin; Jung, Bongki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite of high plasma density, helicon plasma has not yet been applied to a large area ion source such as a driver for neutral beam injection (NBI) system due to intrinsically poor plasma uniformity in the discharge region. In this study, a radio-frequency (RF) ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for high plasma density with good uniformity has been designed and constructed for the NBI system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus at Seoul National University. The ion source consists of a rectangular plasma expansion chamber (120 × 120 × 120 mm{sup 3}), four helicon plasma injectors with annular permanent magnets and RF power system. Main feature of the source is downstream plasma confinement in the cusp magnetic field configuration which is generated by arranging polarities of permanent magnets in the helicon plasma injectors. In this paper, detailed design of the multi-helicon plasma injector and plasma characteristics of the ion source are presented.

  11. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  12. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  13. Patient-specific QA and delivery verification of scanned ion beam at NIRS-HIMAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific QA program and system for constancy checking of a scanning delivery system developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.Methods: For the patient-specific QA, all the planned beams are recalculated on a water phantom with treatment planning software (TPS). The recalculated dose distributions are compared with the measured distributions using a 2D ionization chamber array at several depths, and evaluated using gamma index analysis with criteria of 3% and 3 mm and a pass rate of 90%. For the constancy check, the authors developed the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC), which can record the delivered 2D fluence images in a slice-by-slice manner. During irradiation for dosimetric QA with the 2D ionization chamber array and an accordion-type water phantom, the 2D fluence images are recorded using the MWPC in the delivery system. These recorded images are then compared to those taken in the treatment session to check the constancy check. This analysis also employs gamma index analysis using the same criteria as in the patient-specific QA. These patient-specific QA and constancy check evaluations were performed using the data of 122 patients.Results: In the patient-specific QA, the measured dose distributions agreed well with those calculated by the TPS, and the QA criteria were satisfied in all measurements. The additional check of the fluence comparison ensured the constancy of the delivered field during each treatment irradiation.Conclusions: The authors established a patient-specific QA program and additional check of delivery constancy in every treatment session. Fluence comparison is a strong tool for constancy checking of the delivery system.

  14. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A. [Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy); Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  15. A 915 MHz/2. 45 GHz ECR plasma source for large area ion beam and plasma processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmussen, J.; Hopwood, J.; Sze, F.C. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226 (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology for producing uniform, high density (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}) microwave discharges over cross sections of 50 cm{sup 2} is well established. The present challenge is to extend the high density, and electrodeless benefits of microwave discharges to produce uniform densities over an area of 300--700 cm{sup 2}. Such discharges have important applications for 6 to 8-in. single wafer processing and as large surface, broad beam, high current density ion sources. The design principles for scaling the 18 cm diam MPDR ECR cavity applicator technology to 38--47 cm diam are reviewed. Microwave discharges with diameters of 20--30 cm can be created when these applicators are excited with either 2.45 GHz or 915 MHz. The design and construction of a prototype cavity applicator with a 20 cm diam discharge is described. The discharge is enclosed with a 12-pole multicusp static magnetic field produced by 2-in. by 2-in. by 1-in. rare-earth magnets. Each magnet has a pole face field strength of 3 kG. The experimental test of this plasma source in argon gas excited with 2.45 GHz energy is reviewed.

  16. Focused-ion-beam overlay-patterning of three-dimensional diamond structures for advanced single-photon properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Qianqing; Liu, Dongqi; Liu, Gangqin; Chang, Yanchun; Li, Wuxia, E-mail: liwuxia@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: czgu@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Pan, Xinyu; Gu, Changzhi, E-mail: liwuxia@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: czgu@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sources of single photons are of fundamental importance in many applications as to provide quantum states for quantum communication and quantum information processing. Color centers in diamond are prominent candidates to generate and manipulate quantum states of light, even at room temperature. However, the efficiency of photon collection of the color centers in bulk diamond is greatly reduced by refraction at the diamond/air interface. To address this issue, diamond structuring has been investigated by various methods. Among them, focused-ion-beam (FIB) direct patterning has been recognized as the most favorable technique. But it has been noted that diamond tends to present significant challenges in FIB milling, e.g., the susceptibility of forming charging related artifacts and topographical features. In this work, periodically-positioned-rings and overlay patterning with stagger-superimposed-rings were proposed to alleviate some problems encountered in FIB milling of diamond, for improved surface morphology and shape control. Cross-scale network and uniform nanostructure arrays have been achieved in single crystalline diamond substrates. High quality diamond solid immersion lens and nanopillars were sculptured with a nitrogen-vacancy center buried at the desired position. Compared with the film counterpart, an enhancement of about ten folds in single photon collection efficiency was achieved with greatly improved signal to noise ratio. All these results indicate that FIB milling through over-lay patterning could be an effective approach to fabricate diamond structures, potentially for quantum information studies.

  17. Role of Ion Damage on Unintentional Ca Incorporation During the Plasma-Assisted Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Growth of Dilute Nitrides Using N2/Ar Source Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oye, M. M.; Bank, S. R.; Ptak, A. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Goorsky, M. S.; Holmes Jr., A. L.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unintentional Ca incorporation caused by Ca-contaminated substrate surfaces on as-purchased GaAs wafers are known to limit the efficiency of solar cells based on dilute nitride materials. This article focuses on further understanding the conditions and mechanisms by which these Ca impurities incorporate. Plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy utilizing a 1% N{sub 2} in Ar precursor gas mixture was used to grow GaAs at 400 and 580 C, and GaN{sub 0.01}As{sub 0.99} at 400 C. Two plasma operating combinations of rf power and gas flow rate were used to generate different amounts and energies of both ions and other plasma species, while keeping nitrogen incorporation constant. The ions were characterized with a dual-grid, retarding-field ion energy analyzer, and the corresponding ion energy distributions are presented to correlate ions with Ca incorporation. When appropriate, dc-biased deflector plates were used to remove ions during growth. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to measure Ca in GaAs and GaN{sub 0.01}As{sub 0.99}. Ca incorporation was observed in the dilute nitride samples, but the effects of ions did not exceed other Ca incorporation mechanisms associated with defects due to both low temperature growth and nitrogen incorporation; however, different neutral active nitrogen species (atomic N and metastable N{sub 2}) may be a factor. Ca incorporation measured in GaAs grown at 400 C with a pure Ar plasma is predominantly due to defects associated with low temperature growth, as opposed to plasma damage caused by the ions. GaAs growths at 580 C without a plasma did not exhibit Ca incorporation, but growth at 580 C with ions from a pure Ar plasma caused Ca incorporation.

  18. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal through ion beam exposure on oxygen-doped SiC films deposited at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Phil Kook; Park, Jeung Hun; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Rho, Soon Joon; Jeon, Back Kyun; Shin, Sung Tae; Kim, Jang Sub; Lim, Soon Kwon [School of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); LC/OLED Research Team, LCD R and D Center, LCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Process Development Team, LCD R and D Center, LCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the vertical alignment of liquid crystal (LC) through the ion beam exposure on amorphous oxygen-doped SiC (SiOC) film surfaces deposited at room temperature. The optical transmittance of these films was similar to that of polyimide layers, but much higher than that of SiO{sub x} films. The light leakage of a LC cell aligned vertically on SiOC films was much lower than those of a LC cell aligned on polyimide layers or other inorganic films. They found that LC molecules align vertically on ion beam treated SiOC film when the roughness of the electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) data is high on the SiOC film surface, while they align homogeneously when the roughness of the EFM data is low.

  19. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Labaratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both B{sub p} and E{sub r} at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both B{sub p} and E{sub r}. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results.

  20. STATUS OF NEW 2.5 MEV TEST FACILITY AT SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Champion, Mark [FNAL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Menshov, Alexander A [ORNL; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Webster, Anthony W [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 2.5MeV beam test facility is being built at SNS. It consists of a 65 keV H- ion source, a 2.5MeV RFQ, a beam line with various beam diagnostics and a 6 kW beam dump. The facility is capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60Hz repetition rate with up to 50mA peak current. The commissioning with reduced average beam power is planned for fall 2014 to verify operation of all systems. The full power operation is scheduled to begin in 2015. The status of the facility will be presented as well as a discussion of the future R&D program.

  1. Upgrade of the MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator (LEIA) for nuclear diagnostics development for Omega, Z and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Radiological Sciences Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 02A332 (2012) Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 02B107 (2012) A 2 MV Van de, Z, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Sig- nificant improvements to the system in recent

  2. Atom penetration from a thin film into the substrate during sputtering by polyenergetic Ar{sup +} ion beam with mean energy of 9.4 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalin, B.A.; Gladkov, V.P.; Volkov, N.V.; Sabo, S.E. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetration of alien atoms (Be, Ni) into Be, Al, Zr, Si and diamond was investigated under Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of samples having thermally evaporated films of 30--50 nm. Sputtering was carried out using a wide energy spectrum beam of Ar{sup +} ions of 9.4 keV to dose D = 1 {times} 10{sup 16}--10{sup 19} ion/cm{sup 2}. Implanted atom distribution in the targets was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions with energy of 1.6 MeV as well as secondary ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). During the bombardment, the penetration depth of Ar atoms increases with dose linearly. This depth is more than 3--20 times deeper than the projected range of bombarding ions and recoil atoms. This is a deep action effect. The analysis shows that the experimental data for foreign atoms penetration depth are similar to the data calculated for atom migration through the interstitial site in a field of internal (lateral) compressive stresses created in the near-surface layer of the substrate as a result of implantation. Under these experimental conditions atom ratio r{sub i}/r{sub m} (r{sub i} -- radius of dopant, r{sub m} -- radius target of substrate) can play a principal determining role.

  3. Astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B.; Clark, J. A.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov; Savard, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions involving short-lived nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics, especially in explosive scenarios which occur in novae, supernovae or X-ray bursts. This article describes the nuclear astrophysics program with radioactive ion beams at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The CARIBU facility as well as recent improvements for the in-flight technique are discussed. New detectors which are important for studies of the rapid proton or the rapid neutron-capture processes are described. At the end we briefly mention plans for future upgrades to enhance the intensity, purity and the range of in-flight and CARIBU beams.

  4. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  5. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, Mikhail [FRIB, MSU] [FRIB, MSU; Mokhov, Nikolai [FNAL] [FNAL; Niita, Koji [RIST, Japan] [RIST, Japan

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  6. Methods of Beam Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Stochastic Cooling", presented at PAC, (1995).1991). Hangst, J. , "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem and Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of the

  7. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center atdiffusivities in mesopores

  8. Ion beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition of (Ba,Sr)(Ti,Zr)O{sub 3} films on Pt-Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Joe; Vayunandana Reddy, Y. K.; Autret-Lambert, Cecile; Lagrange, Jean-Francois; Motret, Olivier; Roger, Sylvain; Wolfman, Jerome [Laboratoire LEMA, UMR 6157 CNRS-CEA, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition with an Ar-oxygen ion mixture was used to prepare Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.7}Zr{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} (BSTZ) thin films on Pt-coated Si substrates. The ion beam with an anode voltage of 600 V was effective to reduce the thermal budget, i.e., to achieve similar crystallinity with approximately 100 deg. C lower deposition temperature compared to the cases without ionization. It was revealed that the dielectric properties (relative dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub r} and its electric field tunability), out-of-plane lattice parameter of (001)-oriented grains (a{sub 001}), and the existence of (110)-oriented grains are correlated with one another. Elongation of a{sub 001} was suppressed, resulting in large {epsilon}{sub r} values comparable with that of a ceramic bulk of the same composition, in the BSTZ films that contain (110)-oriented grains. Less volume of amorphous BSTZ region is supposed to be playing an important role for the bulklike properties of these BSTZ films.

  9. Fast-ion spectrometry of ICF implosions and laser-foil experiments at the omega and MTW laser facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinenian, Nareg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast ions generated from laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and laser-foil interactions. LPI, which vary in nature depending on the wavelength and intensity ...

  10. Rabi Waves and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves - has been experimentally identified for the first time. Raman spectra in perfect quasi-1D carbon nanotubes are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D carbon nanotubes of larger diameter. They characterized by vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice and its revival part in frequency representation, which is the consequence of Rabi wave packet formation.

  11. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Karl (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Irwin, Timothy J. (Jackson & Tull Chartered Engineers, Washington, DC); Niu, Guofu (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Fodness, Bryan (SGT, Inc., Greenbelt, MD); Carts, Martin A. (Raytheon ITSS, Greenbelt, MD); Marshall, Paul W. (Brookneal, VA); Reed, Robert A. (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Gilbert, Barry (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Randall, Barbara (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Prairie, Jason (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Riggs, Pam (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Pickel, James C. (PR& T, Inc., Fallbrook, CA); LaBel, Kenneth (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Cressler, John D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Krithivasan, Ramkumar (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  12. High-pressure arcs as vacuum-atmosphere interface and plasma lens for nonvacuum electron beam welding machines, electron beam melting, and nonvacuum ion material modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully demonstrated and a 175 keV electron beam was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ? 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors.

  14. Surface plasmon polariton modes in a single-crystal Au nanoresonator fabricated using focused-ion-beam milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    to 30 keV, and focused by an electrostatic lens system to a spot size with diameter as small as 5­10 nm, photovoltaics, tele- communications, and optoelectronic circuit integration due to their ability to concentrate.5,6 In a typical FIB system, Ga+ ions are extracted from a liquid-metal ion source, accel- erated

  15. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. · Another significant

  16. P-23 Highlights 6/10/12: Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility Refurbishment completed at U1A tunnel in Nevada NNSS meeting Level 2 milestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deyoung, Anemarie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, John R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A moratorium was placed on U.S. underground nuclear testing in 1992. In response, the Stockpile Stewardship Program was created to maintain readiness of the existing nuclear inventory through several efforts such as computer modeling, material analysis, and subcritical nuclear experiments (SCEs). As in the underground test era, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site, provides a safe and secure environment for SCEs by the nature of its isolated and secure facilities. A major tool for SCE diagnosis installed in the 05 drift laboratory is a high energy x-ray source used for time resolved imaging. This tool consists of two identical sources (Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2) and is called the Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility (Figs. 2-6). Each Cygnus machine has 5 major elements: Marx Generator, Pulse Forming Line (PFL), Coaxial Transmission Line (CTL), 3-cell Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA), and Rod Pinch Diode. Each machine is independently triggered and may be fired in separate tests (staggered mode), or in a single test where there is submicrosecond separation between the pulses (dual mode). Cygnus must operate as a single shot machine since on each pulse the diode electrodes are destroyed. The diode is vented to atmosphere, cleaned, and new electrodes are inserted for each shot. There is normally two shots per day on each machine. Since its installation in 2003, Cygnus has participated in: 4 Subcritical Experiments (Armando, Bacchus, Barolo A, and Barolo B), a 12 shot plutonium physics series (Thermos), and 2 plutonium step wedge calibration series (2005, 2011), resulting in well over 1000 shots. Currently the Facility is in preparation for 2 SCEs scheduled for this calendar year - Castor and Pollux. Cygnus has performed well during 8 years of operations at NNSS. Many improvements in operations and performance have been implemented during this time. Throughout its service at U1a, major maintenance and replacement of many hardware items were delayed due to programmatic requirements. It is anticipated that Cygnus will be in service at U1a for another 5 years. With this assumption, it was realized that significant resources and effort should be allotted to bring the hardware back to its original condition, or even to improve elements when appropriate. The Cygnus Refurbishment and Enhancement Project started in April, 2011 with the intent to encompass a major overhaul of Cygnus.

  17. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

  18. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al., for F82H reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAF/M) steel. These previous results combined with our data suggest a complex new 'catalytic' mechanism whereby H interacts with the steady state population of defects and the embryonic cavities so as to accelerated cavity (void) growth in both Fe(Cr) and under special conditions in ODS steels.

  19. Ion-molecule interactions in crossed-beams. [N/sup +/-H/sub 2/; F/sup +/-H; CO/sub 2//sup +/-D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions of the ions N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ with H/sub 2/ and/or its isotopes were examined using the crossed-beam technique in the low (< 4 eV) initial relative energy. For the reaction N/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. NH/sup +/ + H, complex formation dominates up to 1.9 eV and a substantial interaction occurs between all collision partners up to 3.6 eV. The distribution of N/sup +/ scattered nonreactively from H/sub 2/ also showed a long-lived complex channel below 1.9 eV. The reaction F/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->..FH/sup +/ + H proceeded by a direct reaction mechanism at 0.20 to 1.07 eV. The reaction CO/sub 2//sup +/ + D/sub 2/ ..-->.. DCO/sub 2//sup +/ + D gives asymmetric product distributions at 0.27 eV and above, indicating a direct reaction mechanism. Results indicated that there are probably barriers in the exit channels for DCO/sub 2//sup +/, DCO/sup +/, and D/sub 2/O/sup +/ products. The electronic state distributions of the N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ beams was investigated using beam attenuation and total luminescence techniques.

  20. Towards sub-200?nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low ?m range. Deposition of a protective layer (50?nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ?300?nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  1. CEBAF Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWPORT NEWS, VA, May 14, 2014 - The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has...

  2. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  3. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

  4. IRRADIATION CONTROL OF THE "SPIRAL" TARGET BY MEASURING THE ION BEAM INTENSITY VIA A FAST CURRENT TRANSFORMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the target (integrated flux) should not exceed a certain level, function of the radiological risk. In order of measurement will handle the signal of each sensor so that they can be digitized by a computing system received the maximum dose (new safety criterion). PRINCIPLE OF THE MEASUREMENT OF THE BEAM INTENSITY

  5. Application of 3D Code IBSimu for Designing an H{sup -}/D{sup -} Extraction System for the Texas A and M Facility Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Aerje, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae, 40500 (Finland); Clark, H.; Brinkley, J. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional ion optical code IBSimu is being developed at the University of Jyvaeskylae. So far the plasma modelling of the code has been restricted to positive ion extraction systems, but now a negative ion plasma extraction model has been added. The plasma model has been successfully validated with simulations of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source extraction both in cylindrical symmetry and in full 3D, also modelling electron beam dumping and ion beam tilt. A filament-driven multicusp ion source has been installed at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute for production of H{sup -} and D{sup -} beams as a part of the facility upgrade. The light ion beams, produced by the ion source, are accelerated with the K150 cyclotron for production and reacceleration of rare isotopes. The extraction system for the ion source was designed with IBSimu. The extraction features a water-cooled puller electrode with a permanent magnet dipole field for dumping the co-extracted electrons and a decelerating Einzel lens for adjusting the beam focusing for further beam transport. The ion source and the puller electrode are tilted at 4 degree angle with respect to the beam line. The extraction system can handle H{sup -} and D{sup -} beams with final beam energies from 5 keV to 15 keV using the same geometry, only adjusting the electrode voltages. So far, 24 {mu}A of H{sup -} and 15 {mu}A of D{sup -} have been extracted from the cyclotron.

  6. Proceedings of the 10th international workshop on ECR ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, F W; Kirkpatrick, M I [eds.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Recent Developments and Future Projects on ECR Ion Sources; Operation of the New KVI ECR Ion Source at 10 GHz; Operational Experience and Status of the INS SF-ECR Ion Source; Results of the New ECR4'' 14.5 GHz ECRIS; Preliminary Performance of the AECR; Experimental Study of the Parallel and Perpendicular Particle Losses from an ECRIS Plasma; Plasma Instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated Ion Sources; The Hyperbolic Energy Analyzer; Status of ECR Source Development; The New 10 GHz CAPRICE Source; First Operation of the Texas A M ECR Ion Source; Recent Developments of the RIKEN ECR Ion Sources; The 14 GHz CAPRICE Source; Characteristics and Potential Applications of an ORNL Microwave ECR Multicusp Plasma Ion Source; ECRIPAC: The Production and Acceleration of Multiply Charged Ions Using an ECR Plasma; ECR Source for the HHIRF Tandem Accelerator; Feasibility Studies for an ECR-Generated Plasma Stripper; Production of Ion Beams by using the ECR Plasmas Cathode; A Single Stage ECR Source for Efficient Production of Radioactive Ion Beams; The Single Staged ECR Source at the TRIUMF Isotope Separator TISOL; The Continuous Wave, Optically Pumped H{sup {minus}} Source; The H{sup +} ECR Source for the LAMPF Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source; Present Status of the Warsaw CUSP ECR Ion Source; An ECR Source for Negative Ion Production; GYRAC-D: A Device for a 200 keV ECR Plasma Production and Accumulation; Status Report of the 14.4 GHZ ECR in Legnaro; Status of JYFL-ECRIS; Report on the Uppsala ECRIS Facility and Its Planned Use for Atomic Physics; A 10 GHz ECR Ion Source for Ion-Electron and Ion-Atom Collision Studies; and Status of the ORNL ECR Source Facility for Multicharged Ion Collision Research.

  7. RECENT RESULTS WITH AU IONS EXTRACTED FROM AN EBIS USING AN 8A ELECTRON BEAM AT BNL *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source (EBIS), which is a prototype for an EBIS that could meet requirements for a RHIC preinjector. RHIC INTRODUCTION At Brookhaven National Laboratory an EBIS is being developed to provide gold ions with charge state 32+ sufficient for injection into the Booster without stripping. Requirements for the intensity

  8. 2 Dynamic analysis of mixed ion beams/materials effects on the performance 3 of ITER-like devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    ions from the core plasma with impurities of 37 beryllium and carbon eroded from PFC can cause erosion from the surface layers, physical sputtering of target 47 atoms, and possible bubble formation of minute impurities like 59carbon, oxygen, or beryllium. These impurities will also influence 60hydrogen

  9. Origin of the energetic ion beams at the substrate generated during high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maszl, Christian; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) plasmas generate energetic metal ions at the substrate as a major difference to conventional direct current magnetron sputtering. The origin of these energetic ions in HiPIMS is still an open issue, which is unraveled by using three fast diagnostics: time resolved mass spectrometry with a temporal resolution of 2 $\\mu$s, phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy with 1 $\\mu$s and the rotating shutter experiment with a resolution of 50 $\\mu$s. A power scan from dcMS-like to HiPIMS plasmas was performed, with a 2-inch magnetron and a titanium target as sputter source and argon as working gas. Clear differences in the transport as well in the energetic properties of Ar$^+$, Ar$^{2+}$, Ti$^+$ and Ti$^{2+}$ were observed. For discharges with highest peak power densities a high energetic group of Ti$^{+}$ and Ti$^{2+}$ could be identified. A cold group of ions is always present. It is found that hot ions are observed only, when the plasma enters the spokes regime, ...

  10. Development Of Ion Chromatography Methods To Support Testing Of The Glycolic Acid Reductant Flowsheet In The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedenman, B. J.; White, T. L.; Mahannah, R. N.; Best, D. R.; Stone, M. E.; Click, D. R.; Lambert, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Chromatography (IC) is the principal analytical method used to support studies of Sludge Reciept and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) chemistry at DWPF. A series of prior analytical ''Round Robin'' (RR) studies included both supernate and sludge samples from SRAT simulant, previously reported as memos, are tabulated in this report.2,3 From these studies it was determined to standardize IC column size to 4 mm diameter, eliminating the capillary column from use. As a follow on test, the DWPF laboratory, the PSAL laboratory, and the AD laboratory participated in the current analytical RR to determine a suite of anions in SRAT simulant by IC, results also are tabulated in this report. The particular goal was to confirm the laboratories ability to measure and quantitate glycolate ion. The target was + or - 20% inter-lab agreement of the analyte averages for the RR. Each of the three laboratories analyzed a batch of 12 samples. For each laboratory, the percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the averages on nitrate, glycolate, and oxalate, was 10% or less. The three laboratories all met the goal of 20% relative agreement for nitrate and glycolate. For oxalate, the PSAL laboratory reported an average value that was 20% higher than the average values reported by the DWPF laboratory and the AD laboratory. Because of this wider window of agreement, it was concluded to continue the practice of an additional acid digestion for total oxalate measurement. It should also be noted that large amounts of glycolate in the SRAT samples will have an impact on detection limits of near eluting peaks, namely Fluoride and Formate. A suite of scoping experiments are presented in the report to identify and isolate other potential interlaboratory disceprancies. Specific ion chromatography inter-laboratory method conditions and differences are tabulated. Most differences were minor but there are some temperature control equipment differences that are significant leading to a recommendation of a heated jacket for analytical columns that are remoted for use in radiohoods. A suggested method improvement would be to implement column temperture control at a temperature slightly above ambient to avoid peak shifting due to temperature fluctuations. Temperature control in this manner would improve short and longer term peak retention time stability. An unknown peak was observed during the analysis of glycolic acid and SRAT simulant. The unknown peak was determined to best match diglycolic acid. The development of a method for acetate is summaraized, and no significant amount of acetate was observed in the SRAT products tested. In addition, an alternative Gas Chromatograph (GC) method for glycolate is summarized.

  11. Room temperature magnetoresistance in CoFeB/SrTiO{sub 3}/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassen, E. M. J. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble (France); SPINTEC (UMR 8191 CEA-CNRS-UJF), CEA-INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Viala, B.; Cyrille, M. C.; Cartier, M.; Redon, O. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble (France); Lima, P. [SPTS, Process Technology Systems, Ringland Way, Newport (United Kingdom); Belhadji, B.; Yang, H. X.; Chshiev, M. [SPINTEC (UMR 8191 CEA-CNRS-UJF), CEA-INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Velev, J. [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan 00931 (Puerto Rico)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature transport properties are reported in polycrystalline SrTiO{sub 3}-based magnetic tunnel junctions deposited by ion beam sputtering. The junctions comprise CoFeB electrodes and the SrTiO{sub 3} barrier with thickness varied between 0.9 and 1.9 nm. Resistance area product values between 3 {Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} and 22 k{Omega}.{mu}m{sup 2} have been measured with a tunnel magnetoresistance ratio ranging from 3.1 to 13% at room temperature. At low barrier thickness (1.2 nm), ferromagnetic coupling between electrodes is observed, indicating the presence of defects in the structure. A post-oxidation step was found to improve transport properties at lower barrier thickness.

  12. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  13. The Cooling of Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67, 15. Hangst, J "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem an.d Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of theWorkshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Montreaux, CERN

  14. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  15. Chemical reactions of conformationally selected 3-aminophenol molecules in a beam with Coulomb-crystallized Ca{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rösch, Daniel; Willitsch, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.willitsch@unibas.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Chang, Yuan-Pin [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Küpper, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.kuepper@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany) [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many molecules exhibit multiple conformers that often easily interconvert under thermal conditions. Therefore, single conformations are difficult to isolate which renders the study of their distinct chemical reactivities challenging. We have recently reported a new experimental method for the characterization of conformer-specific effects in chemical reactions [Y.-P. Chang, K. D?ugo??cki, J. Küpper, D. Rösch, D. Wild, and S. Willitsch, “Specific chemical reactivities of spatially separated 3-aminophenol conformers with cold Ca{sup +} ions,” Science 342, 98–101 (2013)]. Different conformers are spatially separated using inhomogeneous electric fields and reacted with a Coulomb crystal of cold, spatially localized ions in a trap. As a first application, we studied reactions between the two conformers of 3-aminophenol and Ca{sup +}. We observed a twofold larger rate constant for the cis compared to the trans conformer which was rationalized in terms of the differences in the long-range ion-molecule interactions. The present article provides a detailed description of the new method and a full account of the experimental results as well as the accompanying theoretical calculations.

  16. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  17. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  18. Effects of arrival rate and gas pressure on the chemical bonding and composition in titanium nitride films prepared on Si(100) substrates by ion beam and vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, M.; Isotani, S.; Mittani, J.C.R.; Chubaci, J.F.D.; Ogata, K.; Kuratani, N. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C. P. 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil); Nissin Electric Company, Ltd., 47, Umezu-Takase-cho, Ukyo-ku, Kyota 615-8686 (Japan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin titanium nitride films were prepared at room temperature by titanium metal vapor deposition on silicon substrates with simultaneous irradiation by a 2 keV nitrogen ion beam. Arrival rate ratios, ARR(N/Ti), defined as the ratio of the flux of incident atomic nitrogen particles in the ion beam relative to the flux of titanium atoms transported to the substrate, ranged from 0.17 to 2.5. The gas pressure in the vacuum chamber was maintained at 1.3x10{sup -3} or 6.7x10{sup -3} Pa during the deposition and irradiation process. Analyses of Ti 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra indicated the presence of metal Ti{sup 0}, nitride TiN, oxide TiO{sub 2}, oxynitride TiN{sub x}O{sub y}, and carbide TiC phases. The Ti{sup 0} phase was observed exclusively and predominantly in the films prepared at 1.3x10{sup -3} Pa and ARR(N/Ti)=0.17, 0.21, and 0.28, and the TiN phase is major in the others, as confirmed by the x-ray diffractometry analyses. The chemical composition ratio N/Ti in the films prepared at 1.3x10{sup -3} Pa increased linearly with increasing ARR(N/Ti) up to ARR(N/Ti)=0.42 and tended to be constant with further increase in ARR(N/Ti), while this ratio in the films prepared at 6.7x10{sup -3} Pa was almost constant independently of ARR(N/Ti), similar to the constant value observed at 1.3x10{sup -3} Pa and higher ARR(N/Ti). This dependence may be understood by comparison with the flux of evaporated titanium atoms, the flux of nitrogen in the beam, and the impingement rate of nitrogen gas in the vacuum chamber, evaluated through the kinetic theory of gases. On the other hand, titanium is known to be one of the chemically active materials which form stable compounds with gases by chemisorption, this fact leading to considerable incorporation of contaminant oxygen and carbon in the depositing titanium film.

  19. Review of Heavy-ion Induced Desorption Studies for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahner, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavyion program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (208Pb82+) ions with a beam energy of 2.76 TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 10**27 cm**-2 s**-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 10**12 uranium (238U28+) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the resu...

  20. Development of a thermal ionizer as ion catcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Traykov; U. Dammalapati; S. De; O. C. Dermois; L. Huisman; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; A. J. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. da Silva e Silva; M. Sohani; O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective ion catcher is an important part of a radioactive beam facility that is based on in-flight production. The catcher stops fast radioactive products and emits them as singly charged slow ions. Current ion catchers are based on stopping in He and H$_2$ gas. However, with increasing intensity of the secondary beam the amount of ion-electron pairs created eventually prevents the electromagnetic extraction of the radioactive ions from the gas cell. In contrast, such limitations are not present in thermal ionizers used with the ISOL production technique. Therefore, at least for alkaline and alkaline earth elements, a thermal ionizer should then be preferred. An important use of the TRI$\\mu$P facility will be for precision measurements using atom traps. Atom trapping is particularly possible for alkaline and alkaline earth isotopes. The facility can produce up to 10$^9$ s$^{-1}$ of various Na isotopes with the in-flight method. Therefore, we have built and tested a thermal ionizer. An overview of the operation, design, construction, and commissioning of the thermal ionizer for TRI$\\mu$P will be presented along with first results for $^{20}$Na and $^{21}$Na.

  1. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup ?} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, A., E-mail: akira.ueno@j-parc.jp; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H. [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)] [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup ?} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup ?} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 ? mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 ?s × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120?°C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200?°C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup ?} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  2. Beam-Dynamics Studies and Advanced Accelerator Research at CTF-3 Compact Final Focus, Laser Compton Scattering, Plasmas, etc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R W; Burkhardt, H; Corsini, R; Faus-Golfe, A; Gronberg, J; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Velasco, M; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary investigations are summarized on the possible use of the CTF3 facility for extended beam-dynamics studies and advanced accelerator R&D, which would exploit its unique properties and beam availability. The key element of these considerations is the possible addition of a test beam-delivery system comprising a compact final focus and advanced collimation concepts, scaled from 3 TeV down to low energy and having a short total length. Operational experience, verification of critical questions (octupole tail folding, beam halo transport, etc.), diagnostics (e.g., rf BPMs) and stabilization could all be explored in such a facility, which would benefit not only the CLIC study, but all linear collider projects. Another interesting application would be the study of plasma-beam interaction, which may include plasma focusing, plasma acceleration, ion-channel radiation, and plasma wigglers.

  3. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  4. Beam energy dependence of the expansion dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions: Indications for the critical end point?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow harmonic $v_{n}$ and the emission source radii $R_{\\text{out}}$, $R_{\\text{side}}$ and $R_{\\text{long}}$ are studied for a broad range of centrality selections and beam collision energies in Au+Au ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 7.7 - 200$ GeV) and Pb+Pb ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV) collisions at RHIC and the LHC respectively. They validate the acoustic scaling patterns expected for hydrodynamic-like expansion over the entire range of beam energies studied. The combined data sets allow estimates for the \\sqsn\\ dependence of the mean expansion speed $\\left$, emission duration $\\left$ and the viscous coefficients $\\left$ that encode the magnitude of the specific shear viscosity $\\left$. The estimates indicate initial-state model independent values of $\\left$ which are larger for the plasma produced at 2.76 TeV (LHC) compared to that produced at 200 GeV (RHIC) ($\\left_{\\text{LHC}}=2.2\\pm 0.2$ and $\\left_{\\text{RHIC}}=1.3\\pm 0.2$). They also show a non-monotonic \\sqsn\\ dependence for $\\left$, $\\left$ and $\\left$, with minima for $\\left$ and $\\left$, and a complimentary maximum for $\\left$. These dependencies signal a significant change in reaction dynamics in a narrow span of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$, which may be linked to reaction trajectories close to the critical end point (CEP) in the phase diagram for nuclear matter.

  5. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN and Dep. of Phys. Univ. Messina (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  6. Wavelength measurement of n = 3 - n' = 3 transitions in highly charged tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    3s{sub 1/2} - 3p{sub 3/2} and 3p{sub 1/2} - 3d{sub 3/2} transitions have been studied in potassium-like W{sup 55+} through neon-like W{sup 64}+ ions at the electron-beam ion trap facility in Livermore. The wavelengths of the lines have been measured in high resolution relative to well known reference lines from oxygen and nitrogen ions. Using the high-energy SuperEBIT electron-beam ion trap and an R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence soft x-ray spectrometer, the lines were observed with a cryogenic charge-coupled device camera. The wavelength data for the sodium-like and magnesium-like tungsten lines are compared with theoretical predictions for ions along the isoelectronic sequences.

  7. Aspects of Cooling at the TRI$?$P Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Willmann; G. P. Berg; U. Dammalapati; S. De; P. Dendooven; O. Dermois; K. Jungmann; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. Sohani; E. Traykov; H. W. Wilschut

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri$\\mu$P facility at KVI is dedicated to provide short lived radioactive isotopes at low kinetic energies to users. It comprised different cooling schemes for a variety of energy ranges, from GeV down to the neV scale. The isotopes are produced using beam of the AGOR cyclotron at KVI. They are separated from the primary beam by a magnetic separator. A crucial part of such a facility is the ability to stop and extract isotopes into a low energy beamline which guides them to the experiment. In particular we are investigating stopping in matter and buffer gases. After the extraction the isotopes can be stored in neutral atoms or ion traps for experiments. Our research includes precision studies of nuclear $\\beta$-decay through $\\beta$-$\

  8. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ({mu}-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  9. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry); Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ([mu]-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  10. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  11. Effect of discharge current and deposition temperature on roughness and density of NbC films fabricated by ion beam sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhawan, Rajnish, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, Sanjay, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in [X-ray optics Section, Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    NbC films were prepared using Ion beam sputtering system at various discharges current from 0.4 amps to 1.2 amps at room temperature. Effect of temperature on NbC films were also studied by depositing NbC films at various temperatures from room temperature to 200,300,400 and 600°C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) study shows that surface roughness of the film decreases with decrease in discharge current. The optimum lowest roughness 3.2Å having density 92% of bulk was achieved at discharge current 0.6 amps at 3.0 cm{sup 3}/min Ar gas flow. X-ray study also shows that film roughness decreases with increase in temperature of the film and after a certain temperature it increases with increase in temperature. The lowest surface roughness 2.1Å was achieved at 300°C with density 83% of bulk NbC at constant discharge current 0.6 amps.

  12. First application of the Trojan Horse Method with a Radioactive Ion Beam: study of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O}} reaction at astrophysical energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherubini, S; Spitaleri, C; Rapisarda, G G; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Romano, S; Kubono, S; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, T; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; de Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Kiss, G; Bishop, S; Binh, D N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan Horse Method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam induced reaction studying the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three body reaction $^{2}$H($^{18}$F,${\\alpha}^{15}$O)n. The knowledge of the $^{18}$F($p, {\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in $^{19}$Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in Literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astro...

  13. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  15. Electron Cooling Performance at IMP Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Xiaodong

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion beam of 58Ni19+ with the energy of 6.39MeV/u was accumulated in the main ring of HIRFL-CSR with the help of electron cooling. The related angle between ion and electron beams in the horizontal and vertical planes was intentionally created by the steering coils in the cooling section after maximized the accumulated ion beam in the ring. The radial electron intensity distribution was changed by the ratio of potentials of grid electrode and anode of the electron gun, the different electron beam profiles were formed from solid to hollow in the experiments. In these conditions, the maximum accumulated ion beam intensity in the 10 seconds was measured, the lifetime of ion beam was measured, simultaneously the momentum spread of the ion beam varying with particle number was measured during the ion beam decay, furthermore, and the power coefficient was derived from these data. In additional, the momentum spread in the case of constant particle number was plotted with the angle and electron beam profile. The oscillation and shift of the central frequency of the ion beam were observed during the experiments. The upgrade and improvement in the CSRm cooler and the progress in the CSRe cooler were presented. These results were useful to attempt the crystal beam forming investigation in the CSR.

  16. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  17. Effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acuna, J. J. S.; Alvarez, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6165 Campinas, SP, 13083-970 (Brazil); Escobar, M. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. N. [Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R. J. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, 3iA, UNSAM, Campus Migueletes, San Martin, Pcia. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zanatta, A. R. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos-USP, P.O. Box 369, Sao Carlos 13560-250 (Brazil)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) films on the chemical and electronic properties of the material is reported. The CNTs were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique (CVD) on silicon TiN coated substrates previously decorated with Ni particles. The Ni decoration and TiN coating were successively deposited by ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and afterwards the nanotubes were grown. The whole deposition procedure was performed in situ as well as the study of the effect of ion-beam irradiation on the CNTs by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman scattering, field-effect emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), and field emission (FE) measurements were performed ex situ. The experimental data show that: (a) the presence of either H{sub 2}{sup +} or N{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the irradiation beam determines the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples as well as the studied structural characteristics; (b) due to the experimental conditions used in the study, no morphological changes have been observed after irradiation of the CNTs; (c) the FE experiments indicate that the electron emission from the CNTs follows the Fowler-Nordheim model, and it is dependent on the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples; and (d) in association with FE results, the XPS data suggest that the formation of terminal quinone groups decreases the CNTs work function of the material.

  18. Irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandberg, V.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation facilities for testing SSC components and detector systems are described. Very high intensity proton, neutron, and pion fluxes are available with beam kinetic energies of up to 800 MeV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  20. Negative ion source with low temperature transverse divergence optical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, J.H.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion source is provided which has extremely low transverse divergence as a result of a unique ion focusing system in which the focal line of an ion beam emanating from an elongated, concave converter surface is outside of the ion exit slit of the source and the path of the exiting ions. The beam source operates with a minimum ion temperature which makes possible a sharply focused (extremely low transverse divergence) ribbon like negative ion beam.