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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

An Improved Synthesis of BrettPhos- and RockPhos-Type Biarylphosphine Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved processes for the preparation of biphenyl-based phosphine ligands t-BuBrettPhos, RockPhos, and BrettPhos are presented. The new methods, featuring the use of Grignard reagents and catalytic amounts of copper, are ...

Hoshiya, Naoyuki

2

Test of an LED Monitoring System for the PHOS Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint submitted to Elsevier Print on 26th January 2000A prototype monitoring system for the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is described in detail. The prototype consists of Control and Master modules. The first one is 8x8 matrix of Light Emitting Diodes coupled with stable generators of current pulses. The system provides an individual control for each of the 64 channels of PHOS prototype based on lead-tungstate crystals. A long term stability of order of 10-3 has been achieved in integral beam tests of the monitoring system and PHOS prototypes.

Blick, A M; Erin, S V; Kharlov, Yu V; Lobanov, M O; Mikhailov, Yu V; Minaev, N G; Petrov, V A; Sadovsky, S A; Samoylenko, V D; Suzdalev, V I; Senko, V A; Tikhonov, V V

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Trigger region unit for the ALICE PHOS calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of ALICE measures electromagnetic showers of up to 100 GeV via a large matrix of PWO crystals, each read out by an APD. Trigger regions consist of 28*16 crystals, inter-connected via analogue signals generated on front-end cards and transmitted to Trigger Region Units (TRU) which digitize and process the analogue hit information. Eight TRU cards are embedded inside each PHOS module in water-cooled cassettes, each inserted between a block 14 FEE readout cards. Analogue sums are generated by fast summing shapers, with their outputs connected to the TRU via equal-length differential cables. The TRU receives analogue sums on 112 inputs and digitizes these via 12 bit ADCs which are inter-connected with a central FPGA via serial LVDS links. The level-0 and level-1 trigger algorithms are based on pipelined charge summing over 4 consecutive samples and over 4*4 crystal windows. Low latency level-0 decisions and more refined level-1 decisions are generated as a 40 MHz Yes/No sequence whi...

Müller, Hans; Li Qing Xia; Pimenta, Rui; Röhrich, Dieter; Skaali, Bernhard; Oltean, Alexandra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Environmental Protection Agency 61.220 (iii) The quantity (in pounds) of phos-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the phosphogypsum; (vi) A copy of each certification doc- ument which accompanied the phos- phogypsum at the time or transfer of phosphogypsum to a person other than an agricultural end- user, the distributor, retailer information: (1) The name and address of the per- son in charge of the activity involving use of phosphogypsum

5

Immobilization of iodine in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

Clark, Walter E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thompson, Clarence T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Welcome alumni and friends to the 2007 edition of the G-Hawker. The Department of Geology has done remarkably well over the last year, and I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. & FALGUEIRETTES, J. (1973). Acta Cryst. B29, 1623-1630. EMMERSON, D. S. & CORBRIDGE,D. E. C. (1972). Phos- phorus,W. T. (1965). J. Chem. Phys. 42, 3175-3187. Acta Cryst. (1973). B29, 2918 The Crystal Structure Sciences, Columbia UniversiO', New York, New York 10027, U.S.A. (Received 8 February 1973; accepted 30 July

Peterson, Blake R.

7

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012 Pyro Conf Iodine Partitioning 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in EBR-II Fuel Iodine Off-gas During Pyroprocessing Iodine off-gas during salt distillation operations Iodine off-gas during ceramic waste form production Iodine Off-gas...

8

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

9

Iodine Stabilized Helium-Neon Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... stabilized lasers or spectral lamps that have been recommended for use by international consensus. The iodine stabilized helium-neon laser is just ...

10

Iodine transport analysis in the ESBWR.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified ESBWR MELCOR model was developed to track the transport of iodine released from damaged reactor fuel in a hypothesized core damage accident. To account for the effects of iodine pool chemistry, radiolysis of air and cable insulation, and surface coatings (i.e., paint) the iodine pool model in MELCOR was activated. Modifications were made to MELCOR to add sodium pentaborate as a buffer in the iodine pool chemistry model. An issue of specific interest was whether iodine vapor removed from the drywell vapor space by the PCCS heat exchangers would be sequestered in water pools or if it would be rereleased as vapor back into the drywell. As iodine vapor is not included in the deposition models for diffusiophoresis or thermophoresis in current version of MELCOR, a parametric study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a range of iodine removal coefficients in the PCCS heat exchangers. The study found that higher removal coefficients resulted in a lower mass of iodine vapor in the drywell vapor space.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Young, Michael Francis; Longmire, Pamela

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M.sub.2 O.3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. 6SiO.sub.2.2MX, where M=alkali metal; X=I.sup.- or IO.sub.3.sup.-) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800.degree. to 1100.degree. C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite.

Babad, Harry (Richland, WA); Strachan, Denis M. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dry method for recycling iodine-loaded silver zeolite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fission product iodine is removed from a waste gas stream and stored by passing the gas stream through a bed of silver-exchanged zeolite until the zeolite is loaded with iodine, passing dry hydrogen gas through the bed to remove the iodine and regenerate the bed, and passing the hydrogen stream containing the hydrogen iodide thus formed through a lead-exchanged zeolite which adsorbs the radioactive iodine from the gas stream and permanently storing the lead-exchanged zeolite loaded with radioactive iodine.

Thomas, Thomas R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Staples, Bruce A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Murphy, Llewellyn P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Iodine Revolatilization in a Grand Gulf Loca  

SciTech Connect

The TRENDS models are applied at each time step to each control volume. Significant amounts of water occur only in the wetwell and drywell sump (the refueling pool is not a factor, as discussed earlier). In Fig. 2, we show the radiolytic acid production feeding into each of these pools. Since the water is initially neutral and no chemical additives are present, the acid additions are the major factors affecting pH. In Fig. 3, we see the downward trend of pH resulting from these acid additions. The conversion of iodide (I{sup {minus}}) to molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) is most noticeable in the wetwell, since this is the repository of most iodide and HCl. Gradually, during the transient small amounts of more volatile iodine are formed. While iodide remains the dominant form, noticeable amounts of I{sub 2} and intermediate species are created. Once produced in water, some I{sub 2} is free to evaporate into airspace. Fig. 4 indicates the increase in all airborne iodine throughout the transient. This is compared to the MELCOR result for CsI aerosol, which decreases dramatically due to containment sprays. The I{sub 2} in the airspace can be vented to the enclosure building or the environment. In the present accident sequence, the only path to the environment was through the SGTS, which was assumed to operate as in MELCOR. However, both are dwarfed by the MELCOR gaseous release during the first 12 h because MELCOR does not model spray washout of gaseous iodine. Steadily increasing throughout the transient, the revolatilization release is eventually more than an order-or-magnitude higher than the MELCOR aerosol release. Also, 99% of iodine flowing directly through the SGTS was retained in filters. The remaining 1% was released to the environment. In addition, a small flow bypassing the SGTS filters vented directly into the environment. The total released from these two paths is shown in Fig. 5.

Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism  

SciTech Connect

Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine (/sup 131/I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of /sup 131/I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of /sup 131/I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that /sup 131/I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined.

Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent melt attack.

Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to study the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production. There were three reactions in this cycle: Bunsen reaction, sulfuric… (more)

Dan, Huang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method for gettering organic, inorganic and elemental iodine in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of iodine from aqueous solutions, particularly the trapping of radioactive iodine to mitigate damage resulting from accidents or spills associated with nuclear reactors, by exposing the solution to well dispersed silver carbonate which reacts with the iodine and iodides, thereby gettering iodine and iodine compounds from solution. The iodine is not only removed from solution but also from the contiguous vapor.

Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I-129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Iodine capture is an important aspect of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Off-gas Sigma Team (Jubin 2011, Pantano 2011). Deep-bed iodine sorption tests for both silver-functionalized Aerogel and silver zeolite sorbents were performed during Fiscal Year 2012. These tests showed that: • Decontamination factors were achieved that exceed reasonably conservative estimates for DFs needed for used fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.S. to meet regulatory requirements for I-129 capture. • Silver utilizations approached or exceeded 100% for high inlet gas iodine concentrations, but test durations were not long enough to approach 100% silver utilization for lower iodine concentrations. • The depth of the mass transfer zone was determined for both low iodine concentrations (under 10 ppmv) and for higher iodine concentrations (between 10-50 ppmv); the depth increases over time as iodine is sorbed. • These sorbents capture iodine by chemisorption, where the sorbed iodine reacts with the silver to form very non-volatile AgI. Any sorbed iodine that is physisorbed but not chemically reacted with silver to form AgI might not be tightly held by the sorbent. The portion of sorbed iodine that tends to desorb because it is not chemisorbed (reacted to form AgI) is small, under 1%, for the AgZ tests, and even smaller, under 0.01%, for the silver-functionalized Aerogel.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

AGING AND IODINE LOADING OF SILVER-FUNCTIONALIZED AEROGELS  

SciTech Connect

Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Silver-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine capture capacity, high porosity and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag0-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41wt% to 32wt%.

Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Anderson, Kaara K [ORNL; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Method of extracting iodine from liquid mixtures of iodine, water and hydrogen iodide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The components of a liquid mixture consisting essentially of HI, water and at least about 50 w/o iodine are separated in a countercurrent extraction zone by treating with phosphoric acid containing at least about 90 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. The bottom stream from the extraction zone is substantially completely molten iodine, and the overhead stream contains water, HI, H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 and a small fraction of the amount of original iodine. When the water and HI are present in near-azeotropic proportions, there is particular advantage in feeding the overhead stream to an extractive distillation zone wherein it is treated with additional concentrated phosphoric acid to create an anhydrous HI vapor stream and bottoms which contain at least about 85 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. Concentration of these bottoms provides phosphoric acid infeed for both the countercurrent extraction zone and for the extractive distillation zone.

Mysels, Karol J. (La Jolla, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electron-collision cross sections for iodine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results from a joint experimental and theoretical study of elastic electron scattering from atomic iodine. The experimental results were obtained by subtracting known cross sections from the measured data obtained with a pyrolyzed mixed beam containing a variety of atomic and molecular species. The calculations were performed using both a fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method and an optical model potential approach. Given the difficulty of the problem, the agreement between the two sets of theoretical predictions and the experimental data for the angle-differential and the angle-integrated elastic cross sections at 40 eV and 50 eV is satisfactory.

Zatsarinny, O.; Bartschat, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); Hargreaves, L.R.; Jones, D.B.; Murrie, R.; Brunton, J.R. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Brunger, M.J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hoshino, M. [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Buckman, S.J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Separation of iodine from mercury containing scrubbing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodines can be recovered from a nitric acid scrub solution containing mercuric nitrate by passing a current through the scrub solution to react the iodine with the mercuric nitrate to form mercuric iodate which precipitates out. The mercuric iodate can then be reacted to recover the radioiodine for further processing into a form suitable for long-term storage and to recover the mercury for recycling.

Burger, Leland L. (Richland, WA); Scheele, Randall D. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Recycle of iodine-loaded silver mordenite by hydrogen reduction  

SciTech Connect

In 1977 and 1978, workers at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) developed and tested a process for the regeneration and reuse of silver mordenite, AgZ, used to trap iodine from the dissolver off-gas stream of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. We were requested by the Airborne Waste Management Program Office of the Department of Energy to perform a confirmatory recycle study using repeated loadings at about 150/sup 0/C with elemental iodine, each followed by a drying step at 300/sup 0/C, then by iodine removal using elemental hydrogen at 500/sup 0/C. The results of our study show that AgZ can be recycled. There was considerable difficulty in stripping the iodine at 500/sup 0/C.; however, this step went reasonably well at 550/sup 0/C or slightly higher, with no apparent loss in the iodine-loading capacity of the AgZ. Large releases of elemental iodine occurred during the drying stage and the early part of the stripping stage. Lead zeolite, which was employed in the original design to trap the HI produced, is ineffective in removal of I/sub 2/. The process needs modification to handle the iodine. Severe corrosion of the stainless steel components of the system resulted from the HI-I/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O mixture. Monel or other halogen-resistant materials need to be examined for this application. Because of difficulty with the stripping stage and with corrosion, the experiments were terminated after 12 cycles. Thus, the maximum lifetime (cycles) of recycle AgZ has not been determined. Mechanistic studies of iodine retention by silver zeolites and of the behavior of silver atoms on the reduction stage would be of assistance in optimizing silver mordenite recycle.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Selection of a form for fixation of iodine-129  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on the selection of an /sup 129/I disposal form. Iodine compounds have been screened on the basis of solubilities, thermal stabilities, cost and availability, toxicity of the cation, and the thermodynamic resistance to oxidation and hydrolysis, and leaching of that compound in portland type III cement. Also considered were iodine capture technology, disposal criteria or guidelines, and the disposal site/strategy. The recommended iodine fixation forms, based on their leach resistance and chemical stability and contingent on the disposal strategy/site and capture technique, are silver iodide in cement and barium, calcium, or strontium, and mercuric iodates in cement. Iodine sodalite appears promising and merits further study. If compatible with disposal requirements, the recommended forms for Mercurex and Iodox are insoluble iodates in cement and for silver sorbents the sorbents in cement or AgI in cement. Conversion between the different oxidation states of iodine is feasible but complicates the iodine treatment. For the different disposal strategies, isotopic dilution or ocean disposal has the least stringent disposal form requirements. Any of the recommended forms should be suitable with proper site selection. Isolation in a geologic repository for thousands of years requires the disposal form to be thermally and chemically stable and resistant to leaching at elevated temperatures. Probably the best form studied for isolation is silver iodide in cement. For extraterrestrial disposal, the disposal form may have to withstand reentry impact and surface disposal in the event of an aborted mission; this assumes the capsule is not recovered. Thus the primary containment barrier is critical. The suggested iodine form for space disposal is a heavy metal iodide.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Wiemers, K.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products that increasingly interfere with the fission process as their concentrations increase. Some of these fission and activation products tend to evolve in gaseous species during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Deep-bed iodine sorption testing has been done to evaluate the performance of solid sorbents for capturing iodine in off-gas streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The objectives of the FY 2011 deep bed iodine sorbent testing are: (1) Evaluate sorbents for iodine capture under various conditions of gas compositions and operating temperature (determine sorption efficiencies, capacities, and mass transfer zone depths); and (2) Generate data for dynamic iodine sorption modeling. Three tests performed this fiscal year on silver zeolite light phase (AgZ-LP) sorbent are reported here. Additional tests are still in progress and can be reported in a revision of this report or a future report. Testing was somewhat delayed and limited this year due to initial activities to address some questions of prior testing, and due to a period of maintenance for the on-line GC. Each test consisted of (a) flowing a synthetic blend of gases designed to be similar to an aqueous dissolver off-gas stream over the sorbent contained in three separate bed segments in series, (b) measuring each bed inlet and outlet gas concentrations of iodine and methyl iodide (the two surrogates of iodine gas species considered most representative of iodine species expected in dissolver off-gas), (c) operating for a long enough time to achieve breakthrough of the iodine species from at least one (preferably the first two) bed segments, and (d) post-test purging with pure N2 to drive loosely or physisorbed iodine species off of the sorbent. Post-test calculations determine the control efficiencies for each bed, iodine loadings on the sorbent, and mass transfer zone depths. Portions of the iodine-laden sorbent from the first bed of two of the tests have been shipped to SNL for waste form studies. Over the past three years, we have explored a full range of inlet iodine and methyl iodide concentrations ranging from {approx}100 ppb to {approx}100 ppm levels, and shown adequate control efficiencies within a bed depth as shallow as 2 inches for lower concentrations and 4 inches for higher concentrations, for the AgZ-type sorbents. We are now performing a limited number of tests in the NC-77 sorbent from SNL. Then we plan to continue to (a) fill in data gaps needed for isotherms and dynamic sorbent modeling, and (b) test the performance of additional sorbents under development.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

NIST{endash}JANAF Thermochemical Tables for the Iodine Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of the iodine oxide species have been reviewed. Recommended NIST{endash}JANAF Thermochemical Tables are given for six gaseous iodine oxides: IO, OIO, IOO, IOI, IIO, and IO{sub 3}. Sufficient information is not available to generate thermochemical tables for any condensed phase species. Annotated bibliographies (over 400 references) are provided for all neutral iodine oxides which have been reported in the literature. There is a lack of experimental thermodynamic and spectroscopic information for all iodine oxide species, except IO(g) and OIO(g). The recommended thermochemical tables are based on estimates for the structure, vibrational frequencies, and enthalpy of formation based in part on the spectroscopic and thermodynamic data for the other halogen oxides [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data {bold 25}, 551 (1996); {bold 25}, 1061 (1996)]. Although there is a definite lack of information in comparison with the other halides, this information is provided for the iodine oxides for the following reasons: (1) to complete the study of the halogen oxide family and (2) to stress the need for additional experimental measurements. Of all the species mentioned in the literature, many have not been isolated or characterized. In fact, some do not exist. Throughout this paper, uncertainties attached to recommended values correspond to the uncertainty interval, equal to twice the standard deviation of the mean. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society.}

Chase, M.W. [Standard Reference Data Program, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Light-Induced Passivation of Si by Iodine Ethanol Solution: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our observations of light-activated passivation of silicon surfaces by iodine-ethanol solution.

Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Guhaabiswas, D.; Anderson-Jackson, L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Labeling of indocyanine green with carrier-free iodine-123  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of labeling indocyanine green (ICG) with carrier-free iodine-123 comprising the steps of condensing xenon-123 on crystals of ICG followed by permitting decay of the .sup.123 Xe a sufficient length of time to produce .sup.123 I-electronically excited ions and atoms which subsequently label ICG.

Ansari, Azizullah N. (Mount Sinai, NY); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Redvanly, Carol S. (Upton, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Downstream Behavior of Volatile Iodine, Cesium, and Tellurium Fission Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of how iodine, cesium, and tellurium fission products deposit on primary reactor components during a degraded core accident can help utility analysts improve computer codes that model product behavior. The mathematical model developed in this study predicts the behavior of deposited products vaporized or revaporized by self-heating in a reactor accident.

1989-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hanging coverslip method for cell surface iodination of monolayer cultures  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described by which the use of a 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3 alpha,6 alpha-diphenyl glycoluril (iodogen)-coated coverslip to iodinate the cell surface proteins of monolayer cultures has been improved by hanging the coverslip at a defined distance from the cells. This method allows gentle manipulation of the cell culture, resulting in retention of high cell viability and in recovery of the cell monolayer with a minimum of mechanical damage. In addition, it allows the safe disposal of the radioactive coverslip upon completion of the reaction. Finally, the labeling is surface specific. The application of this procedure to 3T3 fibroblasts results in labeling of proteins comparable to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodinations.

Moutsatsos, I.K.; Cok, S.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Funding was received from NA-22 to investigate transitioning iodine isotopic analyses to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. The present method uses gas-phase chemistry followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). It was anticipated that the AMS approach could provide comparable data, with improved background levels and superior sample throughput. An aqueous extraction method was developed for removal of iodine species from high-volume air filters. Ethanol and sodium hydroxide, plus heating and ultrasonic treatment, were used to successfully extract iodine from loaded high-volume air filters. Portions of the same filters were also processed in the traditional method and analyzed by TIMS for comparison. Aliquot parts of the aqueous extracts were analyzed by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel visited several AMS laboratories in the US, Spain, and Switzerland. Experience with AMS systems from several manufacturers was gained, and relationships were developed with key personnel at the laboratories. Three batches of samples were analyzed in Switzerland, and one in Spain. Results show that the INL extraction method successfully extracted enough iodine from high-volume air filters to allow AMS analysis. Comparison of the AMS and TIMS data is very encouraging; while the TIMS showed about forty percent more atoms of 129I, the 129/127 ratios tracked each other very well between the two methods. The time required for analysis is greatly reduced for the aqueous extraction/AMS approach. For a hypothetical batch of thirty samples, the AMS methodology is about five times faster than the traditional gas-phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than for TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and cleanup of molecular interferences. We showed that an aqueous extraction of high-volume air filters, followed by isotopic analysis by AMS, can be used successfully to make iodine measurements with results comparable to those obtained by filter combustion and TIMS analysis.

J. E. Delmore

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Iodine photodissociation laser with an intracavity space - time light modulator  

SciTech Connect

A scheme of an iodine laser with two different intracavity space - time modulators based on electrooptic PLZT ceramics is experimentally studied. It is shown that lasing can occur in different angular directions with the use of both modulators. The output laser energy is 10 mJ with a pulse duration of 200 {mu}s and a beam divergence of 6.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} rad. The laser field of view (5.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} rad) consists of a discrete set of 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 directions. (control of laser radiation parameters)

Kachalin, G N; Pevny, S N; Pivkin, A N; Safronov, A S [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Improved efficiency in the sulfur dioxide-iodine hydrogen cycle through the use of magnesium oxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of iodine with dry magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfite hexahydrate was studied experimentally as a possible means of improving the efficiency of the sulfur dioxide-iodine cycle. When no extra water was introduced, the maximum product yield was 67% obtained at 423 K. With excess water vapor, a nonporous plug was formed which prevented complete reaction. In the second case, maximum yield was 62% measured at 433 K showing that added water does not increase reaction products. This reaction gives an alternate route for producing hydrogen from water via the sulfur dioxide-iodine process.

Mason, C.F.V.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrothermal synthesis of Sb2S3nanorods using iodine via redox mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystalline antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) with nanorods morphology was successfully prepared via hydrothermal method by the reaction of elemental sulfur, antimony, and iodine as starting materials with high yield at 180°C for 24 ...

Abdolali Alemi; Sang Woo Joo; Younes Hanifehpour; Aliakbar Khandar; Ali Morsali; Bong-Ki Min

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, where anthropogenic 129 I from

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Iodine and NO sub x behavior in the dissolver off-gas and IODOX (Iodine Oxidation) systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Integrated Equipment Test facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments evaluating the behavior of iodine and NO{sub x} in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) Dissolver Off-Gas (DOG) System. This work was performed as part of a joint collaborative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The DOG system consists of two shell-and-tube heat exchangers in which water and nitric acid are removed from the dissolver off-gas by condensation, followed by a packed tower in which NO{sub x} is removed by absorption into a dilute nitric acid solution. The paper also describes the results of the operation of the Iodine Oxidation (IODOX) System. This system serves to remove iodine from the DOG system effluent by absorption into hyperazeotropic nitric acid. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Birdwell, J.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

RADIOACTIVE IODINE IN THE LYMPH LEAVING THE THYROID GLAND  

SciTech Connect

Very high levels of I/sup 131/ were found in lymph of vessels draining the thyroid gland of animals injected with the isotope. The lymph was collected from the draining lymphatics 2-6 days after subcutaneous injection of 50-100 mu C in rabbits and cats and 200 mu C in sheep. Thyroid lymph contained a concentration of radioactivity considerably higher than that in either thyroid venous plasma or systemic blood plasma. This was found in all three species both before and after giving thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Almost all the radioactivity in the lymph was due to organic I/sup 131/. When tie thyroid gland was excised postmortem, a count showed that the proportion of I/sup 131/ which had been injected and which rernained in the gland at the end of the experiment varied considerably. Estimates of the radiation dose varied between 30 and 200 rad. There was no obvious relation between this dose the lymph/plasma I/sup 131/ ratio, which indicates that the radiation dose was not so high as to produce damage to the gland. The radiation dose to the thyroid in these experiments was not greater than is customarily given in studies of hormone release from the thyroid and the dosage used gives a lower level of radiation than that thought to cause radiation damage to the gland. Since, therefore, damage to the thyroid can be discounted as a cause for the release of iodinated protein, it seems likely that a significart proportion of organic iodine leaves the gland under normal conditions via the lymphatic pathway both before and after the administration of TSH and that this pathway should be taken into account in all studies of thyroid secretion. Gentle massage of the gland, which increases the flow of lymph, did not lead to an increase in the output of radioactivity. Movement of lymph in the thyroid vessels is relatively rapid and since the concentration of I/sup 131/ in thyroid lymph is high, the amount of thyroid hormones leaving the gland by this pathway must be considerable. (BBB)

Daniel, R.M.; Gale, M.M.; Pratt, O.E.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, Results of the Phase II Testing of Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International collaborative effort to construct a laboratory-scale Sulfur-Iodine process capable of producing 100-200 L/hr of hydrogen.

Benjamin Russ; G. Naranjo; R. Moore; W. Sweet; M. Hele; N. Pons

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Thermal-hydraulic response and iodine transport during a steam generator tube rupture  

SciTech Connect

Recent reanalyses of the offsite dose consequences following a steam generator tube rupture have identified a possible non-conservatism in original FSAR analyses. Post-trip uncovery of the top of the steam generator U-tubes, in conjunction with a break near the U-tube top, could lead to increased iodine release due to a reduced ''scrubbing'' of the iodine in the primary break fluid by the steam generator secondary liquid. To evaluate this issue, analyses were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RELAP5 computer code was used to conduct an analysis of the Surry plant to determine whether the post-trip steam generator secondary mixture level was sufficient to maintain continuous coverage of the U-tubes. The results indicated continuous coverage of the U-tubes. The RELAP5 result was supported by a hand calculation. Additional RELAP5 analyses were conducted to determine magnitudes of iodine release for a steam generator tube rupture. Two sensitivity studies were conducted. The amount of iodine released to the atmosphere was strongly dependent on the assumed value of the partition coefficient. The assumption of steam generator U-tube uncovery, on a collapsed liquid level basis, following reactor trip had a minor effect on the amount of released iodine. 17 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Callow, R.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

“Super Phos” esters: the key to higher-performance products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robert L. Reierson, winner of the 2012 Samuel Rosen Memorial Award recognizing accomplishments in surfactant chemistry, describes how phosphation process control makes it possible to systematically design and adjust product compositions to deliver maximum

49

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

Matsui, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

T. Matsui

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Features of adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in iodine air filters AU-1500 at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim of research is to investigate the physical features of spatial distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the iodine air filters of the type of AU1500 in the forced exhaust ventilation systems at the nuclear power plant. The gamma activation analysis method is applied to accurately characterize the distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the AU1500 iodine air filter after its long term operation at the nuclear power plant. The typical spectrum of the detected chemical elements and their isotopes in the AU1500 iodine air filter, which was exposed to the bremsstrahlung gamma quantum irradiation, produced by the accelerating electrons in the tantalum target, are obtained. The spatial distributions of the detected chemical element 127I and some other chemical elements and their isotopes in the layer of absorber, which was made of the cylindrical coal granules of the type of SKT3, in the AU1500 iodine air filter are also researched. The possible influences by the standing acoustic wave of air pressure in the iodine air filter on the spatial distribution of the chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter are discussed. The comprehensive analysis of obtained research results on the distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber of iodine air filter is performed.

I. M. Neklyudov; A. N. Dovbnya; N. P. Dikiy; O. P. Ledenyov; Yu. V. Lyashko

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

Evaluation of the potential to upgrade the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 to higher output energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted output energy of the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 is given for various numbers of preamplifier stages and for various small signal gains in each stage. Additional possibilities for further increasing the output energy are given.

Riley, M.E.; Palmer, R.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The development of autocatalytic structural materials for use in the sulfur-iodine process for the production of hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen offers many benefits to traditional methods of hydrogen production. As opposed to steam methane reforming - the most prevalent method of hydrogen ...

Miu, Kevin (Kevin K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

Benjamin Russ

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Physical features of accumulation and distribution processes of small disperse coal dust precipitations and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of absorption process of radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filters of the type of AU-1500 at the nuclear power plants are researched. It is shown that the non-homogenous spatial distribution of absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter, probed by the gamma-activation analysis method, is well correlated with the spatial distribution of small disperse coal dust precipitations in the iodine air filter. This circumstance points out to an important role by the small disperse coal dust fractions of absorber in the absorption process of radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter. The physical origins of characteristic interaction between the radioactive chemical elements and the accumulated small disperse coal dust precipitations in an iodine air filter are considered. The analysis of influence by the researched physical processes on the technical characteristics and functionality of iodine ...

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ultraviolet photodissociation of iodine monochloride (ICl) at 235, 250, and 265 nm  

SciTech Connect

ICl photolysis in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (235-265 nm) is studied using the Slice Imaging technique. The Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and the I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) branching ratio between the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) + Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})/Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) and I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) + Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})/Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) channels is extracted from the respective iodine and chlorine photofragment images. We find that ground state chlorine atoms (Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})) are formed nearly exclusively with excited state iodine atoms (I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})), while excited spin-orbit chlorine atoms (Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})) are concurrently produced only with ground state iodine atoms (I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})). We conclude that photolysis of ICl in this UV region is a relatively ''clean'' source of spin-orbit excited chlorine atoms that can be used in crossed molecular beam experiments.

Diamantopoulou, N.; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Iraklion 71110 (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Iraklion 71003 (Greece); Kartakoulis, A.; Glodic, P.; Samartzis, Peter C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Iraklion 71110 (Greece)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as 134 degrees Celsius. Transmembrane fluxes of water are commercially competitive (~5000 g/m2h) and separation factors have been measured as high as 8000, depending on the membrane and the water content. For the Nafion-117 experiments, the common trade off in membrane performance is observed in that as flux is increased, separation factor decreases. Nafion-112, a thinner membrane, exhibited much higher fluxes than the Nafion-117; however without the expected loss in separation factor indicating that the permeability of iodine and HI through Nafion materials is low. Preliminary data for the sulfuric acid concentration suggests performance similar to the HI experiments. All membranes studied for the HI, HI/iodine and sulfuric acid feeds exhibited no degradation in membrane performance during use.

Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy is currently investigating alternative sorbents for the removal and immobilization of radioiodine from the gas streams in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. One of these new sorbents, Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels, shows great promise as a potential replacement for Ag-bearing mordenites because of its high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine. Moreover, a feasible consolidation of iodine-loaded Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes this aerogel an attractive choice for sequestering radioiodine. This report provides a preliminary assessment of the methods that can be used to consolidate iodine-loaded Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels into a final waste form. In particular, it focuses on experimental investigation of densification of as prepared Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels powders, with or without organic moiety and with or without sintering additive (colloidal silica), with three commercially available techniques: 1) hot uniaxial pressing (HUP), 2) hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and 3) spark plasma sintering (SPS). The densified products were evaluated with helium gas pycnometer for apparent density, with the Archimedes method for apparent density and open porosity, and with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) for the extent of densification and distribution of individual elements. The preliminary investigation of HUP, HIP, and SPS showed that these sintering methods can effectively consolidate powders of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel into products of near-theoretical density. Also, removal of organic moiety and adding 5.6 mass% of colloidal silica to Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel powders before processing provided denser products. Furthermore, the ram travel data for SPS indicated that rapid consolidation of powders can be performed at temperatures below 950°C.

Matyas, Josef; Engler, Robert K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Effect of Dietary Intake of Stable Iodine on Dose-per-unit-intake Factors for 99Tc  

SciTech Connect

It is well-known that the human thyroid concentrates iodine more than 100 times the concentration in plasma. Also well-known is the fact that large amounts of stable iodine in the diet can limit thyroid uptake of total iodine; this is the basis for administering potassium iodide following a release of radioiodine from a nuclear reactor accident or nuclear weapon detonation. Many researchers have shown enhanced concentrations of both organic and inorganic iodine in saliva and breast milk. Technetium-99 is a long-lived (231,000 year half-life) radionuclide of concern in the management of high-level radioactive waste. There is no doubt that 99Tc, if it is in groundwater, will be found in the chemical form of pertechnetate, 99TcO4?. Pertechnetate is a large anion, almost identical in size to iodide, I?. The nuclear medicine literature shows that pertechnetate concentrates in the thyroid, salivary glands, and lactating breast in addition to the stomach, liver, and alimentary tract as currently recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The fact that large intakes of stable iodine (127I) in the diet limit uptake of iodine by the thyroid leads one to generalize that stable iodine in the diet may also limit thyroid uptake of pertechnetate. While there is at least one report that iodine in the diet blocks uptake of 99mTcO4? by the thyroid and salivary glands (which have the same Na/I symporter, the biochemical concentration mechanism), the level of protective effect seen for blocking radioactive iodine is not expected for 99TcO4? because pertechnetate does not become organically bound in the thyroid and thus is not retained for months the way iodide is. While it does account for Tc concentration in the thyroid, the existing ICRP biokinetic model for technetium does not take enhanced concentrations in salivary gland and breast tissue into account. From the survey of the nuclear medicine literature, it is not possible to compute the effect of stable iodine in the diet on the dose per unit intake factors for 99Tc without developing an improved biokinetic model for technetium. Specific experiments should be designed to quantitatively evaluate 99TcO4? metabolism, excretion, and secretion, as well as to evaluate its chemical toxicity It is recommended that the ICRP reexamine its biokinetics models for Tc based on nuclear medicine data that have accumulated over the years. In particular, the ICRP ignores the lactation pathway, the enhanced concentration of Tc in breast and breast milk, and enhanced concentration of Tc (and I) in the salivary glands as well as in the thyroid. The ICRP should also explicitly incorporate the effect of stable iodine in the diet into both its models for iodine and technetium. The effect of concentration of Tc in breast milk needs further study for dosimetric implications to nursing infants whose mothers may ingest 99TcO4? from groundwater sources. The ICRP should also investigate the possibility of enhanced concentration of both I and Tc in the non-lactating female breast. To do these re-evaluations of biokinetic models, new experiments designed specifically to evaluate these questions concerning the biokinetics of Tc and I are needed.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser  

SciTech Connect

The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio {Pi}. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at {tau}{sub d} {<=} 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of {tau}{sub d} = 5 - 7, {Pi} = 4 - 8. (lasers)

Mezhenin, A V; Azyazov, V N

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Test bench for studying the outlook for industrial applications of an oxygen-iodine laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the development and tests of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser test bench based on a twisted-aerosol-flow singlet-oxygen generator and a supersonic laser model for studying the outlook for industrial applications of this laser. The maximal output power of the laser is {approx}65 kW (the average power is {approx}50 kW), corresponding to a specific output power of {approx}110 W cm{sup -2}. The maximal chemical efficiency is {approx}34%. (letters)

Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Bogachev, A V; Buryak, E V; Vdovkin, L A; Velikanov, S D; Vyskubenko, B A; Garanin, Sergey G; Gorbacheva, E V; Grigorovich, Sergei V; Il'in, S P; Il'kaev, R I; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kalashnik, A M; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Leonov, M L; Svischev, V V; Troshkin, M V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

Benjamin Russ

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey  

SciTech Connect

A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.

Daryl Haefner

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of a dynamic simulation code for the sulfur-iodine process coupled to a very high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key issues in developing a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production technology is how to operate the SI process, including the start-up operation procedure. In order to effectively establish a start-up procedure, it is necessary ... Keywords: dynamic simulation, nuclear hydrogen, start-up, sulfur-iodine process, very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

Jiwoon Chang, Youngjoon Shin, Kiyoung Lee, Yongwan Kim, Cheong Youn

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potential influence of iodine-containing compounds on the chemistry of the troposphere in the polar spring. I. Ozone depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine in the atmosphere, identified largely by the presence of IO, is a ubiquitous component of the troposphere in coastal and oceanic areas. The role, if any, that iodine chemistry plays in the polar ozone depletion episodes is not known. These events are rationalized today largely in terms of Br2- and BrCl-initiated reactions. The potential for enhancement of ozone depletions through the presence of iodine-containing molecules (I{sub 2}, IBr, ICl, CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}IBr, CH{sub 2}ICl, and CH{sub 3}I) is investigated in this study. Computer simulations of the homogeneous chemistry are made using a reasonably complete reaction mechanism for Br-, Cl- and I-containing species together with representative chemistry of trace gases in the clean troposphere. The extent of uncertain alternative pathways and efficiencies for OIO and I{sub 2}O{sub 2} photolyses are varied over a range of possible values to establish the sensitivity of the depletion events to these variables. The study shows that significant enhancements of the polar ozone depletion are expected when small amounts of iodine-containing compounds such as CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}, IBr, or ICl are present in a polar air mass containing representative Br{sub 2}-BrCl-trace gas mixtures. The synergistic effect of the iodine compounds results from additional halogen-atom formation from IO-IO, IO-BrO, and IO-ClO reactions. Measurements of IO and precursor iodine-containing compounds are encouraged for future polar spring studies, as well as currently acknowledged important trace species (O{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}O, BrO, Br{sub 2}, and BrCl).

Calvert, Jack G [ORNL; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radioimmunoguided surgery using iodine 125 B72. 3 in patients with colorectal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary data using B72.3 murine monoclonal antibody labeled with iodine 125 suggested that both clinically apparent as well as occult sites of colorectal cancer could be identified intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma detecting probe. We report the preliminary data of a multicenter trial of this approach in patients with primary or recurrent colorectal cancer. One hundred four patients with primary, suspected, or known recurrent colorectal cancer received an intravenous infusion of 1 mg of B72.3 monoclonal antibody radiolabeled with 7.4 x 10 Bq of iodine 125. Twenty-six patients with primary colorectal cancer and 72 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer were examined. Using the gamma detecting probe, 78% of the patients had localization of the antibody in their tumor; this included 75% of primary tumor sites and 63% of all recurrent tumor sites; 9.2% of all tumor sites identified represented occult sites detected only with the gamma detecting probe. The overall sensitivity was 77% and a predictive value of a positive detection was 78%. A total of 30 occult sites in 26 patients were identified. In patients with recurrent cancer, the antibody study provided unique data that precluded resection in 10 patients, and in another eight patients it extended the potentially curative procedure.

Cohen, A.M.; Martin, E.W. Jr.; Lavery, I.; Daly, J.; Sardi, A.; Aitken, D.; Bland, K.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Radioactive iodine treatment of a functional thyroid carcinoma producing hyperthyroidism in a dog  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive iodine (/sup 131/I) was used in the treatment of a 12-year-old female dog with hyperthyroidism resulting from a large, unresectable (and metastatic) thyroid carcinoma associated with signs of severe inspiratory stridor and dyspnea. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs (polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, weight loss, nervousness) and high basal serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations, as well as thyroid radioiodine kinetic studies that showed a high radioiodine uptake into the thyroid (% thyroid uptake) and markedly increased serum concentrations of protein-bound iodine-131 (PB/sup 131/I) after /sup 131/I tracer injection. Thyroid imaging revealed diffuse radionuclide accumulation by the tumor, which involved both thyroid lobes. The dog was treated with three large doses of radioiodine (/sup 131/I), ranging from 60 to 75 mCi, given at intervals of 5 to 7 months. The dog became euthyroid, and the size of the tumor decreased by approximately 25% after each /sup 131/I treatment, improving the severe inspiratory stridor and dyspnea, but both the hyperthyroid state and breathing difficulty recurred within a few months of each treatment. The dog was euthanatized 5 months after the last treatment because of progressive tracheal compression and pulmonary metastasis.

Peterson, M.E.; Kintzer, P.P.; Hurley, J.R.; Becker, D.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

129I is of major concern because of its biophilic nature, excessive inventory, long half-life (~16 million yrs), and high mobility in the natural environment that depends on its chemical speciation. Iodide (I-) has the highest mobility than iodate (IO3-) and is the predominant species in the terrestrial environment due to prevailing pH and Eh conditions. In order to transform I- to less mobile organo-iodine (OI), strong oxidants are necessary to activate the first electron transfer step from I- to reactive intermediates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of naturally occurring aerobic bacteria isolated from an 129I contaminated aquifer (F-area of the Savannah River Site, SC) on I- oxidation and OI formation. It was demonstrated that 3 of 136 strains accumulated I- (0.2~2%) in the presence of H2O2, when incubated in the presence of an environmentally relevant concentration of I- (0.1 microM). The accumulation was likely through electrophilic substitution resulting in the iodination of cellular constituents. The results indicated that culturable I--accumulating bacteria are not directly responsible for the high fraction of oxidized iodine species (IO3- and OI, >50% of total I) present in the SRS F-area. Several bacterial strains were found to be capable of stimulating I- oxidation through excretion of oxidants and enzymes. Organic acids in spent liquid medium from 27 of 84 aerobic bacterial cultures enhanced H2O2-dependent I- oxidation 2-10 fold. Organic acids enhanced I- oxidation by (1) lowering the pH of the spent medium and (2) reacting with H2O2 to form peroxy carboxylic acids, which are strong oxidizing agents. In the absence of H2O2, spent medium from 44 of 84 bacteria cultures showed I- oxidizing capacities. One I- oxidizing bacterium was studied to characterize its extracellular I- oxidizing component(s). The I- oxidizing capability from the spent medium was inactive by treatments with heat and H2O2 and absent under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, NADH, NADPH and FMN additions stimulated I- oxidation in the spend medium. These results indicate an oxidase(s) catalyzed I- oxidation. Understanding the bacterial activities involved with I- oxidation and OI formation is expected to help reduce 129I mobility in water-soil systems.

Li, Hsiu-Ping

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Stable n-CuInSe/sub 2/iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe/sub 2/ electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br/sub 2//MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu/sup +/ or Cu/sup 2 +/ salts and in In/sup 3 +/ salts.

Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.

1984-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle: Process Analysis and Design Using Comprehensive Phase Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the 100+ thermochemical hydrogen cycles that have been proposed, the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) Cycle is a primary target of international interest for the centralized production of hydrogen from nuclear power. However, the cycle involves complex and highly nonideal phase behavior at extreme conditions that is only beginning to be understood and modeled for process simulation. The consequence is that current designs and efficiency projections have large uncertainties, as they are based on incomplete data that must be extrapolated from property models. This situation prevents reliable assessment of the potential viability of the system and, even more, a basis for efficient process design. The goal of this NERI award (05-006) was to generate phase-equilibrium data, property models, and comprehensive process simulations so that an accurate evaluation of the S-I Cycle could be made. Our focus was on Section III of the Cycle, where the hydrogen is produced by decomposition of hydroiodic acid (HI) in the presence of water and iodine (I2) in a reactive distillation (RD) column. The results of this project were to be transferred to the nuclear hydrogen community in the form of reliable flowsheet models for the S-I process. Many of the project objectives were achieved. At Clemson University, a unique, tantalum-based, phase-equilibrium apparatus incorporating a view cell was designed and constructed for measuring fluid-phase equilibria for mixtures of iodine, HI, and water (known as HIx) at temperatures to 350 °C and pressures to 100 bar. Such measurements were of particular interest for developing a working understanding of the expected operation of the RD column in Section III. The view cell allowed for the IR observation and discernment of vapor-liquid (VL), liquid-liquid, and liquid-liquid-vapor (LLVE) equilibria for HIx systems. For the I2-H2O system, liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) was discovered to exist at temperatures up to 310-315 °C, in contrast to the models and predictions of earlier workers. For the I2-HI-H2O ternary, LLE and LLVE were all observed for the first time at temperatures of 160 and 200 °C. Three LLE tie-lines were measured at 160 °C, and preliminary indications are that the underlying phase behavior could result in further improvements in the performance of the S-I Cycle. Unfortunately, these new results were obtained too late in the project to be incorporated into the modeling and simulation work described below. At the University of Virginia, a uniquely complete and reliable model was developed for the thermodynamic properties of HIx, covering the range of conditions expected for the separation of product hydrogen and recycled iodine in the RD column located in Section III. The model was validated with all available property spectroscopy data. The results provide major advances over prior understanding of the chemical speciation involved. The model was implemented in process simulation studies of the S-I Cycle, which showed improvement in energy efficiency to 42%, as well as significantly smaller capital requirements due to lower pressure operation and much smaller equipment sizes. The result is that the S-I Cycle may be much more economically feasible than was previously thought. If both the experimental and modeling work described above were to be continued to ultimate process optimization, both the American public and the global community would benefit from this alternative energy source that does not produce carbon emissions.

Thies, Mark C.; O'Connell, J. P.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement of the bulk minority-carrier lifetime (T{sub b}) by optical methods, such as photocurrent decay or quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC), is strongly influenced by surface recombination. Several techniques are known to lower the effective surface recombination velocity, including the following: use of oxidation, floating N/P junction, SiN:H layer, HF immersion, and use of iodine in ethanol or methanol (I-E solution). Using I-E appears to be very simple and does not require any high-temperature treatment such as oxidation, diffusion, or nitridation processes, which can change T{sub b}. However, this is not a preferred procedure within the photovoltaic community because it is difficult to obtain same T{sub b} values reproducibly, particularly when the wafer lifetime is long. The objectives are: (1) Investigate various reasons why lifetime measurements may be irreproducible using I-E solution passivation. (2) Study the influence of the strength of iodine in the ethanol solution, wafer-cleaning procedures, influence of the wafer container during lifetime measurements, and the stability of I-E. (3) Compare lifetimes of wafers (having different T{sub b}) by various techniques such as QSSPC and transient photoconductive decay using short laser pulses of different light intensity; (4) Make minority-carrier diffusion length (L) measurements by a surface photovoltage technique, and to use T{sub b} and L data to determine diffusivity (D) values for various impurity and defect concentrations, using the relationship L{sup 2} = D* T{sub b}.

Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of the aerodynamic resistance of a model of the vertical iodine air filter is completed. The comparative analysis of the technical characteristics of the vertical and horizontal iodine air filters is also made.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Screening Protocol for Iodine-Specific Getters in YMP-Related Invert Applications  

SciTech Connect

This document defines a standardized screening protocol for use in developing iodine ''getters'' for placement in the proposed YMP-repository invert. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology International (S&T) during 2004-2005. First, the likely environmental conditions in the invert are reviewed as a basis for defining the thermal and geochemical regimes in which a getter must function. These considerations, then, served as the basis for laying out a hierarchy of materials screening tests (Table 1). An experimental design for carrying out these screening tests follows next. Finally, the latter half of the document develops methods for preparing test solutions with chemistries that relate to various aspects of the YMP-repository environment (or, at least to such representations as were available from program documents late in 2004). Throughout the document priority was given to defining procedures that would quickly screen out unpromising candidate materials with a minimum amount of labor. Hence, the proposed protocol relies on batch tests over relatively short times, and on a hierarchy of short pre-test conditioning steps. So as not to repeat the mistakes (and frustrations) encountered in the past (notably in preparing WIPP test brines) particular care was also given to developing standardized test solution recipes that could be prepared easily and reproducibly. This document is principally intended for use as a decision-making tool in evaluating and planning research activities. It is explicitly NOT a roadmap for qualifying getters for actual placement in the repository. That would require a comprehensive test plan and a substantial consensus building effort. This document is also not intended to provide a complete list of all the tests that individuals may wish to carry out. Various materials will have their own peculiar concerns that will call for additional specialized tests. In many cases additional research will also be needed to verify the exact nature of the chemical process responsible for scavenging the iodine from the test solutions.

J.L. Krumhansl; J.D. Pless; J.B. Chwirka

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

Screening protocol for iodine-specific getters in YMP-related invert applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines a standardized screening protocol for use in developing iodine ''getters'' for placement in the proposed YMP-repository invert. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology International (S&T) during 2004-2005. First, the likely environmental conditions in the invert are reviewed as a basis for defining the thermal and geochemical regimes in which a getter must function. These considerations, then, served as the basis for laying out a hierarchy of materials screening tests (Table 1). An experimental design for carrying out these screening tests follows next. Finally, the latter half of the document develops methods for preparing test solutions with chemistries that relate to various aspects of the YMP-repository environment (or, at least to such representations as were available from program documents late in 2004). Throughout the document priority was given to defining procedures that would quickly screen out unpromising candidate materials with a minimum amount of labor. Hence, the proposed protocol relies on batch tests over relatively short times, and on a hierarchy of short pre-test conditioning steps. So as not to repeat the mistakes (and frustrations) encountered in the past (notably in preparing WIPP test brines) particular care was also given to developing standardized test solution recipes that could be prepared easily and reproducibly. This document is principally intended for use as a decision-making tool in evaluating and planning research activities. It is explicitly NOT a roadmap for qualifying getters for actual placement in the repository. That would require a comprehensive test plan and a substantial consensus building effort. This document is also not intended to provide a complete list of all the tests that individuals may wish to carry out. Various materials will have their own peculiar concerns that will call for additional specialized tests. In many cases additional research will also be needed to verify the exact nature of the chemical process responsible for scavenging the iodine from the test solutions.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Chwirka, J. Benjamin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Serum thyroxine concentrations after radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-one cats with hyperthyroidism were given one dose of radioactive iodine (131I) IV. Serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were measured before treatment in all cats, at 12-hour intervals after treatment in 10 cats, and at 48-hour intervals after treatment in 21 cats. Serum T4 concentrations also were measured one month after /sup 131/I therapy in 29 cats. Activity of 131I administered was 1.5 to 6.13 mCi, resulting in a dose of 20,000 rads to the thyroid. Serum T4 concentrations before /sup 131/I administration were 5.3 to 51.0 micrograms/dl, with a median T4 concentration of 11.0 micrograms/dl. Serum T4 decreased most rapidly during the first 3 to 6 days after treatment. Sixteen cats (55%) had normal serum thyroxine concentrations by day 4 after 131I administration, and 23 cats (74%) were euthyroxinemic by day 8 after treatment. One month after administration of 131I, the 29 cats evaluated were clinically improved, and 24 (83%) of the 29 cats evaluated had normal serum T4 concentrations, 3 cats (10%) remained hyperthyroxinemic, and 2 cats (7%) were hypothyroxinemic. Therefore, administration of 131I was a safe and effective method to quickly decrease serum T4 concentrations in hyperthyroid cats.

Meric, S.M.; Hawkins, E.C.; Washabau, R.J.; Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recovery of Technetium and Iodine from Spent ATW TRISO Type Fuels.  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program is being developed to determine the feasibility of separating and transmutating the transactinides (Pu-Cm) and long-lived fission product (99Tc and 129I) from spent LWR fuel. Several types of ATW fuels have been suggested to transmutate the Pu-Cm fraction including TRISO type fuels. An ATW TRISO fuel would consist of a Pu-Cm oxide kernel surrounded by several layers of pyrolytic carbon, a layer of SiC, and an outer layer of pyrolytic carbon. Processing of the spent ATW fuel would involve the crush, burn, and leach approach used on normal TRISO fuels. This report describes experiments that determine the potential behavior of the two long-lived fission products, 99Tc and 129I, in this processing. Iodine can be removed and trapped during the burning of the carbon from the fuel. Some technetium may volatilize in the latter stages of the burn but the bulk of it will have to be recovered after dissolution of the oxide residue.

Schroeder, N. C. (Norman C.); Attrep, Moses

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chalcogen-based aerogels as a multifunctional platform for remediation of radioactive iodine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerogels employing chalcogen-based (i.e., S, Se, and/or Te) structural units and interlinking metals are termed chalcogels and have many emerging applications. Here, chalcogels are discussed in the context of nuclear fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste remediation. Motivated by previous work on removal of heavy metals in aqueous solution, we explored the application of germanium sulfide chalcogels as a sorbent for gas-phase I2 based on Pearson's Hard/Soft Acid-Base (HSAB) principle. This work was driven by a significant need for high-efficiency sorbents for I-129, a long-lived isotope evolved during irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel reprocessing. These chalcogel compositions are shown to possess an affinity for iodine gas, I2(g), at various concentrations in air and the affinity is attributed to a strong chemical attraction between the chalcogen and I2(g), according to the HSAB principle. The high sorption efficiency is facilitated by the high porosity as well as the exceptionally large surface area of the chalcogels.

Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ryan, Joseph V.; Matyas, Josef; Li, Xiaohong S.; Matson, Dean W.; Sundaram, S. K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Vienna, John D.

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

RADIOACTIVE IODINE IN THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTHYROIDISM (EXPERIENCE AT THE TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL, 1950-58). PART III. POSSIBLE BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS FROM RADIOACTIVE IODINE THERAPY  

SciTech Connect

A review of 542 hyperthyroid patients treated by I/sup 131/ at the Toronto General Hospital between 1950 and 1955 is presented. This group included 403 patients with diffuse hyperplastic goitre and 139 patients with toxic nodular goitre. The method for assessing the initial dose of I/sup 131/ is described. In general, patients with toxic nodular goitres received much larger doses. Of the diffuse hyperplastic group 72% were cured with one dose, the remainder requiring two or more doses. A greater percentage of the toxic nodular group required only one dose. No cases of complete resistance to 1/sup 131/ therapy were encountered. Permanent hypothyroidism was produced in 16.3% of those so treated, but in 6.5% it was very mild. The incidence of clinical hypothyroidism was much lower in the toxic nodular group than in the diffuse hyperplastic group. There was a continuing incidence of late hypothyroidism, occurring years after therapy; some of these patients had undergone a transient period of hypothyroidism shortly after treatment, then recovered for some years. Factors possibly related to the response to treatment and to the development of hypothyroidism have been analyzed. Recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyroidectomy was associated with a significant increase in the incidence of post-I/sup 131/ hypothyroidism, while pretreatment with artithyroid drugs seemed to reduce radiosensitivity in the diffuse group. No late recurrences of hyperthyroidism were noted. Twenty-one deaths occurred within two years of therapy. In most, there was no obvious relation to therapy, while in none was there a clear-out cause-and-effect relationship to I/sup 131/ therapy. Nevertheless, elderly or very ill patients should be treated only after they have been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. Fertility has not been affected by I/sup 131/ therapy, but the use of this isotope in pregnancy is contraindicated because of the possible ill effects on the fetas. The possibility of genetic effects appears to be negligible, as judged by the gonadal radiation doses received in I/sup 131/ therapy. The fear of carcinoma of the thyroid likewise appears to be receding if the therapy is utilized only in adults. Leukemia has been reported in 14 instances. However, the statistical import is not clear, since the total number of cases of leukemia and of persons treated by I/sup 131/ is not known. It may be that there is a slight increase in the incidence of leukemia following radioactive treatment, comparable to that possibly induced by certain diagnostic radiological procedures, but this is insufficient to warrant any change in policy regarding the use of I/sup 131/ After consideration of these hypothetical dangers, it is concluded that the use of radioactive iodine is a safe, effective form of therapy for adult, nonpregnant hyperthyroid patients, and is to be preferred to surgical thyroidectomy. 108 references. (auth)

Volpe, R.; Schatz, D.L.; Scott, A.; Peller, J.A.; Vale, J.M.; Ezrin, C.; Johnston, M.W.

1961-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the directi...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Absolute frequency measurement for the emission transitions of molecular iodine in the 982 - 985 nm range  

SciTech Connect

We report high-precision frequency measurements of the separate hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the emission B - X system transitions of {sup 127}I{sub 2} molecules in the 982 - 985 nm range. To resolve the HFS of the emission lines, advantage was taken of the method of three-level laser spectroscopy. The function of exciting radiation was fulfilled by the second harmonic of a cw Nd : YAG laser, and the probe radiation in the 968 - 998 nm range was generated by an external-cavity diode laser. The output Nd : YAG laser frequency was locked to an HFS component of the absorption transition and the probing laser radiation to the emission transition component. When both frequencies were locked to HFS components with a common upper level, the output diode laser frequency was precisely equal to the emission transition frequency. The output frequency of the thus stabilised diode laser was measured with the help of a femtosecond optical frequency synthesiser based on a Ti : sapphire laser. We present the results of the absolute frequency measurements of 20 HFS components belonging to six vibrational - rotational transitions of the B - X system of iodine [R56(32 - 48)a1, P58(32 - 48)a1, P85(33 - 48)a1, R87(33 - 48a1, R88(33 - 48)a10] and all 15 components of the R86(33 - 48) line. The relative measurement uncertainty is equal to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} and is determined by the frequency instability of the diode laser radiation.

Matyugin, Yu A; Ignatovich, S M; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Nesterenko, M I; Okhapkin, M V; Pivtsov, V S; Skvortsov, Mikhail N; Bagaev, Sergei N [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Preliminary results from bench-scale testing of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of a bench-scale model of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle have been operated at General Atomic Company as part of a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technology for hydrogen production from nonfossil sources. The hydrogen program is funded by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, and General Atomic Company. The bench-scale model consists of three subunits which can be operated separately or together and is capable of producing as much as 4 std liters/min (6.7 x 10/sup -5/ m/sup 3//s at standard conditions) of gaseous hydrogen. One subunit (main solution reaction) reacts liquid water, liquid iodine (I/sub 2/) and gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to form two separable liquid phases: 50 wt % sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) and a solution of iodine in hydriodic acid (HI/sub x/). Another subunit (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentration and decomposition) concentrates the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ phase to the azeotropic composition, then decomposes it at high temperature over a catalyst to form gaseous SO/sub 2/ and oxygen. The third subunit (HI separation and decomposition) separates the HI from water and I/sub 2/ by extractive distillation with phosphoric acid (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) and decomposes the HI in the vapor phase over a catalyst to form I/sub 2/ and product hydrogen. This paper presents the results of on-going parametric studies to determine the operating characteristics, performance, and capacity limitations of major components.

O'Keefe, D.; Allen, C.; Besenbruch, G.; McCorkle, K.; Norman, J.; Sharp, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Kinetics of the processes, plasma parameters, and output characteristics of a UV emitter operating on XeI molecules and iodine molecules and atoms  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model of the processes occurring in the plasma of a high-power low-pressure gas-discharge lamp is presented, and the output characteristics of the lamp are described. The lamp is excited by a longitudinal glow discharge and emits the I{sub 2}(D Prime -A Prime ) 342-nm and XeI(B-X) 253-nm bands and the 206.2-nm spectral line of atomic iodine. When the emitter operates in a sealed-off mode on the p(He): p(Xe): p(I{sub 2}) = 400: 120: (100-200) Pa mixture, the fractions of the UV radiation power of iodine atoms, exciplex molecules of xenon iodide, and iodine molecules comprise 55, 10, and 35%, respectively. At the optimal partial pressure, the maximum total radiation power of the lamp reaches 37 W, the energy efficiency being about 15%.

Shuaibov, A. K.; Grabovaya, I. A.; Minya, A. I.; Homoki, Z. T. [Uzhgorod National University (Ukraine); Kalyuzhnaya, A. G.; Shchedrin, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Models for calculating the effects of isotopic exchange, radioactive decay, and of recycle in removing iodine from gas and liquid streams  

SciTech Connect

Different decontamination factors for $sup 129$I and $sup 131$I are frequently invoked in environmental impact reports concerned with nuclear fuel recycle. Selected differences, or ratios, have not been justified on the basis of mathematical models or experimental data. A description is given of the origins of these differences in terms of isotopic exchange and material balance equations for the short- and long-lived (or stable) isotopes. The ratios of decontamination factors can be calculated when there is complete attainment of isotopic exchange between gas- or liquid-phase iodine and iodine sorbed by a solid or liquid. If there is no exchange, decontamination factors are isotope- independent unless material recycle occurs within the system. Between these extremes, there can be decontamination factors whose explanation requires experimental determination of the extent of exchange. The model applies to other radioactive isotopes of iodine as well as to other elements with short- and long- lived (or stable) isotopes. (auth)

Davis, W. Jr.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Commercial Activated Carbon for the Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight activated carbon catalysts were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. No statistically significant correlation was found between catalyst sample properties and catalytic activity. Four of the eight samples were examined for one week of continuous operation at 723 K. All samples appeared to be stable over the period of examination.

Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparison of silver sorbents for application to radioiodine control at the PUREX process facility modification. [Iodine 129  

SciTech Connect

In continued support of the design of the gaseous radioiodine control system for the PUREX Process Facility Modification (PFM), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted laboratory-scale measurements of the performance of four state-of-the-art sorbents for radioiodine in the dissolver offgas (DOG) of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The PFM is a new head-end treatment plant being designed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. The experiments performed measured the iodine effluent concentration from Norton silver mordenite (NAgZ), Linde silver mordenite (LAgZ), Linde silver faujasite (AgX), and silver nitrate-impregnated silicic acid (AgNO/sub 3/Si) during simulated normal operating conditions in the PFM after three shutdown/startup cycles, and during standby. At normal operating conditions the input gas is expected to have a dew point of 35/degree/C to 40/degree/C and contain 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L, 1 vol% NO, and 1 vol% NO /sub 2/. The sorbent bed would be at 150/degree/C. A shutdown/startup cycle consisted of eliminating iodine and NO/sub x/ from the input gas, cooling the bed to room temperature, stopping gas flow, and restarting the system. During standby conditions the input gas contained no iodine or NO/sub x/, the dew point was at 30/degree/C to 35/degree/C, and the bed temperature remained at 150/degree/C. This experimental study showed that 20 cm beds of NAgZ, LAgZ, and 18 wt% silver AgX could load up to 0.25 mmol I/g sorbent and routinely reduce the iodine concentration in a simulated PFM DOG from 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L to less than the target level of 10/sup /minus/5/ ..mu..mol I/L. In contrast, the AgNO/sub 3/Si unexpectedly failed to achieve this required level of performance, reducing the concentration on a routine basis only to 10/sup /minus/4/ to 10/sup /minus/2/ ..mu..mol I/L. 5 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Halko, B.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I{sup {minus}}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium ({Tc}), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I{sup {minus}}, IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and {Tc} sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg {Tc}. It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally afforded to cations by usual and normal soils. 93 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Gu, B.; Schulz, R.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil Science)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rational synthesis of unidimensional mixed valence solids. Structure oxidation state-charge transport relationships in iodinated nickel and palladium bisbenzoquinonedioximates  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study is presented of crystal structure, stoichiometry, oxidation state, and electron transport in the materials Ni(bqd)/sub 2/, Pd(bqd)/sub 2/, Ni(bqd)/sub 2/I/sub 0/ /sub 018/, Ni(bqd)/sub 2/I/sub 0/ /sub 5/ . S, and Pd(bqd)/sub 2/I/sub 0/ /sub 5/ . S, where bqd = o-benzoquinonedioximato and S = an aromatic solvent. The compound Pd(bqd)/sub 2/I/sub 0/ /sub 50/ . 0.52o-C/sub 6/H/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ was shown by single-crystal x-ray diffraction to crystallize in the tetragonal space group D/sub 4h//sup 2/-P4/mcc, with four formula units in a cell of dimensions a = 16.048 (7) and c = 6.367 (3) A. The crystal structure consists of stacked Pd(bqd)/sub 2/ units, each staggered by 65/sup 0/ with respect to its nearest neighbors, and disordered chains of iodine atoms extending in the c direction. The Pd--Pd distance is 3.184 (3) A, Pd--N = 1.996 (7) A, and the Pd(bqd)/sub 2/ units are rigorously planar. The predominant form of the iodine present is I/sub 3//sup -/ (..nu../sub fundamental/ 107 cm/sup -1/). Crystallization of Ni(bqd)/sub 2/ from benzene containing traces of iodine produces the new orthorhombic phase Ni(bqd)/sub 2/I/sub 0/ /sub 018/. It crystallizes in the space group D/sub 2h//sup 26/-Ibam with four formula units in a unit cell of dimensions a = 16.438 (2), b = 14.759 (4), and c = 6.360 (2) A. Full-matrix least-squares refinement gave a final value of the conventional R index (on F) of 0.11 for 1026 reflections having F/sub 0//sup 2/ > 3 sigma(F/sub 0//sup 2/). The structure contains rigorously planar Ni(bqd)/sub 2/ units stacked along the c axis with each molecule staggered by 68/sup 0/ with respect to its nearest neighbors. The Ni--Ni distance is 3.180 (2) A and Ni--N = 1.88 (10) A. Single-crystal electrical conductivity measurements (dc and 100-Hz ac) in the stacking direction show an increase in conductivity upon partial oxidation of >10/sup 3/ (Ni) and >10/sup 4/ (Pd). Maximum conductivities at 300 K are determined.

Brown, L.D. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL); Kalina, D.W.; McClure, M.S.; Schultz, S.; Ruby, S.L.; Ibers, J.A.; Kannewurf, C.R.; Marks, T.J.

1979-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Serum thyroxine concentrations following fixed-dose radioactive iodine treatment in hyperthyroid cats: 62 cases (1986-1989)  

SciTech Connect

The medical records of 62 hyperthyroid cats treated with a fixed dose of 4 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) were reviewed. In 60 cats, serum thyroxine concentrations were determined after treatment, allowing evaluation of treatment success. Eighty-four percent of the cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations after treatment. Five of the 60 cats (8%) remained hyperthyroxinemic after treatment. Five cats (8%) were hypothyroxinemic when evaluated within 60 days of treatment. Three of these cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations 6 months after treatment, and none had clinical signs of hypothyroidism. The administration of a fixed dose of 4 mCi of 131I was determined to be an effective treatment for feline hyperthyroidism.

Meric, S.M.; Rubin, S.I. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Initial Assessment of Sulfur-Iodine Process Safety Issues and How They May Affect Pilot Plant Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur-iodine process to make hydrogen by the thermochemical splitting of water is under active development as part of a U.S. Department of Energy program. An integrated lab scale system is currently being designed and built. The next planned stage of development is a pilot plant with a thermal input of about 500 kW, equivalent to about 30,000 standard liters per hour of hydrogen production. The sulfur-iodine process contains a variety of hazards, including temperatures up to 850 ºC and hazardous chemical species including SO2, H2SO4, HI, I2, and of course H2. The siting and design of a pilot plant must consider these and other hazards. This report presents an initial analysis of the hazards that might affect pilot plant design and should be considered in the initial planning. The general hazards that have been identified include reactivity, flammability, toxicity, pressure, electrical hazards, and industrial hazards such as lifting and rotating equipment. Personnel exposure to these hazards could occur during normal operations, which includes not only running the process at the design conditions but also initial inventory loading, heatup, startup, shutdown, and system flushing before equipment maintenance. Because of the complexity and severity of the process, these ancillary operations are expected to be performed frequently. In addition, personnel could be exposed to the hazards during various abnormal situations which could include unplanned phase changes of liquids or solids, leaks of process fluids or cooling water into other process streams, unintentional introducion of foreign species into the process, and unexpected side reactions. Design of a pilot plant will also be affected by various codes and regulations such as the International Building Code, the International Fire Code, various National Fire Protection Association Codes, and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

Robert S. Cherry

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THE CONCENTRATION OF RADIOACTIVE IODINE IN THE THYROID LYMPH, THYROID VENOUS BLOOD, AND PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF PRIMATES  

SciTech Connect

Attempts were made to find out to what extent iodinated compounds are present in lyraph draining from the thyroid gland of the primate, by using baboons, Papio papio, which were injected with 50 to 200 mu C /sup 131/I 2 to 7 days before collection of lymph. Radioiodine was released from the thyroid gland of the baboon into the lymphatic vessels which drain the gland, as well as irto the thyroid venous blood. A high proportion, 90% or more, of the /sup 131/I appeared in the thyroid lymph in organically combined form. The concentration of /sup 131/I in the thyroid lymph was very much higher (10 to 100-fold) than that in the thyroid venous blood or in the peripheral blood. The administration of thyroidstimulating hormone (TSH) rnised the concertration of radioactivity in the thyroid lymph as well as in the thyroid venous blood and these separate effects of TSH appeared to be closely related processes. lt is known that physical or radiation damage to the thyroid gland may lead to the appearance of iodoprotein in the peripheral blood; however, it was possible to exclude the factor of physical daraage by collecting lynaph nt a distance from the gland. To avoid radiation damage, the doses of /sup 131/I used were lower than those generally used in experiments on the release of radioiodine from the thyroid gland. It was shown that if /sup 125/I was used instead of /sup 131/I, the radiation dose rate to the thyroid gland of a small animal can be reducec by a factor of about 25, and a preliminary study, in which /sup 125/I was used in the monkey, suggested that a similar release of radioiodine, in organic form, takes place into the thyroid lymph. It seems unlikely that such a very low radiation dose could damage the thyroid gland. Therefore, it was concluded that the release of iodinated compounds irto the lymphatics of the thyroid is a physiological phenomenon and that it is not due to damage to the gland. (BBB)

Daniel, P.M.; Gale, M.M.; Pratt, O.E.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Iodine kinetics and dosimetry in the salivary glands during repeated courses of radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The present study was conducted to investigate salivary iodine kinetics and dosimetry during repeated courses of radioiodine ({sup 131}I) therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Such data could provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of {sup 131}I induced salivary toxicity and help to develop appropriate methods to reduce this injury. Methods: Seventy-eight consecutive DTC patients (mean age 45 {+-} 17 years, 60%, female) undergoing {sup 131}I therapy for remnant ablation or metastatic tumors were prospectively recruited. Planar quantitative scintigraphy of head-neck images was serially acquired after administration of 2.9-7.4 GBq of {sup 131}I to assess kinetics in the salivary glands of patients. Salivary absorbed doses were calculated based on the schema of Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry. Results: The maximum uptakes in percentage of administered {sup 131}I activity per kilogram of gland tissue (%/kg) were 12.9% {+-} 6.5%/kg (range, 0.4%-37.3%/kg) and 12.3% {+-} 6.2%/kg (range, 0.4%-35.1%/kg) for the parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Statistically significant correlations of maximum uptake versus cumulative activity (r = -0.74, P glands; r = -0.71, P glands) and treatment cycle (P gland types) were found. The effective half-lives of {sup 131}I in the parotid and submandibular glands were 9.3 {+-} 3.5 h (range, 1.5-19.8 h) and 8.6 {+-} 3.2 h (range, 0.8-18.0 h), respectively. A statistically significant correlation was observed between effective half-life with cumulative activity (r = 0.37, P glands. The calculated absorbed doses were 0.20 {+-} 0.10 mGy/MBq (range, 0.01-0.92 mGy/MBq) and 0.25 {+-} 0.09 mGy/MBq (range, 0.01-1.52 mGy/MBq) for the parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. The photon contribution to the salivary absorbed dose was minimal in relation to the beta dose contribution. Photon-absorbed dose fractions of total absorbed dose were 4.9% {+-} 1.3% (range, 1.1%-8.7%) and 3.7% {+-} 2.5% (range, 0.8%-7.9%) for the parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Conclusions: The iodine uptake of salivary glands is continuously reduced during the courses of therapy. The phenomenon of hyper-radiosensitivity may to some extent account for the occurrence of salivary gland hypofunction at very low radiation doses with low dose rates in {sup 131}I therapy. On the other hand, failure to incorporate a nonuniform and preferential uptake by salivary gland ductal cells may result in underestimating the actual dose for the critical tissue. Other methods, including {sup 124}I voxel-based dosimetry, are warranted to further investigate the {sup 131}I-induced salivary gland toxicity.

Liu, B.; Huang, R.; Kuang, A.; Zhao, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, J.; Tian, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lessons learned from a review of post-accident sampling systems, high range effluent monitors and high concentration particulate iodine samplers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-accident sampling systems (PASS), high range gaseous effluent monitors and sampling systems for particulates and iodine in high concentrations have been reviewed at twenty-one licensee sites in Region I of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission which includes fifteen BWR's and fourteen PWR's. Although most of the installed PASS met the criteria, the highest operational readiness was found in on-line systems that were also used for routine sampling and analysis. The detectors used in the gaseous effluent monitors included external ion chambers, GM tubes, organic scintillators and Cd-Te solid state crystals. Although all were found acceptable, each had its own inherent limitations in the conversion of detector output to the time varying concentration of a post-accident mixture of noble gases. None of the installed particulate and iodine samplers fully met all of the criteria. Their principal limitations included a lack of documentation showing that they could obtain a representative sample and that many of them would collect of an excessive amount of activity at the design criteria. 10 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Hull, A.P.; Knox, W.H.; White, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fission product iodine during early Hanford-Site operations: Its production and behavior during fuel processing, off-gas treatment and release to the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate the radiological dose impact that Hanford Site operations may have made on the local and regional population. This impact is estimated by examining operations involving radioactive materials that were conducted at the Hanford Site from the startup of the first reactor in 1944 to the present. HEDR Project work is divided among several technical tasks. One of these tasks, Source Terms, is designed to develop quantitative estimates of all significant emissions of radionuclides by Hanford Site operations since 1944. Radiation doses can be estimated from these emissions by accounting for specific radionuclide transport conditions and population demography. This document provides technical information to assist in the evaluation of iodine releases. 115 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Burger, L.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Generation of iodine L-shell X-rays under excitation of large CF{sub 3}I clusters by femtosecond laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of clusters of polyatomic molecules with a relatively low ionisation energy ({approx}10 eV) is proposed for the efficient production of X-ray radiation. We have observed for the first time the generation of characteristic X-ray radiation due to L transitions in iodine atoms under the high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation of molecular CF{sub 3}I clusters, which were a small admixture to Ar carrier gas. The X-ray conversion efficiency amounts to {approx}10{sup -6} (for a yield of {approx}10{sup 7} photons per pulse), which is an order of magnitude higher than the efficiency we obtained in the case of argon clusters under comparable conditions. (letters)

Gordienko, Vyacheslav M; Dzhidzhoev, M S; Zhvaniya, I A; Pribytkov, Andrei V; Trubnikov, Dmitrii N; Fedorov, D O

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

Ledenyov, Oleg P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Photoelectron spectroscopy of higher bromine and iodine oxide anions: Electron affinities and electronic structures of BrO2,3 and IO2-4 radicals.  

SciTech Connect

This report details a photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) investigation on electron affinities (EAs) and electronic structures of several atmospherically relevant higher bromine and iodine oxide molecules in the gas phase. PES spectra of BrO{sub 2}{sup -} and IO{sub 2}{sup -} were recorded at 12 K and four photon energies--355 nm/3.496 eV, 266 nm/4.661 eV, 193 nm/6.424 eV, and 157 nm/7.867 eV--while BrO{sub 3}{sup -}, IO{sub 3}{sup -}, and IO{sub 4}{sup -} were studied at 193 and 157 nm only due to their expected high electron binding energies. Spectral features corresponding to transitions from the anion ground state to the ground and excited states of the neutral are unraveled and resolved for each species. For the first time, EAs of these bromine and iodine oxides are experimentally determined (except for IO{sub 2}) to be 2.515 {+-} 0.010 (BrO{sub 2}), 2.575 {+-} 0.010 (IO{sub 2}), 4.60 {+-} 0.05 (BrO{sub 3}), 4.70 {+-} 0.05 (IO{sub 3}), and 6.05 {+-} 0.05 eV (IO{sub 4}). Three low-lying excited states with their respective excitation energies are obtained for BrO{sub 2} [1.69 (A {sup 2}B2), 1.79 (B {sup 2}A{sub 1}), 1.99 eV (C {sup 2}A{sub 2})], BrO{sub 3} [0.7 (A {sup 2}A{sub 2}), 1.6 (B {sup 2}E), 3.1 eV (C {sup 2}E)], and IO{sub 3} [0.60 (A {sup 2}A{sub 2}), 1.20 (B {sup 2}E), {approx}3.0 eV (C {sup 2}E)], whereas six excited states of IO{sub 2} are determined with the respective excitation energies of 1.63 (A {sup 2}B{sub 2}), 1.73 (B {sup 2}A{sub 1}), 1.83 (C {sup 2}A{sub 2}), 4.23 (D {sup 2}A{sub 1}), 4.63 (E {sup 2}B{sub 2}), and 5.23 eV (F {sup 2}B{sub 1}). Periodate possesses a very high electron binding energy. Only one excited state feature with 0.95 eV excitation energy is shown in the 157 nm spectrum. The obtained EAs and low-lying excited state information are compared with available theoretical calculations and discussed with their atmospheric implications.

Wen, Hui; Hou, Gaolei; Huang, Wei; Govind, Niranjan; Wang, Xue B.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

104

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Growth, Characterization, Modeling and Device Applications of Semiconductor Nanowire Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from aluminum oxide coated indium phos- phide nanowirespectroscopy of aluminum oxide coated indium phos- phidealuminum oxide coated (top) and uncoated (bottom) indium

Lohn, Andrew John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Oak Ridge Reservation Volume 3. Records relating to RaLa, iodine-131, and cesium-137 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Operations Office: A guide to record series of the Department of Energy and its contractors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this guide is to describe each of the documents and record series pertaining to the production, release, and disposal of radioactive barium-lanthanum (RaLa), iodine-131, and cesium-137 at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, which seeks to verify and conduct inventories of epidemiologic and health-related records at various DOE and DOE contractor sites. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role. It provides information on the history of the DOE-Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), particularly ORNL. Specific attention is given to the production of RaLa and the fission products iodine-131 and cesium-137. This introduction also describes the methodologies HAI used in the selection and inventorying of documents and record series pertaining to RaLa, iodine-131, and cesium-137, and in the production of this guide. Concluding paragraphs describe the arrangement of the record series, explain the information contained in the record series descriptions, and indicate restrictions on access to the records.

NONE

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

Keller, Brian [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Atmospheric Chemistry of Iodine Monoxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of I, and C1, or by reaction of 0 with a mixture of IC1 and CIO,. ... Stein, SE; Rukkers, JM; Brown, RM NIST Structures & Properties Database; ver. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available No Data Available No Data Available 108 36 milliseconds Alpha Decay 91.00% Electron Capture 9.00% Proton Emission < 1.00% 109 93.5 microseconds Proton Emission 99.99%...

110

Simulation of the sulphur iodine thermochemical cycle / Bothwell Nyoni.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for energy is increasing throughout the world, and fossil fuel resources are diminishing. At the same time, the use of fossil fuels is… (more)

Nyoni, Bothwell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technetium and Iodine Separations in the UREX Process.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program is being developed to determine the feasibility of separatin and transmutating the transactinides (Pu-Cm) and long-lived fission product (99Tc and 'I) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This approach would help with the disposal of spent commercial fuel. In addition, since the residual waste after ATW treatment will have much lower levels of long-lived species, this process may improve the performance and acceptability of long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste. A roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) was submitted to Congress in 1999.' This document gave an overall view of the ATW concept and program. A subsequent document prepared by the Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms issued a second roadmap that dealt more specifically with the radionuclide separations and waste disposal needs for the ATW program.' This latter document discusses the UREX (Uranium Extraction) process. The latest iteration of the UREX flowsheet is shown in Figure le3T his flowsheet anticipates the co-extraction of technetium with uranium from dissolved LWR fuel by tributylphosphate (TBP) and their subsequent sequential bwk-extraction from the TBP stream.

Schroeder, N. C. (Norman C.); Attrep, Moses; Marrero, T. (Thomas)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Adsorption of of Radioactive Iodine from Used Nuclear Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

113

Migration of Iodine Solidified in Ettringite into Compacted Bentonite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

114

Acta Crystallographica Section D Optimum solubility (OS) screening ...  

methane]; TCEP, tris(2-carboxyethyl) phos-phine. 2. Introduction Advances in X-ray crystallography have provided three-dimensional structures of

115

Method for the simultaneous preparation of radon-211, xenon-125, xenon-123, astatine-211, iodine-125 and iodine-123  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a practical method for commercially producing radiopharmaceutical activities and, more particularly, relates to a method for the preparation of about equal amount of Radon-211 (/sup 211/Rn) and Xenon-125 (/sup 125/Xe) including a one-step chemical procedure following an irradiation procedure in which a selected target of Thorium (/sup 232/Th) or Uranium (/sup 238/U) is irradiated. The disclosed method is also effective for the preparation in a one-step chemical procedure of substantially equal amounts of high purity /sup 123/I and /sup 211/At. In one preferred arrangement of the invention almost equal quantities of /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe are prepared using a onestep chemical procedure in which a suitably irradiated fertile target material, such as thorium-232 or uranium-238, is treated to extract those radionuclides from it. In the same one-step chemical procedure about equal quantities of /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I are prepared and stored for subsequent use. In a modified arrangement of the method of the invention, it is practiced to separate and store about equal amounts of only /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe, while preventing the extraction or storage of the radionuclides /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I.

Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synthesis and study of ligands for Pd-catalyzed C-O and C-N coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new ligand, AdBrettPhos, was synthesized and its use, along with tBuBrettPhos, in C-O coupling reactions at low temperatures was investigated. Using Pd catalysts containing these ligands, electron-neutral aryl bromides ...

Davis, Nicole R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NA Standards | Refinement Parameters | X-PLOR parameter file  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bases 18.75% Sugar 56.6% Phos 154.8% remark K scale*(kTsigma**2), scalesBase 0.1875, Sugar 0.566, Phos 1.548 removed references to CA, CF, CS, MG, NH3, OS (ATB 123094) ...

118

Potatoes in the Home Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after being turned under. A compost made of a grass/legumeand phos- phorous. The compost mix should be applied at and15” of soil). While the compost needs to be stable, potatoes

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

In or Out: Setting a Trap for Radioactive Iodine | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moment in a Split Picosecond Unpeeling Atoms and Molecules from the Inside Out Butterfly Wing Yields Clues to Light-Altering Structures Squeezing Information from Materials under...

120

Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After Permanent Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy-An Australian Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 'bounces' after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy to review the relationship to biochemical control and correlate both clinical and dosimetric variables. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 194 hormone-naive patients with a follow-up of {>=}3 years. Four bounce definitions were applied: an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL (definition I), {>=}0.4 ng/mL (definition II), {>=}15% (definition III), and {>=}35% (definition IV) of a previous value with spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Results: Using definition I, II, III, and IV, a bounce was detected in 50%, 34%, 11%, and 9% of patients, respectively. The median time to onset was 14-16 months, the duration was 12-21.5 months, and the magnitude of the increase was 0.5-2 ng/mL. A magnitude of >2 ng/mL, fulfilling the criteria for biochemical failure (BF) according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Phoenix definition, was detected in 11.3%, 16.9%, 47.6%, and 50% using definitions I, II, III, and IV, respectively; 11 patients (5.7%) had true BF. The PSA bounces occurred earlier than BF (p < 0.001). The prediction of BF remains controversial and is probably unrelated to biochemical control. The only statistically significant factor predictive of a PSA bounce was younger age (definitions I and II). Conclusion: PSA bounces are common after brachytherapy. All definitions resulted in a high number of false-positive calls for BF during the first 2 years. The definition of an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL should be preferred because of the lowest number of false-positive results for BF. Patients experiencing a PSA bounce during the first 2 years after brachytherapy should undergo surveillance every 3-6 months. Additional investigations are recommended for elevated postimplant PSA levels that have not corrected by 3 years of follow-up.

Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Smith, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alfred Health and Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Andrianopoulos, Nick [Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University School of Public Health, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Matheson, Bronwyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alfred Health and Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Royce, Peter [Department of Urology, Alfred Health and Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Millar, Jeremy L., E-mail: jeremy.millar@med.monash.edu.a [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alfred Health and Monash University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University School of Public Health, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microhydration Effects on the Intermediates of the SN2 Reacation of Iodide Anion with Methyl Iodine  

SciTech Connect

Reactions of halide anions with methyl halides (X- + CH3Y ? XCH3 + Y-) are bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions that have been well investigated in the last few decades.[1] Figure 1 shows typical potential energy surfaces (PESs) proposed for symmetric (X- + CH3X ? XCH3 + X-) SN2 reactions along the reaction coordinate. In the gas phase, the PES has two minima corresponding to the stable X-(CH3X) complexes.[2] The PES is substantially distorted by the solvation. Since the negative charge is delocalized over the [X•••CH3•••X]- moiety at the transition state the stabilization energy gained by the solvation is smaller for the transition state than that for the (X- + CH3X) reactants or the X- (CH3X) complexes. In solution, a large potential barrier exists between the reactants and products. The rate constants of these reactions in protic solvents were reported to be a few orders of magnitude smaller than those in aprotic solvents; this trend was explained by the formation of solvation shells of protic molecules around the halide anions.[1,3] Morokuma has previously reported a theoretical study on the PES of the (Cl- + CH3Cl ? ClCH3 + Cl-) SN2 reaction with a few H2O molecules. The attachment of H2O molecules to the Cl-(CH3Cl) reactive system produces metastable isomers, which affect the reaction mechanism.[4] Johnson and coworkers extensively investigated the structure and reactions of halide anion complexes in the gas phase using photodissociation spectroscopy.

Doi, Keisuke; Togano, Eijiro; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Nakanishi, Ryuzo; Nagata, Takashi; Ebata, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yoshiya

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Interfacing the tandem mirror reactor to the sulfur-iodine process for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The blanket is linked to the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vaporization units and SO/sub 3/ decomposition reactor with either sodium or helium. The engineering and safety problems associated with these choices are discussed. This H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ step uses about 90% of the TMR heat and is best close-coupled to the nuclear island. The rest of the process we propose to be driven by steam and does not require close-coupling. The sodium loop coupling seems to be preferable at this time. We can operate with a blanket around 1200 K and the SO/sub 3/ decomposer around 1050 K. This configuration offers double-barrier protection between Li-Na and the SO/sub 3/ process gases. Heat pipes offer an attractive alternate to provide an additional barrier, added modularity for increased reliability, and tritium concentration and isolation operations with very little thermal penalty.

Galloway, T.R.

1980-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Summary of the Sulfur-Iodine Process Integrated Laboratory-Scale Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Safety and Technology of Nuclear Hydrogen Production, Control, and Management / Nuclear Hydrogen Production

Benjamin Russ; Robert Buckingham; Lloyd Brown; Robert Moore; Max Helie; Philippe Carle; Nicolas Pons; Denis Ode; Jean Duhamet; Jean Leybros

124

Iodine-129 in forage and deer on the Hanford site and other Pacific Northwest locations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of surface soil, litter, forage, and deer (rumen content, muscle, liver, and thyroid gland) were collected from Bend, Oregon; Centralia, Washington; Wenatchee, Washington; the Wooten Game Range near Dayton, Washington; and on or near the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The concentrations of /sup 129/I and /sup 127/I were determined using neturon activation techniques. The purpose of the study was to establish the current levels of /sup 129/I in the environs of the Hanford Site prior to the proposed restart of fuel reprocessing at the PUREX plant. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the longevity of /sup 129/I in the biosphere following gaseous release from a nuclear facility. Analyses of thyroid glands showed that deer living within 160 km (Wooten Game Range) of Hanford had elevated levels of /sup 129/I when compared to the more distant Pacific Northwest locations (Centralia, or Bend). Levels of /sup 129/I in deer thyroid from Bend, or Centralia, (15 fCi/g wet weight), were about five times higher than values reported for the central United States, while, Hanford samples were about 2,700 times higher. The average concentration of /sup 129/I in deer thyroids collected at Hanford in 1978 was similar to samples collected 14 years earlier. The concentrations of /sup 129/I in soil, litter, forage, and other deer samples generally decrease in the order: Hanford > Wooten > Wenatchee > Centralia approx. = Bend. This corresponds to an increase in distance from the Hanford Site.

Price, K.R.; Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.; Brauer, F.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Capture of Solar and Higher-Energy Neutrinos by Iodine 127  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss and improve a recent treatment of the absorption of solar neutrinos by ${}^{127}$I, in connection with a proposed solar neutrino detector. With standard-solar-model fluxes and an in-medium value of -1.0 for the axial-vector coupling constant $g_A$, we obtain a ${}^8$B-neutrino cross section of 3.3$\\times 10^{-42}$, about 50\\% larger than in our previous work, and a ${}^7$Be cross section that is less certain but nevertheless also larger than before. We then apply the improved techniques to higher incoming energies that obtain at the LAMPF beam dump, where an experiment is underway to finalize a calibration of the ${}^{127}$I with electron neutrinos from muon decay. We find that forbidden operators, which play no role in solar-neutrino absorption, contribute nonnegligibly to the LAMPF cross section, and that the preliminary LAMPF mean value is significantly larger than our prediction.

J. Engel; S. Pittel; P. Vogel

1994-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for {sup 125}I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

Marathe, Omkar S. [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wu, Jeffrey; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu Fei; Burgess, Barry L. [Department of Ophthalmology, The Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Leu Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Straatsma, Bradley R. [Department of Ophthalmology, The Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McCannel, Tara A., E-mail: TMcCannel@jsei.ucla.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solar-Grade Silicon from Metallurgical-Grade Silicon Via Iodine Chemical Vapor Transport Purification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the atmospheric-pressure in an ''open'' reactor, SiI2 transfers from a hot (>1100C) Si source to a cooler (>750C) Si substrate and decomposes easily via 2SiI2 Si+ SiI4 with up to 5?m/min deposition rate. SiI4 returns to cyclically transport more Si. When the source is metallurgical-grade Si, impurities can be effectively removed by three mechanisms: (1) differing free energies of formation in forming silicon and impurity iodides; (2) distillation; and (3) differing standard free energies of formation during deposition. Distillation has been previously reported. Here, we focused on mechanisms (1) and (3). We made feedstock, analyzed the impurity levels, grew Czochralski single crystals, and evaluated crystal and photovoltaic properties. Cell efficiencies of 9.5% were obtained. Incorporating distillation (step 2) should increase this to a viable level.

Ciszek, T. F.; Wang, T. H.; Page, M. R.; Bauer, R. E.; Landry, M. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

University of Mississippi Medical Center Page 1 of 186  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................84 E. Liquid Waste Disposal-125 and/or Iodine- 131 in capsule form or a total of (1) millicurie of liquid Iodine-125 and/or Iodine

Correia, John J.

129

Plutonium complexation by phosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCM-41-type mesoporous silica functionalized with the CMPO-based 'Ac-Phos' silane has been reported in the literature (1) to show good capacity as an acftinide sorbent material, with potential applications in environmental sequestration, aqueous waste separation and/or vitrification, and chemical sensing of actinides in solution. The study explores the complexation of Pu(IV and VI) and other selected actinides and lanthanides by SBA-15 type mesoporous silica functionalized with Ac-Phos. The Pu binding kinetics and binding capacity were determined for both the Ac-Phos functionalized and unmodified SBA-15. They analyzed the binding geometry and redox behavior of Pu(VI) by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). They discuss the synthesis and characterization of the functionalized mesoporous material, batch sorption experiments, and the detailed analyses of the actinide complexes that are formed. Structural measurements are paired with high-level quantum mechanical modeling to elucidate the binding mechanisms.

Parsons-Moss, T; Schwaiger, L K; Hubaud, A; Hu, Y J; Tuysuz, H; Yang, P; Balasubramanian, K; Nitsche, H

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

Characterization of a New Charge Sensitive Preamplifier (CSP) for the Electromagnetic Calorimeters of the ALICE Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ALICE calorimeters PHOS and EMCal (including its extension DCal) are based on Avalanche Photo-Diode (APD) photosensors with Charge Sensitive Preamplifiers (CSPs) for readout of the scintillating elements. A new CSP has been developed on the basis of the design of the PHOS CSP, but modified to meet the requirements of the EMCal and DCal. Modifications were made specifically for a different APD choice with different characteristics, and also with the goals of less noise, faster rise time, and reduced cost. This paper presents a detailed description of the new CSP features and the test results.

Wang, Yaping [Inst. of Particle Physics/Key Lab. of Quark and Lepton Physics, Central China Normal Univ., Wuhan, C; Muller, Hans [CERN, Geneva, Switzerland; Cai, Xu [Inst. of Particle Physics/Key Lab. of Quark and Lepton Physics, Central China Normal Univ., Wuhan, C; Zhou, Daicui [Inst. of Particle Physics/Key Lab. of Quark and Lepton Physics, Central China Normal Univ., Wuhan, C; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Yin, Zhongbao [Inst. of Particle Physics/Key Lab. of Quark and Lepton Physics, Central China Normal Univ., Wuhan, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Combined Gas-Phase Photoelectron Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Zeise's Anion and Its Bromine and Iodine Analogues  

SciTech Connect

We report the first photoelectron spectroscopic study of Zeise’s anion, [PtCl3(C2H4)], and its Br- and I- analogs in the gas phase. Well-resolved and rich spectral features are obtained for each species, yielding detailed electronic structure information, which is assigned with the aid of highlevel electronic structure calculations at the Coupled Cluster (CC) level of theory. The electron binding energies of [PtX3(C2H4)] are found to decrease with the size of halogen (4.57, 4.51, and 4.18 eV for X = Cl, Br, and I, respectively). The calculations indicate a synergistic ?2 interaction [with interaction strengths of 1.54 (Cl), 1.37 (Br) and 1.10 eV (I)] between the perpendicular C2H4 fragment and the nearly horizontal planar PtX3- anions, resulting in activating the ethylene molecule. The detailed insights of the chemical bonding and underlying electronic structure can be used to benchmark interactions between olefins and transition metal complexes, which are crucial to a wide range of catalytic processes.

Hou, Gaolei; Wen, Hui; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Zheng, Weijun; Kowalski, Karol; Govind, Niranjan; Wang, Xue B.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

Korinthenberg, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.korinthenberg@uniklinik-freiburg.d [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Neuburger, Daniela [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido [Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Neurocentre, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

NEMA NU4-2008 performance evaluation for the microPET FOCUS 120 and iodine-124  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the microPET FOCUS 120 in terms of counting rate capability and image quality when using {sup 124}I. The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) index was defined as: NECR = R{sub T}{sup 2}/R{sub P} + R{sub GP} (T = true, P = prompt, GP = gamma prompt). The maximum NECR (48 kcps) value was obtained for the 250-590 keV energy window (EW) with 6 ns time window (TW). The two other EW (350-590 and 350-650 keV) gave comparable maximum NECR of 43 kcps for the 6 ns TW. The 2 ns TW reduced the NECR by 45 to 50 % Scatter and gamma plus scatter fractions were almost not TW dependent. The 250-590 keV window showed the largest scatter fraction with 23% For the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom, coefficients of variation in the uniform part increased from about 8 to 12% when decreasing TW from 6 to 2 ns. The lowest spill-over-ratios (SOR) for the non emitting regions were obtained for the 350-590 and 350-650 keV EW. Recovery coefficients (RC) of the hot rods were the highest for the 350-590 keV EW and 2 ns TW. Scatter correction led to a decrease in RC and occasionally (with FBP or 3DRP) to a negative value for the SOR. The combination of the 350-590 keV energy window with 6 ns time window appeared to be a good compromise between counting rate capability and image quality for the FOCUS 120, especially when MAP reconstruction was used. The scatter correction algorithm provided by the constructor should be used with caution. (authors)

Taleb, D. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Plenevaux, A. [Cyclotron Research Center, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Dartial, N. [Medical imaging laboratory ONIRIS, Nantes (France); Seret, A. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EchoSeed Model 6733 Iodine-125 brachytherapy source: Improved dosimetric characterization using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study primarily aimed to obtain the dosimetric characteristics of the Model 6733 {sup 125}I seed (EchoSeed) with improved precision and accuracy using a more up-to-date Monte-Carlo code and data (MCNP5) compared to previously published results, including an uncertainty analysis. Its secondary aim was to compare the results obtained using the MCNP5, MCNP4c2, and PTRAN codes for simulation of this low-energy photon-emitting source. The EchoSeed geometry and chemical compositions together with a published {sup 125}I spectrum were used to perform dosimetric characterization of this source as per the updated AAPM TG-43 protocol. These simulations were performed in liquid water material in order to obtain the clinically applicable dosimetric parameters for this source model. Dose rate constants in liquid water, derived from MCNP4c2 and MCNP5 simulations, were found to be 0.993 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.73%) and 0.965 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.68%), respectively. Overall, the MCNP5 derived radial dose and 2D anisotropy functions results were generally closer to the measured data (within {+-}4%) than MCNP4c and the published data for PTRAN code (Version 7.43), while the opposite was seen for dose rate constant. The generally improved MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation may be attributed to a more recent and accurate cross-section library. However, some of the data points in the results obtained from the above-mentioned Monte Carlo codes showed no statistically significant differences. Derived dosimetric characteristics in liquid water are provided for clinical applications of this source model.

Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Hadad, K.; Faghihi, R.; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M.; Naghshnezhad, Z.; Meigooni, A. S. [Center for Research in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Physics Unit, Radiotherapy Department, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Research Center and Medical Radiation Department, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: a critical signalling event in pulmonary cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 3-D-phosphorylated phos- phoinositides in C5a-stimulated eosinophils. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2000, 269:816–821. 18. Pan ZK, Chen LY, Cochrane CG, Zuraw BL: fMet-leu-phe stimulates proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in human peripheral blood...

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Macroecology of Sustainability Joseph R. Burger1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phos- phate that should be integral to sustainability science: 1) physical conservation laws gov- ern the flows of energy of scientists, politicians, and lay people--and for good reason. There is increasing evidence that we have ap

Nekola, Jeffrey C.

139

University of Mississippi Medical Center Page 1 of 181  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-125 and/or Iodine- 131 in capsule form or a total of (1) millicurie of liquid Iodine-125 and/or Iodine Radioactive Material Do Not Empty". G. Each sink used for liquid waste disposal or cleaning of contaminated

Raucher, Drazen

140

Multivitamin/Multielement Dietary Supplement SRM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chromium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorous, potassium, selenium, silicon, tin, vanadium, and zinc. ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Looking before we leap: an ongoing, quantative investigation of asteroid and comet impact hazard mitigation  

SciTech Connect

There are many outstanding questions about the correct response to an asteroid or comet impact threat on Earth. Nuclear munitions are currently thought to be the most efficient method of delivering an impact-preventing impulse to a potentially hazardous object (PHO). However, there are major uncertainties about the response of PHOs to a nuclear burst, and the most appropriate ways to use nuclear munitions for hazard mitigation.

Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huebner, Walter F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Oral Histories: Biochemist John Randolph Totter, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

So, it was a concern for iodine-131 and fallout? TOTTER: Yes. And if? FISHER: -the atomic testing? TOTTER: If you followed the gross measurement and assumed that the iodine...

144

Microchemical systems for singlet oxygen generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Lasers (COIL) are a technology of interest for industrial and military audiences. COILs are flowing gas lasers where the gain medium of iodine atoms is collisionally pumped by singlet delta oxygen ...

Hill, Tyrone F. (Tyrone Frank), 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

AOCS Official Method Tg 2a-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fatty Amines, Modified Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Tg 2a-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value is a measure of the unsaturation of the alkyl group or groups and is

146

Microsoft Word - DOE-EIS-0281-SA-01.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

other medical and research isotopes such as iodine-131, xenon-133, and iodine- 125. Irradiation of eight targets was planned in the base year, increasing to 375 targets in 2003...

147

AOCS Official Method Cd 1c-85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculated Iodine Value AOCS Official Method Cd 1c-85 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the iodine value for edible oils dir

148

ORISE: Radiation and Radioactive Contamination FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

take potassium iodide, also known as KI? A: KI is a medication that blocks the thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine. It works by providing all the iodine the gland...

149

AOCS Official Method Da 15-48  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value, Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Da 15-48 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value is a measure of the unsaturation of the

150

AOCS Official Method Tg 3a-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fatty Quaternary Ammonium Chlorides, Modified Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Tg 3a-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value is a measure of the unsaturation of the alkyl

151

AOCS Official Method Ja 14-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value, Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Ja 14-91 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value (IV) is a measure of the content of unsaturated fatty acids. The test sample is reacted with

152

AOCS Official Method Cd 1d-92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fats and Oils Cyclohexane-Acetic Acid Method AOCS Official Method Cd 1d-92 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value is a

153

AOCS Official Method Tg 1-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value, Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Tg 1-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The iodine value is a measure of the unsaturation of industrial oils and derivatives and is expressed in terms

154

First 2D Pictures of a 'Frequency Comb' Transform It into a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of molecular iodine, each taken under different experimental conditions using a NIST frequency brush created with an ultrafast visible laser. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center Text Topic - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 21, 2007 ... Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, ...

156

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Bromine Krypton Rubidium Strontium Yttrium Zirconium Niobium Molybdenum Technetium Ruthenium Rhodium Palladium Silver Cadmium Indium Tin Antimony Tellurium Iodine...

157

Iodized Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iodized Salt Iodized Salt Name: Theresa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do they put iodine in salt? Replies: Iodine was introduced into salt at earlier this century when it was discovered that certain areas of the US had a mark deficiency in iodine in the diet of people, and people developed a neck swelling (goiter). The Great Lakes region is one of these areas where the soil is lacking iodine. Goiter can be caused when the thyroid gland swells because of a lack of iodine in the diet. Most medical advise now states that iodine in salt is no longer necessary due to our food sources arising from all over the world. Steve Sample Hi Theresa...see, there are a variety of elements and compounds that are necessary for the proper maintenance of our life. One of these is iodine, since a small quantity of iodine is needed for the adequate functioning of the thyroid gland. A deficiency of iodine produces dire effects, as goiter, where the thyroid gland swollens due to the lack of iodine traces in the diet. The iodine affects directly the tyrhoid gland secretions, which themselves, to a great extent, control heart action, nerve response to stimuli, rate of body growth and metabolism.

158

La Roca Blanca de Lhang lhang - Un santuario en Nyag rong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Rag dmar, debido a la progresiva influencia a lo largo de los siglos de la emigración de población mi nyag pa en el Nyag rong, procedentes del norte. La predominancia del dialecto mi nyag habría cambiado el antiguo nombre del área, que era Brag... mi nyag pa shar dang lho phyogs su ‘phos mthus mi nyag log skad da lta’ang lus yod pa de sa gnas ‘dir rag dmar ‘go zer ba ni brag dmar ‘go zer ba yin/ La Roca Blanca de Lhang lhang 15 masculina(dbon brgyud) 9 . Muchos de estos centros religiosos...

Aguillar, Oriol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation and Characterization of Membranes for H2SO4/Water and I2/HI/H2O Water Separation and Hydrogen Permeation for the S-I Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report are the findings into three membrane separation studies for potential application to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. The first is the removal of water from hydriodic acid/iodine mixtures. In the S-I cycle, iodine is added to the product of the Bunsen reaction to facilitate the separation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from hydriodic acid (HI). The amount of iodine can be as high as 83% of the overall mass load of the Bunsen product stream, which potentially introduces a large burden on the cycle’s efficiency. Removal of water from the HI and iodine mixture would substantially reduce the amount of required additional iodine. In this work, performance data for Nafion® and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes is shown.

Frederick R. Stewart

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Activated carbon material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

Evans, A. Gary (North Augusta, SC)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Available Technologies: Rotenone Analogs: High Extraction and ...  

Fusion : Iodine-123 rotenone SPECT/CT images of canine heart. STATUS: Published Patent Application WO/2008/133730 available at http://www.wipo.int and ...

162

Nanoporous Al2O3 as a “Getter” for Volatile Radionuclides ...  

The first phase of this project is capture and encapsulation which is achieved by using nanoporous alumina to confine gaseous iodine, for example, ...

163

Technologic Papers 1914  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Industrial gas calorimetry, T 36, Waidner, CW; Mueller, EF http://dx.doi.org/ 10.6028/nbst.1914. Iodine number of linseed and petroleum oils, T 37 ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Conditioning of Iodate Ion in an Apatite-Like Ceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerning the conditioning of Iodine, one promising approach consists in ... Removal of Xenon and Krypton from Air Using Metal Organic Frameworks.

165

Effect of excess iodide on thyroid function of rainbow trout ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish Physiology and Biochemistry vol. ... iodine metabolism appear to exist between mammals and fish. ... The plasma iodide levels of teleost fish in general, .

166

Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

CX-010652: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010652: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Technetium and Iodine Removal Studies with SuperLig Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06262013...

168

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the State of Washington a limited amount of discovery pertaining to iodine-129, technetium-99, and... http:energy.govemdownloadsreport-review-hanford-solid-waste-environm...

169

Grouting project to protect Snake River Plain Aquifer completed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treated locations contain waste contaminated with mobile forms of the radionuclides technetium-99 and iodine-129 produced during historical operations at the DOEs Idaho Site....

170

Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the State of Washington a limited amount of discovery pertaining to iodine-129, technetium-99, and groundwater analyses. While compiling information to respond to the State...

171

Office of Human Radiation Experiments - Archived Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

documents cold war metabolism of lethal dose studies with rates dose experiments medical research program Iodine-131 Iron-59 For further information regarding information...

172

Measure of precursor electron density profiles of laser launched radiative shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the dynamics of strong radiative shocks generated with the high-energy subnanosecond iodine laser at Prague Asterix Laser System facility

Busquet, Michel; González, Matthias; Audit, Edouard; 10.1063/1.3330636

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Iosil Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Place Winter Park, Florida Zip FL 32789 Product Florida iodine-based silicon production technology developer. References Iosil Energy Corporation1 LinkedIn...

174

Method and means of monitoring the effluent from nuclear facilities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodine is detected in the effluent cooling gas from a nuclear reactor or nuclear facility by passing the effluent gas through a continuously moving adsorbent filter material which is then purged of noble gases and conveyed continuously to a detector of radioactivity. The purging operation has little or no effect upon the concentration of radioactive iodine which is adsorbed on the filter material.

Lattin, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA); Erickson, Gerald L. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Physics of Hot Partonic Matter at LHC-ALICE  

SciTech Connect

The field of high energy nuclear physics has recently reached epoch making discoveries at the Relativistic Heavy Ton Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, highlighted with that of new state of nuclear matter with partonic degrees of freedom. The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN aims at comprehensive investigation and understanding of properties of the hot and dense partonic matter, as the only experiment dedicated to nucleus-nucleus collisions at the facility. Physics prospects at ALICE are reviewed including jet quenching as a probe of energy loss of quarks in the created medium, direct and thermal photons as vital probes of the thermal properties, and quarkonia as a beloved probe of color deconfinement, along with latest status of the detector systems including the high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter, PHOS, and a quick report from the first operation of LHC and ALICE in December, 2009.

Shigaki, K. [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Confinement of airborne radioactivity. Progress report, January--December 1974  

SciTech Connect

Several commercial activated carbons, marketed for iodine removal in reactor off-gas cleanup systems, were evaluated for iodine penetration at elevated temperatures (4 hr at 180$sup 0$C), and the penetration data varied widely. Subsequent chemical analysis of the samples indicated a strong correlation between the atom ratio of iodine to potassium (I/K) in the carbon and the high-temperature performance data. Iodine penetration tests were also performed on several carbons in an intense gamma radiation field (greater than 10$sup 7$ rads/hr). Test data show that carbons intentionally exposed to high concentrations of DOP aerosol performed as well as unexposed carbons. Studies of the rate of evaporation of elemental iodine from aqueous solutions indicated that significant quantities of I$sub 2$ might be expected to become airborne within a short period of time (5 hr) after release to open ponds. Addition of sodium thiosulfate to the solution substantially reduced the evaporative loss of iodine; however, the effects of high-intensity radiation fields on iodine-thiosulfate solutions remain to be evaluated. Small HEPA filters containing filter media of the type used in the Savannah River confinement system were exposed to reactor building air and a high-intensity radiation field. Following this exposure, they were tested for flow performance under simulated accident conditions. Radiation exposure slightly impaired the performance of new filters and improved the performance of service-aged filters. Service aging effects on filter performance were far more significant than radiation effects. (auth)

Dexter, A.H.; Evans, A.G.; Jones, L.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Edible Fat Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing for Edible Fat to test OSI,FFA, AOCS Color, Capillary Melting Point, Iodine Value, Lovibond Color, Mettler Dropping Point, a;-Monoglycerides, SFC Edible Fat Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP

178

Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Gas Chromatography to determine Fatty Acid Composition and Iodine Value using AOCS methods Ce 1-62 and Cd 1c-85. Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs appl

179

Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Marine Products and Marine Oil samples to test Anisidine Value, Free Fatty Acid, Iodine Value, Insoluble Impurities, Moisture, Peroxide Value. Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Labo

180

AOCS Official Method Cd 1b-87  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fats and Oils Cyclohexane Method AOCS Official Method Cd 1b-87 Methods and Analyses acid agricultural analysis analytical analytical chemistry analytical methods aocs aocs methods april articles biotechnology certified chemists chloroprop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, While nuclear energy might provide a solution to the increasing demand ... using experiments, theory, mathematical and physical modeling, and simulation. ... Adsorption of of Radioactive Iodine from Used Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing ...

182

Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

Richerme, Philip J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microsoft Word - Transportation pdf.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finnish homes 0.23 to 0.86 Christensen and Mustonen, 1987 Various radioisotopes Danish home 0.1 to 0.5 Roed and Cannell, 1987 Noble gGases, methyl iodide, elemental iodine,...

184

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air during a radiation event and then inhaled, it is quickly absorbed by the thyroid gland and can cause damage. KI acts to block the radioactive iodine from being taken into...

185

AOCS Official Method Tg 1a-64 (Pending)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fatty Acids, Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Tg 1a-64 (Pending) Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists fats lab laboratorie

186

AOCS Official Method Cd 1b-87 (Pending)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value of Fats and Oils Cyclohexane Method AOCS Official Method Cd 1b-87 (Pending) Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists fats lab lab

187

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a smalltest case. We chose chlorine because, unlike iodine orTwo sets of experiments with chlorine using different RF ion

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pos itive and ne gative chlorine i ons, w ith onl y a s malltest case. W e ch ose chlorine b ecause, u nlike iodine o rsets of e xperiments with chlorine using different RF ion s

Grisham, L. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION, ANNUAL REPORT 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coordinated ionic site for the chlorine atom on the siliconK to produce beams of chlorine, bromine, or iodine moleculesPeak flux velocities for chlorine atoms chlorine molecules

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Origin of Halogens and Nitrogen in Enstatite Chondrites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.Y. Je rome, Abundances of chlorine, bromine and iodine inof boron, lithium and chlorine in meteorites, in MeteoriteW. Scherle, Determination of chlorine in stony meteorites by

Rubin, Alan E.; Choi, Byeon-Gak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

AOCS Official Method Cd 1e-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Iodine Value by Pre-calibrated FT-NIR with Disposable Vials AOCS Official Method Cd 1e-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The me

192

Initial Assessment of the Consolidation of Chalcogels into a Viable Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

This report provides some preliminary data for the consolidation of chalcogen-based aerogels. The chalcogels tested to date at PNNL show great promise as iodine sorbents and preliminary consolidation research shows that they can be melted into a phase-pure glass at moderate temperatures. The preliminary consolidation experiments show that these materials might attack fused quartz so an alternative crucible material will likely need to be used to prevent this. The next steps will be to • Consider melting other chalcogel chemistries, e.g., Sn-Sb-S, Ge-Sn-S chalcogels • Consider melting chalcogels with adsorbed iodine to monitor iodine loss during melting • Optimize the consolidation temperatures to minimize the iodine loss and volatilization

Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Laboratory June 26, 2013 CX-010652: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technetium and Iodine Removal Studies with SuperLig Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06262013...

194

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technetium and Iodine Removal Studies with SuperLig Resin Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina An ion exchange resin, SuperLig 639 by IBC Advanced Technologies, is to be...

195

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010652: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technetium and Iodine Removal Studies with SuperLig Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06262013...

196

AOCS Official Method Tg 1-64 (Pending)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine Value, Wijs Method AOCS Official Method Tg 1-64 (Pending) Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists fats lab laboratories laboratory lip

197

Zinc-Column Hydride Generation and 7'rapping Dilute standards or samples containing less than 5 mg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- sium iodide-iodine trapping solution in the centrifuge tube. The nitrogen gas flow rate wasadjusted furnace program (Table I). Gas flow was stopped during the atomizationstep. TABLE I Optimized Furnace

Canberra, University of

198

MEASUREMENT OF RADIOIODINE IN PUREX STACK GASES  

SciTech Connect

The chemical behavior of iodine-131 in stack air from this site's Purex process is reported. The radioiodine in the stack gases apparently consists of variable proportions of molecular vapor and other forms of iodine, thus causing the efficiencies for most collection media to vary widely. Activated charcoal is a satisfactory collection medium although Process gases (ammonia and oxides of nitrogen) lower the efficiency of the charcoal from 99 to 88%. Ambient temperature and humidity had no effect on deposition and retention of iodine in long stainless steel sampling lines. Process conditions did have an effect and estimates of iodine released were 10 to 15% low due to this line loss. (auth)

Jacobsen, W.R.; Jolly, L. Jr.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

1984-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sources of Radioiodine at Boiling Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report determines specific components in operating BWRs that have a potential for being emission sources of radioactive iodine. Conclusions of this study indicate the following: most radioiodine emanating from plants is from a few major areas; in most cases these releases are locally treatable; the interaction with surfaces is an important phenomenon in the behavior of the iodine; and the chemical form in the plant varies according to the circumstances of release. The models developed provide an imp...

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/. The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO/sub 2/ adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO/sub 2/. Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO/sub 2/ removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective.

Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NA Standards | Refinement Parameters | X-PLOR param file for high  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the file for different bond distances and angles of C2'and C3'-endo the file for different bond distances and angles of C2'and C3'-endo remark K= scale*(kT/sigma**2), scales=Base 0.1875, Sugar 0.566, Phos 1.548 ! removed references to CA, CF, CS, MG, NH3, OS (ATB 12/30/94) ! removed TIP3 water model (ATB 12/30/94) ! mapped NA->NNA, CH3E->CC3E (ATB 12/30/94) ! G.PARKINSON, J.VOJTECHOVSKY, L.CLOWNEY, A.T.BRUNGER ! H.M.BERMAN ! NEW PARAMETERS FOR THE REFINEMENT OF NUCLEIC ACID CONTAINING ! STRUCTURES ! ACTA CRYST.D (1996) v. 52 57-64 set echo=false end !the generic bonds were taken from param11.dna with 3*kq bond C5R OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 5' end bond C5D OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 5' end bond C3R OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 3' end bond C3D OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 3' end bond HHO O2R 1350.000 0.9572 !Mod HO to HHO 05/15/96

205

Photovoltaics and the Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past five years, solar energy usage has grown by about 43 percent a year, giving rise to a billion-dollar industry in photovoltaics (PV) or getting electricity from light. The word photovoltaics combines the Greek phos, or light, with the “volt” of electricity. PV technologies have distinct environmental advantages over conventional power technologies, such as: no noise, no emissions, no need for fuel and power lines. Compared to burning coal, a gigawatt-hour of PV-generated electricity would prevent the release of about 1,000 tons of carbon dioxide, eight of sulfur dioxide, four of nitrogen oxides, and 0.4 tons of particulates. However, manufacturing the solar cells that transform light to electricity requires the use of some toxic and flammable substances. Addressing the environmental, health, and safety concerns of the PV industry to minimize risk while ensuring economic viability and public support is the work of the National Photovoltaic Environmental Health, & Safety Assistance Center at BNL.

Fthenakis, Vasilis (BNL Environmental Sciences)

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Structure-property relationship of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and physisorbed off-gas radionuclides.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the host-guest interactions between metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with various profiles and highly polarizable molecules (iodine), with emphasis on identifying preferential sorption sites in these systems. Radioactive iodine 129I, along with other volatile radionuclides (3H, 14C, Xe and Kr), represents a relevant component in the off-gas resulted during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to its very long half-life, 15.7 x 106 years, and potential health risks in humans, its efficient capture and long-term storage is of great importance. The leading iodine capture technology to date is based on trapping iodine in silver-exchanged mordenite. Our interests are directed towards improving existent capturing technologies, along with developing novel materials and alternative waste forms. Herein we report the first study that systematically monitors iodine loading onto MOFs, an emerging new class of porous solid-state materials. In this context, MOFs are of particular interest as: (i) they serve as ideal high capacity storage media, (ii) they hold potential for the selective adsorption from complex streams, due to their high versatility and tunability. This work highlights studies on both newly developed in our lab, and known highly porous MOFs that all possess distinct characteristics (specific surface area, pore volume, pore size, and dimension of the window access to the pore). The materials were loaded to saturation, where elemental iodine was introduced from solution, as well as from vapor phase. Uptakes in the range of {approx}125-150 wt% I2 sorbed were achieved, indicating that these materials outperform all other solid adsorbents to date in terms of overall capacity. Additionally, the loaded materials can be efficiently encapsulated in stable waste forms, including as low temperature sintering glasses. Ongoing studies are focused on gathering qualitative information with respect to localizing the physisorbed iodine molecules within the frameworks: X-ray single-crystal analyses, in conjunction with high pressure differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) studies aimed to identify preferential sites in the pores, and improve MOFs robustness. Furthermore, durability studies on the iodine loaded MOFs and subsequent waste forms include thermal analyses, SEM/EDS elemental mapping, and leach-durability testing. We anticipate for this in-depth analysis to further aid the design of advanced materials, capable to address major hallmarks: safe capture, stability and durability over extended timeframes.

Nenoff, Tina Maria; Chupas, Peter J. (Argonne National Laboratory); Garino, Terry J.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Chapman, Karena W. (Argonne National Laboratory); Sava, Dorina Florentina

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Wu, Ning (Boston, MA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

40 CFR Ch. I (7105 Edition) 190.10 period in which he is engaged in car-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or emissions therefrom and car- rying out inspection and enforcement activities to assure compliance.10(a) shall be effective December 1, 1979, except that for doses arising from operations associated) shall be effective December 1, 1979, except that the standards for krypton-85 and iodine-129 shall

211

Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iodine-containing species (IO, OIO, INO3, (IO)2, I2O3, I2O4channel and ~40% for the OIO forming channel (Saiz-Lopez etiodine oxide species, such as OIO, I 2 O 3 , I 2 O 4 , and I

Nakao, Shunsuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Pacific Cod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes Cod, Pacific Specific Gravity (SG) 15.5/15.5°C 25/25°C Other SG Refractive Index (RI) 25°C 40°C Other RI Iodine Value Saponification Value Titer °C % Unsaponifiable Melti

213

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a developed experimental model of the iodine air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules.

I. M. Neklyudov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin; O. P. Ledenyov

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electronic cleansing in CT colonography: past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fecal tagging is a means of ‘marking' fecal residues (stool and fluid) in a colon by use of the oral administration of a positive contrast agent (barium or iodine) in CT Colonography (CTC). Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for ... Keywords: CT colonography, bowel preparation, electronic cleansing, fecal tagging

Wenli Cai; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Design of GA thermochemical water-splitting process for the Mirror Advanced Reactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GA interfaced the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle to the Mirror Advanced Reactor System (MARS). The results of this effort follow as one section and part of a second section to be included in the MARS final report. This section describes the process and its interface to the reactor. The capital and operating costs for the hydrogen plant are described.

Brown, L.C.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fate of soluble uranium in the I{sub 2}/KI leaching process for mercury removal  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of {approximately} 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake.

Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials and Chemistry Lab.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

NHI-Acid Concentration Membranes -- Membrane Recommendations for the S-I Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scope: The purpose of this draft report is to make recommendations concerning the applicability of specific membrane materials for acid concentration processes to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle integrated laboratory scale (ILS) demonstration. Introduction Acid concentration membrane processes have been studied for possible inclusion in the Sulfur-Iodine integrated laboratory scale (S-I ILS) demonstration. The need for this technology is driven by the chemical processes required for economical water splitting using the S-I cycle. Of the chemical processes inherent to the S-I cycle that have been identified as targets for deployment of membrane technology, three have been studied during the past three fiscal years as a part of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. First, the ability to concentrate hydriodic acid (HI) and iodine mixtures was sought as a method for aiding in the isolation of HI away from water and iodine. Isolated HI would then be delivered to the HI decomposition process for liberation of product hydrogen. Second, an extension of this technology to sulfuric acid was proposed to benefit sulfuric acid decomposition recycle. Third, decomposition of HI to form hydrogen is equilibrium limited. Removal of hydrogen, utilizing Le Chatelier’s principle, will increase to overall conversion and thus increasing the efficiency of the S-I cycle.

Frederick F Stewart

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Experimental investigation of the chemistry of excited states of rare gases. Third quarterly progress report, April 15, 1979-July 15, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Photosensitized studies of Xe(/sup 3/P/sub 1/) and Kr(/sup 3/P/sub 1/) reactions with fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine donors have been very productive. Work on the laser excitation methods for generating selected states of the rare gas atoms lying above the np/sup 5/,n + 1s set of levels continued.

Setser, D.W.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

GEER Program & Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-3 2.3 The Protective Action Guides 2-4 2.3.1 Evacuation and Sheltering 2-5 2.3.2 Thyroid and Skin to a 5 rem Thyroid Dose Equivalent from Inhalation of Radioiodine 5-15 5-3 Dose Conversion Factors (DCF plans include procedures for issuing stable iodine to reduce thyroid dose (FE-85), this may

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Written and Printed Sources for the Study of Mongolian Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the operation. This area is to be thoroughly cleaned from the centre outwards with colton wool soaked in iodine, followed by a similar cleansing with spirit. The next section deals with what conditions may be treated by bleeding, and those where...

Bawden, Charles

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Resonance Raman Study of I2 -Intercalated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conducted resonance Raman studies on the iodine-intercalated bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The Raman spectra obtained using the 647.1-nm line of a Kr-ion laser indicate that I2 intercalation affects the electronic ... Keywords: I $_2$-intercalation, Raman spectroscopy, resonance Raman, single-walled carbon nanotubes

V. M. Nguyen; I. S. Yang; Y. Jung; S. -J. Kim; J. Oh; W. Yi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tracer Studies at Los Alamos 266 Los Alamos Science Number 23 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Sec- ond World War, the scientific community split into two groups on the issue of radioactive fallout Project Sunshine, the Atomic Energy Commission funded the various national laboratories to study fallout. Along with strontium-90 and cesium-137, iodine-131 ended up being one of the most studied fallout

Massey, Thomas N.

227

Laser-fusion program. Semiannual report, January--June 1973  

SciTech Connect

Brief discussions are given for each of the following areas of research covered during this report period: solid-state laser program, design analysis, component development, diagnostics, gas lasers, chemical lasers---the iodine laser, basic studies and advanced concepts, laser propagation, laser plasmas, laser fusion, isotope separation, and program resources. (MOW)

Sussman, S.S. (ed.)

1973-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA); Bosuego, Gail P. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOI: 10.1126/science.1059011 , 479 (2001);292Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a (MoS2)-Ix bundle. (A) Hexagonal structure of the tubes within a bundle. (B) High-resolution view- tubes, creating one-dimensional rows along the bundle axis. The periodicity of feasible sites for iodine-diameter molybdenum disulfide tubes. The nanotubes are up to hundreds of micrometers long and display diverse self

230

Hydriodic acid-anode-depolarized hydrogen generator  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is recovered from aqueous hydriodic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid, in an electrolysis cell having an anode and cathode compartment separated by a hydrogen ion permeable membrane, by electrochemically liberating iodine in the anode compartment by anodization of iodide anions, and electrochemically generating hydrogen in the cathode compartment from hydrogen cations that migrate across the membrane.

Maskalick, N.J.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Molecular Level Characterization and Mobility of Radionuclide-Carrying Natural Organic Matter in Aquatic Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides, 129I and 239,240Pu, are major products or by-products of nuclear fission and among the top risk drivers for waste disposal at the Savannah River Sites (SRS) and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS), respectively, due to their perceived mobility in the environment, excessive inventory, toxicity, and long half-life. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of natural organic matter in retarding or facilitating the migration of 129I and 239,240Pu in the Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Measurements of 127I and 129I in humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) obtained by five successive alkaline, two glycerol and one citric acid-alkaline extractions, demonstrated that these extractable humic substances (HS) together account for 54-56 percent and 46 percent of the total 127I and 129I in the soil, respectively. The variations among 127I and 129I concentrations, isotopic ratios (129I/127I), chemical properties of all these humic substances indicated iodine was bound to a small-size aromatic subunit (~10 kDa), while the large-size subunit (~90 kDa), which likely linked the small-size unit through some weak chemical forces, determined the relative mobility of iodine bound to organic matter. Soil resuspension experiments simulating surface runoff or stormflow and erosion events were conducted with soils collected from SRS. Results showed that 72-77 percent of the newly-introduced I- or IO3- were irreversibly sequestered into the organic-rich soil, while the rest was transformed into colloidal and dissolved organo-iodine by the soil. The resulting iodine remobilization contradicts the conventional view that considers only I- or IO3- as the mobile forms. Quantitative structure analysis by 13C DPMAS NMR and solution state 1H NMR on these humic substances indicate that iodine is closely related to the aromatic regions containing esterified products of phenolic and fomic acid or other aliphatic carboxylic acids, amide functionalities, quinone-like structure activated by electron-donating groups (e.g., NH2) or hemicelluloses-lignin-like complex with phenyl-glycosidic linkage. The micro-molecular environment, such as the hydrophobic aliphatic periphery hindering the active aromatic cores and the hydrophilic polysaccharides favoring its accessibility towards hydrophilic iodine species, play another key role in the interactions between iodine and SOM. NMR spectra of the colloidal organic Pu carrier which can potentially be released from the soil during the surface runoff or stormflow showed Pu was transported, at sub-pM concentrations, by a cutin-derived soil degradation products containing siderophore-like moieties and virtually all mobile Pu.

Xu, Chen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in Aquatic Systems: Interactions with Radionuclides (234Th (IV), 129 I) and Biofilms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of laboratory and field investigations were carried out to elucidate the importance of natural organic matter in aquatic systems, i.e., trace element scavenging (e.g., 234Th) by exopolymeric substances (EPS), formation of biofilms, as well as interactions with 129I. A method involving cross flow ultrafiltration, followed by a three-step cartridge soaking and stirred-cell diafiltration, was developed for isolating EPS from phytoplankton cultures, especially in seawater media. EPS isolated from a marine diatom, Amphora sp. was then subjected to semi-quantitative (e.g., carbohydrate, proteins) and quantitative analysis (e.g., neutral sugars, acidic sugars, sulfate). It appeared that Th (IV) binding by EPS was dominated by the acidic polysaccharides of fraction. For EPS of biofilms collected from polluted streams, hydrophobic proteins were the most abundant components in EPS, followed by more hydrophilic carbohydrates. However, chemical composition of carbohydrates or proteins, i.e., monosaccharides and amino acids, respectively, varied with environmental conditions and substrata applied, which suggests that the formation of biofilms on different substrates is regulated by specific properties of microorganisms, environmental conditions and nature of substratum. No correlation between relative hydrophobicity of substratum and development of biofilm was found in this study. A sensitive and rapid GC-MS method was developed to enable the determination of isotopic ratios (129I/127I) of speciated iodine in natural waters. At the F-area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), iodine species in the groundwater consisted of 48.8 percent iodide, 27.3 percent iodate and 23.9 percent organo-iodine. Each of these iodine species exhibited vastly different transport behavior in the column experiments using surface soil from the SRS. Results demonstrated that mobility of iodine species depended greatly on the iodine concentration, mostly due to the limited sorptive capacity for anions of the soil. EPS, especially enzymes (e.g., haloperoxidases) could facilitate the incorporation of iodide to natural organic carbon. At high input concentrations of iodate (78.7 ?M), iodate was found to be completely reduced and subsequently followed the transport behavior of iodide. The marked reduction of iodate was probably associated with natural organic carbon and facilitated by bacteria, besides inorganic reductants (e.g., Fe2 ) in sediments and pore water.

Zhang, Saijin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Segmentation and quantification of materials with energy discriminating computed tomography: A phantom study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To experimentally investigate whether a computed tomography (CT) system based on CdZnTe (CZT) detectors in conjunction with a least-squares parameter estimation technique can be used to decompose four different materials. Methods: The material decomposition process was divided into a segmentation task and a quantification task. A least-squares minimization algorithm was used to decompose materials with five measurements of the energy dependent linear attenuation coefficients. A small field-of-view energy discriminating CT system was built. The CT system consisted of an x-ray tube, a rotational stage, and an array of CZT detectors. The CZT array was composed of 64 pixels, each of which is 0.8x0.8x3 mm. Images were acquired at 80 kVp in fluoroscopic mode at 50 ms per frame. The detector resolved the x-ray spectrum into energy bins of 22-32, 33-39, 40-46, 47-56, and 57-80 keV. Four phantoms were constructed from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene, polyoxymethylene, hydroxyapatite, and iodine. Three phantoms were composed of three materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (50, 150, 250, and 350 mg/ml) and iodine (4, 8, 12, and 16 mg/ml) contrast elements. One phantom was composed of four materials with embedded hydroxyapatite (150 and 350 mg/ml) and iodine (8 and 16 mg/ml). Calibrations consisted of PMMA phantoms with either hydroxyapatite (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/ml) or iodine (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 mg/ml) embedded. Filtered backprojection and a ramp filter were used to reconstruct images from each energy bin. Material segmentation and quantification were performed and compared between different phantoms. Results: All phantoms were decomposed accurately, but some voxels in the base material regions were incorrectly identified. Average quantification errors of hydroxyapatite/iodine were 9.26/7.13%, 7.73/5.58%, and 12.93/8.23% for the three-material PMMA, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene phantoms, respectively. The average errors for the four-material phantom were 15.62% and 2.76% for hydroxyapatite and iodine, respectively. Conclusions: The calibrated least-squares minimization technique of decomposition performed well in breast imaging tasks with an energy resolving detector. This method can provide material basis images containing concentrations of the relevant materials that can potentially be valuable in the diagnostic process.

Le, Huy Q.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

201: Categorical Exclusion Determination 201: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The objective of this study is to analyze for iodine speciation in Savannah River Site samples (groundwater and soil) by testing for iodide, iodate and organo-Iodide concentrations. This work will be conducted in B-122 and/or B107, B127 in 773-A. This is in support of PA-CA (performance assessment-composite analysis) test and research. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002201.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003638: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000560: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005109

235

Containment atmosphere response (CAR) program. Second status report. [HTGR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the work performed under the Containment Atmosphere Response (CAR) Program of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety Research Task since the publication of the previous status report (February 1978). The work concentrated on development of models describing containment phenomena during core heatup in support of probabilistic risk assessment studies. Models were completed for fission product iodine sorption on coated surfaces, diffusivity and retentivity of untreated concrete, iodine interaction with condensing steam on the containment atmosphere boundaries, and the cleanup filter system. These models were incorporated into a new computer program called CARCAS, a substantial extension of the CNTB computer program, and applied to Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis for Phase II core heatup sequences. Development was begun on models describing the postulated behavior of particulate fission products or aerosols within and leaking out of the containment.

Landoni, J.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Interim results of the F-5 irradiation experiment and proposed fission product transport mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents: (1) results of a study of gamma-scan data for eight fuel rods removed at the end of the first phase of the GCFR F-5 (X317) irradiation experiment in EBR-II; (2) a comparison of cesium and iodine migration behavior in F-5 and previous GCFR irradiation experiments (GB-9, GB-10, and F-1); and (3) proposed cesium and iodine transport mechanisms, based primarily on observed fission product behavior in the irradiation experiments. Two modes of cesium transport, metal vapor transport and xenon precursor transport, are shown to be important. The formation of cesium uranate at the fuel-blanket interface and the effect of uranate formation on cesium transport to the fuel rod trap are discussed. It is shown how cesium isotope concentrations in the fuel rod trap differ for sealed and vented rods.

Bell, W.E.; Greenberg, S.; Goodin, D.T.; Langer, S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

Norman, John H. (La Jolla, CA); Russell, Jr., John L. (La Jolla, CA); Porter, II, John T. (Del Mar, CA); McCorkle, Kenneth H. (Del Mar, CA); Roemer, Thomas S. (Cardiff, CA); Sharp, Robert (Del Mar, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

Wang, Tihu (Littleton, CO); Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Antimocrobial Polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi-Heng (Walnut Creek, CA); Wright, Stacy C. (Columbus, GA)

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

240

Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a letter report to complete level 3 milestone "Assess aging characteristics of silica aerogels" for DOE FCRD program. Recently, samples of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel were aged in flowing dry air for up to 6 months and then loaded with iodine. This dry-air aging simulated the impact of long-term exposure to process gases during process idling. The 6-month aged sample exhibited an iodine sorption capacity of 32 mass%, which was 9 mass % lower than that for an un-aged Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel. In an attempt to understand this decrease in sorption capacity, we characterized physical properties of the aged samples with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed no impact of aging on the aerogel microstructure or the silver nanoparticles in the aerogel, including their spatial distribution and morphology.

Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Robinson, Matthew J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oral Histories: Health Physicist Constantine J. Maletskos, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist Constantine J. Maletskos, Ph.D. Conducted January 20, 1995 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Early Education and Career (1920 to Mid '50s) Early Dosimetry Research (1940s to 1960) Radium Dial Painter Research (Early '50s–60s) Fernald School Calcium Metabolism Studies (1948 to Early '50s) Iodine-131 Thyroid Research (Early '50s); Additional Calcium Metabolism Studies on Elderly Subjects (Early '50s) Iodine-131 Research and the Fernald School (Early to Mid '50s) Robley Evans's Role in Experiment Oversight and Funding Information Experiment Safety Protocols, Clarified (1950s) Radium and Thorium Ingestion by Human Subjects (Late '50s to Early '60s)

242

Assessment of Noble Gases in the Savannah River Site Environment  

SciTech Connect

A series of documents has been published that assesses the impact of various radionuclides released to the environment by Savannah River Site operations. The quantity released, the disposition of the radionuclides in the environment, and the dose to offsite individuals has been presented for carbon, cesium, iodine, plutonium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and uranium. An assessment of the impact of non-radioactive mercury also has been published.

Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The legacy of Cf-252 operations at Savannah River Technology Center: Continuous releases of radioiodine to the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The iodine isotopes I-132, 1-133, I-134, and I-135, which have half-lives ranging from 53 minutes to 21 hours, are measured in the atmospheric effluent from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRS is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The isotopes` release rates range from 10 to 300 microcuries per week compared to the rate. The resulting annual dose from all iodine isotopes is minor; it comprises 0.01 percent of the total offsite dose due to atmospheric releases from SRS in 1990. Circumstantial evidence indicates the radioiodine originates from traces of unencapsulated Cf-252. The determination that spontaneous fission of Cf-252 is the source of the radioiodine has several ramifications. Radioactive fission-product isotopes of the noble gas elements krypton and xenon must also be released. Noble gases are more volatile and mobile than iodine. Also, the released iodine isotopes decay to xenon isotopes. The noble gases decay to non-gaseous elements that are transported along with radioiodine to the terrestrial environment by deposition from the SRTC plume. Only Sr-89 is believed to accumulate sufficiently in the environment to approach detectable levels. Given similar conditions in earlier years, releases of short-lived radioiodine have occurred undetected in routine monitoring since the early 1970s. Release rates 20 years ago would have been 200 times greater than current release rates. This report documents preliminary experiments conducted by SRTC and Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) scientists. The release process and the environmental impact of fission products from Cf-252 should be thoroughly researched.

Kantelo, M.V.; Crandall, B.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

The legacy of Cf-252 operations at Savannah River Technology Center: Continuous releases of radioiodine to the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The iodine isotopes I-132, 1-133, I-134, and I-135, which have half-lives ranging from 53 minutes to 21 hours, are measured in the atmospheric effluent from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRS is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The isotopes' release rates range from 10 to 300 microcuries per week compared to the rate. The resulting annual dose from all iodine isotopes is minor; it comprises 0.01 percent of the total offsite dose due to atmospheric releases from SRS in 1990. Circumstantial evidence indicates the radioiodine originates from traces of unencapsulated Cf-252. The determination that spontaneous fission of Cf-252 is the source of the radioiodine has several ramifications. Radioactive fission-product isotopes of the noble gas elements krypton and xenon must also be released. Noble gases are more volatile and mobile than iodine. Also, the released iodine isotopes decay to xenon isotopes. The noble gases decay to non-gaseous elements that are transported along with radioiodine to the terrestrial environment by deposition from the SRTC plume. Only Sr-89 is believed to accumulate sufficiently in the environment to approach detectable levels. Given similar conditions in earlier years, releases of short-lived radioiodine have occurred undetected in routine monitoring since the early 1970s. Release rates 20 years ago would have been 200 times greater than current release rates. This report documents preliminary experiments conducted by SRTC and Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) scientists. The release process and the environmental impact of fission products from Cf-252 should be thoroughly researched.

Kantelo, M.V.; Crandall, B.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

THAI Multi-Compartment Containment Test Program  

SciTech Connect

The THAI experimental programme includes combined-effect investigations on thermal hydraulics, hydrogen, and fission product (iodine and aerosols) behaviour in LWR containments under severe accident conditions. An overview on the experiments performed up to now and on the future test program is presented, in combination with a selection of typical results to illustrate the versatility of the test facility and the broad variety of topics investigated. (authors)

Kanzleiter, T.; Poss, G. [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Funke, F. [AREVA ANP (Germany); Allelein, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - mbH (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Environmental Levels Of 129I Present In Bovine Thyroid And Fresh Water In Argentina  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of {sup 129}I in bovine thyroid and fresh water samples coming from all over Argentina were analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and total iodine present in samples by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Once we complete this study, it will be the first set of data of this kind from an extended region of the south American subcontinent.

Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Carnellia, P. F. F.; Barbara, E. de; Figueira, J. M.; Fimiani, L.; Heimanna, D. M.; Zalazara, L. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); La Gamma, A. M. [Gerencia Quimica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wallner, A. [VERA-Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen. (MOW)

Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

METABOLISM OF RADIOIODINE BY CAT FETUS NEAR TERM  

SciTech Connect

The chromatographic study of the thyroids of cats and the fetus near term has shown a higher specific radioactivity in the fetus than in the mother and a similar iodine metabolism. There is a hormone ratio, of the same order as the metabolism ratio, of iodide equal to or slightly higher than one, except for some individuals in which it is sharply lowered. (tr-auth)

Verain, A.; Verain-Pinoy, A.

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

MEASUREMENT OF XENON POISONING IN THE HRT  

SciTech Connect

Measurements obtained during three periods of HRT operations indicated that the xenon poison fraction was approximately 0.010. The technique used was based on mass spectrographic analyses of the stable xenon isotopes in the reactor off-gas stream. Models proposed to explain the measurements show that xenon, which is formed primarily by decay of iodine adsorbed on the pipe walls, is held up on the walls, out of the circulating stream, for an average period of about eight hours. (auth)

Burch, W.D.

1962-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

New Approaches for Passivation of Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-351  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New approaches of passivating crystalline, multicrystalline, and amorphous silicon will be explored. These will include the use of aqueous solution of KCN and a proprietary composition formulated by Mallinckrodt Baker, Inc. The surface passivation will be compared with that provided by an iodine-ethanol solution, and bulk passivation will be compared with that of H-passivation obtained by silicon nitride, in a fire-through process.

Sopori, B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mercuric iodide research and development in support of DOE Historically Black Colleges and University Program. Semiannual technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress achieved during the first six months of the program. The different subjects studied were: zone refining experiments of mercuric iodide to establish optimum refining parameters and produce purified material; development of surface reflection spectroscopy as a method to measure crystal surface temperatures, with emphasis on investigation the potential of using optical multichannel analysis; optical methods for measuring iodine vapor during physical vapor transport of HgI{sub 2}; and atomic force microscopy studies.

George, M.A.; Zheng, Y.; Salary, L.; Chen, K.T.; Burger, A.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Anthropological Insights in the Delivery of Health Services in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The impact of environment and genetic factors are further additive one which complicate the situation. Some of the studies done by some anthropologists also reveal that non-availability of safe drinking water, proper sanitation and hygiene coupled... micronutrients (such as iron, vitamin A, calcium and iodine) as well as the inadequate intake of calories and proteins remain important reasons for the lack of better health. Environmental factors are barriers in achieving better health, It is estimated that only...

Regmi, Rishikeshab Raj

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Summary of EPRI Research Applicable to Nuclear Accident Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The events at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant following the March 11, 2011, earthquake and the subsequent tsunami have heightened the need for widespread dissemination of information available within the nuclear industry that addresses subjects pertinent to the on-going situation at the plant. These subjects include, but are not necessarily limited to: Hydrogen generation Loss of off-site power Reactor core performance following a loss of coolant Iodine removal Emergency response planning Emergency...

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6-(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6- .sup.18 F!fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb.sub.3 ; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to .ltoreq.7.

Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Bishop, Allyson J. (Wahnemuhle, DE); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Bida, Gerald T. (Shreveport, LA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Free radical explosive composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

Walker, Franklin E. (15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DEVELOPMENT OF A 250 kW AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS SINGLE REGION SUSPENSION REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactor (20% enriched U/sup 235/) is pressurized with hydrogen up to 20 atm overpressure and has a maximum working temperature of about 250 deg C. The process flowsheet, including the systems for fusion product removal, is presented. Xenon is removed directly by gas stripping and indirectly by removal of iodine. The neutron flux is measured but not used for control purposes. (W.D.M.)

Kreyger, P.J.; van der Plas, Th.; van der Schee, B.L.A.; Went, J.J.; van Zolingen, J.J.

1958-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

Preparation of uranium compounds  

SciTech Connect

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

APPARATUS FOR HIGH PURITY METAL RECOVERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for preparing high purity metal such as uranium, plutonium and the like from an impure mass of the same metal. The apparatus is arranged so that the impure metal is heated and swept by a stream of hydrogen gas bearing a halogen such as iodine. The volatiie metal halide formed is carried on to a hot filament where the metal halide is decomposed and the molten high purity metal is collected in a rceeiver below

Magel, T.T.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted.

Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.; Finney, B.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is revealed for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb{sub 3}; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to {<=}7. 1 fig.

Satyamurthy, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Bishop, A.J.; Namavari, M.; Bida, G.T.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and important halogen is chlorine. In nature, fluorine is mainly found in minerals such as CaF2 and Na2AlF6 for the other halogens - see Table 7.1. Natural gas and oil-derived fuels contain very small amounts of halogens Natural gas - * Iodine 0.5 - 1.5 mg/kg In biomasses, especially straw, the presence of halogens is largely

Zevenhoven, Ron

264

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a .beta." alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl.sub.4 or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose.

Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Prakash, Jai (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chalcogen-Based Aerogels as Sorbents for Radionuclide Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The efficient capture of radionuclides having long half-lives such as technetium-99 (99Tc), uranium-238 (238U), and iodine-129 (129I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, a new nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogel, called a chalcogel, is shown to be very effective to capture ionic forms of 99Tc and 238U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for 129I), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. Some of the chalcogels performed better than others but the PtGeS sorbent performed the best with capture efficiencies of 98% and 99.4% for 99Tc and 238U, respectively. All sorbents showed >99% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This unified sorbent would be an attractive option in environmental remediation for various radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production, wastes from nuclear power production, or potential future nuclear fuel reprocessing.

Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C.; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J.; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a ...

Neklyudov, I M; Poltinin, P Ya; Ledenyov, O P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental Factors Altering Thyroid Function and Their Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic ingestion of modest doses of dietary iodine, radiation, and polyhalogenated biphenyls (PCB's and PBB's) are environmental factors with known or suspected adverse effects on the human thyroid. Iodine consumption in the United States is approaching 1 mg daily for a large segment of the population. Data are reviewed which support the need for concern regarding the long-term adverse effects of dietary iodine on thyroid function, particularly in certain susceptible individuals. Environmental sources of radiation pose a significant risk of thyroid cancer and hypothyroidism under certain circumstances which may be intentional, inadvertent, or accidental. Exposure to polyhalogenated biphenyls during manufacture or as industrial pollutants are hazardous to man and to wildlife in moderate or large quantities and perhaps also in small amounts. The need to investigate the potential harm posed by these factors in the quantities commonly encountered is emphasized. A wide variety of environmental agents adversely affect the thyroid gland. Some have been precisely identified while others are not well characterized. Some are known to alter thyroid function

Charles P. Barsano*t

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Two Aerogel sorption tests that have been performed this fiscal year. The maximum iodine decontamination factor (DF) was measured to be over 10,000, above the 1,000-10,000 target DF range. The mass transfer zone may be as short as 0.5 inches under the sorption conditions of the first test. Only a small fraction of the iodine sorbed on Bed 1 was desorbed during the purge periods. The silver-functionalized Aerogel appears to have potential to be a very effective and efficient iodine sorbent.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Draft Air Pathway Report: Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the air pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating historical radiation doses that could have been received by populations near the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the air-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Air pathway report: Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

Phase 1 of the air-pathway portion of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and, relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. Preliminary median dose estimates summed over the year 1945--1947 for the primary pathway, air-pasture-cow-milk-thyroid, ranged from low median values of 0.006 rad for upwind adults who obtained milk from backyard cows not on pasture to high median values of 68.0 rad for downwind infants who drank milk from pasture-fed cows. Extremes of the estimated range are a low of essentially zero to upwind adults and a high of almost 3000 rem to downwind infants. 37 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microphase separation in copolymers of hydrophilic PEG blocks and hydrophobic tyrosine-derived segments using simultaneous SAXS/WAXS/DSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydration- and temperature-induced microphase separations were investigated by simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in a family of copolymers in which hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks are inserted randomly into a hydrophobic polymer made of either desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE) or iodinated I{sub 2}DTE segments. Iodination of the tyrosine rings in I{sub 2}DTE increased the X-ray contrast between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in addition to facilitating the study of the effect of iodination on microphase separation. The formation of phase-separated, hydrated PEG domains is of considerable significance as it profoundly affects the polymer properties. The copolymers of DTE (or I{sub 2}DTE) and PEG are a useful model system, and the findings presented here may be applicable to other PEG-containing random copolymers. In copolymers of PEG and DTE and I{sub 2}DTE, the presence of PEG depressed the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the copolymer relative to the homopolymer, poly(DTE carbonate), and the DTE/I{sub 2}DTE segments hindered the crystallization of the PEG segments. In the dry state, at large PEG fractions (>70 vol%), the PEG domains self-assembled into an ordered structure with 14-18 nm distance between the domains. These domains gave rise to a SAXS peak at all temperatures in the iodinated polymers, but only above the T{sub g} in non-iodinated polymers, due to the unexpected contrast-match between the crystalline PEG domains and the glassy DTE segments. Irrespective of whether PEG was crystalline or not, immersion of these copolymers in water resulted in the formation of hydrated PEG domains that were 10-20 nm apart. Since both water and the polymer chains must be mobile for the phase separation to occur, the PEG domains disappeared when the water froze, and reappeared as the ice began to melt. This transformation was reversible, and showed hysteresis as did the melting of ice and freezing of the water incorporated into the polymer. PEG-water complexes and PEG-water eutectics were observed in WAXS and DSC scans, respectively.

Murthy, N.S.; Wang, W.; Kohn, J. (Rutgers); (Vermont)

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in monochromatic images, the optimal energy was lower than that when minimizing noise level. When the total radiation dose was equally distributed between low and high energy in dual-energy scans, for minimum noise, the optimal energies were 68, 71, 74, and 77 keV for small, medium, large, and extra-large (xlarge) phantoms, respectively; for maximum iodine CNR, the optimal energies were 66, 68, 70, 72 keV. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the CNR was better than that in a single-energy scan at 120 kV for the same radiation dose. Compared to an 80 kV scan, however, the iodine CNR in monochromatic images was lower for the small, medium, and large phantoms. Conclusions: In dual-source dual-energy CT, optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on patient size, dose partitioning, and the image quality metric optimized. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the iodine CNR was better than that in 120 kV images for the same radiation dose. Compared to single-energy 80 kV images, the iodine CNR in virtual monochromatic images was lower for small to large phantom sizes.

Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Least squares parameter estimation methods for material decomposition with energy discriminating detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Energy resolving detectors provide more than one spectral measurement in one image acquisition. The purpose of this study is to investigate, with simulation, the ability to decompose four materials using energy discriminating detectors and least squares minimization techniques. Methods: Three least squares parameter estimation decomposition techniques were investigated for four-material breast imaging tasks in the image domain. The first technique treats the voxel as if it consisted of fractions of all the materials. The second method assumes that a voxel primarily contains one material and divides the decomposition process into segmentation and quantification tasks. The third is similar to the second method but a calibration was used. The simulated computed tomography (CT) system consisted of an 80 kVp spectrum and a CdZnTe (CZT) detector that could resolve the x-ray spectrum into five energy bins. A postmortem breast specimen was imaged with flat panel CT to provide a model for the digital phantoms. Hydroxyapatite (HA) (50, 150, 250, 350, 450, and 550 mg/ml) and iodine (4, 12, 20, 28, 36, and 44 mg/ml) contrast elements were embedded into the glandular region of the phantoms. Calibration phantoms consisted of a 30/70 glandular-to-adipose tissue ratio with embedded HA (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/ml) and iodine (5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 mg/ml). The x-ray transport process was simulated where the Beer-Lambert law, Poisson process, and CZT absorption efficiency were applied. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the decomposition techniques were performed and compared. The effect of breast size was also investigated. Results: The first technique decomposed iodine adequately but failed for other materials. The second method separated the materials but was unable to quantify the materials. With the addition of a calibration, the third technique provided good separation and quantification of hydroxyapatite, iodine, glandular, and adipose tissues. Quantification with this technique was accurate with errors of 9.83% and 6.61% for HA and iodine, respectively. Calibration at one point (one breast size) showed increased errors as the mismatch in breast diameters between calibration and measurement increased. A four-point calibration successfully decomposed breast diameter spanning the entire range from 8 to 20 cm. For a 14 cm breast, errors were reduced from 5.44% to 1.75% and from 6.17% to 3.27% with the multipoint calibration for HA and iodine, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the simulation study showed that a CT system based on CZT detectors in conjunction with least squares minimization technique can be used to decompose four materials. The calibrated least squares parameter estimation decomposition technique performed the best, separating and accurately quantifying the concentrations of hydroxyapatite and iodine.

Le, Huy Q.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the material problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LPHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. This report covers Task 1.4, Industrial Trial of candidate materials developed by refractory producers and in the laboratory based on the results of Task 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3. Refractories provided by in-kind sponsors to industrial installations tested by cup testing, density/porosity determinations, chemical analysis and microscopy. None of the materials produced in this program have been tried in high temperature gasifiers, but the mortar developed Morcocoat SP-P is outperforming other mortars tested at ORNL. MORCO PhosGun M-90-O has shown in laboratory testing to be an acceptable candidate for hot and cold repairs of existing high temperature gasifiers. It may prove to be an acceptable lining material.

William L. Headrick Jr; Musa Karakus; Xiaoting Laing

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tritium Movement and Accumulation in the NGNP System Interface and Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium movement and accumulation in a Next Generation Nuclear Plant with a hydrogen plant using a high temperature electrolysis process and a thermochemical water splitting sulfur iodine process are estimated by the numerical code THYTAN as a function of design, operational, and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in process chemicals in the hydrogen plant of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the high temperature electrolysis process are slightly higher than the drinking water limit defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the limit in the effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area of a nuclear plant as defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, these concentrations can be reduced to within the limits through use of some designs and modified operations. Tritium concentrations in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the Sulfur-Iodine Process are significantly higher as calculated and are affected by parameters with large uncertainties (i.e., tritium permeability of the process heat exchanger, the hydrogen concentration in the heat transfer and process fluids, the equilibrium constant of the isotope exchange reaction between HT and H2SO4). These parameters, including tritium generation and the release rate in the reactor core, should be more accurately estimated in the near future to improve the calculations for the NGNP using the Sulfur-Iodine Process. Decreasing the tritium permeation through the heat exchanger between the primary and secondary circuits may be an an effective measure for decreasing tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, the hydrogen plant, and the tertiary coolant.

Hirofumi Ohashi; Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microsoft Word - SyrB2.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Figure 1. Crystal structure of the non-heme iron halogenase SyrB2. A. Overall structure showing cupin fold. B. Active site iron coordination. Iron (brown) is coordinated by two histidines, α- ketoglutarate (grey sticks), water (cyan), and chloride (green). Crystal Structure of Iron-dependent Halogenase Over 4000 natural products contain halide atoms such as chlorine, bromine, or iodine. 1 Halogenated natural products are medically valuable and include antibiotics (chlorotetracycline and vancomycin), antitumor agents (rebeccamycin and calichemycin), and human thyroid hormone (thyroxine). 2 Halogenation is essential to the biological activity and chemical reactivity of such compounds, and often generates versatile molecular building

278

Quarterly report for Oak Ridge Enrichment Technical Support (ETS), October--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reported topics include: a model to compute CFC-114 inventory in the cooling systems at the GDP`s, an analysis of Paducah recycle cooler performance test data operating with C{sub 4}F{sub 10}, estimation of Portsmouth in-process test cell coolant system performance, cascade equipment reliability, separation measurements in the single stage separation system, SOLGAS user`s manual, conversion of waste gases, recycling of HF, replacement coolants containing iodine, various aspects of UF{sub 6} coolant mixtures.

Higgins, R.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Xenon ion laser-induced fluorescence using a visible tunable diode laser near 680 nm  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements have been performed for the first time in a low temperature (T{sub e}{approx_equal}0.6 eV) Xe plasma using a tunable diode laser in the visible range of wavelengths. The transition in Xe II involved the ({sup 3}P{sub 1})5d[3]{sub 7/2} metastable state and the excitation wavelength was found to be 680.570{+-}0.001 nm (air). LIF measurements of I{sub 2} in a room temperature iodine gas cell were used to monitor the wavelength of the laser during the measurements.

Severn, Greg; Lee, Dongsoo; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

Ingley, H A

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Los Alamos Air Monitoring Data Related to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is collecting air data and analyzing the data for fission products. At present, we report preliminary data from three high-volume air samplers and one stack sampler. Iodine-131 (I-131) is not optimally measured by our standard polypropylene filters. In addition to the filter data, we have one measurement obtained from a charcoal cartridge. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides are adequate for a preliminary assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi do not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

End of life fission product distributions in F-1 experiment fuel rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission product migration and end-of-life distributions were examined in the F-1 (X094) series of sealed, mixed-oxide fuel rods irradiated in the fast flux of EBR-II. Cesium, rubidium, iodine, and strontium data obtained from axial gamma scanning, mass spectrometry, and radiochemical analyses are presented. The results show significant migration of cesium, probably as both a volatile species and as the noble gas precursor. Cesium metal species leaving the fuel region accumulate predominately at the fuel-blanket interface. Volatile cesium reaching the fission product traps is readily sorbed by the charcoal.

Goodin, D.T.; Langer, S.; Bell, W.E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Well-defined ultrathin Pd films on Pt(111): electrochemical preparation and interfacial chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-defined ultrathin films of palladium, with coverages ranging from submonolayer, ?Pd = 0.5 monolayer (ML), to multilayer, ?P d = 8 ML, were electrochemically deposited on Pt(111) using potentiostatic and potentiodynamic methods. In both methods, between the coverage regimes studied, the growth of the Pd films follows the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism. The interfacial electrochemical properties associated with the film-to-bulk transition were characterized by conventional voltammetric techniques in combination with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The voltammetric peaks associated with H-atom adsorption and desorption on terrace sites indicate that the Pd electrodeposit starts to exhibit bulk-like properties at a coverage of 3 ML. Voltammetric cycling, in sulfuric acid solution, between the hydrogen evolution and the double-layer regions, was found to exert minimal influence on the annealing (smoothening) of the electrodeposited Pd films. However, cycling within the same potential region in the presence of bromide anions (at which Br- adsorption/Br desorption takes place) smoothens the initially rough Pd films essentially as well as high-temperature annealing. The influence of chemisorbed bromine on the anodic dissolution of Pd was also studied; this was for comparison with previous work on the anodic dissolution of Pd, in inert electrolyte, catalyzed by chemisorbed iodine. The present studies indicated that a small but measurable amount of bromine was desorbed along with dissolution of the Pd step atoms; bromine at the Pd terrace behaved identically to iodine in that the coverage of iodine is maintained regardless of the amount or origin of the of anodically stripped Pd. Atomically smooth, well-defined ultrathin Pd films were prepared by a constant potential deposition (CPD) method followed by multiple potential cycles, in dilute Brsolution, within the double-layer region and reductive removal of Brads, by simple emersion at a potential just before the hydrogen evolution reaction potential (EHER). A previously adapted method for the same purpose involved the chemisorption of iodine onto ultrathin PdCPD films, from dilute I- solution, followed by reductive desorption of Iads in iodide-free solution at pH 10 and at a potential just before EHER.

Park, Yeon Su

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area  

SciTech Connect

SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining conditions for new experiments. Regarding predictability of iodine species exiting the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), which affects the amount entering the containment, iodine behaviour in the circuit and silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) release have been reviewed. New experiments are being discussed and performed, and SIC degradation and release models are being improved. For the radioactive aerosol source term, work is conducted in the risk-relevant areas of steam generator (SG) tube rupture, transport through cracks in containment walls and revaporization from previous deposits in the RCS that could lead to a delayed source term. Models for aerosol retention in containment cracks and interpretation of data on retention in the SG secondary side are proposed. For radioactive iodine release to the environment, many physical and chemical processes affect the iodine concentration in the containment atmosphere; of these effects, mass transfer phenomena and radiolytic oxidation are being investigated first. (authors)

Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de S et Nucl ire, IRSN, BP 3 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Herranz, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Initial Assessment of Alternate Metals in Chalcogels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an up-to-date account of the non-Pt based chemistries available in the literature for making non-oxide, chalcogen-based aerogels, called chalcogels. In each case, a combination of multiple precursors is required to make the chalcogels and, in most cases, the precursors are not commercially available and must be prepared in the laboratory. References for the preparation details of these precursors have been provided for each. An account of the chalcogels made at PNNL is also given in this report along with iodine sorption efficiencies for three very diverse chalcogel chemistries. A brief account of consolidation options is provided.

Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Chun, Jaehun; Strachan, Denis M.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

Reimann, G.A.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Trends status: Post-accident fission product chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is important to understand and model the chemical and physical behavior of vapor iodine species in containment environments for the following reasons: This behavior can contribute significantly to severe accident source terms; the development of accident mitigation or management strategies (e.g., an effective filter system); for long-term clean-up and recovery following an accident; regulatory requirements (e.g., spray or pool additives); and design basis accidents (i.e., steam generator tube rupture). This document discusses the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ''Post-Accident'' Chemistry Program.

Kress, T.S.; Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.C.; Weber, C.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

HALOGEN COLLECTOR TEST PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency tests of removal of radioactive iodine from an air stream were performed on the following halogen collectors: a silver-plated copper-ribbon bed: activatedcharcoal beds, 0.5 and l.0 in. deep: a molecular-sieve bed; and a sodium thiosulfate bed. The tests were conducted at 70 and 160 deg F and at 70 and 95% relative humidity. Only the activated-charcoal collectors achieved a high iodineremoval efficiency over a sustained period at the various operating conditions. (C.J.G.)

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Conceptual design study of an intense x-ray source for coronary angiography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations are presented for several 1.4 GeV electron storage ring designs which, with an ultra-high field (80 kG) superconducting wiggler magnet and beam current I = 400 mA, will generate a 33.16 keV x-ray beam at 20 m from the wiggler of adequate intensity (6 10{sup 9}/mm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}) and areal size for iodine K-edge coronary dichromography in humans.

Blumberg, L.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

Piyush Sabharwal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

N Reactor filter system fission-product retention assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data for the N Reactor High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter and charcoal filter systems have been evaluated to determine appropriate filter efficiencies for elemental iodine, methyl iodide, hydrogen iodide, and particulates. The data supports the following filter efficiencies: particulates - 99.95%, elemental iodine - 99%, methyl iodide - 70%, and hydrogen iodide - 99%. The HEPA filter and charcoal filter system, loading capacities have been determined for both radionuclide and non-radioactive aerosols. The results demonstrated that the capacity of the N Reactor confinement filtration system is more than adequate to retain both radionuclide and non-radioactive aerosols postulated to be released during accident situations without overloading. In addition, potential filter failure due to unacceptable heat loads from collected radionuclides was evaluated. The results show that with an acceptable air flow through the filter system (greater than 850 ft/sup 3//min), the heat load on the filters from deposited radionuclides will not lead to filter failure. 30 refs., 8 figs., 13 tabs.

Muhlstein, L.D.; Jeppson, D.W.; McCormack, J.D.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

THE PREPARATION OF RHENIUM FROM IODO COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Potassium hexaiodorhenate (IV) decomposes in vacuo at 500 maiinly to potassium iodide, rhenium and iodine. At 700 potassium iodide sublimes off to leave an iodinefree product, but analyses showed retention of potassium. This cannot be ascribed to the retention of alkali as in the hydrogen reduction of potassium perrhenate, and it indicates that an unsolvated potassium rhenide is stable at high temperatures. Ammonium hexaiodorhenate (IV) prepared quaatitatively from rhenium heptoxide decomposes quantitatively to rhenium at 700 in vacuo. A compound approximating to rhenium tri-iodide was prepared by evaporating the eluate, obtained by passing potassium hexachlororhenate in hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange column, to dryness with hydriodic acid. This iodide also decomposed to rhenium in vacuo. We have confirmed and extended the observations thai rhenium iodides cannot be prepared by direct combination alone or in complexing and non-complexing solvents for iodine. The hexaiodorhenates can be prepared quantitatively from the corresponding chlorides. It has been shown that the series K/sub 2/ReCl/sub 6/, K/sub 2/ReBrI/sub 6/ can be interconvented in either direction with the appropriate halogen acids but with greater difficulty to the left. The hexachloro salt is converted to potassium perrhenate and bifiuoride with hydrofluoric acid and not to the hexafluoro salt. The last resembles the hexaffluoro iridate and not osmate or platinate. (auth)

Woolf, A.A.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MERCURY REMOVAL FROM DOE SOLID MIXED WASTE USING THE GEMEP(sm) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), Metcalf and Eddy (M and E), in association with General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center (GE-CRD), Colorado Minerals Research Institute (CMRI), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted laboratory-scale and bench-scale tests of the General Electric Mercury Extraction Process technology on two mercury-contaminated mixed solid wastes from U. S. Department of Energy sites: sediment from the East Fork of Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge (samples supplied by Oak Ridge National Laboratory), and drummed soils from Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL). Fluorescent lamps provided by GE-CRD were also studied. The GEMEP technology, invented and patented by the General Electric Company, uses an extraction solution composed of aqueous potassium iodide plus iodine to remove mercury from soils and other wastes. The extraction solution is regenerated by chemical oxidation and reused, after the solubilized mercury is removed from solution by reducing it to the metallic state. The results of the laboratory- and bench-scale testing conducted for this project included: (1) GEMEP extraction tests to optimize extraction conditions and determine the extent of co-extraction of radionuclides; (2) pre-screening (pre-segregation) tests to determine if initial separation steps could be used effectively to reduce the volume of material needing GEMEP extraction; and (3) demonstration of the complete extraction, mercury recovery, and iodine recovery and regeneration process (known as locked-cycle testing).

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production in flowing He/O{sub 2} plasmas. I. Axial transport and pulsed power formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) have promising applications due to their high efficiency and ease of scaling to multikilowatt powers. Recent research has focused on pumping the iodine with O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) produced by electric discharges. In a previous work, a global model was used to develop reaction mechanisms and determine the specific energy deposition (eV/O{sub 2}) required to obtain high O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields for electric discharge COILs. Experiments have recently achieved positive laser gain and oscillation with these energy depositions and have highlighted the importance of axial expansion of the plasma in optimizing excitation of the O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}). In this work, the consequences of axial transport on O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields have been computationally investigated in flowing He/O{sub 2} plasmas at a few Torrs using a one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and kinetics model. We show that the experimentally observed extension of the plasma glow upstream and downstream of the electrodes is due to electron diffusion and capacitive coupling of the radio-frequency power source. We also show that {approx_equal}50% higher O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields can be achieved with a pulsed discharge combined with continuous-wave discharge.

Stafford, D. Shane; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. (Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A.; Schopfer, C.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Chemical partitioning technologies for an ATW system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A roadmap for the development of the technology of an Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) system was recently submitted to the U.S. Congress by the U.S. Department of Energy. One element of this roadmap was a development plan for the separations technologies that would be required to support an ATW system operating with a sustained feed of 1,450 tonnes of commercial light water reactor spent fuel per year. A Technical Working Group was constituted to identify appropriate separations processes and prepare a plan for their development. The baseline process selected combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to enable efficient separation of uranium, technetium, iodine, and the transuranic elements from LWR spent fuel in the head-end step. For the recycle of unburned transuranics and newly-generated technetium and iodine from irradiated ATW transmuter assemblies, which were given to be metallic in form, a second and quite different pyrochemical process was identified. The diversity of processing methods was chosen for both technical and economic factors; aqueous methods are deemed to be better suited to large tonnages of commercial oxide spent fuel, while it is considered that pyrochemical processes can be exploited effectively in smaller-scale operations, particularly when the application is to metallic fuels or targets. A six-year technology evaluation and development program is foreseen, by the end of which an informed decision can be made on proceeding with demonstration of the ATW system.

Laidler, James J. (VISITORS); Burris, Leslie (VISITORS); Collins, Emory D. (TANKS ADVISORY PANEL); Duguid, James (Duke Engineering); Henry, Roger N. (UNKNOWN); Hill, Julian G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Karell, Eric J. (UNKNOWN); Mcdeavitt, Sean M. (..); Thompson, Major C. (WESTINGHOUSE SAVANNAH RIV); Williamson, Mark A. (Los Alamos National Lab); Willitt, James L. (Argonne National Laboratory)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses  

SciTech Connect

The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Dewanjee, M.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Driving photochemistry by clustering: The ICl-Xe case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present slice imaging data demonstrating the influence of clustering on the photodissociation dynamics of a diatomic molecule: iodine monochloride (ICl) was dissociated at 235 nm in He and Xe seed gasses, probing both Cl and I photofragment energy and angular distributions. We observe that the kinetic energy releases of both Cl and I fragments change from He to Xe seeding. For Cl fragments, the seeding in Xe increases the kinetic energy release of some Cl fragments with a narrow kinetic energy distribution, and leads to some fragments with rather broad statistical distribution falling off exponentially from near-zero energies up to about 2.5 eV. Iodine fragment distribution changes even more dramatically from He to Xe seeding: sharp features essentially disappear and a broad distribution arises reaching to about 2.5 eV. Both these observations are rationalized by a simple qualitative cluster model assuming ICl dissociation inside larger xenon clusters and 'on surface' of smaller Xe species.

Glodic, Pavle [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Kartakoullis, Andreas; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Farnik, Michal [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague (Czech Republic); Samartzis, Peter C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece)

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

An Assessment of Reactor Types for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear energy has been proposed as a heat source for producing hydrogen from water using a sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle. This document presents an assessment of the suitability of various reactor types for this application. The basic requirement for the reactor is the delivery of 900 C heat to a process interface heat exchanger. Ideally, the reactor heat source should not in itself present any significant design, safety, operational, or economic issues. This study found that Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors, Organic-Cooled Reactors, and Gas-Core Reactors were unsuitable for the intended application. Although Alkali Metal-Cooled and Liquid-Core Reactors are possible candidates, they present significant development risks for the required conditions. Heavy Metal-Cooled Reactors and Molten Salt-Cooled Reactors have the potential to meet requirements, however, the cost and time required for their development may be appreciable. Gas-Cooled Reactors (GCRs) have been successfully operated in the required 900 C coolant temperature range, and do not present any obvious design, safety, operational, or economic issues. Altogether, the GCRs approach appears to be very well suited as a heat source for the intended application, and no major development work is identified. This study recommends using the Gas-Cooled Reactor as the baseline reactor concept for a sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen generation.

MARSHALL, ALBERT C.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Roadmap to the Project: Experiments List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Los Angeles ‡ ‡ ‡ UCLA-1. Early Experimental Imaging of the Thyroid Gland Using Iodine-131 IN 1951, the University of California, Los Angeles conducted a series of tests on humans to study the uptake of radioiodine into the thyroid gland. Additional tests were made on patients at the Sawtelle Veteran's Hospital. The main purpose of this study was to test a new automatic scanner and recorder. Initial scans were made using a collimated gamma scintillation counter. This equipment enabled a record to be obtained on which an image of the gland was visible and which the researchers concluded was better than a total activity count for clinical studies of thyroid disease. The second set of scans was made on a frozen tissue preparation obtained from a terminal patient who had been given 3 millicuries of iodine-131, 14 hours before his death. The measured total activity of the thyroid gland at the time it was scanned was about 50 microcuries.

311

Atomic hydrogen reaction rates in aqueous solution via free-induction decay attenuation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This new pulsed EPR method is providing data on H-atom reaction rates in water, which are important in radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, eg, corrosion in reactor cooling systems, H2 production in high-level radioactive waste, and spread of radioactive iodine following the Chernobyl accident. This AECL-Argonne collaborative effort was undertaken to investigate fundamental aqueous H-atom chemistry for the purpose of developing predictive models of iodine transport that will be used by the nuclear power industry to enhance plant safety. Reactions of (H){sub aq} with many representative organic and inorganicmolecules have already been investigated. Radiolysis of aqueous solns with 3-MeV electrons produces H atoms in high yield; in the free induction decay method, a powerful 30 ns microwave pulse is applied immediately following pulse radiolysis, creating a phase coherence of the H-atom electron spins that is detected in the pulsed EPR spectrometer as a damped cosine free induction decay (FID). Natural decay time of the spin coherence is many microseconds, but if a reaction partner for the H atoms is introduced, the FID becomes shorter, revealing the H reaction rate. Results of H atom reaction with benzene, methanol, periodate and periodic acid are discussed briefly.

Bartels, D.M.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Roadmap to the Project: Experiments List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL-1. Effectiveness of Iodine-131 in Diagnosing and Treating Graves = Disease and Metastatic Carcinoma of the Thyroid IN 1950, BROOKHAVEN National Laboratory conducted a study on the use of iodine-131 (I131) to treat patients with metastatic carcinoma of the thyroid or with Graves=disease. Patients for the study were sent to Brookhaven from Memorial Hospital in New York City. In the study, a therapeutic dose of 4 to 360 millicuries of I131 was given to the patients; the exact dose depended in part on the number of metastases and on previous radiation treatment. Graves=disease patients who were unsuitable for surgical therapy were treated with I131 in doses of 6 to 20 millicuries. The patients were monitored for hematological damage. Metabolic studies were also conducted, including study of the effects of radiation dose on renal tubular function. Twelve patients participated in the study, ranging in age from 15 to 63 years. Of the 12 patients, 8 were female. The study was conducted in conjunction with the Memorial Hospital and was funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. (Included in The DOE Roadmap of February 1995)

314

JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Measuring Radioactivity from Fukushima Daiichi in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was damaged by the tsunami that followed the 'Great East Japan Earthquake,' and the reactor subsequently leaked radioactive material. In response, LANL augmented the routine ambient (AIRNET) and stack (Rad-NESHAP) measurements with three high-volume samplers: No.167 at the Old White Rock Fire Station; No.173 at the TA-49 gate, and No.211 at the Los Alamos Medical Center. Previous accidents, such as the Three-Mile-Island accident in 1979 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986, indicated that the most likely releases were (a) the noble gases: krypton and xenon; and (b) the volatile elements: cesium, tellurium, and iodine. At the latitude of Fukushima, the predominant winds across the Pacific Ocean are from west to east, and models predicted that the plume would arrive in the western US on about March 18. By this time the shorter-lived isotopes would have decayed. Therefore, the expected radionuclides were xenon-133, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132. As expected, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132 were all detected by all three high-volume samplers during March 17-21. The concentrations peaked during the March 24-28 period. After this, concentrations of all nuclides declined. In general, the concentrations were consistent with those measured by the EPA RadNet system and many other monitoring systems throughout the world. At the time of writing, preliminary results from the AIRNET and Rad-NESHAP systems are being reported. More detailed results are described in LA-UR-11-10304 and will be reported in full in the annual environmental report for 2011. All previous releases from nuclear reactors have been dominated by noble gases, primarily krypton and xenon, which are not measured by the high-volume samplers or the AIRNET system. However, in sufficient concentrations these and other fission products would be detected by NEWNET. Consistent with this possibility, all NEWNET detectors recorded an increase of 0.2 {micro}R/h from March 19-1, followed by an additional increase of 0.1 {micro}R/h on March 24 (Figure 1). The consistency of the NEWNET stations is indicated by the error bars, which represent the standard error of the mean of the individual stations. Over the next 10 days, the NEWNET readings declined with approximately the 5-day half life of xenon-133, returning to near normal levels on April 2. After this, any further decrease was masked by high radon concentrations on April 3, by a weather system that moved into New Mexico on April 4, and by rainfall on April 6-9. Furthermore, it is likely that all NEWNET detectors responded to a gradually increasing trend in terrestrial radiation during the month of March as the ground dried out. It is difficult to distinguish the hypothetical effects of xenon-133 from the fluctuations of radon decay products. However, at present we do not have an alternative hypothesis for the sharp increase that was observed in all NEWNET stations from March 19-21. Perhaps some of the increase was caused by radon or terrestrial radiation, in which case the observed increase is an upper limit to that caused by releases from Fukushima. LANL data are consistent with those of the EPA RadNet monitoring system. The EPA has repeatedly stated that 'The levels detected are far below levels of concern.'

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam hardening effect. Conclusions: The results showed that a CT system using an energy resolving detector reduces the dose to the patient while maintaining image quality for various breast imaging tasks.

Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

CX-010119: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010119: Categorical Exclusion Determination Humate Injection CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting a humate injection study at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (FHWMF) as part of the Department of Energy EM-12 Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation "Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)". SRNL will perform a humate injection test in a monitoring well downgradient of the seepage basins at the FHWMF to evaluate the use of a humate amendment for the stabilization of dissolved uranium, strontium-90 and iodine-129 in an acidic groundwater plume.

318

Hypothyroidism prevalence following exposure to radioiodines in childhood  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hypothyroidism prevalence following exposure to radioiodines in childhood Hypothyroidism prevalence following exposure to radioiodines in childhood and adolescence: Belarusian-American Cohort Study of Thyroid Cancer and Other Thyroid Diseases after the Chernobyl Accident Ostroumova Evgenia National Cancer Institute Abstract Background. Hypothyroidism is the most common thyroid abnormality in patients treated with high doses of iodine-131 (131I). Data on risk of hypothyroidism from low to moderate 131I thyroid doses are limited and inconsistent. Objective. To assess the risk of hypothyroidism prevalence in relation to 131I doses from Chernobyl fallout exposure. Materials and methods. The analysis is based on the first screening cycle (1996–2003) of a Belarus-American study of thyroid diseases in a cohort of 10,827 individuals under 18 years of age at the time of the

319

At the Crossroads of Chromosomes | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Making Silicon Melt in Reverse In or Out: Setting a Trap for Radioactive Iodine Probing Spin Liquids with a New Pulsed-Magnet System Making a Magnetic Moment in a Split Picosecond Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed At the Crossroads of Chromosomes SEPTEMBER 21, 2010 Bookmark and Share Structure of the centromere histone complex containing two chains of CENP-A (red) and two copies of its close binding partner, histone H4 (blue). (Image: Ben E. Black, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) On average, one hundred billion cells in the human body divide over the course of a day. Most of the time the body gets it right but sometimes,

320

Reading Comprehension - Digestion and Nutrition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion and Nutrition Digestion and Nutrition 1. The pouchlike muscular organ that secretes acids and digestive enzymes is the _________ stomach esophagus intestines . 2. _________ saliva enzymes chime is the watery material that results form digestion in the stomach. 3. Iron, potassium, and iodine are _________ vitamins minerals amino acids . 4. The human body is about 60 percent _________ salt water nutrients . 5. The teeth break down food by _________ chemical digestion mechanical digestion . 6. _________ Teeth Your tongue Saliva in the mouth helps to chemically digest food. 7. _________ Mechanical digestion Chemical digestion takes place in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine with the help of chemicals called _________ amino acids vitamins enzymes . 8. Proteins are made up of smaller building blocks called _________

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CX-003638: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silver (Ag) Extraction of Sediments CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This activity involves extracting silver (Ag) from core (sediment) collected from F-Area. Silver chloride (AgCl) was injected into the ground in F-Area in an effort to immobilize iodine (goal was to form a precipitate silver iodide). Four soil borings were collected in order to test the core for silver. Collected sediments will be mixed with a sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate solution in order to dissolve the Ag. The resulting solutions will be collected and analyzed for Ag. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003638.pdf More Documents & Publications

322

Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants? | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution At the Crossroads of Chromosomes Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Making Silicon Melt in Reverse In or Out: Setting a Trap for Radioactive Iodine Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants? SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 Bookmark and Share Photo by Tim McCabe. Copyright USDA National Resources Conservation Service, http://www.earthgauge.net/kids-january/do Environmentally-friendly sprays that help plants survive drought and other stresses in harsh environments could result from findings based on research carried out at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS)

323

Finding Aids: Epidemiologic Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site: A Guide to Record Series Supporting Epidemiologic Studies Conducted for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Volume I: Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files: A Guide to Record Series of The Department of Energy and Its Contractors Oak Ridge Volume II: Records Relating to Cesium at the K-25 Plant: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors Oak Ridge Volume III: Records Relating to RaLa, Iodine-131, and Cesium-137 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Operations Office: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A Guide to Record Series Supporting Epidemiologic Studies Conducted for the Department of Energy The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and its Contractors

324

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

325

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave Ingersoll, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sodium-based Battery Development Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C. Apblett, E. Spoerke, K. Zavadil, R. Cygan, J. Ihlefeld, F. Delnick, & T. Anderson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Prof. E. Wachsman University of Maryland, College Park, MD Profs. R. Kee & J. Porter, Dr. H. Zhu Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO S. Bhavaraju & M. Robins Ceramatec, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT D. Beeaff CoorsTek, Inc, Golden, CO J. Martin Boulder Ionics, Golden CO US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC, Sept. 26-28, 2012 Sodium-based batteries  Purpose  Demonstrate a family of sodium-based battery chemistries  sodium-iodine, sodium-bromine, sodium-air, sodium insertion, sodium-metal, etc

326

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycling Long-lived Fissile Materials as Fuel Recycling Long-lived Fissile Materials as Fuel Used Fuel Assembly Uranium accounts for the bulk of used fuel. The fissile component comprises less than 1 percent of the uranium, near the fraction found in the natural ore. This uranium may be disposable as low-level waste or stored for eventual re-enrichment for reactor fuel. Used fuel contains essentially all of the elements in the periodic table. However, nearly all of the risk associated with the disposal of spent fuel comes from approximately 1 percent of its content-primarily the transuranic elements: plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium, and the long-lived isotopes of iodine and technetium. The very high short-term radioactivity comes primarily from two elements, cesium and strontium. In a

327

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

328

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4820 of 26,777 results. 11 - 4820 of 26,777 results. Download CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination 661-G, Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Complex Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002199-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002201-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars (Warren)

329

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Humate Injection Humate Injection Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina SRNL is conducting a humate injection study at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (FHWMF) as part of the Department of Energy EM-12 Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation "Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)". SRNL will perform a humate injection test in a monitoring well downgradient of the seepage basins at the FHWMF to evaluate the use of a humate amendment for the stabilization of dissolved uranium, strontium-90 and iodine-129 in an acidic groundwater plume. B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD,

330

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 25620 of 28,560 results. 11 - 25620 of 28,560 results. Download CX-010018: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2H Evaporator Scale Sample Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010018-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010019: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010019-categorical-exclusion-determination Article Energy Department Launches Public-Private Partnership to Deploy Hydrogen Infrastructure The Energy Department launched H2USA -- a new public-private partnership focused on advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation

331

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia: Film Clips  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Film Clips Multimedia Film Clips Multimedia Home Roadmap What's New Multimedia Related Sites Feedback Sound Bytes Film Clips Historical Photographs Films require: Get Real Player 5.0 to view the films on this page. The Atom and You Second in the series The Atom and You, Paramount News, March 25, 1953, shows tests conducted at Hanford, Washington, on effects of exposure of sheep and salmon to radiation; testing of radioactive dust at UCLA laboratory; the use of radioisotopes and tracer materials for detecting cancer in patients at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the use of rays from the cobalt source at N.Y. cityÂ’s Moncure Hospital, to treat cancer of the brain. (Time: 5 min 9 secs) Real Media Download Versions 28.8 kbps version (782k) 56.0 kbps version (1.3mb) T1 version (7.5mb) Iodine 131

332

Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Silicon Melt in Reverse Making Silicon Melt in Reverse In or Out: Setting a Trap for Radioactive Iodine Probing Spin Liquids with a New Pulsed-Magnet System Making a Magnetic Moment in a Split Picosecond Unpeeling Atoms and Molecules from the Inside Out Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus SEPTEMBER 14, 2010 Bookmark and Share Shown on the left is a surface rendered diagram of adenovirus illustrating the organization of the major and minor capsid proteins (in different colors) on the outer capsid (protein shell of the virus). On the right is a close-up view of the penton base-fiber complex found at the vertices of the

333

Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues As part of the litigation involving receipt of offsite waste and the HSW EIS, the Court allowed the State of Washington a limited amount of discovery pertaining to iodine-129, technetium-99, and groundwater analyses. While compiling information to respond to the State discovery request, Battelle discovered three data quality issues within the data sets used for the cumulative groundwater impact analysis: As a result of these data quality issues, a team was commissioned to review the HSW EIS for additional data quality issues as well as any programmatic problems which

334

A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At the Crossroads of Chromosomes At the Crossroads of Chromosomes Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus Making Silicon Melt in Reverse In or Out: Setting a Trap for Radioactive Iodine Probing Spin Liquids with a New Pulsed-Magnet System Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Boring Material "Stretched" Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 Bookmark and Share Predicted effect of biaxial strain on EuTiO3 and the approach to imparting such strain in EuTiO3 films using epitaxy. This schematic shows the in-plane expansion due to biaxial tension. (From Lee et al., Nature 466, 954, 19 August 2010) The oxide compound europium titanate is pretty boring on its own. But

335

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

901 - 25910 of 31,917 results. 901 - 25910 of 31,917 results. Download CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002201-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003668: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subsurface Soils Exploration for Potential Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project Sandfilter Footprint CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003668-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002984: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improvements to L Area Sidewalks

336

Iodate Refuses to Intimidate | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creating the Heart of a Planet in the Heart of a Gem Creating the Heart of a Planet in the Heart of a Gem How a Powerful Antibody Neutralizes HIV Taking a Page from Nature to Build Better Nanomaterials Hard as Diamond: A New Form of Carbon Created under Ultrahigh Pressure How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Iodate Refuses to Intimidate NOVEMBER 11, 2011 Bookmark and Share For the first time, scientists were able to determine why iodate ions reside in water: The iodine atom's positive nature allows it to draw in three water molecules and these additional water molecules in turn allow the iodate ion to fit within water's structure. Image from Marcel D. Baer

337

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 28, 2010 April 28, 2010 CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination 661-G, Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Complex Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bubbler Upgrade Support - Defense Waste Processing Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010

338

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2011 0, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Oct. 10 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Surhad S. More, University of Chicago Title: Galaxy-Dark Matter Connection: A Cosmological Perspective 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: SRF Cryomodule-2 Components Tested; T-1017 CIRTE - Iodine Threshold in COUPP 5:30 p.m. Budker Seminar - Music Room in the Users' Center Title: High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the MuCool Test Area Tuesday, Oct. 11 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL,

339

NEPA Reports and Records of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Reports and Records of Decision NEPA Reports and Records of Decision NEPA Reports and Records of Decision Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues - As part of the litigation involving receipt of offsite waste and the HSW EIS, the Court allowed the State of Washington a limited amount of discovery pertaining to iodine-129, technetium-99, and groundwater analyses. While compiling information to respond to the State discovery request, Battelle discovered three data quality issues within the data sets used for the cumulative groundwater impact analysis: As a result of these data quality issues, a team was commissioned to review the HSW EIS for additional data quality issues as well as any programmatic problems which might have

340

Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport  

SciTech Connect

Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O' €  ™ Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mass-transfer characteristics of a membrane permeation cell and its application to the kinetic studies of solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect

In this, paper, a stirred membrane permeation cell was used to investigate the interfacial transfer kinetics between two immiscible phases. The diffusion boundary layer resistances on either side of membrane and the intrinsic membrane resistance were first determined by measuring the fluxes of simple diffusions of acetic acid and iodine. The possibility of the application of this permeation cell for studying the kinetics of metal extraction was then examined. The extraction of vanadium(IV) from sulfate solutions with bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene was chosen as the model system. It was found that an easy-to-follow method was provided to eliminate the effect of diffusional resistances on the apparent extraction rates and consequently the intrinsic chemical reaction rates could be obtained.

Juang, R.S.; Lo, R.H. (Yuan-Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Synthesis of a high-yield activated carbon by air gasification of macadamia nut shell charcoal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macadamia nut shell charcoal was heated in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (carbonized), reacted with oxygen (Po{sub 2} = 2.68--11.3 kPa) at temperatures between 525 and 586 K (oxygenated), and heated again in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (activated) to produce an activated carbon. Carbons produced by this process possess surface areas and iodine numbers in the range of 400--550. Overall yields of these carbons (based on the dry, raw macadamia nut shell feed) ranged from 24 to 30 wt %. Under the conditions employed in this work, the rates of chemisorption and gasification were not mass transfer limited. Initially, the gasification reaction was first-order with respect to oxygen concentration but became independent of oxygen concentration as the surface sites of the carbon became saturated with oxygen.

Dai, X.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dose to man from a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we used our computer codes, MATHEW and ADPIC, to assess the environmental impact of a loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, about 40 kilometres southeast of Sacramento, California. Meteorological input was selected so that the effluent released by the accident would be transported over the Sacramento metropolitan area. With the release rates provided by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we calculated the largest total dose for a 24-hour release as 70 rem about one kilometre northwest of the reactor. The largest total dose in the Sacramento metropolitan area is 780 millirem. Both doses are from iodine-131, via the forage-cow-milk pathway to an infant's thyroid. The largest dose near the nuclear plant can be minimized by replacing contaminated milk and by giving the cows dry feed. To our knowledge, there are no milk cows within the Sacramento metropolitan area.

Peterson, K.R.; Greenly, G.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Licensing topical report: the measurement and modelling of time-dependent fission product release from failed HTGR fuel particles under accident conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of fission products from failed fuel particles was measured under simulated accident (core heatup) conditions. A generic model and specific model parameters that describe delayed fission product release from the kernels of failed HTGR fuel particles were developed from the experimental results. The release of fission products was measured from laser-failed BISO ThO/sub 2/ and highly enriched (HEU) TRISO UC/sub 2/ particles that had been irradiated to a range of kernel burnups. The burnups were 0.25, 1.4, and 15.7% FIMA for ThO/sub 2/ particles and 23.5 and 74% FIMA for UC/sub 2/ particles. The fission products measured were nuclides of xenon, iodine, krypton, tellurium, and cesium.

Myers, B.F.; Morrissey, R.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Prevalence of Salmonella sp. in domestic cats in an animal shelter and the comparison of culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques as diagnostic tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies on the prevalence of Salmonella in cats have used a variety of culture methods producing a variety of results, but none have been compared to PCR. Using a double enrichment protocol developed at Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory the prevalence of Salmonella in shelter cat feces was determined in this current study. The culture protocol used included Xylose Lysine Tergitol 4 (XLT4) and MacConkey (MAC) agars with a primary enrichment in Tetrathionate broth (TTH) with iodine and a secondary enrichment in Rappoport-Vassilaidis R10 broth (RV). This study further modified an equine PCR technique and demonstrated its successful use in cats. When comparing the results of the two protocols, PCR and culture, it was found that the procedures are equally adequate at detecting the presence of Salmonella in cat feces. This study further confirmed that Salmonella is a potential hazard for families who adopt shelter cats.

Lee, Melinda J.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Optimization of a dual-energy contrast-enhanced technique for a photon-counting digital breast tomosynthesis system: I. A theoretical model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) iodine contrast-enhanced x-ray imaging of the breast has been shown to identify cancers that would otherwise be mammographically occult. In this article, theoretical modeling was performed to obtain optimally enhanced iodine images for a photon-counting digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using a DE acquisition technique. Methods: In the system examined, the breast is scanned with a multislit prepatient collimator aligned with a multidetector camera. Each detector collects a projection image at a unique angle during the scan. Low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) projection images are acquired simultaneously in a single scan by covering alternate collimator slits with Sn and Cu filters, respectively. Sn filters ranging from 0.08 to 0.22 mm thickness and Cu filters from 0.11 to 0.27 mm thickness were investigated. A tube voltage of 49 kV was selected. Tomographic images, hereafter referred to as DBT images, were reconstructed using a shift-and-add algorithm. Iodine-enhanced DBT images were acquired by performing a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the HE and LE DBT images. The DE technique was evaluated for 20-80 mm thick breasts. Weighting factors, w{sub t}, that optimally cancel breast tissue were computed. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) between iodine-enhanced and nonenhanced breast tissue normalized to the square root of the mean glandular dose (MGD) were computed as a function of the fraction of the MGD allocated to the HE images. Peak SDNR/{radical}(MGD) and optimal dose allocations were identified. SDNR/{radical}(MGD) and dose allocations were computed for several practical feasible system configurations (i.e., determined by the number of collimator slits covered by Sn and Cu). A practical system configuration and Sn-Cu filter pair that accounts for the trade-off between SDNR, tube-output, and MGD were selected. Results: w{sub t} depends on the Sn-Cu filter combination used, as well as on the breast thickness; to optimally cancel 0% with 50% glandular breast tissue, w{sub t} values were found to range from 0.46 to 0.72 for all breast thicknesses and Sn-Cu filter pairs studied. The optimal w{sub t} values needed to cancel all possible breast tissue glandularites vary by less than 1% for 20 mm thick breasts and 18% for 80 mm breasts. The system configuration where one collimator slit covered by Sn is alternated with two collimator slits covered by Cu delivers SDNR/{radical}(MGD) nearest to the peak value. A reasonable compromise is a 0.16 mm Sn-0.23 mm Cu filter pair, resulting in SDNR values between 1.64 and 0.61 and MGD between 0.70 and 0.53 mGy for 20-80 mm thick breasts at the maximum tube current. Conclusions: A DE acquisition technique for a photon-counting DBT imaging system has been developed and optimized.

Carton, Ann-Katherine; Ullberg, Christer; Lindman, Karin; Acciavatti, Raymond; Francke, Tom; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); XCounter AB, Svaerdvaegen 11, SE-182 33 Danderyd (Sweden); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); XCounter AB, Svaerdvaegen 11, SE-182 33 Danderyd (Sweden); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

Moore, E.B.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are recent experimental results of the continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified {sup 99}Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the US Federal Drug Administration for production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Pyrochemical separations technologies envisioned for the U. S. accelerator transmutation of waste system  

SciTech Connect

A program has been initiated for the purpose of developing the chemical separations technologies necessary to support a large Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) system capable of dealing with the projected inventory of spent fuel from the commercial nuclear power stations in the United States. The baseline process selected combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to enable the efficient separation of uranium, technetium, iodine, and the transuranic elements from LWR spent fuel. The diversity of processing methods was chosen for both technical and economic factors. A six-year technology evaluation and development program is foreseen, by the end of which an informed decision can be made on proceeding with demonstration of the ATW system.

Laidler, J. J.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

MARITIME REACTOR PROGRAM ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on general support of the NS Savannah, operation of the pressurized-water in-pile loop, and advanced core development. A shield survey, iodine adsorption studies, a bioassay development program, preparation of replacement control rod drives, irradiation testing of pressure-vessel steel, a thermal insulation investigation, and an analysis of primary system components for gamm-emitting elements were carried out in the NS Savannah program. Water- chemistry studies in the pressurized-water in-pile: loop were made to determine the specific activities and the chemical compositions of filterable and nonfilterable impurities in the loop water. Fuel development and irradiation tests and core I lifetime studies were carried out in the NS Savannah advanced core development. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method oil shale pollutant sorption/NO.sub.x reburning multi-pollutant control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of decreasing pollutants produced in a combustion process. The method comprises combusting coal in a combustion chamber to produce at least one pollutant selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen-containing pollutant, sulfuric acid, sulfur trioxide, carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, chlorine, hydroiodic acid, iodine, hydrofluoric acid, fluorine, hydrobromic acid, bromine, phosphoric acid, phosphorous pentaoxide, elemental mercury, and mercuric chloride. Oil shale particles are introduced into the combustion chamber and are combusted to produce sorbent particulates and a reductant. The at least one pollutant is contacted with at least one of the sorbent particulates and the reductant to decrease an amount of the at least one pollutant in the combustion chamber. The reductant may chemically reduce the at least one pollutant to a benign species. The sorbent particulates may adsorb or absorb the at least one pollutant. A combustion chamber that produces decreased pollutants in a combustion process is also disclosed.

Boardman, Richard D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carrington, Robert A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

1981 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1981 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 28 references, 9 figures, 20 tables.

Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fbis report. Science and technology: China, August 18, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

;Contents: Impact of 1996-2010 World`s S&T Progress on China`s Social andEconomic Development; Microstructure of Nanocrystalline Materials; AFM Observation of Surface Nanoscale Lithography on Cadmium Stearate LB FilmStructure; Success in Inserting Anti-Bacteria Peptide Gene Into Rice; Achievements Made in Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences; ShanghaiCompletes Satellite/Computer Information Network System; Zhejiag University Holds International Virtual Reality Conference; China Develops First Domestic Automonous Underwater Robot; Reports on Diamond Thin Films; Beijing Telecom Expert Proposes Tactics for Developing `Capital Information Highway`; MPT To Build Jinan-Shijiazhuang- Taiyuan-Yinchuan Fiber Optic Cable; CAS Institute Unveils World-Class Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser; Tarium Oil Field Update; Three Largest Natural Gas Fields in Western China; World`s FirstS-Shaped Oil Well Goes Into Operation; China`s Largest Coastal Wind Power Gnerating Field--Nan`ao.

NONE

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

Status of initial testing of the H2SO4 section of the ILS experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sulfuric acid catalytic decomposer section was assembled and tested for the Integrated Laboratory Scale experiments of the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle. This cycle is being studied as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Tests confirmed that the 54-inch long silicon carbide bayonet could produce in excess of the design objective of 100 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} at 2 bar. Furthermore, at 3 bar the system produced 135 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} with only 31 mol% acid. The gas production rate was close to the theoretical maximum determined by equilibrium, which indicates that the design provides adequate catalyst contact and heat transfer. Several design improvements were also implemented to greatly minimize leakage of SO{sub 2} out of the apparatus. The primary modifications were a separate additional enclosure within the skid enclosure, and replacement of Teflon tubing with glass-lined steel pipes.

Moore, Robert Charles; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Gelbard, Fred

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chemical engineering challenges in driving thermochemical hydrogen processes with the tandem mirror reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tandem Mirror Reactor is described and compared with Tokamaks, both from a basic physics viewpoint and from the suitability of the respective reactor for synfuel production. Differences and similarities between the TMR as an electricity producer or a synfuel producer are also cited. The Thermochemical cycle chosen to link with the fusion energy source is the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle, which is a purely thermal-driven process with no electrochemical steps. There are real chemical engineering challenges of getting this high quality heat into the large thermochemical plant in an efficient manner. We illustrate with some of our approaches to providing process heat via liquid sodium to drive a 1050 K, highly-endothermic, catalytic and fluidized-bed SO/sub 3/ Decomposition Reactor. The technical, economic, and safety tradeoffs that arise are discussed.

Galloway, T.R.; Werner, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Study of plasma-edge conditions for a commercial tokamak reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Particle and energy fluxes to the first wall and pumped limiter of a commercial-size tokamak power reactor have been studied with a one-dimensional, time-dependent plasma transport code. The plasma is operated in an enhanced radiation mode, with iodine as the high-Z impurity, whereby the transport power to the limiter is held to about half of the alpha-heating power. Recycling of neutral hydrogen and helium is followed in detail. The ion flux to the limiter and the neutral flux to the first wall are found to depend on the removal efficiency of the limiter/vacuum system. These fluxes also depend strongly on whether gas puffing or pellet injection is used for fueling.

Boley, C.D.; Brooks, J.N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High Efficiency Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy: Laboratory Demonstration of S-I Water-Splitting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the French CEA, US-DOE INERI project is to perform a lab scale demonstration of the sulfur iodine (S-I) water splitting cycle, and assess the potential of this cycle for application to nuclear hydrogen production. The project will design, construct and test the three major component reaction sections that make up the S-I cycle. The CEA will design and test the prime (Bunsen) reaction section. General Atomics will develop and test the HI decomposition section, and SNL will develop and test the H2SO4 decomposition section. Activities for this period included initial program coordination and information exchange, the development of models and analyses that will support the design of the component sections, and preliminary designs for the component reaction sections. The sections are being designed to facilitate integration into a closed loop demonstration in a later stage of the program.

Buckingham, R.; Russ, B.; Brown, L.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Gelbard, F.; Pickard F.S.; Leybros, J.; Le Duigou, A.; Borgard, J.M.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Extraordinarily Efficient Conduction in a Redox-Active Ionic Liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iodine added to iodide-based ionic liquids leads to extraordinarily efficient charge transport, vastly exceeding that expected for such viscous systems. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, in conjunction with dc conductivity, diffusivity and viscosity measurements we unravel the conductivity pathways in 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide melts. This study presents evidence of the Grotthuss mechanism as a significant contributor to the conductivity, and provides new insights into ion pairing processes as well as the formation of polyiodides. The terahertz and transport results are reunited in a model providing a quantitative description of the conduction by physical diffusion and the Grotthuss bond-exchange process. These novel results are important for the fundamental understanding of conduction in molten salts and for applications where ionic liquids are used as charge-transporting media such as in batteries and dye-sensitized solar cells.

Verner K. Thorsmølle; Guido Rothenberger; Daniel Topgaard; Jan C. Brauer; Dai-Bin Kuang; Shaik M. Zakeeruddin; Björn Lindman; Michael Grätzel; Jacques-E. Moser

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radionuclide monitoring in Northern Ireland of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northern Ireland received higher radiation doses due to the radionuclide contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident than did the south of England. Levels of radioactive iodine (1311) and caesium (137Cs) in cows ' milk in Northern Ireland increased to 166 and 120 Bq/l respectively in May 1986, but had decreased by factors of one million, and of twenty-five, respectively, by 1 September 1986. The resultant radiation doses represent less than one per cent of those received by a Northern Ireland individual over a period of 40 years from natural background radiation sources. The added risk to any individual from the Chernobyl accident will therefore be very small and may best bejudged in the context of the enormously greater risk of death due to potentially preventable diseases, such as smoking-related lung cancer, and coronary heart disease.

B J Gilmore; K Cranley

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for concentrating fission-product-containing waste solutions from fuel element processing is described. The process comprises the addition of sugar to the solution, preferably after it is made alkaline; spraying the solution into a heated space whereby a dry powder is formed; heating the powder to at least 220 deg C in the presence of oxygen whereby the powder ignites, the sugar is converted to carbon, and the salts are decomposed by the carbon; melting the powder at between 800 and 900 deg C; and cooling the melt. (AEC) antidiuretic hormone from the blood by the liver. Data are summarized from the following: tracer studies on cardiovascular functions; the determination of serum protein-bound iodine; urinary estrogen excretion in patients with arvanced metastatic mammary carcinoma; the relationship between alheroclerosis aad lipoproteins; the physical chemistry of lipoproteins; and factors that modify the effects of densely ionizing radia

Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M. Jr.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Performance requirements of an inertial-fusion-energy source for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of an inertial fusion system for the production of hydrogen is compared to a tandem-mirror-system hydrogen producer. Both systems use the General Atomic sulfur-iodine hydrogen-production cycle and produce no net electric power to the grid. An ICF-driven hydrogen producer will have higher system gains and lower electrical-consumption ratios than the design point for the tandem-mirror system if the inertial-fusion-energy gain eta Q > 8.8. For the ICF system to have a higher hydrogen production rate per unit fusion power than the tandem-mirror system requires that eta Q > 17. These can be achieved utilizing realistic laser and pellet performances.

Hovingh, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal  

SciTech Connect

Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I{sub 2}) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF{sub 4}, spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area.

West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives  

SciTech Connect

Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biochemist John Randolph Totter, Ph.D., January 23, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is a transcript of an interview of Dr. John Randolph Tottler by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Tottler was selected for this interview because of his career with the Atomic Energy Commission Division of Biology and Medicine (DBM), particularly as its director from 1967 to 1972. After a short biographical sketch Dr. Tottler discusses his remembrances on a wide range topics including nucleic acid and leukemia research at Oak Ridge, AEC biochemistry training in South America, DBM`s research focus on radiation effects, early leadership of DBM, relations with the US Public Health Service, controversies on low-level radiation, iodine from fallout, on John Gofman, and Project Plowshare, funding for AEC Research Programs and for international research, testicular irradiation of prisoners in Washington State and Oregon, Plutonium injections, ethics of government radiation research, and opinions of public misperceptions about radiation and cancer.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Separations Needs for the Alternate Chemical Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulk of the efforts for the development of a hydrogen production plant supported by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) have been directed towards the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. However, it was judged prudent to re-investigate alternate chemical cycles in light of new developments and technical accomplishments derived from the current S-I work. This work analyzes the available data for the promising alternate chemical cycles to provide an understanding of their inherent chemical separations needs. None of the cycles analyzed have separations that are potential “show stoppers”; although some of the indicated separations will be challenging to perform. The majority of the separations involve processes that are either more achievable or more developed

Frederick F. Stewart

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Assessment of selected fission products in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect

Most of the radioactivity produced by the operation of a nuclear reactor results from the fission process, during which the nucleus of a fissionable atom (such as 235U) splits into two or more nuclei, which typically are radioactive. The Radionuclide Assessment Program (RAP) has reported on fission products cesium, strontium, iodine, and technetium. Many other radionuclides are produced by the fission process. Releases of several additional fission products that result in dose to the offsite population are discussed in this publication. They are 95Zr, 95Nb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 141Ce, and 144Ce. This document will discuss the production, release, migration, and dose to humans for each of these selected fission products.

Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

GROUNDWATER RADIOIODINE: PREVALENCE, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, AND POTENTIAL REMEDIAL APPROACHES  

SciTech Connect

Iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) has not received as much attention in basic and applied research as other contaminants associated with DOE plumes. These other contaminants, such as uranium, plutonium, strontium, and technetium are more widespread and exist at more DOE facilities. Yet, at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site {sup 129}I occurs in groundwater at concentrations significantly above the primary drinking water standard and there is no accepted method for treating it, other than pump-and-treat systems. With the potential arrival of a 'Nuclear Renaissance', new nuclear power facilities will be creating additional {sup 129}I waste at a rate of 1 Ci/gigawatts energy produced. If all 22 proposed nuclear power facilities in the U.S. get approved, they will produce more {sup 129}I waste in seven years than presently exists at the two facilities containing the largest {sup 129}I inventories, ({approx}146 Ci {sup 129}I at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site). Hence, there is an important need to fully understand {sup 129}I behavior in the environment to clean up existing plumes and to support the expected future expansion of nuclear power production. {sup 129}I is among the key risk drivers at all DOE nuclear disposal facilities where {sup 129}I is buried, because of its long half-life (16 million years), high toxicity (90% of the body's iodine accumulates in the thyroid), high inventory, and perceived high mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that {sup 129}I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define {sup 129}I mass balance and flux at sites, but can not accurately predict its response to changes in the environment. This uncertainty is in part responsible for the low drinking water standard, 1 pCi/L {sup 129}I, and the low permissible inventory limits (Ci) at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the former Yucca Mountain disposal facilities. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile the background information necessary to understand behavior of {sup 129}I in the environment, (2) discuss sustainable remediation approaches to {sup 129}I contaminated groundwater, and (3) identify areas of research that will facilitate remediation of {sup 129}I contaminated areas on DOE sites. Lines of scientific inquiry that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating {sup 129}I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of {sup 129}I waste are: (1) Evaluation of amendments or other treatment systems that can sequester subsurface groundwater {sup 129}I. (2) Develop analytical techniques for measurement of total {sup 129}I that eliminate the necessity of collecting and shipping large samples of groundwater. (3) Develop and evaluate ways to manipulate areas with organic-rich soil, such as wetlands, to maximize {sup 129}I sorption, minimizing releases during anoxic conditions. (4) Develop analytical techniques that can identify the various {sup 129}I species in the subsurface aqueous and solid phases at ambient concentrations and under ambient conditions. (5) Identify the mechanisms and factors controlling iodine-natural organic matter interactions at appropriate environmental concentrations. (6) Understand the biological processes that transform iodine species throughout different compartments of subsurface waste sites and the role that these processes have on {sup 129}I flux.

Denham, M.; Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Accurate structure analysis of Mo[subscript 6]S[subscript y]I[subscript z] nanowires from atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis  

SciTech Connect

The structure of the recently discovered systematically reproducible Mo{sub 6}S{sub y}I{sub z} nanowires has been determined from the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of powder X-ray diffraction data. This total scattering approach was required because the nanowires are not perfectly crystalline and, therefore, the structure cannot be obtained crystallographically. Several nanotube and nanowire models were fit to the PDF data. The resulting best-fit model structure consists of nanowires of Mo{sub 6} octahedra that are bridged by sulfur and terminated on the outside by iodine. This demonstrates the power of total scattering methods in accurately resolving structural issues in nanostructured materials where traditional crystallographic methods fail.

Paglia, G.; Bozin, E.S.; Vengust, D.; Mihailovic, D.; Billinge, S.J.L. (Joseph Stefan Inst.); (MSU)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage on Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana: A Comparison of Surface Exploration Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, head gas and thermal desorption methods best match production; other methods also mapped depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, head gas along with microbial, iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, results are preliminary. Reconnaissance mapping of magnetic susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent soil gas and head gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Oral Histories: Cell Biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Cell Biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D. Conducted November 29, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments August 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography From South Dakota to University of Chicago (1950) to Los Alamos (1956) Outlining the Agenda for Radiation Research (Early '50s) MET Lab Research in the Metabolism of Radionuclides Choosing a Career at Los Alamos (1956) Nuclear Weapons Fallout Studies (1946–54) The Radiobiology Group's Research Project Approval Process Mission of the Los Alamos Biomedical Group in the 1950s Participation as a Subject in Human Radiation Studies Measuring Iodine-131 Uptake in Children (Circa 1963) AEC Authorization of the Use of Human Subjects (1956)

374

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit (OU), specifically for the immediate area of the 241-TX-TY Tank Farm. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system to remediate the existing groundwater contamination within this general area. Four of these wells (299-W15-40, 299-W15-43, 299-W15-44, and 299-W15-765) are targeted to remediate contamination within the immediate 241-TX-TY Tank Farm area. The major contaminant of concern (COC) for the 200-ZP-1 OU is carbon tetrachloride. Other COC’s include total chromium (trivalent [III] and hexavalent [VI], nitrate, trichloroethlyene, iodine-129, technetium-99, and tritium.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

STARTUP AND INITIAL TESTING OF SM-1 CORE II WITH SPECIAL COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

The loading operation for SM-1 Core II is described. Results of startup physics measurements (Test A-300 (Series) and fission product iodine monitoring in the primary coolant are given. The SM-1 Core II initial loading progressed satisfactorily, fulfilling the predictions of the zero power experiment performed at the Alco Criticality Facility. The initial cold clean five rod bank position was 6.53 in.; the initial hot, no xenon, five rod bank position was 9.62 in.; the initial hot, equilibrium xenon, five rod bank position was 11.41 in.; and the initial hot, peak xenon, five rod bank position was 12.14 in. Rods A and B were 19.00 in. in all four measurements. Stuck rod measurements indicated that an adequate shutdown margin was available with 20% of the rods fully withdrawn. All rod calibrations indicated a distinct shift and broadening of the peaks when compared with similar Core I calibrations. The temperature coefficient for Core II was 3.5 cents/ deg F at 440 deg F. Equilibrium xenon was worth approximately - 00 while peak xenon was worth - 43, both relative to the hot, no xenon core condition. During the period June 2, 1961 through September 30, 1961, the reactor operated at a total of 935.68 deg Fdays which is equivalent to 1.34 MWYR of energy release and represents an average load factor of 44% typical of training periods. The estimated reactivity in the core at startup is .00. A core life of 12.2 MWYR is predicted for the original configuration of Core II. The results of gross fission product iodine monitoring showed that those levels were about one-third to one-half of those found at the end of Core I Operation. (auth)

Moote, F.G.; Schrader, E.W.

1962-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Charcterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors (ANP-R) in rat kidney and lung tissues  

SciTech Connect

The ability of several rat ANP analogues to compete with SVI-ANP(1-28) for binding to plasma membranes of rat kidney cortex (RKPM) and rat lung (RLPM) was examined. Their ability to compete on RKPM was: ANP(1-28)>pro-ANP>ANP(5-28)>ANP(5-27), ANP(5-25) being inactive. Conversely, the potency of the analogues on RLPM was: ANP(5-28)>ANP(5-27)>ANP(1-28)>ANP-(5-25), pro-ANP being unable to compete. The stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase by these peptides paralleled their ability to compete. Truncation of the C-terminal therefore decreases the binding of the peptide to RKPM. In contrast, the N-terminal seems to be important for interaction with ANP-R on RLPM. ANP-R were photolabeled with SVI-iodo-azidosalicylyl-ANP(1-28) (ASA-ANP) or azidobenzoyl- SVI-ANP(1-28) (AB-ANP) in which the C-terminal tyrosine is iodinated. In ASA-ANP, the iodine is located on the benzene ring. ASA-ANP identified a protein of approx.140 kDa in RKPM. AB-ANP recognized an additional protein of approx.120 kDa. The bulkier N-terminal of the ASA-ANP seems to hinder the binding of the analogue to the approx.120-kDa protein. In RLPM only the approx.120-kDa protein was detected by AB-ANP. The approx.140-kDa receptor may be unique to the kidney. ANF-R in RKPM and RLPM respectively, appear to interact with different domains of ANP suggesting the existence of two forms of the ANP-R.

Tallerico-Melnyk, T.; Yu, H.; Flynn, T.G.; Yip, C.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production in flowing He/O{sub 2} plasmas. II. Two-dimensional modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COIL) the 1.315 {mu}m transition in atomic iodine is pumped by a sequence of reactions of I{sub 2} and I with O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) which is generated using liquid chemistry. Ongoing studies are investigating means to produce the O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) precursor with an electric discharge (eCOIL) to enable a totally gas phase system. Due to the thermodynamic and power loading requirements, the plasma in eCOIL systems is sustained in a flow of a rare-gas diluent and the O{sub 2}. In previous investigations, the scaling of production of O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) was investigated using global-kinetics and one-dimensional (1D) models. It was found that the production of O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) scaled linearly with energy deposition for moderate loadings (a few eV/O{sub 2} molecule). In this paper, these previous investigations are extended to two-dimensions using a plasma hydrodynamics model. The goal of this investigation is to determine if multidimensional considerations affect energy scalings for production of O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}). We found that O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production generally does scale linearly with energy loading, however, the saturation of O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production occurs at lower-energy loadings than predicted with global and 1D models. This trend is a result of the more accurately depicted and more localized energy deposition afforded by the two-dimensional model, and emphasizes the need for volumetrically uniform power deposition to optimize O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production.

Arakoni, Ramesh; Stafford, D. Shane; Babaeva, Natalia Y.; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography  

SciTech Connect

An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct investigation of mechanisms of vascular dysfunctions.

Umetani, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukushima, K. [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Hospital, Fujishirodai, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)  

SciTech Connect

The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Micro Ion Source Program NA22 Plutonium Detection Portfolio Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the micro ion source program was to enhance the performance of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for various actinides and fission products. The proposal hypothesized that when ions are created at the ion optic center of the mass spectrometer, ion transmission is significantly increased and the resulting ion beam is more sharply focused. Computer modeling demonstrated this logic. In order to prove this hypothesis it was first necessary to understand the chemistry and physics governing the particular ion production process that concentrates the emission of ions into a small area. This has been achieved for uranium and technetium, as was shown in the original proposal and the improvement of both the beam transmission and sharpness of focus were proven. Significantly improved analytical methods have been developed for these two elements based upon this research. The iodine portion of the proposal turned out to be impractical due to volatility of iodine and its compounds. We knew this was a possibility prior to research and we proceeded anyway but did not succeed. Plutonium is a potential option, but is not quite up to the performance level of resin beads. Now, we more clearly understand the chemical and physical issues for plutonium, but have not yet translated this knowledge into improved analytical processes. The problems are that plutonium is considerably more difficult to convert to the required intermediate species, plutonium carbide, and the chemical method we developed that works with uranium functions only moderately well with plutonium. We are of the opinion that, with this knowledge, similar progress can be made with plutonium.

James E. Delmore

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul 139-707 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of) and Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

The N2K Consortium VI: Doppler Shifts Without Templates and Three New Short-Period Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a modification to the iodine cell Doppler technique that eliminates the need for an observed stellar template spectrum. For a given target star, we iterate toward a synthetic template spectrum beginning with an existing spectrum of a similar star. We then perturb the shape of this first-guess template to match the program observation of the target star taken through an iodine cell. The elimination of a separate template observation saves valuable telescope time, a feature that is ideally suited for the quick-look strategy employed by the ``Next 2000 Stars'' (N2K) planet search program. Tests using Keck/HIRES spectra indicate that synthetic templates yield a short-term precision of 3 m/s and a long-term, run-to-run precision of 5 m/s. We used this new Doppler technique to discover three new planets: a 1.5 Mjup planet in a 2.1375 d orbit around HD 86081; a 0.71 Mjup planet in circular, 26.73 d orbit around HD 224693; and a Saturn-mass planet in an 18.179 d orbit around HD 33283. The remarkably short period of HD 86081b bridges the gap between the extremely short-period planets detected in the OGLE survey and the 16 Doppler-detected hot jupiters (P < 15 d), which have an orbital period distribution that piles up at about three days. We have acquired photometric observations of two of the planetary host stars with the automated photometric telescopes at Fairborn Observatory. HD 86081 and HD 224693 both lack detectable brightness variability on their radial velocity periods, supporting planetary-reflex motion as the cause of the radial velocity variability. HD 86081 shows no evidence of planetary transits in spite of a 17.6% transit probability.

John A. Johnson; Geoffrey W. Marcy; Debra A. Fischer; Gregory Laughlin; R. Paul Butler; Gregory W. Henry; Jeff A. Valenti; Eric B. Ford; Steven S. Vogt; Jason T. Wright

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon. Second quarterly progress report, December 15, 1975--March 31, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Plant construction costs and manufacturing costs have been estimated for the production of solar-grade silicon by the reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles, and several modifications of the iodide process using either thermal decomposition on heated filaments (rods) or hydrogen reduction in a fluidized bed of seed particles. The objective was to evaluate the economics of the zinc reduction process and to determine whether any of the potential economies in the modifications of the iodide process would make it competitive in spite of the high relative cost of recycled iodine in the process intermediate. The estimated cost of the zinc reduction process, $9.12 kg/sup -1/ silicon is within the target of $10.00 kg/sup -1/; however, none of the modifications of the iodide processes yielded costs below $20 kg/sup -1/ Si. Although optimization of one of the iodide process modifications should bring the cost to below $20 kg/sup -1/ Si, it would not be possible to reduce the cost to below that of the zinc reduction product. Energy consumption data for the zinc reduction process and each of the iodide process options are given and all appear to be acceptable from the standpoint of energy pay back. Information is presented on the experimental zinc reduction of SiCl/sub 4/ and electrolytic recovery of zinc from ZnCl/sub 2/. All of the experimental work performed thus far has supported the initial assumption as to technical feasibility of producing semiconductor silicon by the zinc reduction or iodide processes proposed. The results of a more thorough thermodynamic evaluation of the iodination of silicon oxide/carbon mixtures are presented which explain apparent inconsistencies in an earlier cursory examination of the system.

Blocher, J.M.; Jr.; Browning, M.F.; Wilson, W.J.; Carmichael, D.C.

1976-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final Report, "Molecular Design of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Catalytic Processes"  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project had been to use model systems to correlate selectivities in partial oxidation catalysis with the presence of specific sites on the surface of the catalyst. Extensive work was performed this year on characterizing oxygen-treated nickel surfaces by chemical means. Specifically, the surface chemistry of ammonia coadsorbed with atomic oxygen on Ni(110) single-crystal surfaces was studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was determined that at intermediate oxygen coverages direct ammonia adsorption on nickel sites is suppressed, but a new high-temperature reaction regime is generated at 400 K where NHx surface fragments are rehydrogenated concurrently with the production of water and molecular hydrogen. The extensive isotope scrambling and hydrogen transfer seen from nitrogen- to oxygen-containing surface intermediates, and the optimum yields seen for this 400 K state at intermediate oxygen coverages, strongly suggest the direct interaction of the adsorbed ammonia with oxygen atoms at the end of the –Ni–O- rows that form upon reconstruction of the surface. Hydrogen transfer between ammonia and oxygen appears to take place directly via hydrogen bonding, and to be reversible but biased towards water formation. An equilibrium is reached between the produced water and the reacting surface oxygen and hydrogen. The strong influence of the OH surface groups on the thermal chemistry of the adsorbed ammonia was interpreted in terms of the adsorbing geometry of the OH groups on the surface, and of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed OH and NH3 species. In terms of alcohol reactivity, the adsorption of 2-iodoethanol, a precursor for the preparation of 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle surface species, was found to lead to two configurations involving either just the iodine atom or both iodine and hydroxyl ends of the molecule. A complex chemical behavior starts around 140 K with the production of small amounts of ethylene and water, most likely via the concerted decomposition or disproportionation of the adsorbed molecular species. The bulk of the 2-iodoethanol decomposes at about 150 K via an initial carbon-iodine scission to form –O(H)CH2CH2– (~80%) and 2-hydroxyethyl (~20%) intermediates. Two competing reactions are involved with the subsequent conversion of the 2-hydroxyethyl species around 160 K, a reductive elimination with surface hydrogen to yield ethanol, and a ?-H elimination to surface vinyl alcohol. The –O(H)CH2CH2–, on the other hand, dehydrogenates to a –OCH2CH2– oxametallacycle species about the same temperature. Both 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle species tautomerize to acetaldehyde, around 210 K and above 250 K, respectively, and some of that acetaldehyde desorbs while the rest decomposes to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. We contend that a better understanding of the surface chemistry of oxygen-containing surfaces can lead to better selectivities in catalysis. This is arguably the most important issue in the field of catalysis in the near future, and one that impacts several technologies of interest to DOE such as the manufacturing of speciality chemicals and the control and removal of pollutants. Additional work was performed on the characterization of the chemistry of methyl and methylene adsorbed species on oxygen-treated nickel surfaces. Complex chemistry was observed involving not only hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, but also C-C couplings and methylene insertions to produce heavier hydrocarbons, and oxygen insertion reactions that yield oxygenates. Finally, a dual titration technique employing xenon and a chemically sensitive probe was developed to identify minority catalytic sites on oxide surfaces. In the case of oxygen-treated Ni(110) single crystals, it was found that both hydrogen transfer with adsorbed water or ammonia and certain hydrocarbon hydrogenation reactions take place at the end of the –Ni–O rows that form in this system. Carbon and nitrogen oxides, on the other hand, display no pre

Professor Francisco Zaera

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Implementation of dual-energy technique for virtual monochromatic and linearly mixed CBCTs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To implement dual-energy imaging technique for virtual monochromatic (VM) and linearly mixed (LM) cone beam CTs (CBCTs) and to demonstrate their potential applications in metal artifact reduction and contrast enhancement in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: A bench-top CBCT system was used to acquire 80 kVp and 150 kVp projections, with an additional 0.8 mm tin filtration. To implement the VM technique, these projections were first decomposed into acrylic and aluminum basis material projections to synthesize VM projections, which were then used to reconstruct VM CBCTs. The effect of VM CBCT on the metal artifact reduction was evaluated with an in-house titanium-BB phantom. The optimal VM energy to maximize contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for iodine contrast and minimize beam hardening in VM CBCT was determined using a water phantom containing two iodine concentrations. The LM technique was implemented by linearly combining the low-energy (80 kVp) and high-energy (150 kVp) CBCTs. The dose partitioning between low-energy and high-energy CBCTs was varied (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% for low-energy) while keeping total dose approximately equal to single-energy CBCTs, measured using an ion chamber. Noise levels and CNRs for four tissue types were investigated for dual-energy LM CBCTs in comparison with single-energy CBCTs at 80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp. Results: The VM technique showed substantial reduction of metal artifacts at 100 keV with a 40% reduction in the background standard deviation compared to a 125 kVp single-energy scan of equal dose. The VM energy to maximize CNR for both iodine concentrations and minimize beam hardening in the metal-free object was 50 keV and 60 keV, respectively. The difference of average noise levels measured in the phantom background was 1.2% between dual-energy LM CBCTs and equivalent-dose single-energy CBCTs. CNR values in the LM CBCTs of any dose partitioning are better than those of 150 kVp single-energy CBCTs. The average CNR for four tissue types with 80% dose fraction at low-energy showed 9.0% and 4.1% improvement relative to 100 kVp and 125 kVp single-energy CBCTs, respectively. CNRs for low-contrast objects improved as dose partitioning was more heavily weighted toward low-energy (80 kVp) for LM CBCTs. Conclusions: Dual-energy CBCT imaging techniques were implemented to synthesize VM CBCT and LM CBCTs. VM CBCT was effective at achieving metal artifact reduction. Depending on the dose-partitioning scheme, LM CBCT demonstrated the potential to improve CNR for low contrast objects compared to single-energy CBCT acquired with equivalent dose.

Li Hao; Giles, William; Ren Lei; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fluorspar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorspar Fluorspar Nature Bulletin No. 361-A December 6, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FLUORSPAR Among all the states, Illinois stands at the top or very near the top in its production of corn, hogs, soybeans, oats and chickens. The same is true in industries: meat packing, steel, agricultural machinery, tractors, radios, telephones, paint, candy and many others. It is one of the leading producers of coal. Not commonly known, however, is the fact that the world's largest fluorite mines are located in Pope and Hardin counties along the Ohio River, and few people realize what an important part this mineral plays in our daily lives. Chlorine, bromine, iodine and fluorine are chemical elements always found in combination with some metal. Common salt is chloride of sodium. Fluorspar, or Fluorite, is fluoride of calcium. Although quite common, occurring in several states and in foreign countries, there are few deposits with veins large enough to be mined commercially. Almost half of what is used in this country comes from southern Illinois and most of the remainder from Kentucky, just across the river. It is mined from veins as much as 800 feet below the surface.

388

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements - Elements Listed by Atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Atomic Number 1 Hydrogen H 2 Helium He 3 Lithium Li 4 Beryllium Be 5 Boron B 6 Carbon C 7 Nitrogen N 8 Oxygen O 9 Fluorine F 10 Neon Ne 11 Sodium Na 12 Magnesium Mg 13 Aluminum Al 14 Silicon Si 15 Phosphorus P 16 Sulfur S 17 Chlorine Cl 18 Argon Ar 19 Potassium K 20 Calcium Ca 21 Scandium Sc 22 Titanium Ti 23 Vanadium V 24 Chromium Cr 25 Manganese Mn 26 Iron Fe 27 Cobalt Co 28 Nickel Ni 29 Copper Cu 30 Zinc Zn 31 Gallium Ga 32 Germanium Ge 33 Arsenic As 34 Selenium Se 35 Bromine Br 36 Krypton Kr 37 Rubidium Rb 38 Strontium Sr 39 Yttrium Y 40 Zirconium Zr 41 Niobium Nb 42 Molybdenum Mo 43 Technetium Tc 44 Ruthenium Ru 45 Rhodium Rh 46 Palladium Pd 47 Silver Ag 48 Cadmium Cd 49 Indium In 50 Tin Sn 51 Antimony Sb 52 Tellurium Te 53 Iodine I 54 Xenon Xe 55 Cesium Cs 56 Barium Ba 57 Lanthanum La 58 Cerium Ce

389

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements - Elements Listed by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Name Chemical Name Actinium Ac 89 Aluminum Al 13 Americium Am 95 Antimony Sb 51 Argon Ar 18 Arsenic As 33 Astatine At 85 Barium Ba 56 Berkelium Bk 97 Beryllium Be 4 Bismuth Bi 83 Bohrium Bh 107 Boron B 5 Bromine Br 35 Cadmium Cd 48 Calcium Ca 20 Californium Cf 98 Carbon C 6 Cerium Ce 58 Cesium Cs 55 Chlorine Cl 17 Chromium Cr 24 Cobalt Co 27 Copernicium Cn 112 Copper Cu 29 Curium Cm 96 Darmstadtium Ds 110 Dubnium Db 105 Dysprosium Dy 66 Einsteinium Es 99 Erbium Er 68 Europium Eu 63 Fermium Fm 100 Flerovium Fl 114 Fluorine F 9 Francium Fr 87 Gadolinium Gd 64 Gallium Ga 31 Germanium Ge 32 Gold Au 79 Hafnium Hf 72 Hassium Hs 108 Helium He 2 Holmium Ho 67 Hydrogen H 1 Indium In 49 Iodine I 53 Iridium Ir 77 Iron Fe 26 Krypton Kr 36 Lanthanum La 57 Lawrencium Lr 103 Lead Pb 82 Lithium Li 3 Livermorium Lv 116

390

Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

How to treat and recycle heavy clear brine fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear brine fluids, such as CaCl/sub 2/, are replacing muds in well completions and workovers. These ''solids-free'' fluids have caused increases in well productivity of as much as 850%. To use the fluids in higher density ranges, it is necessary to blend the CaCl/sub 2/ brines with the more expensive bromide fluids. This, in turn, has increased the importance of reclaiming weighted brines to make their use more cost effective. To reclaim clear fluids, the solids picked up during use are removed and the fluid is reused or reweighted. A common problem though is the post-precipitation of dissolved contaminants that may appear in the used brines after several days or weeks in storage. Precipitation also may occur if other heavy fluids are added to adjust density before reuse. Laboratory tests have identified the solids as primarily iron hydroxides and halides. (Halides are salts containing a halogen-flourine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine.) Additional experimentation has shown that pH adjustment at the well site or before transfer to storage facilities can provide a simple and effective way of controlling the precipitation of metal hydroxides and halides. This article discusses methods of pH control, measurement, and adjustment, which will allow for optimum use of clear brine fluids.

Pasztor, A.J.; Snover, J.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; Oà ƒ  ¢Ã ‚  € à ‚  ™ Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

TRUMP-BD: A computer code for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUMP-BD (Boil Down) is an extension of the TRUMP (Edwards 1972) computer program for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions. This extension allows prediction of the heat transfer rates, metal-water oxidation rates, fission product release rates, steam generation and consumption rates, and temperature distributions for nuclear fuel assemblies under core uncovery conditions. The heat transfer processes include conduction in solid structures, convection across fluid-solid boundaries, and radiation between interacting surfaces. Metal-water reaction kinetics are modeled with empirical relationships to predict the oxidation rates of steam-exposed Zircaloy and uranium metal. The metal-water oxidation models are parabolic in form with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Uranium oxidation begins when fuel cladding failure occurs; Zircaloy oxidation occurs continuously at temperatures above 13000{degree}F when metal and steam are available. From the metal-water reactions, the hydrogen generation rate, total hydrogen release, and temporal and spatial distribution of oxide formations are computed. Consumption of steam from the oxidation reactions and the effect of hydrogen on the coolant properties is modeled for independent coolant flow channels. Fission product release from exposed uranium metal Zircaloy-clad fuel is modeled using empirical time and temperature relationships that consider the release to be subject to oxidation and volitization/diffusion ( bake-out'') release mechanisms. Release of the volatile species of iodine (I), tellurium (Te), cesium (Ce), ruthenium (Ru), strontium (Sr), zirconium (Zr), cerium (Cr), and barium (Ba) from uranium metal fuel may be modeled.

Lombardo, N.J.; Marseille, T.J.; White, M.D.; Lowery, P.S.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation  

SciTech Connect

Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of design and simulation model and safety study of large-scale hydrogen production using nuclear power.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before this LDRD research, no single tool could simulate a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) that is coupled to a secondary system and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemistry. Furthermore, the SI chemistry could only be modeled in steady state, typically via flow sheets. Additionally, the MELCOR nuclear reactor analysis code was suitable only for the modeling of light water reactors, not gas-cooled reactors. We extended MELCOR in order to address the above deficiencies. In particular, we developed three VHTR input models, added generalized, modular secondary system components, developed reactor point kinetics, included transient thermochemistry for the most important cycles [SI and the Westinghouse hybrid sulfur], and developed an interactive graphical user interface for full plant visualization. The new tool is called MELCOR-H2, and it allows users to maximize hydrogen and electrical production, as well as enhance overall plant safety. We conducted validation and verification studies on the key models, and showed that the MELCOR-H2 results typically compared to within less than 5% from experimental data, code-to-code comparisons, and/or analytical solutions.

Gelbard, Fred; Oh, Seungmin (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Revankar, Shripad T. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gauntt, Randall O.; Cole, Randall K., Jr.; Espinosa, Flor (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Drennen, Thomas E.; Tournier, Jean-Michel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hogan, Kevin (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Archuleta, Louis (OMICRON Safety and Risk, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Malczynski, Leonard A.; Vierow, Karen (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); McFadden, Katherine Letizia; Martin, William Joseph; El-Genk, Mohamed S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Louie, David L. Y. (OMICRON Safety and Risk, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Contaminant Release Data Package for Residual Waste in Single-Shell Hanford Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation report be submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The RCRA Facility Investigation report will provide a detailed description of the state of knowledge needed for tank farm performance assessments. This data package provides detailed technical information about contaminant release from closed single-shell tanks necessary to support the RCRA Facility Investigation report. It was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., which is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with tank closure. This data package is a compilation of contaminant release rate data for residual waste in the four Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have been tested (C-103, C-106, C-202, and C-203). The report describes the geochemical properties of the primary contaminants of interest from the perspective of long-term risk to groundwater (uranium, technetium-99, iodine-129, chromium, transuranics, and nitrate), the occurrence of these contaminants in the residual waste, release mechanisms from the solid waste to water infiltrating the tanks in the future, and the laboratory tests conducted to measure release rates.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Hydridomethyl iridium complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Printed in U.S.A. DOI: 10.1093/epirev/mxi012 The Chernobyl Disaster: Cancer following the Accident at the Chernobyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Chernobyl nuclear power plant, located in Ukraine about 130 km north of the capital of Kiev and about 10 km south of the border with Belarus, was the scene of the most severe accident that has ever occurred in the nuclear industry. On April 26, 1986, two violent explosions destroyed the core of unit 4 of the power plant and the roof of the building, resulting in a series of fires and in massive releases of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. The releases consisted of gases, aerosols, and finely fragmented nuclear fuel particles. From the radiologic point of view, iodine-131 ( 131 I) and cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) are the most important radionuclides to consider (1, 2). During the 10 days of massive releases, the wind direction changed frequently, so that all areas surrounding the reactor received some fallout at one time or another. In addition, rainfall occurred in an irregular pattern, causing varying degrees of deposition. The releases of radioactive materials were such that contamination of the ground was found to some extent in every country in the Northern Hemisphere (3). However, the most contaminated

Nuclear Power Plant; M. Hatch; E. Ron; A. Bouville; L. Zablotska; G. Howe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Technical Division quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first in a series of quarterly progress reports on ERDA budgeted activities subcontracted to Allied Chemical Corporation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. The work is performed by the Technical Division and is divided into three subjects. Fuel cycle research and development includes fluidized-bed calcination and post treatment of commercial nuclear fuel process waste; the storage of fission product noble gas; the catalyzed reaction between NO/sub x/ and NH/sub 3/; the adsorption and storage of /sup 129/I; evaporation of radioactive wastes; the removal of actinides from commercial high-level waste; reprocessing and waste treatment of HTGR fuel; and studies on natural fission reactors. Special materials production covers long-term management of ICPP high-level waste; ICPP fuel process improvements; advanced graphite fuels reprocessing; buried pipeline transfer systems; and ICPP waste management assistance. Other projects supporting energy development include geothermal energy development; inplant source term measurements; burnup methods for FBR fuels; nuclear materials security; absolute thermal fission yield measurements; analytical support to LWBR program; research on analytical methods; and environmental iodine species behavior.

Slansky, C.M. (ed.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Technical Division quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in three categories: Fuel Cycle Research and Development, special materials production, and projects supporting energy development. Results are presented on the fluidized-bed calcination of high-level radioactive waste from the reprocessing of spent commercial nuclear fuel, on the post treatment of the calcine, and on the removal of actinide elements from the waste prior to calcination. Other projects include the development of storage technology for /sup 85/Kr waste; a study of the hydrogen mordenite catalyzed reaction between NO/sub x/ and NH/sub 3/; the adsorption and storage of /sup 129/I on silver exchanged mordenite; physical properties, materials of construction, and unit operations studies on the evaporation of high-level waste; the behavior of volatile radionuclides during the combustion of HTGR graphite-based fuel; and the use of fission product ruthenium in age-dating uranium ore bodies. The long-term management of defense waste from the ICPP covers post-calcination treatment of ICPP calcined waste. Improvements are reported on the Fluorinel head end process for Zircaloy-clad fuels. Studies are included on nuclear materials security; application of a liquid-solid fluidized-bed heat exchanger to the recovery of geothermal heat; inplant reactor source term measurements; burnup methods for fast breeder reactor fuels; research on analytical methods; and the behavior of environmental species of iodine.

Slansky, C.M. (ed.)

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Process for functionalizing alkanes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

MELCOR-H2 Benchmarking of the SNL Transient Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Experiments  

SciTech Connect

MELCOR is a world-renowned nuclear reactor safety analysis code that is used to simulate both light water and gas-cooled reactors. MELCOR-H2 is an extension of MELCOR that can model detailed nuclear reactors that are fully coupled with modular secondary-system components and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle for the generation of hydrogen and electricity. The models are applicable to both steady state and transient calculations. Previous work has shown that the hydrogen generation rate calculated by MELCOR-H2 for the SI cycle was within the expected theoretical yield, thus providing a macroscopic confirmation that MELCOR-H2's computational approach is reasonable. However, in order to better quantify its adequacy, benchmarking of the code with experimental data is required. Sulfuric acid decomposition experiments were conducted during late 2006 at Sandia National Laboratories, and MELCOR-H2 was used to simulate them. We developed an input deck based on the experiment's geometry, as well as the initial and boundary conditions, and then proceeded to compare the experimental acid conversion efficiency and SO{sub 2} production data with the code output. The comparison showed that the simulation output was typically within less than 10% of experimental data, and that key experimental data trends such as acid conversion efficiency, molar acid flow rate, and solution mole % were computed adequately by the MELCOR-H2. (authors)

Rodriguez, Sal B.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Gelbard, Fred; Pickard, Paul; Cole, Randy; McFadden, Katherine; Drennen, Tom; Martin, Billy [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 0748, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States); Louie, David; Archuleta, Louis [OMICRON Safety and Risk (United States); Revankar, Shripad T. [Purdue University (United States); Vierow, Karen [University of Texas A and M (United States); El-Genk, Mohamed; Tournier, Jean Michel [University of New Mexico (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Halogenated high {Tc} superconductors and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for producing a superconductor of the R-Ba-Cu-O system which comprises of selecting an insulating material of the formula RBa{sub x}Cu{sub y}O{sub z} where R is selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu, and where x ranges from about 1.7 to about 2.3, y ranges from about 2.7 to about 3.3 and z ranges from about 5.0 to about 6.99, and halogenating said material with a halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine, iodine, and mixtures thereof, while maintaining said material at a temperature ranging from about 160 to about 440{degrees}C, for a period of time sufficient to cause incorporation of said halogen into said material. Also, disclosed are the materials produced by the method and articles of manufacture incorporating said materials as electronic circuitry components.

Radousky, H.B.; Glass, R.S.; Fluss, M.J.

1990-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Dose verification with Monte Carlo technique for prostate brachytherapy implants with {sup 125}I sources  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo technique has been implemented to generate the dose distributions in a model prostate patient, implanted with iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy sources. The results of these calculations are also compared with the dose distributions calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system. The comparison shows that with the source strength suggested by the Monte Carlo technique, the current clinical planning system is found to provide 100% coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose for the same implant pattern. However, the dose-volume histogram of this investigation shows that the VariSeedTM treatment planning system has a 29% and 136% larger dose coverage for the 150% and 200% isodose lines, respectively, than the Monte Carlo simulation. These differences are attributed to the oversimplification of the current planning system using the point source approximation, and also to the interseed effects from multisources that are neglected in the conventional planning systems. The results of this study provide evidence that supports the use of the Monte Carlo technique in treatment planning systems to provide accurate dose calculations in brachytherapy implants.

Zhang Hualin [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States)]. E-mail: hualinzhang@yahoo.com; Baker, Curtis [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States); McKinsey, Rachel [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States); Meigooni, Ali [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States)

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?  

SciTech Connect

We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their O’s atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 Å. This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 Å. We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Spatial Analysis of Contaminants in 200 West Area Groundwater in Support of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit Pre-Conceptual Remedy Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a preliminary spatial and geostatistical analysis of the distribution of several contaminants of interest (COIs) in groundwater within the unconfined aquifer beneath the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The contaminant plumes of interest extend within the 200-ZP-1 and 200-UP-1 groundwater operable units. The COIs included in the PNNL study were carbon tetrachloride (CTET), technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-129 (I-129), chloroform, plutonium, uranium, trichloroethylene (TCE), and nitrate. The project included three tasks. Task 1 involved the development of a database that includes all relevant depth-discrete data on the distribution of COIs in the study area. The second task involved a spatial analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of data for the COIs in the study area. The main focus of the task was to determine if sufficient data are available for geostatistical mapping of the COIs in 3D. Task 3 involved the generation of numerical grids of the concentration of CTET, chloroform, and Tc-99.

Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production by water decomposition. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interest in hydrogen as a chemical feedstock and as a possible non-polluting fuel has continued to be high, affected by recent estimates of 1980 prices for imported natural gas in the range of $3.00/MM Btu. Our exhaustive survey of multi-step thermochemical and hybrid cycles concluded that the most promising prospects to date are (1) a modification of Abraham's ANL-4 cycle, and (2) the Rohm and Haas multi-reaction, single reactor cycle. Both sequences utilize iodine-based oxidation-reduction chemistry and each ultimately produces hydrogen via an iodide vapor decomposition, in the first case from NH/sub 4/I, in the second from HI. Process feasibility depends on demonstration of separation steps of relatively low energy requirements. Further research is proposed along four lines: (1) modeling and computation focusing on selectivity in gas-solid reactions, (2) experimental studies of solids flow and mixing, as well as mass transfer and chemical reaction in rotating and/or oscillating kiln reactors, (3) kinetics of the crucial reactions in the ANL-4 and Rohm and Haas cycles, and gas separations associated with these processes, and (4) flow sheet evaluations and preliminary economics.

Perlmutter, D.D.; Myers, A.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two Sulfur-based cycles--the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) and the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS)--have emerged as the leading thermochemical water-splitting processes for producing hydrogen utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors. Numerous international efforts have been underway for several years to develop the SI Cycle, but development of the HyS Cycle has lagged. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background, current status, recent development results, and the future potential for this thermochemical process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology since 2004 to evaluate and to conduct research and development for the HyS Cycle. Process design studies and flowsheet optimization have shown that an overall plant efficiency (based on nuclear heat converted to hydrogen product, higher heating value basis) of over 50% is possible with this cycle. Economic studies indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant based on this process can be economically competitive, assuming that the key component, the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer, can be successfully developed. SRNL has recently demonstrated the use of a proton-exchange-membrane electrochemical cell to perform this function, thus holding promise for economical and efficient hydrogen production.

Summers, William A.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.; Buckner, Melvin R.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

Report of 1,000 Hour Catalyst Longevity Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 1,000 hour, high-pressure, catalyst longevity test for the decomposition of concentrated sulfuric acid. The reaction is used for both the sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle and hybrid sulfur cycle. By the time of the delivery date of April 17, 2009, for project milestone no. 2NIN07TC050114, the 1% Pt/TiO2 catalyst had been in the reaction environment for 658 hours. During the first 480 hours of testing, the catalyst activity provided stable, near-equilibrium yields of 46.8% SO2 and 22.8% O2. However, product yields declined at sample exposure times >480 hours. At 658 hours of operation, catalyst activity (based on oxygen yield) declined to 57% relative to the stable period of catalyst activity. Thus, as of April 17, this catalyst did not provide the desired stability level of <10% degradation per 1,000 hours. The experiment was terminated on April 27, after 792 hours, when a fitting failed and the catalyst was displaced from the reactor such that the sample could not be recovered. Oxygen conversion at the end of the experiment was 12.5% and declining, suggesting that at that point, catalyst activity had decreased to 54% of the initial level.

Daniel M. Ginosar

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A review of the technical issues of air ingression during severe reactor accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe reactor accident scenarios involving air ingression into the reactor coolant system are described. Evidence from modem reactor accident analyses and from the accident at Three Mile Island show residual fuel will be present in the core region when air ingression is possible. This residual fuel can interact with the air. Exploratory calculations with the MELCOR code of station blackout accidents during shutdown conditions and during operations are used to examine clad oxidation by air and ruthenium release from fuel in air. Extensive ruthenium release is predicted when air ingression rates exceed about 10 moles/s. Past studies of air interactions with irradiated reactor fuel are reviewed. Effects air ingression may have on fission product release, transport, deposition and revaporization are discussed. Perhaps the most important effects of air ingression are expected to be enhanced release of ruthenium from the fuel and the formation of copious amounts of aerosol from uranium oxide vapors. Revaporization of iodine and tellurium retained in the reactor coolant system might be expected.

Powers, D.A.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Schmidt, R.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

An analysis of radionuclide behavior in water pools during accidents at the Annular Core Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Physical and chemical phenomena that will affect the behavior of radionuclides released from fuel in the Annular Core Research Reactor during a hypothetical, core disruptive accident are described. The phenomena include boiling of water on heated clad, metal-water reactions, vapor nucleation to form aerosol particles, coagulation of aerosol particles, aerosol deposition within bubbles rising through the shield pool, vapor dissolution in the shield pool, and revaporization of radionuclides from the shield pool. A model of these phenomena is developed and applied to predict the release of radionuclides to the confinement building of the Annular Core Research Reactor. It is found that the shield pool provides overall decontamination factors for particulate of about 2.8 {times} 10{sup 5} and decontamination factors for noble gases of about 2.5--3.7. These results are found to be sensitive to the predicted clad temperature and bubble behavior in the shield pool. Slow revalorization of krypton, xenon and iodine from the shield pool is shown to create a prolonged, low-intensity source term of radioactive material to the confinement atmosphere.

Powers, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (15–1100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (24–1800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposure–dose and dose–response models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT model’s uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

USE OF THE MODULAR HELIUM REACTOR FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A significant ''Hydrogen Economy'' is predicted that will reduce our dependence on petroleum imports and reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels, but contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels. The author has recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-slitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen, and to select one for further detailed consideration. They selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this report.

SCHULTZ,KR

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radioactivity discharged in gaseous wastes from separations facilities 200 Area stacks during 1970  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes by stack number the amount of radioactivity discharged from the facilities of Chemical Processing Division, Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company. Emission data for 231-Z Building and 2724-W, Laundry Building, which are operated by other AEC Contractors are not available for this report. Total beta, alpha and I{sup l3l} radioactive emissions from the stacks for 1970 were as follows: alpha (Pu, assumed) 1.59 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C, alpha (U, assumed) 1.44 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} C, beta 1.93C, and I{sup 131} 4.92 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} C. Air samples taken continuously from gaseous release facilities were analyzed for total beta and alpha activity (and iodine activity, where applicable). Where sample data were not available, the total radioactive emission was adjusted by using the average emission rate prior to the subject period; or where activity was near constant, by using the daily average as a base. A gamma scan of the 291-S stack is included in the report.

Maxfield, H.L.

1971-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "iodine phos phorus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

TRITIUM MOVEMENT AND ACCUMULATION IN THE NGNP SYSTEM INTERFACE AND HYDROGEN PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium movement and accumulation in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) employing either a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) process or a thermochemical water-splitting Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process to produce hydrogen is estimated by a numerical code, THYTAN, as a function of design, operational and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in the process chemicals of the hydrogen plant using the HTE process are slightly higher than the limit in drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and in effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), respectively. Estimated tritium concentrations in the NGNP using the SI hydrogen production process are significantly higher, and are largely affected by undetermined parameters (i.e., tritium permeability of heat exchanger materials, hydrogen concentration in the helium energy transport fluids, equilibrium constant of the tritium isotope exchange reaction between HT and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). These parameters should be measured or estimated in the near future, as should the tritium generation and release rate from the NGNP nuclear reactor core. Decreasing the tritium permeation rate between the primary and secondary heat transport circuits is an effective measure to decrease the tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, hydrogen plant process chemicals, and the tertiary heat transport fluid.

Sherman, S

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluation of Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the operating conditions for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) that will transfer heat from the reactor primary system to the demonstration hydrogen production plant(s). The Department of Energy is currently investigating two primary options for the production of hydrogen using a high temperature reactor as the power source. These options are the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) and Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production processes. However, since the SI process relies entirely on process heat from the reactor, while the HTE process relies primarily on electrical energy with only a small amount of process heat required, the design of the IHX is dictated by the SI process heat requirements. Therefore, the IHX operating conditions were defined assuming 50 MWt is available for the production of hydrogen using the SI process. Three configurations for the intermediate loop were evaluated, including configurations for both direct and indirect power conversion systems. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the influence of reactor outlet temperatures, intermediate loop working fluids (helium and molten salt), intermediate loop pressures, and intermediate loop piping lengths on NGNP performance and IHX operating conditions. The evaluation of NGNP performance included assessments of overall electric power conversion efficiency and estimated hydrogen production efficiency. Based on these evaluations, recommended IHX operating conditions are defined.

E. A. Harvego

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications. Semiannual report, September 29, 1978-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As high temperature solar energy systems are developed for applications such as refrigeration, heating, cooking, electrical power generation, and industrial processes, the need for inexpensive, reliable heat transfer media (liquid coolants) will become more intense. At present petroleum distillates and synthetic coolants are being utilized for these purposes. Since the use of these substances represents a drain on our natural fuel resources, it has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. This research project was implemented for the purpose of researching such a use. During the conceptual phase of the study, it was recognized that very little data are readily available for predicting the results of using vegetable oils as liquid coolants in high temperature solar systems. Therefore, the major thrust of the project will be to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density and thermal conductivity will be determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods will be used for these determinations. Boiling point data and viscosity data have been determined for each of the four oils selected. Chemical analyses have been performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each boiling point experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests include iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination.

Ingley, H A

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An assessment of the radiological doses resulting from accidental uranium aerosol releases and fission product releases from a postulated criticality accident at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dose assessment for two separate normalized source terms was conducted for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The first source term consisted of the noble gas and iodine fission products emanating from a postulated criticality with a magnitude of 10{sup 19} fissions. The second postulated source term was 1 kg of respirable highly enriched uranium. The MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2 (MACCS2) (beta test) computer code was used for this assessment. Both fixed weather (e.g., constant weather assumed throughout the accident) and sampled weather cases were performed using MACCS2. The results of the analysis are summarized in terms of the effective dose equivalent as a function of distance along the downwind centerline of the plume. In addition, population doses for the workers and the public are presented. A brief code comparison between the MACCS2 and MESORAD computer codes is also presented. Modeling differences for the cloudshine and groundshine dose pathways are discussed. Finally, the dose results are summarized, and recommendations are provided that enable the reader to make quick estimates of downwind doses for different source terms that are scalable.

Fisher, S.E.; Lenox, K.E.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Radioactive Cesium Isotope Ratios as a Tool for determining Dispersal and Re-dispersal Mechanisms Downwind from the Nevada Nuclear Security Site  

SciTech Connect

Fractionation of the two longer lived radioactive cesium isotopes (135 and 137) produced by above ground nuclear tests have been measured and used to clarify the dispersal mechanisms of cesium deposited in the area between the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) and Lake Mead in the southwestern United States. Fractionation of these isotopes is due to the 135 decay chain requiring several days to completely decay to Cs and the 137 decay chain less than one hour. Since the Cs precursors are gases, iodine and xenon, the 135Cs plume was deposited farther downwind than the 137Cs plume. Samples were obtained from the Las Vegas arm of Lake Mead, separated into segments, gamma counted to identify layers of activity and analyzed for 135Cs/137Cs ratios. The layers proved to have nearly identical highly fractionated isotope ratios. This information is consistent with a model where the cesium was initially deposited onto the land area draining into Lake Mead and the composite from all the above ground shots subsequently washed onto the Lake by high intensity rain and windstorms producing a layering of Cs activity where each layer is a portion of the composite.

Darin C. Snyder; James E. Delmore; Troy J. Tranter; Nick R. Mann; Michael L. Abbott; John E. Olson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, ORNL has run 95 diesel range fuels in homogene-ous charge compression ignition (HCCI), including 40 bio-diesels and associated diesel fuels in their blending. The bio-diesel blends varied in oxygen content, iodine number, cetane, boiling point distribution, chemical composition, and some contained nitrogen. All fuels were run in an HCCI engine at 1800 rpm, in the power range of 2.5 to 4.5 bar IMEP, using intake air heating for combustion phasing control, and at a compression ratio of 10.6. The engine response to fuel variables has been analyzed statistically. Generally, the engine responded well to fuels with lower nitrogen and oxygen, lower cetane, and lower aromatics. Because of the wide range of fuels combined in the model, it provides only a broad overview of the engine response. It is recommended that data be truncated and re-modeled to obtain finer resolution of engine response to particular fuel variables.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Joyce, Blake [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

We have exploring the possibility of measuring urinary radioactivity as an index of pancreatic lipase activity after oral administration of a new triglyceride containing a radioactive iodine-1 25-labeled fatty acid moiety. The new agent, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3[15-(p-iodophenyl)pentandecan-l-oyl]-racglycerol (1,2-Pal-3-IPPA), was prepared by the thallation-iodide displacement method. Following oral gavage of the radioiodinated triglyceride to rats, about 30% of the administered activity was excreted in 24 hours in the urine. In normal human controls an higher urinary excretion (of about 75% was observed. In this report, we describe an evaluation of the metabolites excreted in the urine and the chemical species stored in adipose from rats. The urine activity co-chromatographed with hippuric acid by TLC indicating conjugation of the IPPA metabolites. Release of the acidic components from the conjugated excretory products by acid hydrolysis of the urine provided the radioactive acidic IPPA metabolites. Analysis of the Folch extracts of fat samples from rats demonstrated that the radioactive components co-chromatographed In the triglyceride region. Recent studies in patients with compromised pancreatic exocrine function have demonstrated significantly decreased 24 hr. urinary excretion of about 25%, following oral administration of [1 -1 31]-1,2-Pal-3-IPPA. Thus, urine analysis after oral administration of [I -1 31]-1,2-Pal-3-IPPA may be a simple, non-invasive tool for the clinical evaluation of various diseases involving dietary fat digestion.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z