Sample records for ion beam consortium

  1. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  2. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  3. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  4. ORISE: University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships, Scholarships andUNIRIB Research Overview

  5. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  6. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  7. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  8. Ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miura, A.; Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of numerical simulations on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. For the beam speed exceeding the thermal speed of background ions and the beam temperature much lower than the background ion temperature, it is found that the instability results in strong perpendicular heating and slowing down of parallel drift of the beam ions, leading to the saturation of the instability. Applications to plasma heating and space plasma physics are discussed.

  9. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  10. Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

  11. ORISE University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) Consortium: Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControlsOMBRadiationHow to Work with

  12. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  13. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  14. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  15. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  16. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  17. Flow-through ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springer, R.W.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and an apparatus for forming a charge neutral ion beam which is useful in producing thin films of material on electrically conductive or non-conductive substrates are provided. 4 figs.

  18. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  19. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient for clinical practice. Although only data for helium beams was presented, the performance of the pencil beam algorithm for proton beams was comparable. Conclusions: The pencil beam algorithm developed for helium ions presents a suitable tool for dose calculations. Its calculation speed was evaluated to be similar to other published pencil beam algorithms. The flexible design allows easy customization of measured depth-dose distributions and use of varying beam profiles, thus making it a promising candidate for integration into future treatment planning systems. Current work in progress deals with RBE effects of helium ions to complete the model.

  20. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  1. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  2. Ion beam extractor with counterbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing; Standiford, Keith; King, Tsu-Jae; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractor system for a plasma ion source has a single (first) electrode with one or more apertures, or a pair of spaced electrodes, a first or plasma forming electrode and a second or extraction electrode, with one or more aligned apertures. The aperture(s) in the first electrode (or the second electrode or both) have a counterbore on the downstream side (i.e. away from the plasma ion source or facing the second electrode). The counterbored extraction system reduces aberrations and improves focusing. The invention also includes an ion source with the counterbored extraction system, and a method of improving focusing in an extraction system by providing a counterbore.

  3. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  4. Using neutral beams as a light ion beam probe (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi, E-mail: chenxi@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By arranging the particle first banana orbits to pass near a distant detector, the light ion beam probe (LIBP) utilizes orbital deflection to probe internal fields and field fluctuations. The LIBP technique takes advantage of (1) the in situ, known source of fast ions created by beam-injected neutral particles that naturally ionize near the plasma edge and (2) various commonly available diagnostics as its detector. These born trapped particles can traverse the plasma core on their inner banana leg before returning to the plasma edge. Orbital displacements (the forces on fast ions) caused by internal instabilities or edge perturbing fields appear as modulated signal at an edge detector. Adjustments in the q-profile and plasma shape that determine the first orbit, as well as the relative position of the source and detector, enable studies under a wide variety of plasma conditions. This diagnostic technique can be used to probe the impact on fast ions of various instabilities, e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and neoclassical tearing modes, and of externally imposed 3D fields, e.g., magnetic perturbations. To date, displacements by AEs and by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields have been measured using a fast ion loss detector. Comparisons with simulations are shown. In addition, nonlinear interactions between fast ions and independent AE waves are revealed by this technique.

  5. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  6. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  7. Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

  8. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  9. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  10. Characterization of ionic liquid ion sources for focused ion beam applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Martinez, Carla S. (Carla Sofia)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique, a beam of ions is reduced to nanometer dimensions using dedicated optics and directed to a substrate for patterning. This technique is widely used in micro- and nanofabrication for ...

  11. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

  12. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  13. Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, David Sun, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

  14. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrubia, J J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  15. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro [Nagaoka University of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Nagaoka University of Technology, Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  16. Project Execution Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Execution Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 07-SC-02 at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY For the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Nuclear Physics (SC ­ 26) Rev. 1 May 2008 #12;#12;#12;4 Project Execution Plan for the Electron Beam Ion

  17. Production of multiply charged ion beams from solid substances with the mVINIS ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Nedeljkovic, T.; Siljegovic, M. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box. 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mVINIS ion source has enabled us to obtain multiply charged ion beams from gases as well as from solid materials. The solid substance ion beams were produced by using two techniques: (a) the evaporation of metals by using the inlet system based on a minioven and (b) the metal-ions-from-volatile-compounds method (MIVOC) by using the modified gas inlet system. Great efforts were made in the production of high current stable ion beams of solids with relatively high melting points (over 1000 deg. C). The B{sup 3+} ion-beam current of over 300 {mu}A was one of the most intensive beams extracted until now. The obtained multiply charged ion-beam spectra of solid substances (B, Fe, and Zn) are presented as well as some of the corresponding experimental results achieved during the modification of polymers, carbon materials, and fullerenes.

  18. Design and operation of the electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, D.

    1990-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the basic features and operating principles of the Electron Beam Ion Trap. The differences between EBIT and other sources of highly charged ions are outlined. Its features and operating parameters are discussed. The report also explains why certain design choices were necessary and the constraints involved in building an electron beam ion trap. EBIT's evaporation cooling system is described in detail. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  19. EXTRACTION COMPRESSION AND ACCELERATION OF HIGH LINE CHARGE DENSITY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on compression of heavy ion beams for creating high energyet al, “Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy DensityPulsed Solenoid for Intense Ion Beam Transport,” these Proc:

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic ion beams Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion beams Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic ion beams Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 he Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ion beam Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System 12;1. Ions from radio frequency (RF) ion source... to eliminate unwanted ion beams and to limit size of beam entering bending magnet 3. Main beam stop used... magnet is...

  2. Method and apparatus for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Yuan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Havener, Charles C. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for efficient photodetachment and purification of negative ion beams. A method of purifying an ion beam includes: inputting the ion beam into a gas-filled multipole ion guide, the ion beam including a plurality of ions; increasing a laser-ion interaction time by collisional cooling the plurality of ions using the gas-filled multipole ion guide, the plurality of ions including at least one contaminant; and suppressing the at least one contaminant by selectively removing the at least one contaminant from the ion beam by electron photodetaching at least a portion of the at least one contaminant using a laser beam.

  3. Status of Beta Beam R&D: Radioactive ion production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Status of Beta Beam R&D: Radioactive ion production O b h lf f EURISOL DS*/ISOLDE CERN Etam NOAH Infrastructure Action Structuring the European Research Area" g , y , Status of BetaBeam R&D AHIPA09 etam Status of BetaBeam R&D AHIPA09 etam.noah@esss.se #12;Introduction to betabeams Beta-beam proposal

  4. Ion beam collimating grid to reduce added defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Walter B. (Oakland, CA); Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A collimating grid for an ion source located after the exit grid. The collimating grid collimates the ion beamlets and disallows beam spread and limits the beam divergence during transients and steady state operation. The additional exit or collimating grid prevents beam divergence during turn-on and turn-off and prevents ions from hitting the periphery of the target where there is re-deposited material or from missing the target and hitting the wall of the vessel where there is deposited material, thereby preventing defects from being deposited on a substrate to be coated. Thus, the addition of a collimating grid to an ion source ensures that the ion beam will hit and be confined to a specific target area.

  5. Spontaneous ion beam formation in the laboratory, space, and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Cassak, P. A.; Galante, M.; Keesee, A. M.; Lusk, G.; Magee, R. M.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; Vandervort, R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway)] [University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Colorado–Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Eastwood, J. P. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence for the spontaneous formation of multiple double layers within a single divergent magnetic field structure. Downstream of the divergent magnetic field, multiple accelerated ion populations are observed. The similarity of the accelerated ion populations observed in these laboratory experiments to ion populations observed in the magnetosphere and in numerical simulations suggests that the observation of a complex ion velocity distribution alone is insufficient to distinguish between simple plasma expansion and magnetic reconnection. Further, the effective temperature of the aggregate ion population is significantly larger than the temperatures of the individual ion population components, suggesting that insufficiently resolved measurements could misidentify multiple beam creation as ion heating. Ions accelerated in randomly oriented electric fields that mimic heating would have an ion heating rate dependent on the ion charge and mass that is qualitatively consistent with recent experimental observations of ion heating during magnetic reconnection.

  6. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -see http://videos.komando.com/2008/08/19/water-painting/]. #12;12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual12/7/08 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 1 Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and fusion* Presented by B. Grant Logan on behalf of the U.S. Heavy Ion

  7. Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, W.F.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

  8. Etching of Graphene Devices with a Helium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herb

    We report on the etching of graphene devices with a helium ion beam, including in situ electrical measurement during lithography. The etching process can be used to nanostructure and electrically isolate different regions ...

  9. anaconda ion beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Ion beam CiteSeer Summary: Fast ignition is a method to decrease the energy of a fusion driver 1. At first the matter becomes compressed to high densities due to the...

  10. Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinto, Katsuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko [Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

  11. Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

  12. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)] [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  13. Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

  14. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

  15. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110 086 (India); Sharma, Kavita [Department of Physics, Bhagwan Parshuram Institute of Technology, Sector-17, Rohini, New Delhi 110 089 (India)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  16. Improved production of N{sup +} ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kunkel, W.B.; Walther, S.R.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N{sup +} ion beam using a multicusp ion source having a chamber formed by a cylindrical chamber wall surrounded by a plurality of magnets, a filament centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode having an extraction orifice at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets spaced from said plasma electrode and dividing the chamber into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber, maintaining the chamber wall at a positive voltage relative to the filament and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beam, disposing a hot liner within the chamber and near the chamber wall to limit recombination of N{sup +} ions into the N{sub 2}{sup +} ions, spacing the magnets of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3--8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} torr) for an optimum percentage of N{sup +} ions in the extracted ion beam.

  17. Plasma and Ion Beam Injection into an FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.; Bystritskii, V.; Garate, E.; Rostoker, N.; Song, Y.; Drie, A. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, CA, 92697 (United States); Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., Foothill Ranch, CA, 92610 (United States); Isakov, I. [Institute of High Voltage Technology, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on the transverse injection of intense (5-20 A/cm{sup 2}), wide cross-section (10-cm), neutralized, {approx}100-eV H{sup +} plasma and 100-keV H{sup +} ion beams into a preformed B-field reversed configuration (FRC) are described. The FRC background plasma temperature was {approx}5 eV with densities of {approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. In contrast to earlier experiments, the background plasma was generated by separate plasma gun arrays. For the startup of the FRC, a betatron-type 'slow' coaxial source was used. Injection of the plasma beam into the preformed FRC resulted in a 30-40% increase of the FRC lifetime and the amplitude of the reversed magnetic field. As for the ion beam injection experiment into the preformed FRC, there was evidence of beam capture within the configuration.

  18. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  19. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer; John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (State College, PA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  20. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  1. University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) Consortium: How ORISE Is Making a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version)Underground NaturalUnions,

  2. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  3. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  4. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002 at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY For the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Nuclear Physics (SC ­ 26) #12;1. Background and References 1.1 Background The EBIS Project will manage

  5. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  6. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  7. PIC MODELING: Measuring Ion Beam Current Density in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    -Mission Research, Albuquerque, NM 87110 #12;2Ion beams focused beyond the space-charge limit via plasma pressure chamber Final focus magnet Target RF Source: Volume plasma (from photoionization of hot target W m-2 With plasma: Without plasma: Also, can't transversely focus without plasma! #12;7LSP predicts

  8. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. T. C. [UKAEA Culham Division, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: ion beam assisted deposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing therenewableswind blade inspectionion beam

  10. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  11. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Arijeet, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Mukharjee, C., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rajiv, K., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Bose, Aniruddha, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, S. D., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Phase, D. M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore-452017 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  12. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HI FAN 1160 LBNL-50492 Progress in Bright Ion BeamsMedicine and Fusion at LBNL Joe W. Kwan Lawrence BerkeleyAbstract Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated ion beams Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion beams Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accelerated ion beams Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of...

  14. Electrostatic dispersion lenses and ion beam dispersion methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An EDL includes a case surface and at least one electrode surface. The EDL is configured to receive through the EDL a plurality of ion beams, to generate an electrostatic field between the one electrode surface and either the case surface or another electrode surface, and to increase the separation between the beams using the field. Other than an optional mid-plane intended to contain trajectories of the beams, the electrode surface or surfaces do not exhibit a plane of symmetry through which any beam received through the EDL must pass. In addition or in the alternative, the one electrode surface and either the case surface or the other electrode surface have geometries configured to shape the field to exhibit a less abrupt entrance and/or exit field transition in comparison to another electrostatic field shaped by two nested, one-quarter section, right cylindrical electrode surfaces with a constant gap width.

  15. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  16. Dynamics of Ion Beam Stimulated Surface Mass Transport to Nanopores David P. Hoogerheide1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of Ion Beam Stimulated Surface Mass Transport to Nanopores David P. Hoogerheide1 membrane, from the substrate side, by rastering a 10-nm diameter, 50 keV gallium ion beam produced by a FEI We explore the ion beam-induced dynamics of the formation of large features at the edges of nanopores

  17. Laser-Cooled Lithium Atoms: A New Source for Focused Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser-Cooled Lithium Atoms: A New Source for Focused Ion Beams P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jabez Mc) to provide ions for a focused ion beam (FIB) capable of non-destructive imaging. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M mounted on a commercial focused ion beam system, creating the world's first lithium ion microscope

  18. Applied Physics B28, 2/3 239 cw Ion Lasers Pumpedby Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Applied Physics B28, 2/3 239 cw Ion Lasers Pumpedby Electron Beams J. J. Rocca, J. D. Meyer, Zeng, and As by exciting He metal-vapor mixtures with a dc electron beam. The beam is generated by glow discharge electron obtained using electron beam excitation. The conventional manner of exciting cw ion lasers is to use

  19. Microchip and wedge ion funnels and planar ion beam analyzers using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodynamic ion funnels confine, guide, or focus ions in gases using the Dehmelt potential of oscillatory electric field. New funnel designs operating at or close to atmospheric gas pressure are described. Effective ion focusing at such pressures is enabled by fields of extreme amplitude and frequency, allowed in microscopic gaps that have much higher electrical breakdown thresholds in any gas than the macroscopic gaps of present funnels. The new microscopic-gap funnels are useful for interfacing atmospheric-pressure ionization sources to mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility separation (IMS) stages including differential IMS or FAIMS, as well as IMS and MS stages in various configurations. In particular, "wedge" funnels comprising two planar surfaces positioned at an angle and wedge funnel traps derived therefrom can compress ion beams in one dimension, producing narrow belt-shaped beams and laterally elongated cuboid packets. This beam profile reduces the ion density and thus space-charge effects, mitigating the adverse impact thereof on the resolving power, measurement accuracy, and dynamic range of MS and IMS analyzers, while a greater overlap with coplanar light or particle beams can benefit spectroscopic methods.

  20. The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Hussein, M. S.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Benjamim, E. A. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Depto. Fisica Particulas, Facultad Fisica, Campus Sur s/n 15786 Santiago de Compostela (Spain) (Spain); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio Tandar, Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Assuncao, M. [UNIFESP-Campus de Diadema, SP (Brazil)] (and others)

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as {sup 6}He,{sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

  1. Proton Beam Lithography at the University of Surrey's Ion Beam Centre , I. Gomez-Morilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Roger P.

    the Ion Scan software developed by the National University of Singapore [4]. Simulations with the SRIM in photosensitive glass [3]. This technique has clear advantages in comparison with electron beam lithography and X energy protons have a long range and a low lateral spread making them ideal for exposing thick resist

  2. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

  3. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  4. Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Cordier, J.-J.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, 13108 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 (Italy); Bonicelli, T. [IPR, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382428 (India); Chakraborty, A. [EFDA CSU, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Inoue, T.; Watanabe, K. [JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the requirements of the four operating and one start-up scenarios foreseen in the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) a flexible heating mix will be required, which has to include a reliable contribution from neutral beams. The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB) systems based on negative ion technology, each operating at 1 MeV 40 A D{sup -} ions, and each capable of delivering up to 16.7 MW of D deg. to the ITER plasma. A 3rd HNB injector is foreseen as an upgrade option. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) injecting 100 keV 60 A of negative hydrogen ions will be available for charge exchange resonant spectroscopy (CXRS). The significant R and D effort necessary to meet the design requirements will be provided in the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), which is to be constructed in Padua, Italy. This paper gives an overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration. The ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant is highlighted and open interface issues are identified. It is shown how installation and maintenance logistics has influenced the design. ITER operating scenarios are briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning. For example it is now envisaged to have a low current hydrogen phase of ITER operations, essentially for commissioning of the many auxiliary systems used on ITER. The low current limits the achievable plasma density, and hence the NB energy due to shine through limitations. Therefore a possible reconfiguration of the auxiliary heating systems is now being discussed. Other NB related issues identified by the ongoing design review process are emphasized and possible impact on the implementations of the HNB and DNB systems is indicated.

  5. Control system for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, B.A.; Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new accelerator control system is being implemented as part of the development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), a first generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. The pre- existing accelerator control systems are based on 1970`s technology and addition or alteration of controls is cumbersome and costly. A new, unified control system for the cyclotron and tandem accelerators, the RIB injector, ion sources, and accelerator beam lines is based on a commercial product from Vista Control Systems, Inc. Several other accelerator facilities, as well as numerous industrial sites, are now using this system. The control system is distributed over a number of computers which communicate over Ethernet and is easily extensible. Presently, implementation at the HRIBF is based on VAX/VMS, VAX/ELN, VME, and Allen-Bradley PLC5 programmable logic controller architectures. Expansion to include UNIX platforms and CAMAC hardware support is planned. Operator interface is via X- terminals. The system has proven to be quite powerful, yet is has been easy to implement with a small staff. A Vista users group has resulted in shared software to implement specific controls. This paper details present system features and future implementations at the HRIBF.

  6. Rare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    Pr,10,11 Eu,12 Dy,13 Er,13­15 and Tm16 doped GaN. Rare earth elements were added during growthRare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources L. C. Chao, B write implantation. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 99 08306-7 I. INTRODUCTION Rare earth

  7. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

  8. Direct-write milling of diamond by a focused oxygen ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Aiden A; Botman, Aurelien; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in focused ion beam technology have enabled high-resolution, direct-write nanofabrication using light ions. Studies with light ions to date have, however, focused on milling of materials where sub-surface ion beam damage does not inhibit device performance. Here we report on direct-write milling of single crystal diamond using a focused beam of oxygen ions. Material quality is assessed by Raman and luminescence analysis, and reveals that the damage layer generated by oxygen ions can be removed by nonintrusive post-processing methods such as localised electron beam induced chemical etching.

  9. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  10. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  11. Nuclear Spectroscopy Using Radioactive Ion Beams from the HRIBF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Exciting opportunities in the study of nuclei far from stability in both the neutron and proton rich side are opening with the recent availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies above the Coulomb barrier at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). These RIBs provide a unique opportunity for a whole class of measurements that could never before be realized. A recent highlight has been the acceleration of 'pure' beams of fission fragments such as 82Ge (T1/2=4.6s) and 132Sn (T1/2=40s). These semi-magic and doubly-magic nuclei are important benchmarks within the chart of nuclides, because they are constraints for the shell-model parameter sets. We are currently developing the required experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in nuclear astrophysics, reaction spectroscopy, and nuclear structure research with RIBs. I will discuss some of the challenges encountered with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved.

  12. Nuclear Spectroscopy Using Radioactive Ion Beams from the HRIBF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exciting opportunities in the study of nuclei far from stability in both the neutron and proton rich side are opening with the recent availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies above the Coulomb barrier at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). These RIBs provide a unique opportunity for a whole class of measurements that could never before be realized. A recent highlight has been the acceleration of 'pure' beams of fission fragments such as 82Ge (T1/2=4.6s) and 132Sn (T1/2=40s). These semi-magic and doubly-magic nuclei are important benchmarks within the chart of nuclides, because they are constraints for the shell-model parameter sets. We are currently developing the required experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in nuclear astrophysics, reaction spectroscopy, and nuclear structure research with RIBs. I will discuss some of the challenges encountered with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved.

  13. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  14. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions to the fast ion emission process. The interest in laser plasmas and interaction phenomena of heavy ion beams!. Thus there is a tradition to investigate accelerator related issues like beam transport phenomena

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

  16. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Siskind, Barry (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  17. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa... I. D. Kaganovich beams,13 the physics of solar flares,14 high-intensity high- energy particle beam propagation Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali ion beams Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beams Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkali ion beams Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 METHOD FOR EFFICIENCY AND TIME RESPONSE...

  19. Opportunistic Mass Measurements at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Larochelle, Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wollnik, Hermann [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for measuring mass differences has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) that requires no specialized equipment. Mass differences are measured as position differences between known and unknown-mass isobars, dispersed at the image of the energy-analyzing magnet following the 25MV tandem post-accelerator, and identified by an energy-loss measurement. The technique has been demonstrated on neutron-rich 77 79Cu and 83 86Ge isotopes produced using the isotope separator online (ISOL) method with the 238U(p,fission) reaction, where a mass accuracy of 500 keV was achieved. These nuclides are well suited to the measurement technique, as they readily migrate out of the production target and to the ion source and comprise the most neutron-rich elements of the isobarically mixed beam. Because modest precision mass values can be obtained with only a few tens of counts of the nuclide of interest among orders of magnitude more of the isobaric neighbors closer to stability, the sensitivity of this technique makes it appropriate for initial mass measurements far from stability.

  20. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER ANDtemperature rise in the tungsten foil. A cross-calibrationis obtained with a 3µm thick tungsten foil calorimeter and

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - ar ion beam Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Collection: Materials Science 3 OPERATION STATUS OF HIGH INTENSITY ION BEAMS AT GANIL F. Chautard, G. Sncal, GANIL, Caen, France Summary: OPERATION STATUS OF HIGH...

  2. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34102 Basovizza (Italy)

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  3. Heating of beam ions by ion acoustic waves A. Vaivads, K. Ro nnmark, T. Oscarsson, and M. Andre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    spectral density at frequencies much below the ion gyrofrequency. The wave power decreases with increasingHeating of beam ions by ion acoustic waves A. Vaivads, K. RoÃ? nnmark, T. Oscarsson, and M. AndreÃ? Swedish Institute of Space Physics, University of UmeaÃ? , S-901 87 UMEAÃ? , Sweden Received: 30 April 1997

  4. Experimental test of a microwave ion beam source in oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmussen, J.; Dahimene, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments have demonstrated a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma disk ion source operating with inert gases both with and without an applied static magnetic field. Earlier results were reported using a preliminary, multicusp static magnetic field configuration produced by alternating pole, small, --2.5 kG rare earth magnets surrounding the microwave discharge zone. This electrodeless ion source has been rebuilt incorporating several improvements and has been experimentally tested with different discharge diffusion lengths. The improvements include removing the rare earth magnets from the inside of the microwave cavity and embedding them in the cavity walls. The placement and strength of the magnets allows electron cyclotron resonant surfaces (--875 G) to lie entirely within the discharge zone. Discharges with different diffusion lengths were created by varying the thickness of the disk-shaped discharge zone. The experimental performance with and without a static magnetic field is discussed at the low flow rates of 2--10 sccm and using a 2.5 cm diam double grid set. Experimental test results are compared to similar ion beam sources in oxygen that employ a dc discharge. The expected lifetime, startup, and shutdown problems and maintenance are also reviewed.

  5. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

  6. Nanostructuring superconductors by ion beams: A path towards materials engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerbaldo, Roberto; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gozzelino, Laura; Laviano, Francesco [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino c.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy and INFN Sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amato, Antonino; Rovelli, Alberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Cherubini, Roberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with nanostructuring of superconducting materials by means of swift heavy ion beams. The aim is to modify their structural, optical and electromagnetic properties in a controlled way, to provide possibility of making them functional for specific applications. Results are presented concerning flux pinning effects (implantation of columnar defects with nanosize cross section to enhance critical currents and irreversibility fields), confined flux-flow and vortex guidance, design of devices by locally tailoring the superconducting material properties, analysis of disorder-induced effects in multi-band superconductors. These studies were carried out on different kinds of superconducting samples, from single crystals to thin films, from superconducting oxides to magnesium diboride, to recently discovered iron-based superconductors.

  7. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  8. Ion beam sputter target and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A.; Goldsmith, Jason; Cook, Bruce; Blau, Peter; Jun, Qu; Milner, Robert

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A target for use in an ion beam sputtering apparatus made of at least two target tiles where at least two of the target tiles are made of different chemical compositions and are mounted on a main tile and geometrically arranged on the main tile to yield a desired chemical composition on a sputtered substrate. In an alternate embodiment, the tiles are of varied thickness according to the desired chemical properties of the sputtered film. In yet another alternate embodiment, the target is comprised of plugs pressed in a green state which are disposed in cavities formed in a main tile also formed in a green state and the assembly can then be compacted and then sintered.

  9. Process Considerations and Failure Analysis using Focused Ion Beam Milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy L. Rasera; Certifie Dr; Joseph B. Bernstein; Roy L. Rasera

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    novel method of connecting two adjacent lines on the same level of metallization in integrated circuits using a laser was previously developed with programmable gate array applications and customized chips in mind. This work reports a study of failure mechanisms in the laser linking process. Experiments relating critical processing parameters (laser power and target alignment) to the visual failure modes were performed. A Focused Ion Beam (FIB) was used to cross-section and image failed links. The images were compared with previously published linking models. Finite element analysis was used to simulate laser absorption and subsequent thermal diffusion, and to justify a simple model defining the process window for laser linking. The research correlated theoretical predictions

  10. Focused ion beam damage to MOS integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FLEETWOOD,D.M.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.; HEMBREE,CHARLES E.; TANGYUNYONG,PAIBOON; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SODEN,JERRY M.

    2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial focused ion beam (FIB) systems are commonly used to image integrated circuits (ICS) after device processing, especially in failure analysis applications. FIB systems are also often employed to repair faults in metal lines for otherwise functioning ICS, and are being evaluated for applications in film deposition and nanofabrication. A problem that is often seen in FIB imaging and repair is that ICS can be damaged during the exposure process. This can result in degraded response or out-right circuit failure. Because FIB processes typically require the surface of an IC to be exposed to an intense beam of 30--50 keV Ga{sup +} ions, both charging and secondary radiation damage are potential concerns. In previous studies, both types of effects have been suggested as possible causes of device degradation, depending on the type of device examined and/or the bias conditions. Understanding the causes of this damage is important for ICS that are imaged or repaired by a FIB between manufacture and operation, since the performance and reliability of a given IC is otherwise at risk in subsequent system application. In this summary, the authors discuss the relative roles of radiation damage and charging effects during FIB imaging. Data from exposures of packaged parts under controlled bias indicate the possibility for secondary radiation damage during FIB exposure. On the other hand, FIB exposure of unbiased wafers (a more common application) typically results in damage caused by high-voltage stress or electrostatic discharge. Implications for FIB exposure and subsequent IC use are discussed.

  11. Controlled formation of nanoscale wrinkling patterns on polymers using focused ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    2007 It has previously been shown that focused ion beam irradiation induces a wrinkled skin­10]. Other potential appli- cations include optical diffraction gratings and optical microlenses [11 is constrained by the PDMS substrate, the skin experiences in-plane compressive strain upon ion beam irradiation

  12. Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser18, deliver an intense uranium beam that deposit about 1 kJ0g specific energy in solid matter. Using 2004! Abstract Intense heavy ion beams from the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung ~GSI, Darmstadt

  13. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  14. Characterization of polymeric films subjected to lithium ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; W. Roger Cannon; Paul A. Lessing; Recep Avci; Muhammedin Deliorman; Mark Wolfenden; Doug W. Akers; J. Keith Jewell

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different polymeric materials that are candidate materials for use as binders for mixed uranium–plutonium oxide nuclear fuel pellets were subjected to Li ion beam irradiation, in order to simulate intense alpha irradiation. The materials (a polyethylene glycol 8000 and a microcrystalline wax) were then analyzed using a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) approaches and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Samples of the irradiated PEG materials were dissolved in H2O and then analyzed using electrospray ionization-MS, which showed the formation of a series of small oligomers in addition to intact large PEG oligomers. The small oligomers were likely formed by radiation-induced homolytic scissions of the C–O and C–C bonds, which furnish radical intermediates that react by radical recombination with Hradical dot and OHradical dot. Surface analysis using SIMS revealed a heterogeneous surface that contained not only PEG-derived polymers, but also hydrocarbon-based entities that are likely surface contaminants. XPS of the irradiated PEG samples indicated the emergence of different carbon species, with peak shifts suggesting the presence of sp2 carbon atoms. Analysis of the paraffinic film using XPS showed the emergence of oxygen on the surface of the sample, and also a broadening and shifting of the C1s peak, demonstrating a change in the chemistry on the surface. The paraffinic film did not dissolve in either H2O or a H2O–methanol solution, and hence the bulk of the material could not be analyzed using electrospray. However a series of oligomers was leached from the bulk material that produced ion series in the ESI-MS analyses that were identified octylphenyl ethoxylate oligomers. Upon Li ion bombardment, these shifted to a lower average molecular weight, but more importantly showed the emergence of three new ion series that are being formed as a result of radiation damage. Surface analysis of the paraffinic polymers using SIMS produced spectra that were wholly dominated by hydrocarbon ion series, and no difference was observed between unirradiated and irradiated samples. The studies demonstrate that for the PEG-based polymers, direct evidence for radiolytic scission can be observed using ESI-MS, and suggests that both radiolytic pathways and efficiencies as a function of dose should be measurable by calibrating instrument response to the small oligomeric degradation products.

  15. Excited-Level Lifetimes and Hyperfine-Structure Measurements on Ions using Collinear Laser Ion-Beam Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resolve isotopic beams of Ca+ or Cl+. However, each isotopic mass had a different velocity, and hence Doppler shift, following subsequent acceleration to and within the DSS. Consequently ion isotopes other than the dominant iso- tope had significantly...

  16. Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

  17. A Novel Detector Design for Imaging Low-Intensity Diffuse Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    A Novel Detector Design for Imaging Low- Intensity Diffuse Ion Beams J. Schmidt, R. de Souza, S for signal processing To image the beam scintillating fibers are used. Ionizing particles, when incident readouts for each dimension. Right: example of a beam profile. Above: EZ10EN drive electronics to control

  18. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 2–3 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  19. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)] [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico)] [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup ?} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  20. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Drazic, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Salamon, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza 34012 (Italy); Holy, V. [Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic)

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  1. Ion beam oscillation due to fluctuation of a hot filament driven magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imakita, S.; Kasuya, T.; Kimura, Y.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Miyamoto, N. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co. Ltd., Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam current extracted from a modified Bernas type ion source occasionally exhibits an oscillation at a frequency of several 100 kHz. Increase in the strength of a linear magnetic field induced to the ion source has either decreased or increased the frequency of this oscillation. The frequency showed an increase in proportion to the ion extraction voltage when the frequency decreased with increasing magnetic field. The change of extraction voltage did not affect the frequency when the frequency increased with the increasing magnetic field. Mechanisms causing these oscillations of an ion beam had been investigated.

  2. Numerical study of the characteristics of the ion and fast atom beams in an end-Hall ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An end-Hall ion source is a cylindrical magnetized device of few centimeters in length able to generate an ion beam with a current of typically 1 A and ion energies in the range of 100 eV. This ion source does not use acceleration grids, has a relatively large ion beam divergence, and is well suited for ion assisted deposition processes. In this paper, a self-consistent two-dimensional quasi-neutral model of an end-Hall ion source is used to understand the parameters controlling the characteristics of the extracted. The model results underline the role of charge exchange collisions on beam properties. The calculated energy distribution functions reveal the existence of groups of slow ions and fast neutrals. Ion mean energy corresponds to roughly 60% of the discharge voltage, while the root mean square deviation from the mean energy corresponds to about 33% of the discharge voltage, as in experiments. The influence of the position of the electron emitting source on the ion angular distribution is also shown.

  3. An Ion Guide for the Production of a Low Energy Ion Beam of Daughter Products of $?$-Emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tordoff; T. Eronen; V. V. Elomaa; S. Gulick; U. Hager; P. Karvonen; T. Kessler; J. Lee; I. Moore; A. Popov; S. Rahaman; S. Rinta-Antila; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ion guide has been modeled and tested for the production of a low energy ($\\approx$ 40 kV) ion beam of daughter products of alpha-emitting isotopes. The guide is designed to evacuate daughter recoils originating from the $\\alpha$-decay of a $^{233}$U source. The source is electroplated onto stainless steel strips and mounted along the inner walls of an ion guide chamber. A combination of electric fields and helium gas flow transport the ions through an exit hole for injection into a mass separator. Ion guide efficiencies for the extraction of $^{229}$Th$^{+}$ (0.06%), $^{221}$Fr$^{+}$ (6%), and $^{217}$At$^{+}$ (6%) beams have been measured. A detailed study of the electric field and gas flow influence on the ion guide efficiency is described for two differing electric field configurations.

  4. Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann N. (Albuquerque, NM); Soden, Jerry M. (Placitas, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal.

  5. Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, A.N.; Soden, J.M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits are disclosed. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal. 4 figs.

  6. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  7. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S. [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Shizuoka (Japan) and Institute de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) and Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Gunnma (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of {approx} 1.0 {mu}m at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5{mu}m FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  8. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  9. Formation of Cobalt Silicide Films by Ion Beam Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yanwen; McCready, David E.; Wang, Chong M.; Young, James S.; Mckinley, Mathew I.; Whitlow, Harry J.; Razpet, Alenka; Possnert, Göran; Zhang, Tonghe; Wu, Yuguang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of cobalt silicide are widely used as metallization in very large-scale integrated electronic circuits. In this study, Co ions were deposited on Si (111) wafers by a high beam current filter metal vacuum arc deposition (FMEVAD) system. Surface silicide films were formed after annealing from 500 to 700 C for 30 minutes. Cobalt depth profiles and contaminations were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and time-of-flight energy elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA). The polycrystalline cobalt silicide phases formed were characterized by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The surface topography development and interfaces have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that a thin CoSi2 surface layer with both a smooth surface topography and sharp interface can be achieved by annealing at 700 C. The CoSi phase and O contamination were observed in the samples that were annealed at lower temperatures.

  10. Diagnostics of ion beam generated from a Mather type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, L. K., E-mail: yapsl@um.edu.my; Ngoi, S. K., E-mail: yapsl@um.edu.my; Wong, C. S., E-mail: yapsl@um.edu.my; Yap, S. L., E-mail: yapsl@um.edu.my [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagnostics of ion beam emission from a 3 kJ Mather-type plasma focus device have been performed for deuterium discharge at low pressure regime. Deuterium plasma focus was found to be optimum at pressure of 0.2 mbar. The energy spectrum and total number of ions per shot from the pulsed ion beam are determined by using biased ion collectors, Faraday cup, and solid state nuclear track detector CR-39. Average energy of the ion beam obtained is about 60 keV. Total number of the ions has been determined to be in the order of 10{sup 11} per shot. Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR39 are employed to measure the particles at all angular direction from end on (0°) to side on (90°). Particle tracks are registered by SSNTD at 30° to 90°, except the one at the end-on 0°.

  11. Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Qin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 4, 104401 (2001). [30] S.Davidson, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 021001 (2002). [31]Channell, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 074401 (1999); [32

  12. Ion beam energy spectrum calculation via dosimetry data deconvolution.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Sharp, Andrew Clinton (A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of a H{sup +} beam generated within the HERMES III accelerator is calculated from dosimetry data to refine future experiments. Multiple layers of radiochromic film are exposed to the beam. A graphic user interface was written in MATLAB to align the film images and calculate the beam's dose depth profile. Singular value regularization is used to stabilize the unfolding and provide the H{sup +} beam's energy spectrum. The beam was found to have major contributions from 1 MeV and 8.5 MeV protons. The HERMES III accelerator is typically used as a pulsed photon source to experimentally obtain photon impulse response of systems due to high energy photons. A series of experiments were performed to explore the use of Hermes III to generate an intense pulsed proton beam. Knowing the beam energy spectrum allows for greater precision in experiment predictions and beam model verification.

  13. Consortium for Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Consortium for Energy Efficiency at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  14. Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K. [Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Materials Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

  15. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  16. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B. Grant

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

  17. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  18. Investigation into direct conversion with medium energy He-ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guild-Bingham, Avery A.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION INTO DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION WITH MEDIUM ENERGY HELIUM-ION BEAMS A Thesis by AVERY ALLAN GUILD-BINGHAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering INVESTIGATION INTO DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION WITH MEDIUM ENERGY HELIUM-ION BEAMS A Thesis...

  19. Ion Beam Deposition of Thin Films: Growth Processes and Nanostructure Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofsaess, Hans C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam deposition is a process far from thermodynamic equilibrium and is in particular suited to grow metastable thin films with diamond-like properties, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and cubic boron nitride (c-BN). In this contribution the atomistic description of the deposition and growth processes are reviewed and compared to experimental results, obtained from mass selected ion beam deposition. The focus will be set to the nucleation and growth processes of boron nitride as a model system for ion based thin film formation. Furthermore, recent examples for nanostructure formation in ion deposited compound thin films will be presented. Ion beam deposited metal-carbon nano-composite thin films exhibit a variety of different morphologies such as rather homogeneous nanocluster distributions embedded in an a-C matrix, but also the self-organized formation of nanoscale multilayer structures.

  20. Saturation of multi-laser beams laser-plasma instabilities from stochastic ion heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, P.; Williams, E. A.; Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2G7 (Canada) [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2G7 (Canada); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been used as a tool on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) since the first energetics experiments in 2009 to control the energy deposition in ignition hohlraums and tune the implosion symmetry. As large amounts of power are transferred between laser beams at the entrance holes of NIF hohlraums, the presence of many overlapping beat waves can lead to stochastic ion heating in the regions where laser beams overlap [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 195004 (2012)]. This increases the ion acoustic velocity and modifies the ion acoustic waves’ dispersion relation, thus reducing the plasma response to the beat waves and the efficiency of CBET. This pushes the plasma oscillations driven by CBET in a regime where the phase velocities are much smaller than both the electron and ion thermal velocities. CBET gains are derived for this new regime and generalized to the case of multi ion species plasmas.

  1. Concentrated ion beam emitted from an enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator and mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, S. F.; Wang, C. X. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Tang, D. L.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator with an outlet diameter of 150 mm is experimentally demonstrated to produce a concentrated ion beam, especially at a high discharge voltage, with a high current utilization efficiency of up to {approx}0.9. Numerical investigation based on the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method is performed to study the ion dynamics and elucidate the origin of the ion beam characteristics. The simulation results reveal that the equipotential lines play an important role in the surface near the anode emitting the ions. The ion emitting surface is determined by the magnetic field lines near the anode and the magnetic mirror contributes to the concentrated beam significantly. The high current utilization efficiency results from the appropriate obliquity of the magnetic mirror.

  2. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Kashine, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima National College of Technology, 1460-1 Shinko, Hayato-cho, Aira-gun, Kagoshima 899-5193 (Japan); Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Extreme Energy Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  3. Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, F., E-mail: ames@triumf.ca; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

  4. Chapter 2 Deuterium Reaction with C(100): IonBeam Scattering Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ­beam scattering techniques are easily calibrated by compari­ #12; 28 son to ion­implanted standards, and nuclear of 1560 ffi C from time­of­flight scattering and recoil­ion spectroscopy (TOF­SARS). However, Chin et al

  5. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer Andreas Rohrbacher and Robert E. Continettia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    /ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins myoglobin and lysozyme , created by matrix assisted laser,7 and matrix assisted desorption and ionization MALDI 8­11 have become avail- able to allow the mass the samples with a robot- driven capillary,15 a scanning ion beam,16 or spatial resolu- tion was achieved

  6. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; /Fermilab; Assmann, R.; /CERN; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Extracted MCI Beam from an ECR Ion Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, L.T.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Guo, X.H.; Zhang, Z.M.; Feng, Y.C.; Li, J.Y.; Ma, L.; Li, J.; Zhao, H.Y.; He, W.; Li, X.X. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Hitz, D.; Girard, A. [CEA-Grenoble, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, Service des Basses Temperatures, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS), very high performance ECRIS nowadays have been set up one by one around the world, such as the GTS in Grenoble, SERSE in Catania, LECR3 in Lanzhou and etc, which can produce very intense Multiply Charged Ion (MCI) beam. But till now, the study of the extracted MCI beam from an ECRIS remains open. In this article, we present a theoretical and experimental study of the extracted MCI beam. In the theoretical part, the influences of the extraction system on the extracted ion beam quality are mainly analyzed. The aspects that have influences on the extracted ion beam quality have been analyzed. With the instruction of the analysis, the PBGUNS code is used to simulate the influences of some important aspects concerning the extraction system. The influences of the extraction system geometry design, magnetic field, and the space charge effect will be detailedly presented in this article. In the experimental part, with an Electric-Sweep Scanner (ESS) emittance detection system, the influences on the extracted ion beam emittance of some typical parameters of ECRIS have been researched, such as the injected RF power, the RF frequency, the magnetic field and etc. The obtained results and the corresponding explanations are presented. Some of the results are well in accord with some empirical laws, but some other results seem to be disputed.

  8. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbamonte, Peter M. [University of Illinois] University of Illinois

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The original purpose of this award was to use low?energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real?time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low?energy, inelastic electron scattering (?EELS?) instrument. Consistent with Flynn?s original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low?energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss of ~ 90 meV. This excitation disperses quadratically, exhibits a critical momentum of q{sub c} = 0.11 ?{sup ?1}, and may be identified as the surface collective mode of the helical Dirac liquid. To make a stronger connection between the behavior of this excitation and the known surface physics of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, we are carrying out a doping?dependent study, as a function of Se vacancy content, of this excitation. From this study we will be able to quantify the strength of interactions in the spin?polarized surface states in a manner analogous to our past work on graphene.

  9. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beam intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.

  10. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan) [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)] [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  11. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  12. Ion-beam driven lower hybrid waves in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110 068 (India)] [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110 068 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India)] [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India); Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110 036 (India)] [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110 036 (India)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam drives lower hybrid waves to instability in a magnetized dusty plasma via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the lower hybrid waves have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability increase with relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The lower hybrid modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density.

  13. Ion boundary conditions in semi-infinite fluid models of electron beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The modified Bohm criterion is derived for the plasma consisting of the monoenergetic electron beam and thermal electrons. This criterion allows us to define the accurate ion boundary conditions for semi-infinite collisionless fluid models of electron beam–plasma interaction. In the absence of electron beam, these boundary conditions give the classical sheath parameters. When the monoenergetic electron beam propagates through the plasma, the fluid model with proposed boundary conditions gives the results, which are in qualitative agreement with the results obtained earlier in M. Sharifian and B. Shokri, Phys. Plasmas 14, 093503 (2007). However, dynamics and parameters of the plasma sheath are different.

  14. Ion Beam Nanosculpting and Materials Science with Single Nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovchenko, J A; Branton, D

    2009-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is reported in these areas: Nanopore studies; Ion sculpting of metals; High energy ion sculpting; Metrology of nanopores with single wall carbon nanotube probes; Capturing molecules in a nanopore; Strand separation in a nanopore; and DNA molecules and configurations in solid-state nanopores.

  15. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimbucher, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waveform and there are voltage oscillations. Before reachingbunching of the beam. Voltage oscillations in the diode alsoThe period T of the voltage oscillation must be t a < T < t

  16. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayle, H., E-mail: bayle@bergoz.com [Bergoz Instrumentation, Saint-Genis-Pouilly (France); Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)] [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  17. Reactive ion beam etching of HfO{sub 2} film and removal of sidewall redeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xudi; Liu Ying; Xu Xiangdong; Fu Shaojun; Cui Zheng [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China) and School of Mechanical and Automobile Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Central Microstructure Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparative studies on ion beam etching (IBE) and reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) of HfO{sub 2} film have been carried out using photoresist as the masking layer. The etching rates of HfO{sub 2} film and photoresist mask in pure Ar and Ar/CHF{sub 3} mixture plasmas were measured as a function of ion energy, plasma composition, and ion beam incident angle. It has been found that the RIBE with Ar/CHF{sub 3} plasma is capable of lowering the threshold energy of ion beam and increasing sputtering yield, compared to the IBE with pure Ar. The redeposition of photoresist sidewall is a major issue, due to the formation of nonvolatile etching products during sputtering of HfO{sub 2} film in both IBE and RIBE. However, the sidewall redeposition can be easily removed in HCl solutions with assistance of ultrasonic wave for RIBE with Ar/CHF{sub 3} plasma. Alternatively, the sidewall redeposition can be eliminated by controlling the slope of photoresist sidewall or combined with ion incident angle.

  18. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  19. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  20. The HypHI project: Hypernuclear spectroscopy with stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams at GSI and FAIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bianchin; P. Achenbach; S. Ajimura; O. Borodina; T. Fukuda; J. Hoffmann; M. Kavatsyuk; K. Koch; T. Koike; N. Kurz; F. Maas; S. Minami; Y. Mizoi; T. Nagae; D. Nakajima; A. Okamura; W. Ott; B. Özel; J. Pochodzalla; C. Rappold; T. R. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; M. Sako; M. Sekimoto; H. Sugimura; T. Takahashi; H. Tamura; K. Tanida; W. Trautmann

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The HypHI collaboration aims to perform a precise hypernuclear spectroscopy with stable heavy ion beams and rare isotope beams at GSI and fAIR in order to study hypernuclei at extreme isospin, especially neutron rich hypernuclei to look insight hyperon-nucleon interactions in the neutron rich medium, and hypernuclear magnetic moments to investigate baryon properties in the nuclei. We are currently preparing for the first experiment with $^6$Li and $^{12}$C beams at 2 AGeV to demonstrate the feasibility of a precise hypernuclear spectroscopy by identifying $^{3}_{\\Lambda}$H, $^{4}_{\\Lambda}$H and $^{5}_{\\Lambda}$He. The first physics experiment on these hypernuclei is planned for 2009. In the present document, an overview of the HypHI project and the details of this first experiment will be discussed.

  1. Site-controlled fabrication of Ga nanodroplets by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Zhiming M., E-mail: zhmwang@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Jiang; Li, Handong; Zhou, Zhihua [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Wang, Xiaodong [Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ga droplets are created by focused ion beam irradiation of GaAs surface. We report that ordered Ga droplets can be formed on the GaAs surface without any implantation damage. The droplets are characterized with bigger sizes than those droplets formed on damaged area. These aligned Ga droplets are formed via the migration of Ga atoms from ion irradiation area to the edge of undamaged GaAs surface and further nucleation into droplets. The morphological evolution and size distribution of these nanodroplets are investigated systematically with different beam irradiation time and incident angles. Based on this method, well positioned Ga nanodroplets, such as chains, are achieved by using focus ion beam patterning. The controllable assembly of droplets on undamaged semiconductor surface can be used to fabricate templates, to fabricate quantum structures and quantum devices by droplet epitaxy technique.

  2. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagulya, A V; Negodaev, M A; Rusetskii, A S; Chubenko, A P; Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  3. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Bagulya; O. D. Dalkarov; M. A. Negodaev; A. S. Rusetskii; A. P. Chubenko; V. G. Ralchenko; A. P. Bolshakov

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  4. Ion-beam treatment to prepare surfaces of p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a p-CdTe layer and outer contact layers by ion beam processing comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe device into a chamber and evacuating the chamber; b) orienting the p-CdTe side of the CdS/CdTe layer so that it faces apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality; c) introducing Ar and igniting the area of apparatus capable of generating Ar atoms and ions of preferred energy and directionality in a manner so that during ion exposure, the source-to-substrate distance is maintained such that it is less than the mean-free path or diffusion length of the Ar atoms and ions at the vacuum pressure; d) allowing exposure of the p-CdTe side of the device to said ion beam for a period less than about 5 minutes; and e) imparting movement to the substrate to control the real uniformity of the ion-beam exposure on the p-CdTe side of the device.

  5. Parametric coupling of lower hybrid wave with gyrating ion beam driven ion cyclotron instability in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rohtash; Tripathi, V. K. [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A lower hybrid wave, launched into a tokamak for supplementary heating in the presence of neutral beam turned gyrating ion beam, is seen to excite some prominent channels of parametric decay. The beam driven deuterium cyclotron mode is further destabilized by the lower hybrid pump through the nonlinear 4-wave coupling, involving higher and lower frequency lower hybrid sidebands, when ?{sub 0}/k{sub 0z}v{sub 0z}=(1??{sub LH}{sup 2}/?{sub 0}{sup 2}) , where ?{sub LH} is the lower hybrid frequency, ?{sub 0} and k{sub 0z} are the frequency and parallel wave number of the pump wave, and v{sub 0z} is the velocity of ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. The growth rate increases with parallel wave number of the ion-cyclotron mode. The pump is also susceptible to parametric upconversion into an upper sideband shifted by the frequency of the negative energy deuterium cyclotron mode. For typical parameters, the growth rate of this channel is around one fiftieth of deuterium cyclotron frequency and falls off with the transverse wave number of the mode.

  6. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapson, Christopher, E-mail: chris.rapson@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)] [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Klinger, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  7. Photo-neutralization of Negative Ion Beam for Future Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaibi, W.; Simonin, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Blondel, C.; Cabaret, L.; Delsart, C.; Drag, C. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS-Universite Paris XI, Bat 505 Campus d'Orsay 91405 Orsay (France)

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An exploratory study of negative ion beam photo-neutralization for future fusion reactors is explained. A refolded Fabry-Perot cavity system is proposed, with which a 60% neutralisation efficiency could be reached with low electric power consumption. The system would make use of sophisticated optical-cavity locking systems, which have been developed recently for gravitational-wave optical detection. The ITER Neutral beam Injector is taken as an example.

  8. X-Ray Entangled Photon Production in Collisions of Laser Beams with Relativistic Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Ispirian; M. K. Ispiryan

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested to produce, with the help of colliding laser photons with bunches of relativistic ions having two energy levels, both intense beams of monochromatic polarized X-ray fluorescence photons and significant number of X-ray entangled photons, via double Doppler transformation. Nonlinear susceptibility of the ions, the cross section and the rate of production of such photons at RHIC are estimated. Such beams of X-ray photons can be detected and applied to solve various problems, in a manner similar to the usage of optical photons.

  9. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Rusnak, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Saadatmand, K. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Operation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at {pi} radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  11. Ion Beam Radiation Effects in Monazite , X. Deschanels2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ions to simulate the consequences of alpha decay. This article describes the effects, Irradiation effects, Hardness, Density, XRD, Raman spectroscopy; Deposited energy PACS: 81.05.Je, 61.82-d, 61-19] actinides, but relatively few papers dealing with compounds incorporating both tri- and tetravalent elements

  12. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam.

  13. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Roma (Italy); Riquier, R. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France) [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  14. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P., E-mail: pradipr@barc.gov.in; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)] [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, ?2 to ?4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup ?3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  15. Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuhr, R.A.; Holland, O.W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes metallic silicide films formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

  16. Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

  17. Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuhr, R.A.; Holland, O.W.

    1989-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

  18. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: linchen0812@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  19. Ion-beam-induced damage formation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rischau, C. W.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage formation in <111>- and <112>-oriented CdTe single crystals irradiated at room temperature and 15 K with 270 keV Ar or 730 keV Sb ions was investigated in situ using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) in channeling configuration. Defect profiles were calculated from the RBS spectra using the computer code DICADA and additional energy-dependent RBS measurements were performed to identify the type of defects. At both temperatures no formation of a buried amorphous layer was detected even after prolonged irradiation with several 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The fact that CdTe is not rendered amorphous even at 15 K suggests that the high resistance to amorphization is caused by the high ionicity of CdTe rather than thermal effects. The calculated defect profiles show the formation of a broad defect distribution that extends much deeper into the crystal than the projected range of the implanted ions at both temperatures. The post-range defects in CdTe thus do not seem to be of thermal origin either, but are instead believed to result from migration driven by the electronic energy loss.

  20. Focused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    , biased TEM specimen, thin film solar cell, FIB Thin films of hydrogenated Si (Si:H) can be used as active for electron holography of a thin film solar cell using conventional lift-out specimen preparation and a homeFocused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film

  1. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  2. Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper! ! ! ! ! prepared) driver. The quantitative details of both project cost and facility performance have changed as planning as the driver. Consequently performance is often compared to that of the electron driver concept. If we were re

  3. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  4. Nonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    describe the plasma perturbations well.5 Here, we focus on the general case where the plasma density hasNonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev, and Ronald C. Davidson Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton

  5. Consequences of the ion beam irradiation on the chemical durability of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate Kinetics study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Consequences of the ion beam irradiation on the chemical durability of Thorium Phosphate of the long-term specific immobilization of actinides, Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD), as potential-13], and thorium-actinide phosphate-diphosphate solid solutions (-Th4-xAnx(PO4)4P2O7) with associated -TPD

  6. Focused Ion Beam Production Using a Pyroelectric Crystal and a Resistive Glass Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Focused Ion Beam Production Using a Pyroelectric Crystal and a Resistive Glass Tube T. Z. Fullem, A to accelerate electrons into a metal target has led to the production of compact X-Ray generators [4], [5], [6 tungsten tip (marketed for use in a scanning electron microscope) with an apex radius of 70 nm was mounted

  7. EBIT - Electronic Beam Ion Trap: N Divison experimental physics annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-faceted research effort of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N-Division of the Physics and Space Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continues to contribute significant results to the physical sciences from studies with low energy very highly charged heavy ions. The EBIT program attracts a number of collaborators from the US and abroad for the different projects. The collaborations are partly carried out through participating graduate students demonstrating the excellent educational capabilities at the LLNL EBIT facilities. Moreover, participants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are engaged in the EBIT project. This report describes EBIT work for 1995 in atomic structure measurements and radiative transition probabilities, spectral diagnostics for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, ion/surface interaction studies, electron-ion interactions studies, retrap and ion collisions, and instrumental development.

  8. Micromilling of Metal Alloys with Focused Ion Beam-Fabricated Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This work combines focused ion beam sputtering and ultra-precision machining as a first step in fabricating microstructure in metals and alloys. Specifically, {approx}25{micro}m diameter micro-end mills are made from cobalt M42 high-speed steel and C2 micrograin tungsten carbide tool blanks by ion beam sputtering. A 20 keV focused gallium beam defines tool cutting edges having radii of curvature < 0.1{micro}m. Micro-end mills having 2, 4 and 5 cutting edges successfully machine small trenches in 6061-T4 aluminum, brass, 4340 steel and polymethyl methacrylate. Machined trench widths are approximately equal to the tool diameters and surface roughnesses (rms) are {approx}150 nm or less. Microtools are robust and operate for more than 6 hours without fracture. Results from ultra-precision machining aluminum at feed rates as high as 50 mm/minute are included.

  9. Statistical analysis of the ion beam production in a self magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the results of a study on shot to shot variation in energy density of an ion beam formed by a self-magnetically insulated diode with an explosive emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: plasma formation occurs during the first pulse (negative polarity, 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV), and ion extraction and acceleration during the second pulse (positive polarity, 150 ns, 250–300 kV). Crucially, it was found that the standard deviation of energy density does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20%–30%, suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. This idea is further supported by the fact that ion current density is only weakly dependant on the accelerating voltage and other output parameters of the accelerator (coefficient of determination < 0.3), whilst the correlation between the energy density of the beam and the output parameters is strong (coefficient of determination > 0.9). We attribute the neutral component as being due to charge exchange between accelerated ions and neutral molecules from a neutral layer near the anode surface. Implementation using a self-magnetically insulated diode with an explosive-emission cathode, having an operational lifetime of up to 10{sup 7} shots, has promising prospects for various technological applications.

  10. Self-focusing of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a multi-ions plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors have developed a formulation for the dependence of electron and ion densities on the irradiance of an electromagnetic beam in a plasma with multiply charged ions, corresponding to collisional, ponderomotive, and relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearities and different electron/ion temperatures; consequently, the corresponding expressions for the electron density modification in the presence of an electromagnetic (em) field have been derived. Paraxial approach in the vicinity of intensity maximum has been adopted to analyze the propagation characteristics of an em beam in such plasmas; on the basis of this analysis, critical curves and self-focusing curves have been computed numerically and graphically illustrated. For a numerical appreciation of the analysis, we have specifically carried out the computations for the simultaneous presence of singly and doubly charged ions in the plasma. As an important outcome, it is seen that the nonlinear effects (and hence self-focusing) get suppressed in the presence of multiply ionized ions; the conditions for the three modes of em-beam propagation viz. oscillatory focusing/defocusing and steady divergence have been discussed.

  11. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, J. J.; Sha, Sh.; Zhang, Zh. L.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C{sup 6+} beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  12. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct...

  13. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  14. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Thomas M., E-mail: baumannt@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, Alain, E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)?m in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  15. Heavy Ion Beam in Resolution of the Critical Point Problem for Uranium and Uranium Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy; Victor Gryaznov

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Important advantages of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation of matter are discussed in comparison with traditional sources - laser heating, electron beam, electrical discharge etc. High penetration length (~ 10 mm) is of primary importance for investigation of dense matter properties. This gives an extraordinary chance to reach the uniform heating regime when HIB irradiation is being used for thermophysical property measurements. Advantages of HIB heating of highly-dispersive samples are claimed for providing free and relatively slow quasi-isobaric heating without fast hydrodynamic expansion of heated sample. Perspective of such HIB application are revised for resolution of long-time thermophysical problems for uranium and uranium-bearing compounds (UO2). The priorities in such HIB development are stressed: preferable energy levels, beam-time duration, beam focusing, deposition of the sample etc.

  16. Clinical output factors for carbon-ion beams passing through polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Ogata, Risa; Himukai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A recent study suggested that polyethylene (PE) range compensators would cause extra carbon-ion attenuation by 0.45%/cm due to limitations in water equivalence. The present study aims to assess its influence on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy. Methods: Carbon-ion radiation was modeled to be composed of primary carbon ions and secondary particles. For these components, tumor dose fraction and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were estimated at a reference depth in the middle of spread-out Bragg peak. The PE effect was estimated for clinical carbon-ion beams and was partially tested by experiment. The two-component model was integrated into a treatment-planning system, with which the PE effect on tumor dose was investigated in two clinical cases. Results: The fluence and clinical attenuation coefficients for dose decrease per polyethylene thickness were estimated to be 0.1%-0.3%/cm and 0.2%-0.4%/cm, depending on energy and modulation of clinical carbon-ion beams. In the treatment-planning s...

  17. Stakeholder Consortium Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Stakeholder Consortium Meeting March 22, 2013 Susan Riha Director, NYS Water Resources Institute of regional water planning / inefficiencies "Build it they will come" has resulted in significant excess Resources Institute #12;#12;NYS POTW Design Flows 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960

  18. International milk genomics consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocke, David M.

    University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

  19. Atomic physics with relativistic ion beams, using the Brookhaven 200 MeV linac and 1. 5 GeV Booster Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimmersperg, U. von; Jones, K.W.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.; Ward, T.E.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of atomic physics experiments with relativistic ion beams at the Brookhaven Neutral Beam Test Facility is presented and special techniques using 150 m flight paths and precision particle and laser beam optics are described. 5 refs.

  20. Temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing in crystalline and amorphous germanium isotope multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radek, M.; Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Posselt, M.; Liedke, B.; Schmidt, B. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Bougeard, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-atom mixing induced by 310 keV gallium (Ga) ion implantation in crystalline and preamorphized germanium (Ge) at temperatures between 164 K and 623 K and a dose of 1?×?10{sup 15}?cm{sup ?2} is investigated using isotopic multilayer structures of alternating {sup 70}Ge and {sup nat}Ge layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The distribution of the implanted Ga atoms and the ion-beam induced depth-dependent self-atom mixing was determined by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Three different temperature regimes of self-atom mixing, i.e., low-, intermediate-, and high-temperature regimes are observed. At temperatures up to 423 K, the mixing is independent of the initial structure, whereas at 523?K, the intermixing of the preamorphized Ge structure is about twice as high as that of crystalline Ge. At 623?K, the intermixing of the initially amorphous Ge structure is strongly reduced and approaches the mixing of the crystalline material. The temperature dependence of ion-beam mixing is described by competitive amorphization and recrystallization processes.

  1. Deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia by ion-beam-assisted deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudzik, M. P.

    1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Biaxially textured yttria (8 mol %)-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited on randomly oriented Hastelloy C and Stainless Steel 304 at room temperature as a buffer layer for subsequent deposition of oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films. The 0.16-1.3 {micro}m thick YSZ films were deposited by e-beam evaporation at rates of 1.2-3.2 {angstrom}/sec. Biaxially textured films were produced with an Ar/O{sub 2} ion beam directed at the substrate during film growth. X-ray diffraction was used to study in-plane and out-of-plane orientation as a function of ion-bombardment angle, film thickness, ion-to-atom flux ratio, and substrate material. In-plane and out-of-plane average-misorientation angles on these YSZ films that were deposited by ion-beam-assisted deposition were as low as 17 and 5.4{degree}, respectively, on as-received substrates.

  2. Design and Fabrication of the Lithium Beam Ion Injector for NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takakuwa, J.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 130 keV injector is developed for the NDCX-II facility. It consists of a 10.9 cm diameter lithium doped alumina-silicate ion source heated to {approx}1300 C and 3 electrodes. Other components include a segmented Rogowski coil for current and beam position monitoring, a gate valve, pumping ports, a focusing solenoid, a steering coil and space for inspection and maintenance access. Significant design challenges including managing the 3-4 kW of power dissipation from the source heater, temperature uniformity across the emitter surface, quick access for frequent ion source replacement, mechanical alignment with tight tolerance, and structural stabilization of the cantilevered 27-inch OD graded HV ceramic column. The injector fabrication is scheduled to complete by May 2011, and assembly and installation is scheduled to complete by the beginning of July. The Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) is for the study of high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research utilizing a lithium ion (Li+) beam with a current of 93 mA and a pulse length of 500 ns (compressed to 1 ns at the target). The injector is one of the most complicated sections of the NDCX-II accelerator demanding significant design and fabrication resources. It needs to accommodate a relatively large ion source (10.9 cm), a high heat load (3-4 kW) and specific beam optics developed from the physics model. Some specific design challenges are noted in this paper.

  3. Electrostatic ion-acoustic-like instabilities in the solar wind with a backstreaming alpha particle beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomberoff, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gomberoff, K. [Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Deutsch, A. [Rafael, P.O. Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear electrostatic instabilities have been shown to occur frequently and under very different conditions in plasma with two ion beams such as the fast solar wind. These instabilities can be triggered when the phase velocity of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves propagating forward and backward relative to the interplanetary magnetic field overlaps due to the presence of a finite amplitude of circularly polarized wave. The instabilities can be triggered by waves supported by the same ion component, or by waves supported by different ion components. By assuming a beam of alpha particles moving backward relative to the external magnetic field, as observed in some events in the fast solar wind, it is shown that a very small negative drift velocity of the alpha particle beam relative to the core plasma--a few percent of the local Alfven velocity--can trigger a very rich variety of nonlinear electrostatic acousticlike instabilities. Their growth rates can be rather large and they persist for larger negative alpha particles drift velocities and temperatures.

  4. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  5. Upgrade and benchmarking of a 4D treatment planning system for scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, D.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Trautmann, J.; Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jaekel, O. [Clinic for Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Bert, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Universitaetsstr. 27, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Upgrade and benchmarking of a research 4D treatment planning system (4DTPS) suitable for realistic patient treatment planning and treatment simulations taking into account specific requirements for scanned ion beam therapy, i.e., modeling of dose heterogeneities due to interplay effects and range changes caused by patient motion and dynamic beam delivery. Methods: The 4DTPS integrates data interfaces to 4D computed tomography (4DCT), deformable image registration and clinically used motion monitoring devices. The authors implemented a novel data model for 4D image segmentation using Boolean mask volume datasets and developed an algorithm propagating a manually contoured reference contour dataset to all 4DCT phases. They further included detailed treatment simulation and dose reconstruction functionality, based on the irregular patient motion and the temporal structure of the beam delivery. The treatment simulation functionality was validated against experimental data from irradiation of moving radiographic films in air, 3D moving ionization chambers in a water phantom, and moving cells in a biological phantom with a scanned carbon ion beam. The performance of the program was compared to results obtained with predecessor programs. Results: The measured optical density distributions of the radiographic films were reproduced by the simulations to (-2 {+-} 12)%. Compared to earlier versions of the 4DTPS, the mean agreement improved by 2%, standard deviations were reduced by 7%. The simulated dose to the moving ionization chambers in water showed an agreement with the measured dose of (-1 {+-} 4)% for the typical beam configuration. The mean deviation of the simulated from the measured biologically effective dose determined via cell survival was (617 {+-} 538) mGy relative biological effectiveness corresponding to (10 {+-} 9)%. Conclusions: The authors developed a research 4DTPS suitable for realistic treatment planning on patient data and capable of simulating dose delivery to a moving patient geometry for scanned ion beams. The accuracy and reliability of treatment simulations improved considerably with respect to earlier versions of the 4DTPS.

  6. The production of dense lead-ion beams for the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reach the design luminosity for lead-ions in the LHC, the present Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) has to be converted into a Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Since the present ECR lead-ion source does not provide sufficient intensity, the main goal of LEIR is to act as a low-energy (4.2MeV/u) accumulator where the ion beam is stacked and cooled (with the help of an electron-cooler) to reach the required intensity and emittances. An experimental program has been carried out at LEAR in recent years in order to test the cooling and stacking process with the present electron-cooler. A variety of results have been reported at previous conferences. This paper will focus on the electron cooling aspects resulting from the afore mentioned experiments. Taking into account the experience

  7. Z-petawatt driven ion beam radiography development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schollmeier, Marius; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-driven proton radiography provides electromagnetic field mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution, and has been applied to many laser-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments. Our report addresses key questions about the feasibility of ion radiography at the Z-Accelerator (%E2%80%9CZ%E2%80%9D), concerning laser configuration, hardware, and radiation background. Charged particle tracking revealed that radiography at Z requires GeV scale protons, which is out of reach for existing and near-future laser systems. However, it might be possible to perform proton deflectometry to detect magnetic flux compression in the fringe field region of a magnetized liner inertial fusion experiment. Experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser to enhance proton yield and energy showed an unexpected scaling with target thickness. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, coupled to fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell simulations running for over 10 ps, explain the scaling by a complex interplay of laser prepulse, preplasma, and ps-scale temporal rising edge of the laser.

  8. Extraction of highly charged ions from the electron beam ion trap at LBNL for applications in surface analysis and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Ion Trap at LBNL for Applications in Surfacetransferred from LLNL to LBNL, and is now operating with+ . The research program at LBNL is focused on the following

  9. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  10. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraby, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); DiBattista, M. [Qualcomm Technologies Incorporated, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  11. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Hannah; Auvinen, Jussi; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  12. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah Petersen; Jan Steinheimer; Jussi Auvinen; Marcus Bleicher

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  13. Radiobiologic Significance of Response of Intratumor Quiescent Cells In Vivo to Accelerated Carbon Ion Beams Compared With {gamma}-Rays and Reactor Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ando, Koichi; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Koike, Sachiko [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Sakurai, Yoshinori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kashino, Genro [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Kinashi, Yuko [Department of Radiation Safety and Control, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroki; Maruhashi, Akira [Department of Radiation Medical Physics, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To clarify the radiosensitivity of intratumor quiescent cells in vivo to accelerated carbon ion beams and reactor neutron beams. Methods and Materials: Squamous cell carcinoma VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label all intratumor proliferating cells. Next, they received accelerated carbon ion or {gamma}-ray high-dose-rate (HDR) or reduced-dose-rate (RDR) irradiation. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons with RDR irradiation. Immediately after HDR and RDR irradiation or 12 h after HDR irradiation, the response of quiescent cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The response of the total (proliferating plus quiescent) tumor cells was determined from the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine nontreated tumors. Results: The difference in radiosensitivity between the total and quiescent cell populations after {gamma}-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with a greater linear energy transfer (LET) value. Clearer repair in quiescent cells than in total cells through delayed assay or a decrease in the dose rate with {gamma}-ray irradiation was efficiently inhibited with carbon ion beams, especially with a greater LET. With RDR irradiation, the radiosensitivity to accelerated carbon ion beams with a greater LET was almost similar to that to reactor thermal and epithermal neutron beams. Conclusion: In terms of tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including quiescent cells, accelerated carbon ion beams, especially with greater LET values, are very useful for suppressing the dependency on the heterogeneity within solid tumors, as well as depositing the radiation dose precisely.

  14. Planarization of amorphous carbon films on patterned substrates using gas cluster ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao [Incubation Center, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Nagato, Keisuke; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya [Department of Engineering Synthesis, School of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tani, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Sakane, Yasuo [Western Digital Media Operations, 1710 Automation Parkway, San Jose, CA 95131 (United States)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface planarization and modification of a patterned surface were demonstrated using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). Grooves with 100-400 nm intervals were formed on amorphous carbon films using focused ion beams to study the special frequency dependence of the planarization. Also, line and space patterns were fabricated on Si substrates, and amorphous carbons were deposited as a model structure of discrete track media. Subsequently, surface planarization using Ar-GCIB was carried out. After GCIB irradiations, all of the grooves were completely removed, and a flat surface was realized. And it showed that GCIB irradiation planarized grooves without huge thickness loss. From the power spectrum density of an atomic force microscope, GCIB preferentially removed grooves with small intervals. It was found from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that surface planarization without severe damage in the amorphous carbon and magnetic layers was carried out with GCIB.

  15. Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

  16. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 e?A of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  17. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  18. Beta Beams for Neutrino Production Heat Deposition from Decaying Ions in Superconducting Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildner, Elena; Cerutti, F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes studies of energy deposition in superconducting magnets from secondary ions in the "beta beam" decay ring as described in the base-line scenario of the EURISOL Beta Beam Design Study. The lattice structure proposed in the Design Study has absorber elements inserted between the superconducting magnets to protect the magnet coils. We describe an efficient and small model made to carry out the study. The specially developed options in the beam code "ACCSIM" to track largely off-momentum particles has permitted to extract the necessary information to interface the transport and interaction code "FLUKA" with the aim to calculate the heat deposition in the magnets and the absorbers. The two beta emitters 18Ne10+ and 6He2+ used for neutrino and anti-neutrino production and their daughter ions have been tracked. The absorber system proposed in the Design Study is efficient to intercept the ions decayed in the arc straight sections as foreseen, however, the continuous decay in the dipoles induce ...

  19. Beta Beams for neutrino production: Heat deposition from decaying ions in superconducting magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildner, Elena; Cerutti, Francesco

    This note describes studies of energy deposition in superconducting magnets from secondary ions in the “beta beam” decay ring as described in the base-line scenario of the EURISOL Beta Beam Design Study. The lattice structure proposed in the Design Study has absorber elements inserted between the superconducting magnets to protect the magnet coils. We describe an efficient and small model made to carry out the study. The specially developed options in the beam code “ACCSIM” to track largely off-momentum particles has permitted to extract the necessary information to interface the transport and interaction code “FLUKA” with the aim to calculate the heat deposition in the magnets and the absorbers. The two beta emitters 18Ne10+ and 6He2+ used for neutrino and anti-neutrino production and their daughter ions have been tracked. The absorber system proposed in the Design Study is efficient to intercept the ions decayed in the arc straight sections as foreseen, however, the continuous decay in the dipol...

  20. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClements, K. G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hole, M. J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  1. Pure radioactive Ga ion beams provided by new laser ion source for nuclear research at ORNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic generation capability. It can provide up to three-step, three- photon · A highly-selective laser ion source based on multi-step resonant photo-ionization has been successfully have been developed. In studies with stable isotopes, up to 40% ionization efficiency ­ the highest

  2. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  3. Ion-Beam-Induced Chemical Mixing at a Nanocrystalline CeO2–Si Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Young, Niel P.; Parish, Chad M.; Moll, Sandra J.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of nanocrystalline ceria deposited onto a silicon substrate have been irradiated with 3 MeV Au+ ions to a total dose of 34 displacements per atom to examine the film/substrate interfacial response upon displacement damage. Under irradiation, a band of contrast is observed to form that grows under further irradiation. Scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis suggest that this band of contrast is a cerium silicate phase with an approximate Ce:Si:O composition ratio of 1:1:3 in an amorphous nature. The slightly nonstoichiometric composition arises due to the loss of mobile oxygen within the cerium silicate phase under the current irradiation condition. This nonequilibrium phase is formed as a direct result of ion-beam-induced chemical mixing caused by ballistic collisions between the incoming ion and the lattice atoms. This may hold promise in ion beam engineering of cerium silicates for microelectronic applications e.g., the fabrication of blue LEDs.

  4. Ion-Beam-Induced Chemical Mixing at a Nanocrystalline CeO2 Si Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Dr. Philip [University of Oxford; Young, Neil P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Moll, Sandra [CEA, Saclay, France; Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of nanocrystalline ceria deposited onto a silicon substrate have been irradiated with 3 MeV Au+ ions to a total dose of 34 displacements per atom to examine the film/substrate interfacial response upon displacement damage. Under irradiation, a band of contrast is observed to form that grows under further irradiation. Scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis suggest that this band of contrast is a cerium silicate phase with an approximate Ce:Si:O composition ratio of 1:1:3 in an amorphous nature. The slightly nonstoichiometric composition arises due to the loss of mobile oxygen within the cerium silicate phase under the current irradiation condition. This nonequilibrium phase is formed as a direct result of ion-beam-induced chemical mixing caused by ballistic collisions between the incoming ion and the lattice atoms. This may hold promise in ion beam engineering of cerium silicates for microelectronic applications e.g., the fabrication of blue LEDs.

  5. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

  6. Mechanisms for covalent immobilization of horseradish peroxi-dase on ion beam treated polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondyurin, Alexey V; Tilley, Jennifer M R; Nosworthy, Neil J; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism that provides the observed strong binding of biomolecules to polymer sur-faces modified by ion beams is investigated. The surface of polyethylene (PE) was modified by plasma immersion ion implantation with nitrogen ions. Structure changes including car-bonization and oxidation were observed in the modified surface layer of PE by Raman spec-troscopy, FTIR ATR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface energy measurement and XPS spectroscopy. An observed high surface energy of the modified polyethylene was attributed to the presence of free radicals on the surface. The surface energy decay with stor-age time after PIII treatment was explained by a decay of the free radical concentration while the concentration of oxygen-containing groups increased with storage time. Horseradish per-oxidase was covalently attached onto the modified PE surface. The enzymatic activity of co-valently attached protein remained high. A mechanism based on the covalent attachment by the reaction of protein with free r...

  7. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  8. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  9. Enhanced Self-Focusing of an Ion Beam Pulse Propagating through a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Enhanced Self-Focusing of an Ion Beam Pulse Propagating through a Background Plasma along.58.Lq, 52.59.Ã?f Neutralization and focusing of charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma form plasma elec- trons. The effects of the enhanced self-focusing are of particular importance

  10. Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2011 to accelerate the development and deployment of new, lower cost carbon fiber composite materials. The Consortium draws on the broad experience that the Oak Ridge National...

  11. Heavy ion beam probe advances from the first installation of the diagnostic on an RFP (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J. [Xantho Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam probes have been installed on a variety of toroidal devices, but the first and only application on a reversed field pinch is the diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Simultaneous measurements of spatially localized equilibrium potential and fluctuations of density and potential, previously inaccessible in the core of the reversed field pinch (RFP), are now attainable. These measurements reflect the unique strength of the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) diagnostic. They will help determine the characteristics and evolution of electrostatic fluctuations and their role in transport, and determine the relation of the interior electric field and flows. Many aspects of the RFP present original challenges to HIBP operation and inference of plasma quantities. The magnetic field contributes to a number of the issues: the comparable magnitudes of the toroidal and poloidal fields and edge reversal result in highly three-dimensional beam trajectories; partial generation of the magnetic field by plasma current cause it and hence the beam trajectories to vary with time; and temporal topology and amplitude changes are common. Associated complications include strong ultraviolet radiation and elevated particle losses that can alter functionality of the electrostatic systems and generate noise on the detectors. These complexities have necessitated the development of new operation and data analysis techniques: the implementation of primary and secondary beamlines, adoption of alternative beam steering methods, development of higher precision electrostatic system models, refinement of trajectory calculations and sample volume modeling, establishment of stray particle and noise reduction methods, and formulation of alternative data analysis techniques. These innovative methods and the knowledge gained with this system are likely to translate to future HIBP operation on large scale stellarators and tokamaks.

  12. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro, E-mail: dmytro.rafalskyi@lpp.polytechnique.fr; Popelier, Lara; Aanesland, Ane [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF{sub 6} is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition, and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350?V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10?mA for each component at RF power of 100?W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/? ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the applied acceleration voltage.

  13. Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion etching, and chemical mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 Received 2 June's size and location, and reactive ion etching was used to form an SiO2 template. Nickel electroplating

  14. Study of Nuclear Reactions with 11C and 15O Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dongwon

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides {sup 11}C, {sup 14}O and {sup 15}O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as {sup 12}N and {sup 15}F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on {sup 11}C has been evaluated via the indirect d({sup 11}C, {sup 12}N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective {sup 12}N {yields} {sup 11}C+p ANC is found to be (C{sub eff}{sup 12{sub N}}){sup 2} = 1.83 {+-} 0.27 fm{sup -1}. With the high {sup 11}C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the {sup 11}C(p,{gamma}) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed {sup 15}O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of {sup 16}F via the p({sup 15}O,{sup 15}O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in {sup 16}N and {sup 16}O have been well established, but less has been reported on {sup 16}F. Four states of {sup 16}F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0{sup -}, 1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, and 3{sup -} (E{sub x} = 0.0, 0.19, 0.42, and 0.72 MeV, respectively). Our study utilized R-matrix analysis and found that the 0- state has a level width of 23.1 {+-} 2.2 keV, and that the broader 1- state has a width of 91.1 {+-} 9.9 keV. The level width of the 2{sup -} state is found to be 3.3 {+-} 0.6 keV which is much narrower than the compiled value of 40 {+-} 30 keV, while a width of 14.1 {+-} 1.7 keV for the 3{sup -} state is in good agreement with the reported value (< 15 keV). These experimental level widths of all four levels are also in accordance with theoretical predictions using single particle shell model calculation.

  15. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Brown, G. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr{sup 34+} and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th{sup 87+} and U{sup 89+}, which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti{sup 20+} through CO{sup 25+}. A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT.

  16. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grote, D.P.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  17. A prototype compton camera for in-vivo dosimetry of ion beam cancer irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kormoll, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Fiedler, F. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Golnik, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Heidel, K.; Kempe, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Schoene, S.; Sobiella, M. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Inst. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Zellescher Weg 19, 013069 Dresden (Germany); Enghardt, W. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay, PF 86, 013307 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiation Physics, PF 5103119, 013314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional in-vivo dose monitoring of ion beam cancer irradiation can improve the quality of treatment. For this purpose we investigate the feasibility of imaging the single photon emissions due to nuclear reactions of projectiles with target nuclei (in-beam SPECT). A suitable imaging technique in the energy range of the emitted gamma rays is the Compton camera. A prototype based on prior simulations is currently under construction. Te system comprises two CdZnTe cross-strip detectors with steering grid and depth-of-interaction capability and one segmented LSO scintillator crystal with modified Anger light readout. We present the concept of the system including the front-end and DAQ electronics as well as first measurements. (authors)

  18. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Galata, A.; Porcellato, A. M.; Prete, G. F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell'Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T. [LPSC Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Ban, G. [LPC Caen, 6 bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Celona, L.; Lunney, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5a, 02 093 Warsaw (Poland); Kalvas, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PB 35 (YFL) 40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); and others

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  19. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

  20. Interface and process for enhanced transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages at unequal pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a new interface with non-circular conductance limit aperture(s) useful for effective transmission of non-circular ion beams between stages with different gas pressure. In particular, the invention provides an improved coupling of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzers of planar or side-to-side geometry to downstream stages such as mass spectrometry or ion mobility spectrometry. In this case, the non-circular aperture is rectangular; other geometries may be optimum in other applications. In the preferred embodiment, the non-circular aperture interface is followed by an electrodynamic ion funnel that may focus wide ion beams of any shape into tight circular beams with virtually no losses. The jet disrupter element of the funnel may also have a non-circular geometry, matching the shape of arriving ion beam. The improved sensitivity of planar FAIMS/MS has been demonstrated in experiments using a non-contiguous elongated aperture but other embodiments (e.g., with a contiguous slit aperture) may be preferable, especially in conjunction with an ion funnel operated at high pressures.

  1. Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Dr. Jose Olivares of Los Alamos...

  2. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?°C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  3. Ion-Beam Synthesis of Epitaxial Au Nanocrystals in MgO. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponses toInvestigatingAdaptedInvestor|Heavy Ions:Beam

  4. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponses toInvestigatingAdaptedInvestor|HeavyIon-beam-induced

  5. Induced Optical Losses in Optoelectronic Devices due to Focused Ion Beam Damages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallini, Felipe; Reis, Elohim Fonseca dos; von Zuben, Antônio Augusto; Frateschi, Newton Cesário

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of damages caused by gallium focused ion beam (FIB) into III-V compounds is presented. Potential damages caused by local heating, ion implantation, and selective sputtering are presented. Preliminary analysis shows that local heating is negligible. Gallium implantation is shown to occur over areas tens of nanometers thick. Gallium accumulation as well as selective sputtering during III-V compounds milling is expected. Particularly, for GaAs, this effect leads to gallium segregation and formation of metallic clusters. Microdisk resonators were fabricated using FIB milling with different emission currents to analyze these effects on a device. It is shown that for higher emission current, thus higher implantation doses, the cavity quality factor rapidly decreases due to optical scattering losses induced by implanted gallium atoms.

  6. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Jiang, Weilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 98163 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ?6?nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  7. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-42 (India); Kaur, Daljeet [Department of Physics, Guru Teg Bahadur Institute of Technology, Rajouri Garden, New Delhi (India); Gahlot, Ajay [Department of Physics, Maharaja Surajmal Institute of Technology, Janakpuri, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Jyotsna [Department of Physics, KIIT College of Engineering, Bhondsi Gurgaon 122102 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  8. TITAN's Digital RFQ Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher, Operation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brunner; M. J. Smith; M. Brodeur; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri A. Lapierre; E. Mané; R. Ringle; M. C. Simon; J. A. Vaz; P. Delheij; M. Good; M. R. Pearson; J. Dilling

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap built as part of the TITAN facility. It consists of a gas-filled, segmented, linear Paul trap and is the first stage of the TITAN setup with the purpose of cooling and bunching radioactive ion beams delivered from ISAC-TRIUMF. This is the first such device to be driven digitally, i.e., using a high voltage ($V_{pp} = \\rm{400 \\, V}$), wide bandwidth ($0.2 < f < 1.2 \\, \\rm{MHz}$) square-wave as compared to the typical sinusoidal wave form. Results from the commissioning of the device as well as systematic studies with stable and radioactive ions are presented including efficiency measurements with stable $^{133}$Cs and radioactive $^{124, 126}$Cs. A novel and unique mode of operation of this device is also demonstrated where the cooled ion bunches are extracted in reverse mode, i.e., in the same direction as previously injected.

  9. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  10. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  11. Helicon plasma generator-assisted surface conversion ion source for the production of H{sup -} ion beams at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarvainen, O.; Rouleau, G.; Keller, R.; Geros, E.; Stelzer, J.; Ferris, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The converter-type negative ion source currently employed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is based on cesium enhanced surface production of H{sup -} ion beams in a filament-driven discharge. In this kind of an ion source the extracted H{sup -} beam current is limited by the achievable plasma density which depends primarily on the electron emission current from the filaments. The emission current can be increased by increasing the filament temperature but, unfortunately, this leads not only to shorter filament lifetime but also to an increase in metal evaporation from the filament, which deposits on the H{sup -} converter surface and degrades its performance. Therefore, we have started an ion source development project focused on replacing these thermionic cathodes (filaments) of the converter source by a helicon plasma generator capable of producing high-density hydrogen plasmas with low electron energy. In our studies which have so far shown that the plasma density of the surface conversion source can be increased significantly by exciting a helicon wave in the plasma, and we expect to improve the performance of the surface converter H{sup -} ion source in terms of beam brightness and time between services. The design of this new source and preliminary results are presented, along with a discussion of physical processes relevant for H{sup -} ion beam production with this novel design. Ultimately, we perceive this approach as an interim step towards our long-term goal, combining a helicon plasma generator with an SNS-type main discharge chamber, which will allow us to individually optimize the plasma properties of the plasma cathode (helicon) and H{sup -} production (main discharge) in order to further improve the brightness of extracted H{sup -} ion beams.

  12. Design of the channel for irradiation of materials with highly charged ion beams obtained from the mVINIS ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siljegovic, M.; Dobrosavljevic, A.; Draganic, I.; Cizmic, B.; Jelic, G. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy part of the TESLA Accelerator Installation comprises an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (the mVINIS ion source) and the channel for modification of materials (L3A). The L3A channel is long and has low beam transmission (30%-50%), so it is not suitable for high fluence implantations (over 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}). Therefore, we are planning to introduce an experimental channel (L4), close to the mVINIS Ion Source, where we shall be able to achieve high beam currents on the target and, consequently, irradiation of materials to high fluences. During the ion implantation, we shall be able to measure fluence rate, achieve uniform fluence distribution by a mechanism for x and y sample movements, and control the sample temperature in the range of 0-200 deg. C.

  13. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, Mikhail A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  16. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  17. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  18. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  19. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  1. Ion Beam Sputter Fabrication of Micro-Grooving and Micro-Threading Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; KRISHNAN,A.S.M.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents techniques for fabricating microscopic, nonplanar features in a variety of materials. Micro-grooving and micro-threading tools having cutting dimensions of 10-30{micro}m are made by focused ion beam sputtering and used in ultra-precision machining. Tool fabrication involves directing a 20 keV gallium beam at polished cylindrical punches made of cobalt M42 high-speed steel or C2 tungsten carbide. This creates cutting edges having radii of curvature less than 0.4 {micro}m, and rake features similar to conventional lathe tools. Clearance for minimizing frictional drag of a tool results from the sputter yield dependence on ion herd target incidence angle. Numerically controlled, ultra-precision machining with micro-grooving tools results in a close matching between tool width and feature size. Microtools controllably machine 13 {micro}m wide, 4 {micro}m deep, helical grooves in polymethyl methacrylate and 6061-T6 Al cylindrical substrates. Micro-grooving tools also fabricate sinusoidal waveform features in polished metal substrates.

  2. Implementation of focused ion beam (FIB) system in characterization of nuclear fuels and materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Aitkaliyeva; J. W. Madden; B. D. Miller; J I Cole; T A Hyde

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in 2007, a program was established at the Idaho National Laboratory to update key capabilities enabling microstructural and micro-chemical characterization of highly irradiated and/or radiologically contaminated nuclear fuels and materials at scales that previously had not been achieved for these types of materials. Such materials typically cannot be contact handled and pose unique hazards to instrument operators, facilities, and associated personnel. One of the first instruments to be acquired was a Dual Beam focused ion beam (FIB)-scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support preparation of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography samples. Over the ensuing years, techniques have been developed and operational experience gained that has enabled significant advancement in the ability to characterize a variety of fuel types including metallic, ceramic, and coated particle fuels, obtaining insights into in-reactor degradation phenomena not obtainable by any other means. The following article describes insights gained, challenges encountered, and provides examples of unique results obtained in adapting Dual Beam FIB technology to nuclear fuels characterization.

  3. Introduction of the MC3-II/GP system, medium current ion implanter with enhanced multi-charge beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Masazumi; Sato, Fumiaki; Sano, Makoto; Kawatsu, Sho; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Kudo, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Miyuki; Shinozuka, Masamitsu; Takahashi, Yuji; Ishida, Yuji; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Sugitani, Michiro [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MC3-II/GP is a leading-edge single-wafer medium-current ion implanter, newly developed by SEN Corporation. It demonstrates exceptional productivity based on a high speed wafer-handling station and enhanced beam current. It covers a substantively wider energy range in order to fully meet advanced device requirements. Retaining the superior features of the MC3-II/WR, the MC3-II/GP provides a remarkable increase of multiply-charged beam current coupled with longer ion source lifetime. Another advanced feature of the MC3-II/GP is a 30 second or 14% reduction in auto beam setup time. These improvements enable a fabrication line to reduce the total number of ion implanters and dramatically reduce COO.

  4. Anomalous patterns and nearly defect-free ripples produced by bombarding silicon and germanium with a beam of gold ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollick, Safiul Alam; Ghose, Debabrata [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector - I, Block - AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Shipman, Patrick D. [Department of Mathematics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Mark Bradley, R. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that surface ripples with an exceptionally high degree of order can develop when germanium is bombarded with a broad beam of gold ions. In contrast, if silicon is sputtered with an Au{sup ?} beam, patches of ripples with two distinct wave vectors can emerge. These types of order can be understood if the coupling between the surface morphology and composition is taken into account.

  5. Ion-acoustic waves in a plasma consisting of adiabatic warm ions, nonisothermal electrons, and a weakly relativistic electron beam: Linear and higher-order nonlinear effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Azerbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kourakis, I. [Center for Plasma Physics (CPP), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1 NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Shukla, P. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear propagation of finite amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves in a plasma consisting of adiabatic warm ions, nonisothermal electrons, and a weakly relativistic electron beam is studied via a two-fluid model. A multiple scales technique is employed to investigate the nonlinear regime. The existence of the electron beam gives rise to four linear ion acoustic modes, which propagate at different phase speeds. The numerical analysis shows that the propagation speed of two of these modes may become complex-valued (i.e., waves cannot occur) under conditions which depend on values of the beam-to-background-electron density ratio {alpha}, the ion-to-free-electron temperature ratio {sigma}, and the electron beam velocity v{sub 0}; the remaining two modes remain real in all cases. The basic set of fluid equations are reduced to a Schamel-type equation and a linear inhomogeneous equation for the first and second-order potential perturbations, respectively. Stationary solutions of the coupled equations are derived using a renormalization method. Higher-order nonlinearity is thus shown to modify the solitary wave amplitude and may also deform its shape, even possibly transforming a simple pulse into a W-type curve for one of the modes. The dependence of the excitation amplitude and of the higher-order nonlinearity potential correction on the parameters {alpha}, {sigma}, and v{sub 0} is numerically investigated.

  6. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  7. Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USDA awards 1 million eor e. coli research by Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium February 29, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 29, 2012-Researchers from...

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  10. Development of Fragmented Low-Z Ion Beams for the NA61 Experiment at the CERN SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Bohl, T; Breuker, H; Calviani, M; Manglunki, D; Mataguez, S; Maury, S; Valderanis, C; Cornelis, K; Spanggaard, J; Cettour-Cave, S; Gazdzicki, M; Seyboth, P; Guber, F; Ivashkin, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA61 experiment, aims to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement at low SPS energies and to find signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. A broad range in T-?B phase diagram will be covered by performing an energy (13A-158AGeV/c) and system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) scan. In a first phase, fragmented ion beams of 7Be or 11C produced as secondaries with the same momentum per nucleon when the incident primary Pb-ion beam hits a thin Be target will be used. The H2 beam line that transports the beam to the experiment acts as a double spectrometer which combined with a new thin target (degrader) where fragments loose energy proportional to the square of their charge allows the separation of the wanted A/Z fragments. Thin scintillators and TOF measurement for the low energy points are used as particle identification devices. In this paper results from the first test of the fragmented ion beam done in 2010 will be presented showing that a pure Be beam can be obtained sa...

  11. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S., E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  12. Passive tailoring of laser-accelerated ion beam cut-off energy by using double foil assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu; Brambrink, E.; Mancic, A.; Romagnani, L.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Robinson, A. P. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Antici, P. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France) [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-École Polytechnique-Université Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma « La Sapienza », Via Scarpa 14-16, 00165 Roma (Italy); INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); D'Humières, E. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States) [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); University of Bordeaux—CNRS—CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, 33405 Talence (France); Gaillard, S. [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Grismayer, T.; Mora, P. [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pépin, H. [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)] [INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, 1650 bd. L. Boulet, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A double foil assembly is shown to be effective in tailoring the maximum energy produced by a laser-accelerated proton beam. The measurements compare favorably with adiabatic expansion simulations, and particle-in-cell simulations. The arrangement proposed here offers for some applications a simple and passive way to utilize simultaneously highest irradiance lasers that have best laser-to-ion conversion efficiency while avoiding the production of undesired high-energy ions.

  13. Quantification of Dopant Concentrations in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors using Ion Beam Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Punnoose, Alex; Hays, Jason; Chambers, Scott A.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been demonstrated that magnetically doped TiO2 and SnO2 show ferromagnetism at room-temperature and Curie temperatures above room temperature. However, accurate knowledge of dopant concentrations is necessary to quantify magnetic moments in these materials. Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is one of the powerful techniques to quantify magnetic transition metal dopant concentrations in these materials. However, in some cases, the interference of RBS signals for different dopants and substrate elements in these materials makes analysis difficult. In this work, we demonstrate that particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) can be successfully used to quantify the magnetic transition element dopants in several room temperature ferromagnetic materials synthesized using three different synthesis methods: oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy, ion implantation and wet chemical methods.

  14. Design of quantum dot lattices in amorphous matrices by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Jaksic, M.; Salamon, K.; Drazic, G.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Institute of Physics, Bijenicka cesta 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SLO-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sincrotrone Trieste, I-34149 Basovizza (Italy); Charles University in Prague, CZ-12116 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the highly controllable self-assembly of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles in a solid amorphous matrix, induced by ion beam irradiation of an amorphous multilayer. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a possibility to tune the basic structural properties of the quantum dots in a wide range. Furthermore, the sizes, distances, and arrangement type of the quantum dots follow simple equations dependent on the irradiation and the multilayer properties. We present a Monte Carlo model for the simulation and prediction of the structural properties of the materials formed by this method. The presented results enable engineering and simple production of functional materials or simple devices interesting for applications in nanotechnology.

  15. Characterization of zirconia- and niobia-silica mixture coatings produced by ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Tolenis, Tomas; Mazule, Lina; Mirauskas, Julius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Mangote, Benoit; Fu Xinghai; Zerrad, Myriam; Gallais, Laurent; Commandre, Mireille; Kicas, Simonas; Drazdys, Ramutis

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture coatings as well as those of pure zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by ion-beam sputtering were investigated. Refractive-index dispersions, bandgaps, and volumetric fractions of materials in mixed coatings were analyzed from spectrophotometric data. Optical scattering, surface roughness, nanostructure, and optical resistance were also studied. Zirconia-silica mixtures experience the transition from crystalline to amorphous phase by increasing the content of SiO{sub 2}. This also results in reduced surface roughness. All niobia and silica coatings and their mixtures were amorphous. The obtained laser-induced damage thresholds in the subpicosecond range also correlates with respect to the silica content in both zirconia- and niobia-silica mixtures.

  16. Control of power characteristics of ion flow in plasma-etching reactor based on beam-plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaev, N. V.; Klykov, I. L.; Shustin, E. G., E-mail: shustin@ms.ire.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that on the basis of the earlier revealed effect of generating the ion flow in the beam-plasma discharge from the discharge axis, a plasma processing reactor can be created for low-energy etching of semiconductor structures. The possibility of easily controlling the density and energy of ion flow by means of varying the potential of the discharge collector is demonstrated. The charge compensation of the ion flow incident on the nonconducting surface is implemented using the modulation of the potential of the substrate holder as well as the plasma-potential modulation.

  17. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  18. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenway, W. G.; Kwan, J. W.

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ?1275{degrees}C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ? 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A source with an alumino-silicate coating 6.35 mm in diameter and ?0.25 mm thick, has a lifetime of ?40 hours at ?1275{degrees}C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ?6 ?s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Furthermore, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  19. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  20. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D., E-mail: leitnerd@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  1. Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion under 12 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion behaviour of pure iron. Oxygen and hydrogen playing a crucial role during the corrosion process have been specifically investigated. Heavy desaerated water

  2. Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beta-induced Alfv´en-Acoustic Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions N. N. Gorelenkov´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta-induced Alfv´en- acoustic Eigenmodes) New BAAE modes (Gorelenkov- bilities: · TAE/RSAEs and (toroidicity-induced/ reversed shear AEs - Alfv´en Cascades) · BAAEmodes (Beta

  3. DESIGN ISSUES OF RADIOACTIVE ION BEAM FACILITIES M. Lieuvin, SPIRAL/GANIL (DSM/CEA, IN2P3/CNRS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    illustration of the interest of these techniques. Nuclear reactions with secondary beams of light neutron (103-106 g/cm3) are such that nuclear reactions proceed on time scales of typically sec-min. Thus any are also asking for RIB, most often at very low energy, associated with ion traps. Table 1 summarises

  4. Comparison of experimental data and three-dimensional simulations of ion beam neutralization from the Neutralized Transport Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    . Greenway, B. Logan, R. MacGill, D. Shuman et al., Phys. Rev. ST-Accel. Beams 7, 083501 2004 . Preformed-dimensional 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data with perveance,16 it is possible to scale the experi- ment to lower mass ions and particle energy as well

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  7. Field emission from gadolinium silicide prepared by ion implantation with electron beam annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, H. G.; Xie, E. Q.; Ye, F. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A silicon-based field emission cathode, the rare earth silicide GdSi{sub 2} was prepared by implanting Gd ions into silicon using a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source and subsequently annealed by electron beam. For as-implanted samples, turn-on field was about 21 V/{mu}m at a current density of 1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} and a field emission current density of 1 mA/cm{sup 2} was reached at an applied field of 34 V/{mu}m. After annealing, the turn-on field could be as low as 9 V/{mu}m and the current density of 1 mA/cm{sup 2} can be reached at an applied field of 14 V/{mu}m. X-ray diffraction with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize microstructure changes of the samples. The results showed that these excellent field emission characteristics were attributed to the GdSi{sub 2} compounds formed in the samples. The field emission mechanism was discussed in terms of Fowler-Nordheim (FN) theory. It was found that FN plots could be divided into two segments obviously, and this was perhaps because of the thermal effect in the process of field emission.

  8. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  9. A digitizer based compact digital spectrometer for ion beam analysis using field programmable gate arrays and various energy algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jäger, Markus [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Reinert, Tilo [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a compact multi-detector fully digital spectrometer and data acquisition system at a nuclear microprobe for ion beam analysis and imaging. The spectrometer design allows for system scalability with no restriction on the number of detectors. It consists of four-channel high-speed digitizer modules for detector signal acquisition and one low-speed digital-to-analog converter (DAC) module with two DAC channels and additional general purpose inputs/outputs to control ion beam scanning and data acquisition. Each digitizer module of the spectrometer provides its own Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as digital signal processing unit to analyze detector signals as well as to synchronize the ion beam position in hard real-time. With the customized FPGA designs for all modules, all calculation intensive tasks are executed inside the modules, which reduces significantly the data stream to and CPU load on the control computer. To achieve an optimal energy resolution for all detector/preamplifier pulse shape characteristics, a user-definable infinite impulse response filter with high throughput for energy determination was implemented. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and is able to process any type of detector signals such as particle induced x-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, or scanning transmission ion microscopy.

  10. Propagation of ion-acoustic solitons in an electron beam-superthermal plasma system with finite ion-temperature: Linear and fully nonlinear investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saberian, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Neyshabur, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Rastkar-Ebrahimzadeh, A.; Afsari-Ghazi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitons is studied in a plasma system, comprised of warm ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in the presence of an electron-beam by using a hydrodynamic model. In the linear analysis, it is seen that increasing the superthermality lowers the phase speed of the IA waves. On the other hand, in a fully nonlinear investigation, the Mach number range and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed, parametrically and numerically. It is found that the accessible region for the existence of IA solitons reduces with increasing the superthermality. However, IA solitons with both negative and positive polarities can coexist in the system. Additionally, solitary waves with both subsonic and supersonic speeds are predicted in the plasma, depending on the value of ion-temperature and the superthermality of electrons in the system. It is examined that there are upper critical values for beam parameters (i.e., density and velocity) after which, IA solitary waves could not propagate in the plasma. Furthermore, a typical interaction between IA waves and the electron-beam in the plasma is confirmed.

  11. BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results...

  12. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  13. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  14. Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, G.B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N.P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L.N.; Singh, M.J.; Patel, P.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Mattoo, S.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India-382428 (India)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the control system for a 5 MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks{sup TM} real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20 ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

  15. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, University of North Texas, Department of Physics, 1155 Union Circle 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and magnetic applications, surface sputtering and micro-fabrication of materials, development of high-energy ion microprobe systems, and educational and outreach activities.

  16. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  17. Structural and composition investigations at delayered locations of low k integrated circuit device by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dandan, E-mail: dandan.wang@globalfoundries.com; Kee Tan, Pik; Yamin Huang, Maggie; Lam, Jeffrey; Mai, Zhihong [Technology Development Department, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte. Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report a new delayering technique – gas-assisted focused ion beam (FIB) method and its effects on the top layer materials of integrated circuit (IC) device. It demonstrates a highly efficient failure analysis with investigations on the precise location. After removing the dielectric layers under the bombardment of an ion beam, the chemical composition of the top layer was altered with the reduced oxygen content. Further energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that the oxygen reduction lead to appreciable silicon suboxide formation. Our findings with structural and composition alteration of dielectric layer after FIB delayering open up a new insight avenue for the failure analysis in IC devices.

  18. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M. [STFC/RAL, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  19. Glass nanoimprint using amorphous Ni-P mold etched by focused-ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Kitadani, Takeshi; Yamashita, Michiru; Takahashi, Masaharu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1, Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); SAWA Plating Co., Ltd., 753 Hoshiro, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0804 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12 Yukihira-cho, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors succeeded in glass-nanoimprint lithography of micropatterns and nanopatterns using an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold. Glasslike carbon has been used as a mold material to mold not only Pyrex glass but also quartz, because it is still stable at a temperature of 1650 deg. C. However, it is difficult to process glasslike carbon substrates into arbitrary shapes by machining. They thought that amorphous Ni-P alloy could be used as a mold material for industrial glass molding. If Ni is electroless plated when mixed with suitable amount of P on a Si wafer, the Ni-P alloy layer becomes amorphous. An appropriate ratio of Ni and P was determined by the results of x-ray-diffraction measurements. The optimized composition ratio of Ni-P was Ni:P=92:8 wt %. Moreover, line and space patterns and dot arrays with linewidths of as little as 500 nm were etched on the mold using focused-ion beam (FIB) and the processing accuracy for the amorphous Ni-P layer was compared with that for the pure Ni layer. The result was that patterns of 500 nm width were etched to a depth of 2 {mu}m on an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold and the processed surfaces were smooth. In contrast, in the case of the pure Ni layer, the processing line was notched and the sidewalls were very rough. The crystal grain seems to hinder the processing of the nanopattern. After FIB etching, the amorphous Ni-P alloy was thermally treated at 400 deg. C to improve the hardness. Finally, line and space patterns and dot arrays on the amorphous Ni-P alloy mold were nanoimprinted on Pyrex glass using a glass-nanoimprint system (ASHE0201) that National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology developed.

  20. A PARALLEL-PROPAGATING ALFVENIC ION-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE HIGH-BETA SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A., E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu, E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves are driven unstable by an isotropic (T{sub {alpha}} = T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}) population of alpha particles drifting parallel to the magnetic field at an average speed U{sub {alpha}} with respect to the protons. We derive an approximate analytic condition for the minimum value of U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability and refine this result using numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion relation. When the alpha-particle number density is {approx_equal} 5% of the proton number density and the two species have similar thermal speeds, the instability requires that {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 1, where {beta}{sub p} is the ratio of the proton pressure to the magnetic pressure. For 1 {approx}< {beta}{sub p} {approx}< 12, the minimum U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability ranges from 0.7v{sub A} to 0.9v{sub A}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. This threshold is smaller than the threshold of {approx_equal} 1.2v{sub A} for the parallel magnetosonic instability, which was previously thought to have the lowest threshold of the alpha-particle beam instabilities at {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 0.5. We discuss the role of the parallel Alfvenic drift instability for the evolution of the alpha-particle drift speed in the solar wind. We also analyze measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups and show that the U{sub {alpha}} values measured in solar-wind streams with T{sub {alpha}} Almost-Equal-To T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} are approximately bounded from above by the threshold of the parallel Alfvenic instability.

  1. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

  3. Sub-50 nm high aspect-ratio silicon pillars, ridges, and trenches fabricated using ultrahigh resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching P. B. Fischer and S. Y. Chou University of Minnesota Department of Electrical Engineering, Minneapolis, Minnesota 554~3 (Received 29 July 1992 and chlorine based reactive ion etching. These nanoscale Si features can be further reduced to 10 nm using

  4. Beam-ion confinement for different injection geometries This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    energy, torque and particles, so a thorough understanding of beam behavior is crucial for plasma of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About-ion energy and at high plasma temperature, suggesting that fast-ion transport by microturbulence

  5. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX) with a High Intensity Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compression; plasma; neutralization; diagnostics; inductioncolumn with plasma plug, and beam diagnostics. Figure 2(a)the plasma column. 3. Experiment setup and diagnostics The

  6. Ion Source for Neutral beam injection meant for plasma and magnetic field diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meant for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics a Jaakkodiagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasmaplasma 5 . High proton fraction and small divergence are essential for diagnostic

  7. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage in 9Cr2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.H.; Hunn, J.D.; Rao, G.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate radiation damage under a future Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) environment, irradiation experiments were conducted on a candidate 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel using the Triple Ion Facility (TIF) at ORNL. Irradiation was conducted in single, dual, and triple ion beam modes using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup ++}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} at 80, 200, and 350{degrees}C. These irradiations produced various defects comprising black dots, dislocation loops, line dislocations, and gas bubbles, which led to hardening. The largest increase in hardness, over 63 %, was observed after 50 dpa for triple beam irradiation conditions, revealing that both He and H are augmenting the hardening. Hardness increased less than 30 % after 30 dpa at 200{degrees}C by triple beams, compatible with neutron irradiation data from previous work which showed about a 30 % increase in yield strength after 27.2 dpa at 365{degrees}C. However, the very large concentrations of gas bubbles in the matrix and on lath and grain boundaries after these simulated SNS irradiations make predictions of fracture behavior from fission reactor irradiations to spallation target conditions inadvisable.

  8. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  9. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The shrinking of IC devices has followed the Moore's Law for over three decades, which states that the density of transistors on integrated circuits will double about every two years. This great achievement is obtained via continuous advance in lithography technology. With the adoption of complicated resolution enhancement technologies, such as the phase shifting mask (PSM), the optical proximity correction (OPC), optical lithography with wavelength of 193 nm has enabled 45 nm printing by immersion method. However, this achievement comes together with the skyrocketing cost of masks, which makes the production of low volume application-specific IC (ASIC) impractical. In order to provide an economical lithography approach for low to medium volume advanced IC fabrication, a maskless ion beam lithography method, called Maskless Micro-ion-beam Reduction Lithography (MMRL), has been developed in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The development of the prototype MMRL system has been described by Dr. Vinh Van Ngo in his Ph.D. thesis. But the resolution realized on the prototype MMRL system was far from the design expectation. In order to improve the resolution of the MMRL system, the ion optical system has been investigated. By integrating a field-free limiting aperture into the optical column, reducing the electromagnetic interference and cleaning the RF plasma, the resolution has been improved to around 50 nm. Computational analysis indicates that the MMRL system can be operated with an exposure field size of 0.25 mm and a beam half angle of 1.0 mrad on the wafer plane. Ion-ion interactions have been studied with a two-particle physics model. The results are in excellent agreement with those published by the other research groups. The charge-interaction analysis of MMRL shows that the ion-ion interactions must be reduced in order to obtain a throughput higher than 10 wafers per hour on 300-mm wafers. In addition, two different maskless lithography strategies have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  10. Monte-Carlo Simulation of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of Neutral Beam Ions and Effects on MHD Stability: Validation With Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V. S.; Turnbull, A. D.; Choi, M.; Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally, during fast wave (FW) radio frequency (rf) heating in DIII-D L-mode discharges, strong acceleration of neutral beam (NB) deuterium beam ions has been observed. Significant effects on the n/m = 1/1 sawtooth stability are also seen. Simulations using the Monte-Carlo Hamiltonian code ORBIT-RF, coupled to the TORIC full wave code, predict beam ion tails up to a few hundred keV, in agreement with the experiment. The simulations and experiment both clearly show a much greater efficiency for 4th harmonic FW heating than for 8th harmonic heating. Simple analyses of the kinetic contribution to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) potential energy from energetic beam ions generated by FW heating yields reasonable consistency with the observations. A more detailed analysis shows a more complicated picture, however. Other physics effects such as geometry, plasma rotation, and the presence of a free boundary, play a significant role.

  11. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  12. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  13. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  14. A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann Executive Documentation Consortium," it would leverage the efforts and commitments of multiple agencies, such as NOAA in the deployment of ISOcompliant documentation. Such exemplars can be found in a growing and diverse set

  15. Beam Energy Scaling on Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Impact on Stainless Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K + Impact on Stainless Steel Michel Kireeff Covo Lawrence+ ions hit the stainless steel target with energy up to 400energies hitting stainless steel target obtained from

  16. Spectra of In-like Tungsten, $W^{25+}$, from the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, W; Shi, Z; Fei, Z; R,; Zhao,; Brage, T; Huldt, S; Hutton, R; Zou, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three visible lines of M1 transitions from In-like W were recorded using the Shanghai permanent magnet electron beam ion trap. The experimental wavelengths were measured as 493.84 $\\pm$ 0.15, 226.97 $\\pm$ 0.13 and 587.63 $\\pm$ 0.23 nm (vacuum wavelengths). These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained using large-scale Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory, in the form of the Flexible Atomic Code, and some explorations with the Muliconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock code GRASP2K.

  17. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  18. Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops 2008 To report

  19. Ion-radical synergy in HfO{sub 2} etching studied with a XeF{sub 2}/Ar{sup +} beam setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevers, P. M.; Beijerinck, H. C. W.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain more insight into fundamental aspects of the etching behavior of Hf-based high-k materials in plasma etch reactors, HfO{sub 2} films were etched in a multiple-beam setup consisting of a low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam and a XeF{sub 2} radical beam. The etch rate and etch products were monitored by real-time ellipsometry and mass spectrometry, respectively. Although etching of HfO{sub 2} in XeF{sub 2}/Ar{sup +} chemistry is mainly a physical effect, an unambiguous proof of the ion-radical synergistic effect for the etching of HfO{sub 2} is presented. The etch yield for 400 eV Ar{sup +} ions at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C was 0.3 atoms/ion for Ar{sup +} sputtering and increased to 2 atoms/ion when XeF{sub 2} was also supplied. The etch yield proved to follow the common square root of ion energy dependence both for pure sputtering and radical enhanced etching, with a threshold energy at room temperature of 69{+-}17 eV for Ar{sup +} ions and 54{+-}14 eV for Ar{sup +} ions with XeF{sub 2}.

  20. OPERATION STATUS OF HIGH INTENSITY ION BEAMS AT GANIL F. Chautard, G. Sncal, GANIL, Caen, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . · A high-energy experiment. · An auxiliary experiments sharing the CSS2 beam · Additionally, the cyclotron, Venice, Italy 54 Circular Accelerators in2p3-00396700,version1-29Jul2010 Author manuscript, published

  1. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki [Dept. of Electron. Sci. Eng., Kyoto Univ. Kyotodaigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Dept. of Electron. Information Eng., Chubu Univ., 1200, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  2. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  3. NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Blog NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White ... NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of 25 Million in Grants...

  4. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and...

  5. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient...

  7. Energy Department Announces $4 Million for University Consortium...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power Industry Energy Department Announces 4 Million for University Consortium to Advance America's Water Power...

  8. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spemann, D., E-mail: spemann@uni-leipzig.de; Esquinazi, P., E-mail: esquin@physik.uni-leipzig.de; Setzer, A.; Böhlmann, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  9. MONO1001 : A source for singly charged ions applied to the production of multicharged fullerene beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (from pure C60 and C70 powder) will be shown and the influence of several source parameters (HF-power, support gas, gas pressure, ...) will be discussed specifying the conditions necessary for an optimum ion

  10. Offline trapping of $^{221}$Fr in a magneto-optical trap from implantation of an $^{225}$Ac ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; R. Collister; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; H. Heggen; J. Lassen; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson; S. Raeder; A. Teigelhöfer

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new technique to prepare an offline source of francium for trapping in a magneto-optical trap. Implanting a radioactive beam of $^{225}$Ac, $t_{1/2} = 9.920(3)$ days, in a foil, allows use of the decay products, i.e.$^{221}$Fr, $t_{1/2} = 288.0(4)$ s. $^{221}$Fr is ejected from the foil by the $\\alpha$ decay of $^{225}$Ac. This technique is compatible with the online accumulation of a laser-cooled atomic francium sample for a series of planned parity non-conservation measurements at TRIUMF. We obtain a 34% release efficiency for $^{221}$Fr from the recoil source based on particle detector measurements. We find that laser cooling operation with the source is $8^{+10}_{-5}$ times less efficient than from a mass-separated ion beam of $^{221}$Fr in the current geometry. While the flux of this source is two to three orders of magnitude lower than typical francium beams from ISOL facilities, the source provides a longer-term supply of francium for offline studies.

  11. Effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manjunatha, H., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu; Kumaraswamy, G. N., E-mail: gnk-swamy@blr.amrita.edu [Department of Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bengaluru-560035 (India); Damle, R. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru-560056 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past three decades, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have drawn significant attention of researchers due to their prospective commercial applications in high energy-density batteries, electrochemical sensors and super-capacitors. The optimum conductivity required for such applications is about 10{sup ?2} – 10{sup ?4} S/cm, which is hard to achieve in these systems. It is known that the increase in the concentration of salt in the host polymer results in a continuous increase in the ionic conductivity. However, there is a critical concentration of the salt beyond which the conductivity decreases due to formation of ion pairs with no net charge. In the present study, an attempt is made to identify the concentration at which ion pair formation occurs in PEO: RbBr. We have attempted to modify microstructure of the host polymer matrix by low energy ion (Oxygen ion, O{sup +1} with energy 100 keV) irradiation. Ionic conductivity measurements in these systems were carried out using Impedance Spectroscopy before and after irradiation to different fluencies of the oxygen ion. It is observed that the conductivity increases by one order in magnitude. The increase in ionic conductivity may be attributed to the enhanced segmental motion of the polymer chains. The study reveals the importance of ion irradiation as an effective tool to enhance conductivity in SPEs.

  12. Linking Texas irrigation: Consortium communicates research, education projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on irrigation studies, past and present, as well as to input their own information to be shared throughout the state.? Consortium communicates research, education projects I rrigation research and education profes-sionals have had a tremendous impact... to exchange ideas and collaborate on more proj- ects.? It is our hope that the CIRE Web site will be a common place for irrigators across Texas to come for information on irrigat ion studies, past and present....? ? Dr. B.L. Harris, TWRI associate director...

  13. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  14. Recent Performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockli, Martin P [ORNL] [ORNL; Ewald, Kerry D [ORNL] [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL] [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL] [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL] [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL] [ORNL; Tang, Johnny Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the H beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to 45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H beam exiting the RFQ dropped from 40 mA to 34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  15. SIMULATION OF CLUSTER IMPACT INDUCED DESORPTION AND COOLING Surrey Ion Beam Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Roger P.

    caused by a high energy C60 impact can eject a large polystyrene molecule without fragmentation spectrometry (SIMS) as a probing beam is showing great promise for the analysis of large organic molecules on ejection. Unlike the sputtering process this desorption process does not require that the binding energy

  16. SHyPIE A NEW SOURCE FOR ON LINE PRODUCTION OF MULTICHARGED RADIOACTIVE CONDENSABLE ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chouaib Doukkali, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El ladida Morocco In order to define the future intensity and reliability of the on line radioactive beams for the SPIRAL project, an intense activity of research, with energies up to 95.A MeV and intensities up to 6 1012 particles/s for the lightest elements. The primary

  17. Ultramicroscopy 103 (2005) 6781 Conventional and back-side focused ion beam milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    prepared using the more conventional `trench' FIB geometry. The use of carbon coating to remove specimen is used, then the local intensity and spacing of the interference fringes that form in the overlap region as it provides direct access to the electrostatic potential in the specimen (projected in the electron beam

  18. PERMANENT MAGNETS UNDER IRRADIATION AND RADIOACTIVE ALKALI ION BEAM DEVELOPMENT FOR SPIRAL 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    produced by nuclear reactions are released from the high temperature target (2000°C), effuse through a cold transfer tube up to a multi-charged ECR ion source. After extraction from the ECRIS at low energy ( 34 q of high-energy fragmentation as well as the ISOL methods for exploring the structure of nuclei far from

  19. An innovative accelerator-driven inertial electrostatic confinement device using converging ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, T. H.; Wigeland, R. A.

    1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental physics issues facing development of fusion power on a small-scale are assessed with emphasis on the idea of Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC). The authors propose a new concept of accelerator-driven IEC fusion, termed Converging Beam Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (CB-IEC). CB-IEC offers a number of innovative features that make it an attractive pathway toward resolving fundamental physics issues and assessing the ultimate viability of the IEC concept for power generation.

  20. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Microstructure Modeling of Porosity-Graded Cathode Using Focused Ion Beam and Homogenization Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamedani, Amani; Baniassadi, Majid; Sheidaei, A.; Pourboghrat, F.; Remond, Y.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, microstructure of a porosity-graded lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has been characterized using focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) combined with image processing. Two-point correlation functions of the two-dimensional (2D) images taken along the direction of porosity gradient are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure. The effective elastic modulus of the two-phase porosity-graded cathode is predicted using strong contrast (SC) and composite inclusion (CI) homogenization techniques. The effectiveness of the two methods in predicting the effective elastic properties of the porositygraded LSM cathode is investigated in comparison with the results obtained from the finite element model (FEM).

  1. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB?SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non?destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three?dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  2. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  3. Tunneling conductance studies in the ion-beam sputtered CoFe/Mg/MgO/NiFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Braj Bhusan; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic tunnel junctions consisting of CoFe(10 nm)/Mg(1 nm)/MgO(3.5 nm)/NiFe(10 nm) are grown at room temperature using dual ion beam sputtering via in-situ shadow masking. The effective barrier thickness and average barrier height are estimated to be 3.5 nm (2.9 nm) and 0.69 eV (1.09 eV) at 290 K (70 K), respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance value of 0.2 % and 2.3 % was observed at 290 K and 60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of tunneling conductance revealed the presence of localized states present within the forbidden gap of the MgO barrier leading to finite inelastic spin independent tunneling contributions, which degrade the TMR value.

  4. TEM and x-ray investigation of single crystal-like zirconia films fabricated by dual ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ressler, K.G.; Sonnenberg, N.; Cima, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Ceramics Processing Research Lab.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystal-like yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films have been deposited on amorphous quartz, polycrystalline zirconia, single crystal Si, and Hastelloy substrates using dual ion beam deposition (IBAD). These films are highly crystallographically aligned both normal to and within the film plane. The films are deposited at low substrate temperatures (< 200 C), and the film orientation is substrate independent. 0--20 X-ray diffraction, X-ray rocking curves, X-ray pole figures and X-ray phi scans are used to evaluate the film structure. High resolution cross-sectional TEM is used to examine the evolution of crystallographic film alignment on an amorphous quartz substrate. The data suggest that the evolution of biaxial alignment is nucleation controlled under these conditions.

  5. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trushnikov, D. N., E-mail: trdimitr@yandex.ru [The department for Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Mladenov, G. M., E-mail: gmmladenov@abv.bg; Koleva, E. G., E-mail: eligeorg@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Shose, 1784, Sofia (Bulgaria); Technology Centre of Electron Beam and Plasma Technologies and Techniques, 68-70 Vrania, ap.10, Banishora,1309, Sofia (Bulgaria); Belenkiy, V. Ya., E-mail: mtf@pstu.ru; Varushkin, S. V., E-mail: stepan.varushkin@mail.ru [The department for Welding Production and Technology of Constructional Materials, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup ?3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup ?2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  6. Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton 8283 joined Booz Allen Hamilton in July 2002 as a Vice President and officer in the firm's Global Resilience

  7. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arms- control-technology experts LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 7, 2014-A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes Los Alamos National Laboratory as a partner has been...

  8. LI Delivery Consortium AISBL Rue Montoyer 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Romania. The ELI facilities will be operated jointly under a single pan-European consortium ­ preferably of the Management Board is, in general, two (2) years and is renewable. The Management Board consists

  9. ELI Delivery Consortium AISBL Rue Montoyer 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Romania. The ELI facilities will be operated jointly under a single pan-European consortium ­ preferably of the Management Board is, in general, two (2) years and is renewable. The Management Board consists

  10. Smoothing metallic glasses without introducing crystallization by gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Myers, Michael; Wang, Jing [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Chu, Wei-Kan [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Xie, Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Zare, Arezoo; Lucca, Don A. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)] [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that 30 keV Ar cluster ion bombardment of Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} metallic glass (MG) can remove surface mountain-like features and reduce the root mean square surface roughness from 12 nm to 0.7 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals no crystallization after cluster ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, although damage cascades lead to local melting, the subsequent quenching rate is a few orders of magnitude higher than the critical cooling rate for MG formation, thus the melted zone retains its amorphous nature down to room temperature. These findings can be applied to obtain ultra-smooth MGs without introducing crystallization.

  11. Production of Liquid Cluster Ions by Nozzle Beam Source with and without He Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Okada, T.; Sugiyama, K. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new type of cluster ion source which could produce various kinds of liquid clusters such as water, methanol, ethanol and octane clusters. When the vapor pressure was larger than one atm, the water and ethanol clusters could be produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon without adding He gas. The peak size of the cluster ions increased with the increase of the vapor pressures. When the source temperature was at room temperature, the water and ethanol clusters were also produced by adding He gas. In another case of producing liquid clusters such as methanol and octane clusters, He gas was added to mix up with vapors of liquid materials. When the He gas pressure was larger than a few atms, the methanol and octane clusters were produced at a vapor pressure of two atm. The peak size increased with increase of the vapor pressure as well as the He gas pressure.

  12. Polarity-inverted ScAlN film growth by ion beam irradiation and application to overtone acoustic wave (000-1)/(0001) film resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Masashi; Yanagitani, Takahiko, E-mail: yana@nitech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Odagawa, Hiroyuki [Kumamoto National College of Technology, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarity inversion in wurtzite film is generally achieved by the epitaxial growth on a specific under-layer. We demonstrate polarity inversion of c-axis oriented ScAlN films by substrate ion beam irradiation without using buffer layer. Substrate ion beam irradiation was induced by either sputtering a small amount of oxide (as a negative ion source) onto the cathode or by applying a RF bias to the substrate. Polarity of the films was determined by a press test and nonlinear dielectric measurement. Second overtone thickness extensional mode acoustic resonance and suppression of fundamental mode resonance, indicating complete polarity inversion, were clearly observed in bilayer highly oriented (000-1)/(0001) ScAlN film.

  13. Experiments with planar inductive ion source meant for creation ofH+ Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Kalvas, T.; Hahto, S.K.; Reijonen, J.

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article the effect of different engineering parameters of an rf-driven ion sources with external spiral antenna and quartz disk rf-window are studied. Paper consists of three main topics: The effect of source geometry on the operation gas pressure, the effect of source materials and magnetic confinement on extracted current density and ion species and the effect of different antenna geometries on the extracted current density. The operation gas pressure as a function of the plasma chamber diameter, was studied. This was done with three cylindrical plasma chambers with different inner diameters. The chamber materials were studied using two materials, aluminum and alumina (AlO{sub 2}). The removable 14 magnet multicusp confinement arrangement enabled us to compare the effects of the two wall materials with and without the magnetic confinement. Highest proton fraction of {approx} 8% at 2000 W of rf-power and at pressure of 1.3 Pa was measured using AlO{sub 2} plasma chamber and no multicusp confinement. For all the compared ion sources at 1000W of rf-power, source with multicusp confinement and AlO2 plasma chamber yields highest current density of 82.7 mA/cm{sup 2} at operation pressure of 4 Pa. From the same source highest measured current density of 143 mA/cm{sup 2} at 1.3 Pa and 2200W of rf-power was achieved. Multicusp confinement increased the maximum extracted current up to factor of two. Plasma production with different antenna geometries was also studied. Antenna tests were performed using same source geometry as in source material study with AlO{sub 2} plasma chamber and multicusp confinement. The highest current density was achieved with 4.5 loop solenoid antenna with 6 cm diameter. Slightly lower current density with lower pressure was achieved using tightly wound 3 loop spiral antenna with 3.3 cm ID and 6 cm OD.

  14. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, D. Stutman, K. Tritz, A. Boozer, L. Delgardo-Aparicio, E. Fredrickson, S. Kaye, and R. White

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  15. The Research Program at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Pampa Condori, R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Unifesp, Campus de Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080, Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A part of the research program developed in the RIBRAS facility over the last four years is presented. Experiments using radioactive secondary beams of light exotic nuclei such as {sup 6}He, {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}Li on several targets have been performed. Elastic angular distributions have been analysed by the Optical Model and four body Continuous Discretized Coupled Channels Calculations (4b-CDCC) and the total reaction cross sections have been obtained. A comparison between the reaction cross sections of {sup 6}He and other stable projectiles with medium-heavy targets was performed. Measurements of the proton transfer reaction {sup 12}C({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 11}B are also presented.

  16. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H{sub 2}{sup +} beam production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Xianlu; Zhang Tianjue; Wang Chuan; Zheng Xia; Yin Zhiguo; Zhong Junqing; Wu Longcheng; Qin Jiuchang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(3), Beijing 102413 (China); Luo Shan [The 6th Department, Communication Command Academy, Wuhan 430010 (China)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H{sub 2}{sup +} beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of {approx}875 Gs[T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  17. Spectroscopy at the high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The following progress report presents some of the x-ray measurements performed during the last year on the Livermore SuperEBIT facility. The measurements include: direct observation of the spontaneous emission of the hyperfine transition in ground state hydrogenlike holmium, {sup 165}Ho{sup 66{plus}}; measurements of the n {equals} 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies in neonlike thorium, Th{sup 80{plus}}, through lithiumlike thorium, Th{sup 87{plus}}, testing the predictions of quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions up to the 0.4{percent} level; measurements of the isotope shift of the n= 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies between lithiumlike through carbonize uranium, {sup 233}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}} and {sup 238}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}}, inferring the variation of the mean- square nuclear charge radius; and high-resolution measurements of the K{alpha} radiation of heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52 {plus}}, using a transmission-type crystal spectrometer, resolving for the first time the ls2p{sup 3}P{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and ls2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transitions individually. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  19. Patient-specific QA and delivery verification of scanned ion beam at NIRS-HIMAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific QA program and system for constancy checking of a scanning delivery system developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.Methods: For the patient-specific QA, all the planned beams are recalculated on a water phantom with treatment planning software (TPS). The recalculated dose distributions are compared with the measured distributions using a 2D ionization chamber array at several depths, and evaluated using gamma index analysis with criteria of 3% and 3 mm and a pass rate of 90%. For the constancy check, the authors developed the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC), which can record the delivered 2D fluence images in a slice-by-slice manner. During irradiation for dosimetric QA with the 2D ionization chamber array and an accordion-type water phantom, the 2D fluence images are recorded using the MWPC in the delivery system. These recorded images are then compared to those taken in the treatment session to check the constancy check. This analysis also employs gamma index analysis using the same criteria as in the patient-specific QA. These patient-specific QA and constancy check evaluations were performed using the data of 122 patients.Results: In the patient-specific QA, the measured dose distributions agreed well with those calculated by the TPS, and the QA criteria were satisfied in all measurements. The additional check of the fluence comparison ensured the constancy of the delivered field during each treatment irradiation.Conclusions: The authors established a patient-specific QA program and additional check of delivery constancy in every treatment session. Fluence comparison is a strong tool for constancy checking of the delivery system.

  20. A 915 MHz/2. 45 GHz ECR plasma source for large area ion beam and plasma processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmussen, J.; Hopwood, J.; Sze, F.C. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226 (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology for producing uniform, high density (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}) microwave discharges over cross sections of 50 cm{sup 2} is well established. The present challenge is to extend the high density, and electrodeless benefits of microwave discharges to produce uniform densities over an area of 300--700 cm{sup 2}. Such discharges have important applications for 6 to 8-in. single wafer processing and as large surface, broad beam, high current density ion sources. The design principles for scaling the 18 cm diam MPDR ECR cavity applicator technology to 38--47 cm diam are reviewed. Microwave discharges with diameters of 20--30 cm can be created when these applicators are excited with either 2.45 GHz or 915 MHz. The design and construction of a prototype cavity applicator with a 20 cm diam discharge is described. The discharge is enclosed with a 12-pole multicusp static magnetic field produced by 2-in. by 2-in. by 1-in. rare-earth magnets. Each magnet has a pole face field strength of 3 kG. The experimental test of this plasma source in argon gas excited with 2.45 GHz energy is reviewed.

  1. Much simplified ion-beam assisted deposition-TiN template for high-performance coated conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, J. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Matias, V.; Zhai, J. Y.; Maiorov, B.; Trugman, D.; Jia, Q. X. [Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Tao, B. W.; Li, Y. R. [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A much simplified template, i.e., two nonsuperconducting layers between the superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) and the polycrystalline metal substrate, has been developed for high-performance coated conductors by using biaxially aligned TiN as a seed layer. A combination of a thin TiN ({approx}10 nm by ion-beam assisted deposition) layer and an epitaxial buffer LaMnO{sub 3} layer ({approx}120 nm) allows us to grow epitaxial YBCO films with values of full width at half-maximum around 3.5 deg. and 1.7 deg. for the {phi}-scan of (103) and rocking curve of (005) YBCO, respectively. The YBCO films grown on electropolished polycrystalline Hastelloy using this two-layer template exhibited a superconducting transition temperature of 89.5 K, a critical current density of 1.2 MA/cm{sup 2} at 75.5 K, and an {alpha} value (proportional factor of critical current density J{sub c}{approx}H{sup -}{alpha}) of around 0.33, indicating a high density of pinning centers and an absence of weak links.

  2. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Labaratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both B{sub p} and E{sub r} at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both B{sub p} and E{sub r}. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results.

  3. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloss, Jonas [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria) [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Shah Zaman, Sameena [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria) [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Varga, Peter [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria) [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); CEITEC BUT, Brno University of Technology, Technická 10, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Urbánek, Michal [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic) [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC BUT, Brno University of Technology, Technická 10, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc ? phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  4. Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation (formerly the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub) develops, demonstrates, and deploys energy-saving technologies that can achieve 50% energy reduction in small- and medium-sized buildings. Its headquarters serves as a test bed for real-world integration of technology and market solutions.

  5. Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    in Fig. 2, the gas fuel (such as propane C3H8) and oxygen leaving the torch combust into a high of the heat is transported away through radiation and advection with the combustion gas and the rest- 1 - Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO Modeling Steel Slab Heat Transfer During

  6. Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

  7. Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium I. BACKGROUND Recent measurements of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G are in disagreement, with discrepancies that are roughly ten times forces on a laboratory scale. It also raises the question of whether the Newtonian force law

  8. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub? · Modeled after research entities like the Manhattan Project (nuclear

  9. A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

  10. A Test Stand for Ion Sources of Ultimate Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enparantza, R.; Uriarte, L.; Romano, P.; Alonso, J.; Ariz, I.; Egiraun, M. [Fundacion Tekniker-IK4, Eibar (Spain); Bermejo, F. J.; Etxebarria, V. [University of the Basque Country, Dpt. Electricity and Electronics, Leioa, Spain, and Consejo Superior de Investgaciones Cientificas, Inst. Estructura de la Materia (Spain); Lucas, J. [Elytt Energy, Portugalete (Spain); Del Rio, J. M. [Jema Group, Lasarte (Spain); Letchford, A.; Faircloth, D. [ISIS Accelerator Division, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Stockli, M. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge (United States)

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rationale behind the ITUR project is to perform a comparison between different kinds of H{sup -} ion sources using the same beam diagnostics setup. In particular, a direct comparison will be made in terms of the emittance characteristics of Penning Type sources such as those currently in use in the injector for the ISIS (UK) Pulsed Neutron Source and those of volumetric type such as that driving the injector for the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (TN, U.S.A.). The endeavour here pursued is thus to build an Ion Source Test Stand where virtually any type of source can be tested and its features measured and, thus compared to the results of other sources under the same gauge. It would be possible then to establish a common ground for effectively comparing different ion sources. The long term objectives are thus to contribute towards building compact sources of minimum emittance, maximum performance, high reliability-availability, high percentage of desired particle production, stability and high brightness. The project consortium is lead by Tekniker-IK4 research centre and partners are companies Elytt Energy and Jema Group. The technical viability is guaranteed by the collaboration between the project consortium and several scientific institutions, such the CSIC (Spain), the University of the Basque Country (Spain), ISIS (STFC-UK), SNS (ORNL-USA) and CEA in Saclay (France)

  11. Atom penetration from a thin film into the substrate during sputtering by polyenergetic Ar{sup +} ion beam with mean energy of 9.4 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalin, B.A.; Gladkov, V.P.; Volkov, N.V.; Sabo, S.E. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetration of alien atoms (Be, Ni) into Be, Al, Zr, Si and diamond was investigated under Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of samples having thermally evaporated films of 30--50 nm. Sputtering was carried out using a wide energy spectrum beam of Ar{sup +} ions of 9.4 keV to dose D = 1 {times} 10{sup 16}--10{sup 19} ion/cm{sup 2}. Implanted atom distribution in the targets was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions with energy of 1.6 MeV as well as secondary ion mass-spectrometry (SIMS). During the bombardment, the penetration depth of Ar atoms increases with dose linearly. This depth is more than 3--20 times deeper than the projected range of bombarding ions and recoil atoms. This is a deep action effect. The analysis shows that the experimental data for foreign atoms penetration depth are similar to the data calculated for atom migration through the interstitial site in a field of internal (lateral) compressive stresses created in the near-surface layer of the substrate as a result of implantation. Under these experimental conditions atom ratio r{sub i}/r{sub m} (r{sub i} -- radius of dopant, r{sub m} -- radius target of substrate) can play a principal determining role.

  12. Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Neutrino Factory Based on Muon Beams,” Proc. 2001 ParticleMD. [19] C. Rubbia et al. , “Beam Cooling with Ionisationthe required unstable ion beams has recently been suggested

  13. DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

  14. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Joel H. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  15. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.PortaldefaultIntroducing AuroraInvestorPages

  16. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  17. AN ADJUSTABLE THICKNESS Li/Be TARGET FOR FRAGMENTATION OF 3-kW HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    in the target and is carried away by the recirculating liquid lithium loop. It is designed for high power beams in the mass range from oxygen to calcium. Tapered beryllium windows combined with a uniform thickness lithium power of up to 3 kW is currently under construction for use with beams from oxygen to calcium

  18. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility A leading international facility with unique capabilities for research in nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    questions that drive the field of low-energy nuclear physics: · How do protons and neutrons make stable Directions Nuclear structure and reaction research at HRIBF provides insight into the nature of the force species are available as low-energy (~50 keV) beams. More than 60 post-accelerated beams, including 132 Sn

  19. High-pressure arcs as vacuum-atmosphere interface and plasma lens for nonvacuum electron beam welding machines, electron beam melting, and nonvacuum ion material modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [AGS Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Vacuum-atmosphere interface utilizing a cascade arc discharge was successfully demonstrated and a 175 keV electron beam was successfully propagated from vacuum through such a plasma interface and out into atmospheric pressure. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Transport properties of discontinuous Co{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers, prepared by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakazei, G.N.; Freitas, P.P.; Cardoso, S.; Lopes, A.M.L.; Pereira de Azevedo, M.M.; Pogorelov, Y.G.; Sousa, J.B.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion beam sputtered Co{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}(t)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(30 {angstrom}) multilayers were obtained. The Co{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} layers become discontinuous for nominal thicknesses T {le} 18{angstrom}. Tunnel magnetoresistance was measured in CIP and CPP geometries, reaching up to 6.5% at room temperature and 11% at 15 K, for as-deposited films in CIP geometry. The temperature dependence of MR was found quite different for the two geometries: fairly strong in the CIP case and almost absent in the CPP geometry. A model is proposed to explain these large differences in behavior.

  1. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Karl (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Irwin, Timothy J. (Jackson & Tull Chartered Engineers, Washington, DC); Niu, Guofu (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Fodness, Bryan (SGT, Inc., Greenbelt, MD); Carts, Martin A. (Raytheon ITSS, Greenbelt, MD); Marshall, Paul W. (Brookneal, VA); Reed, Robert A. (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Gilbert, Barry (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Randall, Barbara (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Prairie, Jason (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Riggs, Pam (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN); Pickel, James C. (PR& T, Inc., Fallbrook, CA); LaBel, Kenneth (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD); Cressler, John D. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Krithivasan, Ramkumar (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  2. Rabi Waves and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes, produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves - has been experimentally identified for the first time. Raman spectra in perfect quasi-1D carbon nanotubes are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D carbon nanotubes of larger diameter. They characterized by vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice and its revival part in frequency representation, which is the consequence of Rabi wave packet formation.

  3. Magnetization dynamics and interface studies in ion-beam sputtered Si/CoFeB(8)/MgO(4)/CoFeB(8)/Ta(5) structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raju, M.; Behera, Nilamani; Pandya, Dinesh K., E-mail: dkpandya@physics.iitd.ac.in; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface roughness, Boron distribution in bulk CoFeB and at interface, Gilbert damping constant (?), and inhomogeneous broadening in ion-beam sputtered Si/CoFeB(8)/MgO(4)/CoFeB(8)/Ta(5) structures are found to be sensitive to the MgO growth process. The ion-assist and reactive growth processes that result in sharper interfaces of width ?0.5?nm lead to smaller ? of 0.0050?±?0.0003 and 0.0060?±?0.0002 and inhomogeneous broadening ?H{sub 0} of 3?±?0.3 and 1?±?0.3?Oe, respectively. On the other hand, the post-oxidation method results in rough interface and higher retention of Boron in CoFeB leading to higher values for ? and ?H{sub 0} as 0.0080?±?0.0006 and 5?±?0.3?Oe, respectively.

  4. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  5. Surface plasmon polariton modes in a single-crystal Au nanoresonator fabricated using focused-ion-beam milling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    to 30 keV, and focused by an electrostatic lens system to a spot size with diameter as small as 5­10 nm, photovoltaics, tele- communications, and optoelectronic circuit integration due to their ability to concentrate.5,6 In a typical FIB system, Ga+ ions are extracted from a liquid-metal ion source, accel- erated

  6. GreenTouch Consortium Passes 50-Member Milestone, Adds Seven...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GreenTouch is open to any organization or individual that is committed to environmental sustainability and to supporting the consortium in realizing its vision. More information...

  7. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission...

  8. NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffrey Hawk of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Far West region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Outstanding Technology Development...

  9. THE MECHANICAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A CONVECTIVELY COOLED ION ACCELERATOR FOR CONTINUOUSLY OPERATING NEUTRAL BEAM SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    100 kV 1. 5 sec Table 1. Grid heat loads as %beam power. Towith a central separation. Grid heat loading is the dominantsystem. To investigate grid heat loads on our grid designs

  10. Ion Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  11. Composition and Bonding in Amorphous Carbon Films Grown by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition: Influence of the Assistance Voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albella, J.M.; Banks, J.C.; Climent-Font, A.; Doyle, B.L.; Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous carbon films have been grown by evaporation of graphite with concurrent Ar+ ions bombardment assistance. The ion energy has been varied between 0-800 V while keeping a constant ion to carbon atom arrival ratio. Film composition and density were determined by ion scattering techniques (RBS and ERDA), indicating a negligible hydrogen content and a density dependence with the assistance voltage. The bonding structure of the films has been studied by Raman and X-ray Absorption Near-Edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Different qualitative effects have been found depending on the ion energy range. For ion energies below 300 eV, there is a densification of the carbon layer due to the increase in the sp3 content. For ion energies above 300 eV sputtering phenomena dominate over densification, and thinner films are found with increasing assistance voltage until no film is grown over 600 V. The films with the highest SP3 content are grown with intermediate energies between 200-300 V.

  12. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  13. U. K. consortium Stirling engine programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, G.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper covers the design and construction of a high pressure helium-charged two cylinder 20 kW Stirling engine to be operated in either the alpha or gamma configuration. The design includes a sodium heat pipe head. A joint University/ Industry Consortium was set up for the production of this research engine and the various contributions of the members are outlined in the paper. A dynamic test rig has been built to test regenerators and the paper illustrates the unique feature of this rig which enables measurement of the enthalpy loss through the regenerator and its effectiveness.

  14. Consortium Participant List - Spreadsheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 *09ofName TitleConsortium

  15. Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix Solar Jump to:Consortium Jump to: navigation, search

  16. Consortium Support (Fixed Support) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced-30 QERDNA linkers allowMarch 31, 2015Consortium Fixed

  17. The Solar Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:InformationThe PotomacInc Jump to:Consortium Jump

  18. Exergy Consortium Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4Evendale, - FloodplainExergy Consortium Pvt

  19. Ion-molecule interactions in crossed-beams. [N/sup +/-H/sub 2/; F/sup +/-H; CO/sub 2//sup +/-D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions of the ions N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ with H/sub 2/ and/or its isotopes were examined using the crossed-beam technique in the low (< 4 eV) initial relative energy. For the reaction N/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. NH/sup +/ + H, complex formation dominates up to 1.9 eV and a substantial interaction occurs between all collision partners up to 3.6 eV. The distribution of N/sup +/ scattered nonreactively from H/sub 2/ also showed a long-lived complex channel below 1.9 eV. The reaction F/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->..FH/sup +/ + H proceeded by a direct reaction mechanism at 0.20 to 1.07 eV. The reaction CO/sub 2//sup +/ + D/sub 2/ ..-->.. DCO/sub 2//sup +/ + D gives asymmetric product distributions at 0.27 eV and above, indicating a direct reaction mechanism. Results indicated that there are probably barriers in the exit channels for DCO/sub 2//sup +/, DCO/sup +/, and D/sub 2/O/sup +/ products. The electronic state distributions of the N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ beams was investigated using beam attenuation and total luminescence techniques.

  20. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub-grantee program was designed to address the unique local conditions and population of its community. There was great diversity in programs design, types of financing and incentives, building stock characteristics, climate and partnerships. From 2010 through 2013, SEEA and its sub-grantee programs focused on determining best practices in program administration, workforce development, marketing and consumer education, financing, and utility partnerships. One of the common themes among programs that were most successful in each of these areas was strong partnerships and collaborations with people or organizations in the community. In many instances engaged partners proved to be the key to addressing barriers such as access to financing, workforce development opportunities and access to utility bill data. The most challenging barrier proved to be the act of building a market for energy efficiency where none previously existed. With limited time and resources, educating homeowners of the value in investing in energy efficiency while engaging electric and gas utilities served as a significant barrier for several programs. While there is still much work to be done to continue to transform the energy efficiency market in the Southeast, the programmatic activities led by SEEA and its sub-grantees resulted in 8,180 energy audits and 5,155 energy efficiency retrofits across the Southeast. In total the Southeast Consortium saved an estimated 27,915,655.93 kWh and generated an estimated $ 2,291,965.90 in annual energy cost savings in the region.

  1. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  2. West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building West Virginia.nasa.wvu.edu West Virginia University Bethany College Bluefield State College Fairmont State University Consortium Foundation West Virginia State University WVU Institute of Technology West Virginia Wesleyan

  3. THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1 and Peter Hauge Madsen2 1 Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark; lars.landberg@risoe.dk 2 Siemens Wind Power, DK-7330 Brande, Denmark Abstract The Danish Wind Energy Research Consortium

  4. for the Open Source Modelica Consortium December 4, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    1 BYLAWS for the Open Source Modelica Consortium (OSMC) December 4, 2007 Adopted at the statutory Source Modelica Consortium, abbreviated as OSMC. The association has its seat in Linköping, Sweden. §1 and promoting the development and usage of the OpenModelica open source implementation of the Modelica computer

  5. ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security Assessment at National SCADA Test Bed ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber...

  6. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  8. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  9. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  10. Chemical reactions of conformationally selected 3-aminophenol molecules in a beam with Coulomb-crystallized Ca{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rösch, Daniel; Willitsch, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.willitsch@unibas.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Chang, Yuan-Pin [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Küpper, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.kuepper@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany) [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many molecules exhibit multiple conformers that often easily interconvert under thermal conditions. Therefore, single conformations are difficult to isolate which renders the study of their distinct chemical reactivities challenging. We have recently reported a new experimental method for the characterization of conformer-specific effects in chemical reactions [Y.-P. Chang, K. D?ugo??cki, J. Küpper, D. Rösch, D. Wild, and S. Willitsch, “Specific chemical reactivities of spatially separated 3-aminophenol conformers with cold Ca{sup +} ions,” Science 342, 98–101 (2013)]. Different conformers are spatially separated using inhomogeneous electric fields and reacted with a Coulomb crystal of cold, spatially localized ions in a trap. As a first application, we studied reactions between the two conformers of 3-aminophenol and Ca{sup +}. We observed a twofold larger rate constant for the cis compared to the trans conformer which was rationalized in terms of the differences in the long-range ion-molecule interactions. The present article provides a detailed description of the new method and a full account of the experimental results as well as the accompanying theoretical calculations.

  11. Beam energy dependence of the expansion dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions: Indications for the critical end point?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow harmonic $v_{n}$ and the emission source radii $R_{\\text{out}}$, $R_{\\text{side}}$ and $R_{\\text{long}}$ are studied for a broad range of centrality selections and beam collision energies in Au+Au ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 7.7 - 200$ GeV) and Pb+Pb ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV) collisions at RHIC and the LHC respectively. They validate the acoustic scaling patterns expected for hydrodynamic-like expansion over the entire range of beam energies studied. The combined data sets allow estimates for the \\sqsn\\ dependence of the mean expansion speed $\\left$, emission duration $\\left$ and the viscous coefficients $\\left$ that encode the magnitude of the specific shear viscosity $\\left$. The estimates indicate initial-state model independent values of $\\left$ which are larger for the plasma produced at 2.76 TeV (LHC) compared to that produced at 200 GeV (RHIC) ($\\left_{\\text{LHC}}=2.2\\pm 0.2$ and $\\left_{\\text{RHIC}}=1.3\\pm 0.2$). They also show a non-monotonic \\sqsn\\ dependence for $\\left$, $\\left$ and $\\left$, with minima for $\\left$ and $\\left$, and a complimentary maximum for $\\left$. These dependencies signal a significant change in reaction dynamics in a narrow span of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$, which may be linked to reaction trajectories close to the critical end point (CEP) in the phase diagram for nuclear matter.

  12. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  13. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C. [INFN Lab. Naz. del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44-95123 Catania (Italy); Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G. [INFN, Sez di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Dep. of Phys. and Astr. Univ. Catania Via S. Sofia 64-95123 Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN and Dep. of Phys. Univ. Messina (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  14. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  15. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

  16. DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S., conducted...

  17. CAIIAC: Consortium for Accelerated Innovation and Insertion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Grant Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMTech) Program will spur consortium-planned, industry-led R Standardized composite design and testing for faster and more affordable certifications Recycling and reuse

  18. A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and...

  19. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs. This will be achieved by involving the faculty in the development of state-of-the-art research facilities at the URRs and subsequently, in the utilization of these facilities, c) Facilitate the use of the URRs by the science and engineering faculty within the individual institutions and by the general community of science and engineering, d) Develop a far-reaching educational component that is capable of addressing the needs of the nuclear science and engineering community. Specifically, the aim of this component will be to perform public outreach activities, contribute to the active recruitment of the next generation of nuclear professionals, strengthen the education of nuclear engineering students, and promote nuclear engineering education for minority students.

  20. ambient ion sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an...

  1. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  2. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  4. Inelastic tunneling conductance and magnetoresistance investigations in dual ion-beam sputtered CoFeB(110)/MgO/CoFeB (110) magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhusan Singh, Braj; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) comprising Ta(5)/NiFe(5)/IrMn(15)/CoFeB(5)/Mg(1)/MgO(3.5)/ CoFeB(5)/Ta(5)/Ag(20) (thickness in nm) with (110) oriented CoFeB layers are grown using dual ion beam sputtering. The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of MTJs is found to be significantly bias dependent and exhibits zero bias anomaly (ZBA) which is attributed to the presence of magnetic impurities or diffusion of Mn from antiferromagnetic IrMn in the barrier. Adjacent to the ZBA, two peaks at 24?±?3?mV and 34?±?3?mV are also observed, which differ both in intensity as well as their position in the antiparallel and parallel magnetic states, suggesting that they are due to magnon excitations. In addition to this, a phonon peak at 65?±?3?mV is also observed. The effect of temperature on the inelastic and elastic tunneling contributions is studied in detail in 25–300?K range using the Glazman and Matveev model. Ten series of localized states are found to be involved in hopping conduction in the forbidden gap of MgO barrier. The effect of presence of such inelastic channels is found to be insignificant at low temperatures yielding sizeable enhancement in TMR.

  5. Effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acuna, J. J. S.; Alvarez, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6165 Campinas, SP, 13083-970 (Brazil); Escobar, M. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. N. [Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R. J. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, 3iA, UNSAM, Campus Migueletes, San Martin, Pcia. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zanatta, A. R. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos-USP, P.O. Box 369, Sao Carlos 13560-250 (Brazil)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) films on the chemical and electronic properties of the material is reported. The CNTs were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique (CVD) on silicon TiN coated substrates previously decorated with Ni particles. The Ni decoration and TiN coating were successively deposited by ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and afterwards the nanotubes were grown. The whole deposition procedure was performed in situ as well as the study of the effect of ion-beam irradiation on the CNTs by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman scattering, field-effect emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), and field emission (FE) measurements were performed ex situ. The experimental data show that: (a) the presence of either H{sub 2}{sup +} or N{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the irradiation beam determines the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples as well as the studied structural characteristics; (b) due to the experimental conditions used in the study, no morphological changes have been observed after irradiation of the CNTs; (c) the FE experiments indicate that the electron emission from the CNTs follows the Fowler-Nordheim model, and it is dependent on the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples; and (d) in association with FE results, the XPS data suggest that the formation of terminal quinone groups decreases the CNTs work function of the material.

  6. Design of a testing device for quasi-confined compression of lithium-ion battery cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roselli, Eric (Eric J.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Impact and Crashworthiness Laboratory at MIT has formed a battery consortium to promote research concerning the crash characteristics of new lithium-ion battery technologies as used in automotive applications. Within ...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated radioactive ion Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Ion Beam Facility A leading international facility with unique... light-ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron and ... Source: Controlled Fusion Atomic Data...

  8. Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Beta beam R&D status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact 08 1 Beta beam R&D status Elena Wildner, CERN on behalf of the Beta Beam Study Group EURISOL/Euronu #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact08Nufact08 Outline Recall, EURISOL Ion Production Loss Management Improvements New Program, EuroNu 2 #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP

  9. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  10. Rabi Wave Packets and Peculiarities of Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes, Produced by High Energy Ion Beam Modification of Diamond Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Yearchuck; Alla Dovlatova

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    QED-model for multichain coupled qubit system, proposed in \\cite{Part1}, was confirmed by Raman scattering studies of quasi-1D carbon zigzag-shaped nanotubes (CZSNTs), produced by high energy ion beam modification of natural diamond single crystals. Multichain coupled qubit system represents itself Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice, formed in CZSNTs plus quantized external electromagnetic (EM) field. New quantum optics phenomenon - Rabi waves, predicted in \\cite{Slepyan_Yerchak} has experimentally been identified for the first time. It is shown, that Raman spectra in quasi-1D CZSNTs are quite different in comparison with well known Raman spectra in 2D those ones. They characterized by semiclassical consideration by the only one vibronic mode of Su-Schriffer-Heeger $\\sigma$-polaron lattice instead of longitudinal and transverse optical phonon $G^+$ and $G^-$modes and the out-of-plane radial breathing mode, which are observed in Raman spectra of 2D single wall nanotubes. It is consequence of 2D - 1D transition in all physical properties of nanotubes. It is shown, that strong electron-photon coupling takes place in CZSNTs by interaction with EM-field and quantum nature of EM-field has to be taken into account. It has been done for the first time in stationary spectroscopy at all. All optical spectra, in particular, Raman spectra are registered by usual stationary measurement technique in nonequilibrium conditions, which are the consequence of Rabi wave packets' formation. It leads in its turn to appearance of additional lines, corresponding to revival part of inversion dependence of joint EM-field + matter system in frequency representation.

  11. Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations Warner College of Natural the growing need for sustainability planning, imple- mentation, and facilitation on United States military bases. CEMML is already a proven global provider of re- search and sustainable management of natural

  12. Gravity&MagneticsResearchConsortium CGEMaestro v.1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravity&MagneticsResearchConsortium CGEMaestro v.1.0 A potential fields software package developed at the Center for Gravity, Electrical & Magnetic Studies (CGEM) Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Developed for the sponsors of the Gravity

  13. The Chicago Wilderness Consortium Melinda Pruett-Jones, Executive Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of natural areas embedded in the third largest metropolitan area in the country, a consortium of diverse is to reclaim the cultural tradition of restoring, protecting and managing the globally outstanding natural to the protection, restoration and management of the Chicago region's natural resources. The Chicago Wilderness

  14. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL (BWR) Common types of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) #12;www.casl.gov U.S. Nuclear Energy Increasing

  15. Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Rolf

    Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office The New York office in Hessen to serve as interns. Successful candidates will be motivated and energetic individuals who expenses incurred in New York. Important notice: New York City is an expensive city. Applicants must budget

  16. Moving Toward Product Line Engineering in a Nuclear Industry Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Moving Toward Product Line Engineering in a Nuclear Industry Consortium Sana Ben Nasr, Nicolas line engineering, variability mining 1. INTRODUCTION Nuclear power plants are some of the most.ben-nasr, nicolas.sannier, mathieu.acher, benoitbaudry}@inria.fr ABSTRACT Nuclear power plants are some of the most

  17. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

  18. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  19. Electroweak Tests at Beta-beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; J. H. de Jesus; C. Volpe

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of measuring the Weinberg angle from (anti)neutrino-electron scattering using low energy beta beams, a method that produces single flavour neutrino beams from the beta-decay of boosted radioactive ions. We study how the sensitivity of a possible measurement depends on the intensity of the ion beam and on a combination of different Lorentz boosts of the ions.

  20. LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathanMultimaterial2RecoveryBioenergy »0 Los1

  1. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, Shigeki, E-mail: sakai-shigeki@nissin.co.jp; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)] [Nissin Ion Equipment co., ltd, 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8205 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  2. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose rate and improved overall treatment precision were observed compared to conventional free breathing-based, respiratory-gated irradiation. Because breathing guidance curves could be established based on the respective average respiratory period and amplitude for each patient, it may be easier for patients to cooperate using this technique.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ion hall Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering 13 Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition of GMR Multilayers Summary: guns, it uses low energy ion sources that combine end-Hall ion 29 and hollow cathode...

  4. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to controlled thermonuclear fusion which uses intense ion orto controlled thermonuclear fusion energy to commercialFusion Energy (MFE) is the approach to controlled thermonuclear

  5. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  6. Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

  7. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    luminescence ­ Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator E. Gardésa,b,* , E the dynamics of UV- visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity

  8. High Current Ion Sources and Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion requires short ion beam pulses with high current and high brightness. Depending on the beam current and the number of beams in the driver system, the injector can use a large diameter surface ionization source or merge an array of small beamlets from a plasma source. In this paper, we review the scaling laws that govern the injector design and the various ion source options including the contact ionizer, the aluminosilicate source, the multicusp plasma source, and the MEVVA source.

  9. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, James W. (Canoga Park, CA); Schlanger, Herbert (Simi Valley, CA); McNulty, Jr., Hugh (Santa Monica, CA); Parker, Norman W. (Camarillo, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  10. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  11. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppte'ment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZZet 1979, page C7-477 THE RF-ION SOURCE RIG 10FOR INTENSEHYDROGEN ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - are accelerated,too, by the s w mechanism. We obtain an intense electrodeless, non-them1 rf-plasma. The ham- advantages of our rf-plasma source called RIG 10 (-Radio-Frequency- Ion-erator of 10 an in diameter): This type of ion- source has no discharge electrodes immersed in the discharge plasma

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated heavy ions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in ion-beam-driven high energy density Summary: Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 8, 124201 (2005). 12;91506 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science... Physics and Heavy Ion...

  13. Mechanics of nanoscale beams in liquid electrolytes: beam deflections, pull-in instability, and stiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Sang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    predicted by the two models is presented by varying the ion concentration, surface potential, ion size and distance of separation. The ratio of pressures is relatively independent of the distance of separation between the two surfaces. An elastic beam...

  14. A relation between surface oxide and oxygen-defect complexes in solid-phase epitaxial Si regrown from ion-beam-amorphized Si layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petkov, Mihail P. [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States); Chen, Claudine M. [Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Atwater, Harry A. [Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Rassiga, Stefano [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States); Lynn, Kelvin G. [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163-2814 (United States)

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a direct evidence that ion implantation through thin ({<=}5 nm) surface oxide layers is a source of O impurities, which form O-defect complexes during thermal treatment. The impurity-defect complexes are identified by correlating the results from positron annihilation spectroscopy, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and Monte Carlo simulations. The O atoms are introduced in the bulk by multiple recoil implantation by the primary ions. The signatures of large V{sub m}O{sub n} formations are observed at 800 degree sign C, which implies the existence of smaller species at lower temperatures. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Heavy-ion induced desorption of a TiZrV coated vacuum chamber bombarded with 5 MeV/u Ar{sup 8+} beam at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedlund, E.; Malyshev, O. B.; Westerberg, L.; Krasnov, A.; Semenov, A. S.; Leandersson, M.; Zajec, B.; Kollmus, H.; Bellachioma, M. C.; Bender, M.; Kraemer, A.; Reich-Sprenger, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 535, SE 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 530, SE 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Academician Lavrentiev Prospect, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Materials Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 530, SE 751 21 Uppsala, Sweden and 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TiZrV nonevaporable getter (NEG) coated vacuum chambers is a new vacuum technology which is already used in many particle accelerators worldwide. This coating is also of interest for heavy-ion accelerator vacuum chambers. Heavy-ion desorption yields from an activated as well as a CO saturated NEG coated tube have been measured with 5 MeV/u Ar{sup 8+} beam. The sticking probability of the NEG film was obtained by using the partial pressure ratios on two sides of the NEG coated tube. These ratios were compared to results of modeling of the experimental setup with test particle Monte Carlo and angular coefficient methods. The partial pressures inside the saturated NEG coated tube bombarded with heavy ions were up to 20 times larger than those inside the activated one. However, the partial pressure of methane remained the same. The value of the total desorption yield from the activated NEG coated tube is 2600 molecules/ion. The desorption yields after saturation for CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} were found to be very close to the yields measured after the activation, while CO increased by up to a factor of 5. The total desorption yield for the saturated tube is up to 7000 molecules/ion. The large value of the desorption yield of the activated NEG coated tube, an order of magnitude higher than the desorption yield from a stainless steel tube at normal incident angle, could be explained by the grazing incident angle.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - association studies consortium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1 and Peter Hauge Madsen2 1 Ris... Wind Power, DK-7330 Brande, Denmark Abstract The Danish Wind Energy Research Consortium......

  17. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  18. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  19. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - area consortium research Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University Collection: Engineering 27 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) at the University of California,...

  1. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  2. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional AccountExperience |Reactors The Consortium

  3. New Mexico Consortium works toward food and energy security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1,DepartmentMeasurementNew Mexico Consortium

  4. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos April 7, 2014

  5. Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced-30 QERDNA linkers allowMarch 31, 2015Consortium

  6. US Advanced Battery Consortium USABC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. - UtahAsia ClimateConsortium USABC Jump to:

  7. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  8. Experimental observation of ion beams in the Madison Helicon eXperiment Matt Wiebold, Yung-Ta Sung, and John E. Scharer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    observed in an expanding magnetic field in several heli- con sources.1­12 These double layers form without a net cur- rent through the DL.16­18 Ions traverse the potential structure of the double layer and gain2­5 was one of the first to observe a current-free double layer in an expanding helicon source

  9. A relation between surface oxide and oxygen-defect complexes in solid-phase epitaxial Si regrown from ion-beam-amorphized Si layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Stefano Rassiga and Kelvin positron annihilation spectroscopy, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and Monte Carlo simulations. The O was used to measure the incorporation of O atoms in the Si sub- strate, predicted by Monte Carlo TRIM 8

  10. The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper Prepared by David information that is used by the entire geosciences community. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC open source standards for sharing geospatial and observational information. The authors of this paper

  11. IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER) Illinois Institute of Technology On-campus wind turbine [OVER] The U.S. Department of Energy has invested $8 Million in the IIT-led Wind Energy Consortium to improve wind generation

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic beam merging Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    saved profiles of the first. The dual wire scanner was installed on the ion-atom merged-beams apparatus... V O5 ion beam (typical current density of 1 mAmm2 ) was merged with a...

  13. Beam energy dependent two-pion interferometry and the freeze-out eccentricity of pions in heavy ion collisions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of analyses of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR detector as part of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan program. The extracted correlation lengths (HBT radii) are studied as a function of beam energy, azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane, centrality, and transverse mass ($m_{T}$) of the particles. The azimuthal analysis allows extraction of the eccentricity of the entire fireball at kinetic freeze-out. The energy dependence of this observable is expected to be sensitive to changes in the equation of state. A new global fit method is studied as an alternate method to directly measure the parameters in the azimuthal analysis. The eccentricity shows a monotonic decrease with beam energy that is qualitatively consistent with the trend from all model predictions and quantitatively consistent with a hadronic transport model.

  14. Enhancement of exchange bias and training effect in ion-beam sputtered Fe{sub 46}Mn{sub 54}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulara, Himanshu; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in; Kashyap, Subhash C. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Granville, Simon [Callaghan Innovation, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a remarkable enhancement by 300% of the exchange-bias field at room temperature, without affecting the coercivity value, via optimum magnetic annealing (250?°C/3 kOe) in ion-beam sputtered FeMn(30?nm)/NiFe(10?nm) bilayers. This specific behavior has been attributed to a higher degree of ?-FeMn(111) orientation that offers more interfacial FeMn moments to get pinned with the moments of the adjacent NiFe layer. Unlike the absence of training effect at room temperature, a pronounced training effect and an accompanying magnetization reversal asymmetry are evidenced upon field cooling below 50?K due to the presence of biaxial exchange induced anisotropy across the interdiffused FeMn/NiFe interface. The present findings not only have technological significance but also are of relevance to the understanding of interfacial spin disorder and frustration in these exchange-biased systems.

  15. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  16. Nanopatterning of metal-coated silicon surfaces via ion beam irradiation: Real time x-ray studies reveal the effect of silicide bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atwani, Osman [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gonderman, Sean; Suslova, Anastassiya; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Paul Allain, Jean [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the effect of silicide formation on ion-induced nanopatterning of silicon with various ultrathin metal coatings. Silicon substrates coated with 10 nm Ni, Fe, and Cu were irradiated with 200 eV argon ions at normal incidence. Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) were performed during the irradiation process and real time measurements revealed threshold conditions for nanopatterning of silicon at normal incidence irradiation. Three main stages of the nanopatterning process were identified. The real time GISAXS intensity of the correlated peaks in conjunction with XRF revealed that the nanostructures remain for a time period after the removal of the all the metal atoms from the sample depending on the binding energy of the metal silicides formed. Ex-situ XPS confirmed the removal of all metal impurities. In-situ XPS during the irradiation of Ni, Fe, and Cu coated silicon substrates at normal incidence demonstrated phase separation and the formation of different silicide phases that occur upon metal-silicon mixing. Silicide formation leads to nanostructure formation due the preferential erosion of the non-silicide regions and the weakening of the ion induced mass redistribution.

  17. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Dong-Jin, E-mail: Dongjin.yun@samsung.com; Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung [Analytical Science Laboratory of Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, PO Box 14-1, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51?eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35?eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19?eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69?eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81?eV and Ti: 4.19?eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  18. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

  19. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  20. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo code for simulating ion beam focusing or defocusing with magnetic elements modeled as current loops or current lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, R. A.; Ordonez, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational tool is described that can be used for designing magnetic focusing or defocusing systems. A fully three-dimensional classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation has been developed. Ion trajectories are simulated in the presence of magnetic elements that can be modeled as any combination of current loops and current lines. Each current loop or line may be located anywhere in the system and oriented along any of the three coordinate axes. The configuration need not be axisymmetric. The solutions are obtained using normalized parameters, which can be used for easily scaling the results. Examples are provided of the utility of the code.

  1. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of the space-time extent of the pion emission source produced in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; H. Al-Ta'ani; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; X. Bing; D. Black; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; P. Castera; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; L. D'Orazio; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. Guragain; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; S. Hasegawa; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; Y. Imazu; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; D. Ivanishchev; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; S. J. Jeon; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; E. Joo; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. Kihara; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; H. -J. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; M. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klatsky; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; M. Kofarago; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; A. J. Miller; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; T. Nagae; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; C. Nattrass; A. Nederlof; P. K. Netrakanti; J. Newby

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-pion interferometry measurements are used to extract the Gaussian radii $R_{{\\rm out}}$, $R_{{\\rm side}}$, and $R_{{\\rm long}}$, of the pion emission sources produced in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au collisions at several beam collision energies $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ at PHENIX. The extracted radii, which are compared to recent STAR and ALICE data, show characteristic scaling patterns as a function of the initial transverse size $\\bar{R}$ of the collision systems and the transverse mass $m_T$ of the emitted pion pairs, consistent with hydrodynamiclike expansion. Specific combinations of the three-dimensional radii that are sensitive to the medium expansion velocity and lifetime, and the pion emission time duration show nonmonotonic $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ dependencies. The nonmonotonic behaviors exhibited by these quantities point to a softening of the equation of state that may coincide with the critical end point in the phase diagram for nuclear matter.

  2. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - ablation ion trap Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Texas at Austin Collection: Physics 8 The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Status of heavy-ion-beam-driven Summary: . High coupling...

  4. The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

  5. Doublet III neutral beam power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

  6. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

  7. Genomic Standards Consortium's Eighth Annual Meeting: Opening Remarks (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Dawn

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dawn Field of the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology presents the overview of the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  8. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

  9. New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

  10. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  12. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  13. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  14. Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in {sup 249}Cm by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, T. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, M. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makishima, A. [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo 154-8525 (Japan); Shizuma, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Toume, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Hossain, I. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured de-excitation {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a {sup 248}Cm target and 162-MeV {sup 16}O, 162-MeV {sup 18}O, and 120-MeV {sup 13}C beams. {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the ({sup 16}O, {sup 15}O) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2{sup +}[620], 1/2{sup -}[750], and 7/2{sup +}[613] bands were extended up to 19/2{sup +}, 19/2{sup -}, and 13/2{sup +} states, respectively. We have established the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[604] state with a short life of T{sub 1/2}<<2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/2 11/2{sup -}[725] state with T{sub 1/2}=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/2 1/2{sup +}[880] state, having a large component of the k{sub 17/2} spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

  15. 154 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 Scanning Laser-Beam-Induced Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    154 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 Scanning Laser-Beam-Induced Current-efficiency silicon-based photovoltaics. They are notable for their high open-circuit voltage (Voc), which can exceed Exchange, and the Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium. The work of Z. C. Holman, A. Descoeudres, S. De Wolf

  16. RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS J. D. LARSON (*) Oak Ridge National are frequently encounte- red during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples are provided of analytic procedures that clarify accelerator ion optics and lead to more effective beam

  17. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

  18. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, R.W.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams is disclosed. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications. 16 figs.

  19. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties of epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3}-BiMnO{sub 3} films on ion-beam-assisted deposited TiN buffered flexible Hastelloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, J., E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Matias, V.; Jia, Q. X. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Tao, B. W.; Li, Y. R. [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of multifunctional thin films on flexible substrates is of great technological significance since such a platform is needed for flexible electronics. In this study, we report the growth of biaxially aligned (BiFeO{sub 3}){sub 0.5}:(BiMnO{sub 3}){sub 0.5} [BFO-BMO] films on polycrystalline Hastelloy by using a biaxially aligned TiN as a seed layer deposited by ion-beam-assisted deposited and a La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) as a buffer layer deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The LSMO is used not only as a buffer layer but also as the bottom electrode of the BFO-BMO films. X-ray diffraction showed that the BFO-BMO films are biaxially oriented along both in-plane and out-of-plane directions. The BFO-BMO films on flexible metal substrates showed a polarization of 22.9??C/cm{sup 2}. The magnetization of the BFO-BMO/LSMO is 62?emu/cc at room temperature.

  20. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.