National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for iodine phos phorus

  1. An Improved Synthesis of BrettPhos- and RockPhos-Type Biarylphosphine Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoshiya, Naoyuki

    Improved processes for the preparation of biphenyl-based phosphine ligands t-BuBrettPhos, RockPhos, and BrettPhos are presented. The new methods, featuring the use of Grignard reagents and catalytic amounts of copper, are ...

  2. The Seebeck coefficient of iodine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Fernandez, Domingo Miguel

    1968-01-01

    of iodine, has given considerable informa- tion about the semiconductive properties of iodine. Interest in the Seebeck effect (thermoelectric power) arises from the fact that it seems possible to predict ita magnitude from previous data, but also that a... large fraction of these previous data becomes involved in the interpretation, affording a test of the consistency of the picture of the conduction process in iodine crystals. This work, the measurement of the Seebeck effect in iodine, neither...

  3. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  4. Iodine transport analysis in the ESBWR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Young, Michael Francis; Longmire, Pamela

    2009-03-01

    A simplified ESBWR MELCOR model was developed to track the transport of iodine released from damaged reactor fuel in a hypothesized core damage accident. To account for the effects of iodine pool chemistry, radiolysis of air and cable insulation, and surface coatings (i.e., paint) the iodine pool model in MELCOR was activated. Modifications were made to MELCOR to add sodium pentaborate as a buffer in the iodine pool chemistry model. An issue of specific interest was whether iodine vapor removed from the drywell vapor space by the PCCS heat exchangers would be sequestered in water pools or if it would be rereleased as vapor back into the drywell. As iodine vapor is not included in the deposition models for diffusiophoresis or thermophoresis in current version of MELCOR, a parametric study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a range of iodine removal coefficients in the PCCS heat exchangers. The study found that higher removal coefficients resulted in a lower mass of iodine vapor in the drywell vapor space.

  5. Method and apparatus for removing iodine from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H. (Monroeville, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing iodine-131 and iodine-125 from a liquid sodium reactor coolant. Non-radioactive iodine is dissolved in hot liquid sodium to increase the total iodine concentration. Subsequent precipitation of the iodine in a cold trap removes both the radioactive iodine isotopes as well as the non-radioactive iodine.

  6. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  7. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 324 19 JUNE 2009 1519 POLICYFORUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    nutrients extracted in crop harvest (7). For example, on the 90 small- holder farms sampled in the Siaya within, as well as across, agricultural systems. Harvested crops remove nitrogen, phos- phorus, and other, including the degradation of downstream water quality and eutrophication of coastal marine ecosys- tems

  8. Exposure Pathways are the ways in which a person might have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control and Prevention The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project calculated doses (24 Na), phos- phorus-32 (32 P), zinc-65 (65 Zn), arsenic-76 (76 As), and neptu- nium-239 (239 Np cancer incidence risks for each of the 23 radionuclides. These estimates are called screening values

  9. PhosPlusPhosPlus High-Purity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    depositions. · The use of high-purity raw materials results in high-purity doping of single crystalPlus sources are manufactured from raw materials exhibiting very high purity. These materials are made using represent a significant advancement in the field of phosphorus dopant materials. Their ability to easily

  10. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  11. Therapeutic implications of iodine-125 cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomer, W.D.; McLaughlin, W.H.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    The biological consequences of differential subcellular radionuclide accumulation within nuclear stuctures have important implications for the design and development of new therapeutic agents for cancer management. A growing body of experimental data demonstrates that localization of /sup 125/I within the genome results in marked cytotoxicity. Investigations of iodine-125 labeled iododeoxyuridine, DNA intercalators and tamoxifen are reviewed as representative of this new group of potential radiotherapeutic agents.

  12. Method for the simultaneous preparation of Radon-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Astatine-211, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed (East Setauket, NY); Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY)

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneously preparing Radon-211, Astatine-211, Xenon-125, Xenon-123, Iodine-125 and Iodine-123 in a process that includes irradiating a fertile metal material then using a one-step chemical procedure to collect a first mixture of about equal amounts of Radon-211 and Xenon-125, and a separate second mixture of about equal amounts of Iodine-123 and Astatine-211.

  13. Speciation and transport of anthropogenic 129Iodine and natural 127Iodine in surface and subsurface environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, Kathleen Ann

    2005-02-17

    ................................... 29 2.2 Mobile phase gradient elution profile ........................................................ 30 2.3 Iodine speciation in the vertical profile of a warm core ring, Gulf of Mexico, 26o 0.04? N, 95o 20? W. Collection was July 9...

  14. Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes of enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Iodine in groundwater of the North China Plain: Spatial patterns and hydrogeochemical processes online xxxx Keywords: Iodine Groundwater Spatial patterns Hydrogeochemistry North China Plain The North/L) and low-iodine (b10 g/L) groundwater regions that frequently result in iodine excess or deficien- cy

  15. AGING AND IODINE LOADING OF SILVER-FUNCTIONALIZED AEROGELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Anderson, Kaara K [ORNL; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Silver-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine capture capacity, high porosity and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag0-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41wt% to 32wt%.

  16. Aging and iodine loading of silver-functionalized aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, S.H.; Jubin, R.T.; Anderson, K.K.; Walker, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6223, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their potential application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine-capture capacity, high porosity, and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high-humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine-capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41 wt% to 32 wt%. (authors)

  17. Discharge formation systems for generating atomic iodine in a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksinin, V I; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Antsiferov, S A; Velikanov, S D; Gerasimov, A Yu; Gostev, I V; Kalinovskii, V V; Konovalov, V V; Mikhalkin, V N; Sevryugin, I V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-31

    Generation characteristics of a pulse-periodic oxygen–iodine laser with the electro-discharge production of atomic iodine were compared with inductively stabilised edged or anisotropic- resistive cathodes used for ignition of the volume discharge. The discharge was initiated by the radiation of a barrier discharge from the side of a grid anode. It was found that at equal specific electrical energy depositions to the gas-discharge plasma, the system with the anisotropic-resistive cathode provides a more stable and uniform volume discharge with the possibility of varying the composition and pressure of working mixtures over a wide range and a greater specific extraction of laser energy is observed (up to 2.4 J L{sup -1}). At a high pulse repetition rate of laser pulses (50 – 100 Hz) and long duration of the pulse trains (longer than a minute) the surface of anisotropic-resistive cathode became eroded. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    composition, chemistry, and climate. atmospheric chemistry | oxidative capacity | halogens | heterogeneous chemistry | air-sea exchange Reactive iodine impacts atmospheric chemistry in several ways. Catalytic a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215; b Cooperative

  19. Origin of electronic transport of lithium phthalocyanine iodine crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Noritake; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    The electronic structures of Lithium Phthalocyanine Iodine are investigated using density functional theory. Comparing the band structures of several model crystals, the metallic conductivity of highly doped LiPcI{sub x} can be explained by the band of doped iodine. These results reveal that there is a new mechanism for electronic transport of doped organic semiconductors that the dopant band plays the main role.

  20. Iodine behavior in containment under LWR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisbey, S.J.; Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.; Wang, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    The description of containment iodine behavior in reactor accident sequences requires an understanding of iodine volatility effects, deposition and revaporization/resuspension (from surfaces and aerosols), chemical changes between species, and mass transport. The experimental work in this program has largely centered on the interactions of iodine in or with water pools. The formation of volatile iodine, as I/sub 2/ or organic iodides, is primarily dependent on radiation and solution pH. Lower pH results in increased formation of volatile iodine species; thus, for example, a pH of 3.05 resulted in a conversion of I/sup -/ to I/sub 2/ that was more than two orders of magnitude greater than tests run at pH 6.1 or 6.8. The formation or organic iodides involving water pools has been linked to the presence of iodine as I/sub 2/, the solution/gas contact, and to the type of organic material.

  1. Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2012-09-11

    Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

  2. Summary of FY 2010 Iodine Capture Studies at the INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryl R. Haefner; Tony L. Watson; Michael G. Jones

    2010-08-01

    Three breakthrough runs using silver mordenite sorbents were conducted and a dynamic sorption capacity estimated based on MeI analysis from a 2" bed. However, it is now believed the data for the first 2 runs is incomplete because the contributions from elemental iodine were not included. Although the only source of iodine was MeI, elemental iodine was generated within the sorbent bed, presumably from a recombination reaction likely catalyzed by silver mordenite. On-line effluent analysis with a GC was only capable of analyzing MeI, not I2. Scrub samples drawn during Run #3, which are specific for I2, show significant levels of I2 being emitted from a partially spent Ag-mordenite bed. By combining MeI and I2 analyses, a well defined total iodine breakthrough curve can be generated for Run #3. At the conclusion of Run #3 (IONEX Ag-900 was the sorbent) the effluent level from Bed 2 was approaching 70% of the feed concentration. The leading bed (Bed 1) had an estimated average loading of 66 mg I/g sorbent, Bed 2's was 52 mg I/g. The corresponding silver utilizations (assuming formation of AgI) were about 59% and 46%, respectively. The spent sorbents are being sent to Sandia National Laboratories for confirmatory analysis of iodine and silver utilization as well as source material for waste form development.

  3. The etiology of loin disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greeley, Ralph Gordon

    1966-01-01

    treatment has been discovered and the etiology of the disease has never been proven. In South Africa a similar disease, larnsiekte, has been recorded for centuries. In the 1920's intensive research in that country un- covered a chain of conditions... the similarity of lamsiekte and loin disease, and of the phosphorus deficiency that soils of South Africa and the Texas coastal plains have in common. In 1924 he began recommending the routine supplemental feeding of phos- phorus to range cattle (8). Where...

  4. Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson Department of Chemistry of the hydrogen-iodine reaction, H2+I,-*HI +HI. He reported rate measurementsof the forward and reverse reactions of existing iodine atoms with hydrogen would have to be looked (at): 21+Hz-+2HI... ." ' It is now be- lieved

  5. VAPOUR PHASE CHEMICAL TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE CADMIUM TELLURIDE-IODINE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , it was shown that no iodine chemical transport is possible in closed tubes in the hot-cold direction, but only was explained in terms of a reverse (cold-hot) iodine transport associated with a reduced sublimation tendency155 VAPOUR PHASE CHEMICAL TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE CADMIUM TELLURIDE-IODINE SYSTEM C. PAORICI

  6. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  7. Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kathawa; C. Fry; M. Thoennessen

    2012-01-20

    Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathawa, J.; Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-01-15

    Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Iodine Doped P3AT Structure 5.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    samples. The study of various intercalated structures by x­ray diffraction of polymer systems has a number doped P3AT films, the Osaka group has investigated a number of different dopants (NF \\Gamma 4 , BF \\Gamma 4 , AsF \\Gamma 6 , p­TS and Iodine) in P3ATs with side chain lengths ranging from butyl

  10. Aging of Iodine-Loaded Silver Mordenite in NO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Patton, Kaara K.; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin

    2014-04-01

    Used nuclear fuel facilities need to control and minimize radioactive emissions. Off-gas systems are designed to remove radioactive contaminants, such as 85Kr, 14C, 3H, and 129I. In an off-gas system, any capture material will be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents comprising the dissolver off-gas stream in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration is reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z), which is recognized for its efficient iodine capture properties. Iodine is immobilized on Ag0Z as AgI, a solid with low volatility (m.p. ? 500°C). The aim of this study was to determine whether extended aging at elevated temperature in a nominally 2% NO2 environment would result in a loss of immobilized iodine from this material due to either physical or chemical changes that might occur during aging. Charges of iodine-loaded reduced silver mordenite (I2-Ag0Z) were exposed to a 2% NO2 environment for 1, 2, 3, and 4 months at 150°C, then analyzed for iodine losses The aging study was completed successfully. The material did not visibly change color or form. The results demonstrate that no significant iodine loss was observed over the course of 4 months of 2% NO2 aging of I2-Ag0Z at elevated temperature within the margin of error and the variability (~10%) in the loading along the beds. This provides assurance that iodine will remain immobilized on Ag0Z during extended online use in an off-gas capture treatment system. Future tests should expose I2-Ag0Z to progressively more complex feed gases in an effort to accurately replicate the conditions expected in a reprocessing facility.

  11. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai, E-mail: haiyao@clemson.edu [Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  12. Iodine-129 and Iodine-127 speciation in groundwater at the Hanford Site, U.S.: iodate incorporation into calcite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Creeley, Danielle; Ho, Yi-Fang; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Grandbois, Russell; Schwehr, Kathy; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Yeager, Chris; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2013-09-03

    The Hanford Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States, has large radioactive waste plumes containing high 129I levels. The geochemical transport and fate of radioiodine depends largely on its chemical speciation that is greatly affected by environmental factors. This study reports, for the first time, the speciation of stable and radioactive iodine in the groundwater from the Hanford Site. Iodate was the dominant species and accounts for up to 84%, followed by organo-iodine and minimal levels of iodide. The relatively high pH and oxidizing environment may have prevented iodate reduction. Our results identified that calcite precipitation caused by degassing of CO2 during deep groundwater sampling incorporated between 7 to 40% of dissolved iodine (including 127I and 129I) that was originally in the groundwater, transforming dissolved to particulate iodate during sampling. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying iodine incorporation by calcite, laboratory experiments were carried out to replicate this iodine sequestering processes. Two methods were utilized in this study, 1) addition of sodium carbonate; 2) addition of calcium chloride followed by sodium carbonate where the pH was well controlled at ~8.2, which is close to the average pH of Hanford Site groundwater. It was demonstrated that iodate was the main species incorporated into calcite and this incorporation process could be impeded by elevated pH and decreasing ionic strength in groundwater. This study provides critical information for predicting the long-term fate and transport of 129I at the Hanford Site and reveals a potential means for improved remediation strategies of 129I.

  13. Numerical study of He/CF{sub 3}I pulsed discharge used to produce iodine atom in chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Duo Liping; Li Guofu [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-04-15

    The pulsed discharge for producing iodine atoms from the alkyl and perfluoroalky iodides (CH{sub 3}I, CF{sub 3}I, etc.) is the most efficient method for achieving the pulse operating mode of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of pulsed discharge in CF{sub 3}I-He mixture. By solving continuity equation, momentum equation, Poisson equation, Boltzmann equation, and an electric circuit equation, the temporal evolution of discharge current density and various discharge products, especially the atomic iodine, are investigated. The dependence of iodine atom density on discharge parameters is also studied. The results show that iodine atom density increases with the pulsed width and pulsed voltage amplitude. The mixture ratio of CF{sub 3}I and helium plays a more significant role in iodine atom production. For a constant voltage amplitude, there exists an optimal mixture ratio under which the maximum iodine atom concentration is achieved. The bigger the applied voltage amplitude is, the higher partial pressure of CF{sub 3}I is needed to obtain the maximum iodine atom concentration.

  14. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  15. Iodine Loading of NO Aged Silver Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, K. K. [ORNL; Bruffey, S. H. [ORNL; Jubin, J. T. [ORNL; Walker, Jr., J. F. [ORNL

    2014-09-30

    In an off-gas treatment system for used nuclear fuel processing, a solid sorbent will typically be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water vapor, gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), nitric acid vapors, and a variety of other constituents. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed sorbents. Silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ) is being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine its iodine sorption capacity after long term exposure to increasingly more complex chemical environments. Studies previously conducted at ORNL investigated the effects of aging reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag{sup 0}Z) in dry air, moist air, and NO2. This study investigated the effects of extended exposure to nitric oxide (NO) gas on the iodine capture performance of Ag{sup 0}Z. A deep bed of Ag{sup 0}Z was aged in a 1% nitric oxide (NO) air stream, and portions of the bed were removed at pre-determined intervals. After being removed from the NO stream, each sample was loaded with iodine in a thin bed configuration. These samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA) to quantify the iodine content in the sample. Samples were removed at one week and one month. A 78% decrease in sample capacity was seen after one week of exposure, with no further decrease observed after 1 month of aging. The observed loss in capacity is larger in magnitude than previous studies exposing Ag{sup 0}Z to dry air, moist air, or NO2 gas. The aging study was terminated after one month and repeated; this successfully demonstrated the reproducibility of the results.

  16. Relationship of the serum protein-bound iodine to rates of gain in beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, David Kershaw

    1956-01-01

    HERITABILITY AND REPEATABILITY OF THE SERUM PROTEIN- BOUND IODINE IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE...................... 13 THE METHOD OF MEASUREMENT OF SERUM PROTEIN- BOUND IODINE............................................ 13 REPEATABILITY OF THE SERUM PBI LEVEL.................... 17 ESTIMATES OF HE RIT ABILITY OF THE SERUM PBI LEVEL IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE......................... 23 RELATIONSHIP OF THE SERUM PROTEIN-BOUND IODINE LEVELS TO RATES OF GAIN IN IMMATURE BEEF CATTLE......... 31 PROCEDURE...

  17. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. L. Adamic; J. E. Olson; D. D. Jenson; J. G. Eisenmenger; M. G. Watrous

    2012-09-01

    This NA 22 funded research project investigated the transition of iodine isotopic analyses from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system. Previous work (Fiscal Year 2010) had demonstrated comparable data from TIMS and AMS. With AMS providing comparable data with improved background levels and vastly superior sample throughput, improvement in the sample extraction from environmental sample matrices was needed to bring sample preparation throughput closer to the operation level of the instrument. Previous research used an extraction chemistry that was not optimized for yield or refined for reduced labor to prove the principle. This research was done to find an extraction with better yield using less labor per sample to produce a sample ready for the AMS instrument. An extraction method using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was developed for removal of iodine species from high volume air filters. The TMAH with gentle heating was superior to the following three extraction methods: ammonium hydroxide aided by sonication, acidic and basic extraction aided by microwave, and ethanol mixed with sodium hydroxide. Taking the iodine from the extraction solvent to being ready for AMS analysis was accomplished by a direct precipitation, as well as, using silver wool to harvest the iodine from the TMAH. Portions of the same filters processed in FY 2010 were processed again with the improved extraction scheme followed by successful analysis by AMS at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The data favorably matched the data obtained in 2010. The time required for analysis has been reduced over the aqueous extraction/AMS approach developed in FY 2010. For a hypothetical batch of 30 samples, the AMS methodology is about 10 times faster than the traditional gas phase chemistry and TIMS analysis. As an additional benefit, background levels for the AMS method are about 1000 times lower than TIMS. This results from the fundamental mechanisms of ionization in the AMS system and which produces a beneficial cleanup of molecular interferences. Continued clean operation of the extraction process was demonstrated through blank analysis included with all sample sets analyzed. INL work showed improvement on the first year’s demonstration of AMS vs. TIMS. An improved extraction of high volume air filters followed by isotopic analysis by AMS, can be used successfully to make iodine measurements with results comparable to those obtained by filter combustion and TIMS analysis. More progress on the conversion from an extract solution to an AMS sample ready for analysis is still needed. Although the preparation scheme through AMS is already at a higher performing thoughput than TIMS, the chemical preparation cannot match the instrument capability for number of samples per day without further development.

  18. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionaliz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel The U.S. Department of Energy is currently investigating alternative sorbents for the removal and immobilization...

  19. A Sensitive Determination of Iodine Species, Including Organoiodine, for Freshwater and Seawater Samples Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Spectrophotometric Detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, K. A.; Santschi, P. H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to more effectively use iodine isotope ratios, 129I/127I, as hydrological and geochemical tracers in aquatic systems, a new HPLC method was developed for the determination of iodine speciation. The dissolved iodine ...

  20. Exposure of Treating Physician to Radiation during Pro-state Brachytherapy using Iodine-125 Seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krusche, Bernd

    1 Exposure of Treating Physician to Radiation during Pro- state Brachytherapy using Iodine-125 brachytherapy duration by the most experienced physician was 19.2 min (standard deviation = 1.2 min) (novices. Key Words: Prostate cancer, brachytherapy, Iodine-125 seeds, radiation expos- ure, TLD Short Title

  1. Zeolite Salt Occlusion: A Potential Route for the Immobilisation of Iodine-129? Neil C. Hyatt,1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Zeolite ­ Salt Occlusion: A Potential Route for the Immobilisation of Iodine-129? Neil C. Hyatt,1 examined as possible starting routes to the long term immobilisation of iodine-129. Heating the salts, where the iodide salt migrates into the zeolite pores. Detailed studies of the Na-A / 5AgI complex

  2. Complete Initial Scoping Tests on the Incorporation of Novel Loaded Iodine Getters into GCM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James

    2015-08-18

    This study encompasses initial scoping tests on the incorporation of a novel iodine loaded getter material into the Sandia developed low temperature sintering glass ceramic material (GCM) waste form. In particular, we studied the PNNL Ag-I-Aerogel. Optical microscopy indicates inhomogenous samples based on particle sizes and variations in color (AgI vs Ag/AgO on silica). TGA/MS data when heated in air indicates loss of iodine and organics (CO2) between 250-450°C a total of ~15wt% loss, with additional / small iodine loss when during 550°C hold for 1 hr. TGA/MS data when heated in N2 indicates less organic and slightly less iodine loss below 550°C, with no loss of iodine in 550°C 1 hour hold. Furthermore, a substantial mass loss of sulfur containing compounds is observed (m/e of 34 and 36) between 150 – 550°C in both air and N2 sintering atmospheres. In an effort to capture iodine lost to volatilization during heating (at temps below glass sintering temperature of 550°C), we added 5 wt% Ag flake to the AgIaerogel. Resulting data indicates the iodine is retained with the addition of the Ag flake, resulting in only a small iodine loss (< 1wt%) at ~350°C. No method of curtailing loss of sulfur containing compounds due to heating was successful in this scoping study.

  3. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  4. Iodine Solubility in Low-Activity Waste Borosilicate Glass at 1000 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Iovin, Cristian; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Dixon, Derek R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Mccloy, John S.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2014-04-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine the solubility of iodine in a low-activity waste borosilicate glass when heated inside an evacuated and sealed fused quartz ampoule. The iodine was added to glass frit as KI in quantities of 100–24000 ppm iodine (by mass), each mixture was added to an ampoule, the ampoule was heated at 1000 °C for 2 h and then air quenched. In samples with ?12000 ppm iodine, low viscosity salt phases were observed on the surface of the melts during cooling that solidified into a white coating upon cooling. These salts were identified as mixtures of KI, NaI, and Na2SO4 with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The iodine concentrations in glass specimens were analyzed with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and the overall iodine solubility was determined to be 10000 ppm by mass. Several crystalline inclusions of iodine sodalite, Na8(AlSiO4)6I2, were observed in the 24000 ppm specimen and were verified with micro-XRD and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy.

  5. Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

  6. Cerebral perfusion imaging with iodine 123-labeled amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, B.L.; Hill, T.C.; Polak, J.F.; Lee, R.G.; Royal, H.D.; O'Leary, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Two amines, N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine and N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-prop anediamine, have been labeled with iodine 123. The brain uptake of these radioactive tracers is proportional to cerebral blood flow. These tracers are retained in the brain for a sufficiently long time so that imaging can be performed with standard, readily available instrumentation. Transaxial tomography with amines is useful in acute cerebral infarction, in which the x-ray computed tomographic scan may be normal for several days after onset of symptoms while the uptake of radioisotope-labeled amines will be altered immediately after the onset of the stroke. It is also useful in examining patients with cerebral vascular disease and in the preoperative examination of patients with partial epilepsy.

  7. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance tomore »stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.« less

  8. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance to stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.

  9. Iodine and NO sub x behavior in the dissolver off-gas and IODOX (Iodine Oxidation) systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Integrated Equipment Test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments evaluating the behavior of iodine and NO{sub x} in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) Dissolver Off-Gas (DOG) System. This work was performed as part of a joint collaborative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The DOG system consists of two shell-and-tube heat exchangers in which water and nitric acid are removed from the dissolver off-gas by condensation, followed by a packed tower in which NO{sub x} is removed by absorption into a dilute nitric acid solution. The paper also describes the results of the operation of the Iodine Oxidation (IODOX) System. This system serves to remove iodine from the DOG system effluent by absorption into hyperazeotropic nitric acid. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. NO2 Aging and Iodine Loading of Silver-Functionalized Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, K K [ORNL; Bruffey, S H [ORNL; Walker, J F [ORNL; Jubin, R T [ORNL

    2014-07-31

    Off-gas treatment systems in used fuel reprocessing which use fixed-bed adsorbers are typically designed to operate for an extended period of time before replacement or regeneration of the adsorbent. During this time, the sorbent material will be exposed to the off-gas stream. Exposure could last for months, depending on the replacement cycle time. The gas stream will be at elevated temperature and will possibly contain a mixture of water vapor, NOx, nitric acid vapors, and a variety of other constituents in addition to the radionuclides of capture interest. A series of studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed iodine sorbent materials under increasingly harsh off-gas conditions. Previous studies have evaluated the effects of up to 6 months of aging under dry air and under humid air conditions on the iodine loading behavior of Ag0-functionalized aerogels. This study examines the effects of extended exposure (up to 6 months) to NO2 on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0- functionalized aerogels. Material aged for 1 and 2 months appeared to have a similar total loading capacity to fresh material. Over an aging period of 4 months, a loss of approximately 15% of the total iodine capacity was seen. The iodine capacity loss on silver-functionalized aerogels due to NO2 was smaller than the iodine capacity loss due to humid or dry air aging.

  11. Adsorbate-induced corrosion: anodic dissolution of palladium induced by chemisorbed iodine in halide-free acid solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schimpf, Janemarie A

    1991-01-01

    ) Diagram of the electrochemical H-Cell apparatus. . . . . . . . . . 11 XPS spectrum for an electrochemically clean palladium foil. . 17 XPS spectrum of an iodine coated palladium electrode. . . . . . . . 18 Current potential curves for the clean (dotted...) and iodine coated 1mm palladium wire electrode. . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2 Current potential curves for the clean (dotted) electrode and four successive scans of iodine coated 1mm 2 palladium wire electrode. 23 Micromoles of Pd measured by ICP-OES vs...

  12. Continuous-wave laser oscillation on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    of atomic iodine in favor of the I 2 P1/2 state. The laser output power was 220 mW in a stable cavityContinuous-wave laser oscillation on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a11/2 I 2 P3/2 transition of atomic iodine is conventionally obtained by a near-resonant energy

  13. FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2011-11-16

    To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

  14. Effects of soil treatments supplemented with two rates of magnesium sulfate on the availability of soil nutrients and on the yield and chemical composition of coastal Bermuda grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evatt, Nathan S

    1951-01-01

    'ZATZ ON THE AVAILABILITY OF SOIL NUTRIENTS AND ON TH YIELD AND CHENICAL COMPOSITICN GF CO. iSTAL BERNUDA GHASS INTRODUCTION It is known that magnesium is one of' the elements essential for plant growth; however much is to be learned concerning its specific functions... within the plant, Host Texas soils are not deficient, in magnesium (23). Magnesium is reported to be a carrier of the phos- phorus used by the plant. It is entirely possible that the failure to obtain crops of higher phosphorus content upon...

  15. Atomic-Scale Mechanistic Study of Iodine/Alcohol Passivated Si(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Renee T.

    1999-09-27

    Solutions of iodine in alcohol have been shown to passivate H{sub x}-Si(100), decreasing the number of surface states. The degree of passivation depends upon the structure of the alcohol; methanol provides the most stable surface, with an order of magnitude fewer unpassivated sites than H{sub x}-Si(100). The authors experiments have allowed them to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction of the iodine/alcohol solution with the hydrogen-terminated surface. The passivation mechanism appears to be light activated iodination of the surface followed by nucleophilic substitution by the alcohol. Their data suggests that this methoxy-terminated surface is exceptionally stable in the cleanroom ambient because the Si-O bond and the unreactive methoxy moiety hinder further reactions with contaminants. Upon annealing, they find that the passivation is readily removed, and the surface reconstructs to clean Si(100) 2x1 without the formation of silicon carbide.

  16. Project EARTH-11-RR2: Co-evolution of iodine antioxidant mechanism in marine algae and Earth-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-11-RR2: Co-evolution of iodine antioxidant mechanism in marine algae and Earth algae (yet they are lacking in green algae) ­ but the phylogenetic distribution of iodine accumulation haloperoxidases. The first appearance and important divergence of brown algae occurred within the last 200 myr

  17. Improved Visible Light Harvesting of WO3 by Incorporation of Sulfur or Iodine: A Tale of Two Impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

    Improved Visible Light Harvesting of WO3 by Incorporation of Sulfur or Iodine: A Tale of Two report the incorporation of sulfur or iodine into monoclinic tungsten trioxide (S:WO3 or I:WO3 pyrolysis with either ammonium sulfide or iodide added to the aqueous WO3 precursor solutions. Red shifts

  18. An evaluation of radio-iodinated human serum albumin in the dog 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, David Martin

    1973-01-01

    AN EVALUATION OF RADIO-IODINATED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN IN THE DOG A Thesis by DAVID MARTIN HOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1973 Major Subject: Veterinary Physiology AN EVALUATION OF RADIO-IODINATED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN IN THE DOG A Thesis by DAVID MARTIN HOOD Approved as to style and content by: Chairma of Committee ead of Departm t Me r / Me sr December 1973...

  19. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

  20. Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hsiu-Ping

    2012-10-19

    (IO3-) and is the predominant species in the terrestrial environment due to prevailing pH and Eh conditions. In order to transform I- to less mobile organo-iodine (OI), strong oxidants are necessary to activate the first electron transfer step from I...

  1. Super-linear Enhancement of the Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser David L. Carrolla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    output power reported is 538 W [Benavides, 2012]. 2. EXPERIMENTS The ElectricOIL system consists higher beam quality than solid state systems, and be more logistically friendly than current chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) systems. The principal advantage of such an inherently high beam quality

  2. Critical role of iodination for T cell recognition of thyroglobulin in experimental murine thyroid autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, B.R.; Rayner, D.C.; Byfield, P.G.H.; Page, K.R.; Chan, C.T.J.; Roitt, I.M.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have used two clonotypically distinct thyroglobulin (Tg)-specific, I-A/sup k/-restricted monoclonal T cell populations to investigate the role of thyroid peroxidase-catalyzed iodination in Tg recognition by autorreactive T cells. The results showed that these T cells could recognize Tg only it was sufficiently iodinated. Unlike normal mouse Tg, noniodinated mouse Tg was unable to induce significant thyroid lesions but could trigger the production of Tg autoantibodies. In these experiments, the importance of T cell recognition of iodination-related epitopes was emphasized by the inability of serum antibodies to distinguish Tg on the basis of iodine content, whether they were induced with normal or noniodinated Tg. Therefore, thyroid peroxidase-dependent modification of Tg would appear to be central to its recognition by autoreactive T cells and hence its capacity to induce autoimmune thyroid lesions. Proliferative responses of the Tg-specific T cell clone was assessed by the incorporation of (/sup 125/I) deoxyuridine. Anti-Tg antibody activity was determined by radioimmunoassay.

  3. Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matsui

    2011-12-13

    We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

  4. Discharge-driven electric oxygen-iodine laser superlinear enhancement via increasing g0L

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    length, g0L. A factor of 4.4 increase in laser power output on the 1315 nm atomic iodine transition geometry, discharge power to O2 flow ratio, He diluent ratio, atomic oxygen control (quenching mechanisms-frequency discharges. Continuous wave (CW) average total laser power of 481 W was extracted with g0L 0.042. © 2012

  5. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL OF IODINE RICH CAUSTIC WASTE DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    2005-07-14

    CH2M HILL is working to develop, design, and construct low-activity waste (LAW) treatment and imcholization systems to supplement the LAW capacity provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. CH2M HILL is investigating use of cast stone technology for treatment and immobilization of caustic solutions containing high concentrations of radioactive Iodine-129.

  6. Features of adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in iodine air filters AU-1500 at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Neklyudov; A. N. Dovbnya; N. P. Dikiy; O. P. Ledenyov; Yu. V. Lyashko

    2013-06-21

    The main aim of research is to investigate the physical features of spatial distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the iodine air filters of the type of AU1500 in the forced exhaust ventilation systems at the nuclear power plant. The gamma activation analysis method is applied to accurately characterize the distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the AU1500 iodine air filter after its long term operation at the nuclear power plant. The typical spectrum of the detected chemical elements and their isotopes in the AU1500 iodine air filter, which was exposed to the bremsstrahlung gamma quantum irradiation, produced by the accelerating electrons in the tantalum target, are obtained. The spatial distributions of the detected chemical element 127I and some other chemical elements and their isotopes in the layer of absorber, which was made of the cylindrical coal granules of the type of SKT3, in the AU1500 iodine air filter are also researched. The possible influences by the standing acoustic wave of air pressure in the iodine air filter on the spatial distribution of the chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter are discussed. The comprehensive analysis of obtained research results on the distribution of the adsorbed chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber of iodine air filter is performed.

  7. Impact of Pretreatment and Aging on the Iodine Capture Performance of Silver-Exchanged Mordenite - 12314

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.; Ramey, D.W.; Spencer, B.B.; Anderson, K.K.; Robinson, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Volatile gas emissions from a nuclear fuel recycle facility in the United States are governed by several key regulations, including 10 CFR 20, 40 CFR 61, and 40 CFR 190. Under 40 CFR 190, the total quantity of iodine that may be released to the environment from the entire fuel cycle is limited to 5 millicuries of I-129 per gigawatt-year of electrical energy produced by the fuel cycle. With a reasonable engineering margin, an iodine decontamination factor (DF) of approximately 1000 will be required for the complete fuel cycle. Off-gas treatment in a fuel reprocessing plant must address several gas streams containing iodine, among a number of volatile radionuclides. Past research and developmental activities identified silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) as a very promising sorbent based on its acid resistance, relatively high iodine and methyl iodide capacity, and high achievable DF. Recent studies at ORNL have focused on the impacts of long-term exposure to simulated off-gas streams (aging) and pretreatment on the iodine adsorption performance of hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag{sup 0}Z). Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of long-term exposure to both dry and moist air on the iodine sorption capacity of Ag{sup 0}Z. The data indicates that aging reduces the capacity of Ag{sup 0}Z, which must be accounted for to prevent degradation of DF. Because of its high acid resistance, a AgZ sorbent has been selected specifically for application in treating off-gas streams containing iodine. While extensive tests have been conducted in the United States on a form of this sorbent, the specific material previously tested is no longer commercially available and similar materials are currently being evaluated. As part of this evaluation, tests were conducted to determine the iodine sorption properties of this replacement media and the effects of long-term (up to 6 months) exposure to simulated off-gas streams. The ultimate goal is to develop an understanding of the fundamental phenomena that controls aging for this material and other zeolites that could be considered for use in off-gas treatment in the future. The trends in the study results indicate that the amount of elemental silver observed by XRD increases from 0.3 wt% in vendor-supplied AgZ to approximately 5 wt% by reducing the material with hydrogen. The study also concluded that aging decreases the quantity of elemental silver in the material. After 2 months of aging, the Ag{sup 0} content of an experimental sample was reduced from 5 wt% to about 1.3 wt%. The form into which the elemental silver is converted during aging was not determined. Experimental tests have been initiated to study how aging of Ag{sup 0}Z impacts iodine loading on the zeolite. Loading tests with un-aged Ag{sup 0}Z resulted in an 81% silver utilization. The loading capacity of iodine on Ag{sup 0}Z was reduced with aging in dry air. Material aged for 6 months in dry air had a 40% reduction in iodine loading capacity. Under moist-air aging conditions, a significant decrease in the rate and total loading (?45% of theoretical) of iodine uptake can be observed beginning with the shortest aging period (i.e., after 1 month) when compared with the loading curve using Ag{sup 0}Z with no aging. Increasing exposure time to the humid air used to age the Ag{sup 0}Z beyond 1 month resulted in a slight additional reduction in capacity to about 35% of theoretical at 2 months. Virtually identical capacity was observed with 4 months of aging. Compared to the non-aged material, the 1 month dry-air aged Ag{sup 0}Z shows about a 35% reduction (approximate) in iodine loading capacity and the 6 month dry-air aged Ag{sup 0}Z shows about a 50% reduction. These studies generated several questions that will be addressed in future tests. They include the following: Is there indeed degradation over time (in storage) in the iodine adsorption performance of Ag{sup 0}Z? Once reduced, how should the Ag{sup 0}Z be stored- under a hydrogen atmosphere, an inert atmosphere, a desiccant, or some other method or c

  8. The development of autocatalytic structural materials for use in the sulfur-iodine process for the production of hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miu, Kevin (Kevin K.)

    2006-01-01

    The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen offers many benefits to traditional methods of hydrogen production. As opposed to steam methane reforming - the most prevalent method of hydrogen ...

  9. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Brady D.; Johnson, Christian D.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Last, George V.; Lee, Michelle H.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  10. Expanded Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressed Iodine-Loaded Silver-Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R. T. [ORNL; Bruffey, S. H. [ORNL; Patton, K. K. [ORNL

    2014-09-30

    Reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) is being evaluated as a potential material to control the release of radioactive iodine that is released during the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel into the plant off-gas streams. The purpose of this study was to determine if hot pressing could directly convert this iodine loaded sorbent into a waste form suitable for long-term disposition. The minimal pretreatment required for production of pressed pellets makes hot pressing a technically and economically desirable process. Initial scoping studies utilized hot uniaxial pressing (HUPing) to prepare samples of non-iodine-loaded reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). The resulting samples were very fragile due to the low pressure (~ 28 MPa) used. It was recommended that hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), performed at higher temperatures and pressures, be investigated. HIPing was carried out in two phases, with a third and final phase currently underway. Phase I evaluated the effects of pressure and temperature conditions on the manufacture of a pressed sample. The base material was an engineered form of silver zeolite. Six samples of Ag0Z and two samples of I-Ag0Z were pressed. It was found that HIPing produced a pressed pellet of high density. Analysis of each pressed pellet by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrophotometry (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that under the conditions used for pressing, the majority of the material transforms into an amorphous structure. The only crystalline phase observed in the pressed Ag0Z material was SiO2. For the samples loaded with iodine (I-Ag0Z) iodine was present as AgI clusters at low temperatures, and transformed into AgIO4 at high temperatures. Surface mapping and EDS demonstrate segregation between silver iodide phases and silicon dioxide phases. Based on the results of the Phase I study, an expanded test matrix was developed to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional variations, and an expanded temperature range. Each sample was analyzed with the approach used in Phase I. In all cases, there is nothing in the SEM or XRD analyses that indicates creation of any AgI-containing silicon phase, with the samples being found to be largely amorphous. Phase III of this study has been initiated and is the final phase of scoping tests. It will expand upon the test matrix completed in Phase II and will examine the durability of the pressed pellets through product consistency testing (PCT) studies. Transformation of the component material into a well-characterized iodine-containing mineral phase would be desirable. This would limit the additional experimental testing and modeling required to determine the long-term stability of the pressed pellet, as much of that information has already been learned for several common iodine-containing minerals. However, this is not an absolute requirement, especially if pellets produced by hot isostatic pressing can be demonstrated through initial PCT studies to retain iodine well despite their amorphous composition.

  11. A comprehensive program for countermeasures against potentially hazardous objects (PHOs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, Walter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giguere, P T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plesko, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohletz, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, L N [SMD; Boice, D C [SWR; Chocron, S [SWRI; Ghosh, A [SWRI; Goldstein, R [SWRI; Mukerherjee, J [SWRI; Patrick, W [SWRI; Walker, J D [SWRI

    2008-01-01

    At the hundredth anniversary of the Tunguska event in Siberia it is appropriate to discuss measures to avoid such occurrences in the future. Recent discussions about detecting, tracking, cataloguing, and characterizing near-Earth objects (NEOs) center on objects larger than about 140 m in size. However, objects smaller than 100 m are more frequent and can cause significant regional destruction of civil infrastructures and population centers. The cosmic object responsible for the Tunguska event provides a graphic example: although it is thought to have been only about 50 to 60 m in size, it devastated an area of about 2000 km{sup 2}. Ongoing surveys aimed at early detection of a potentially hazardous object (PHO: asteroid or comet nucleus that approaches the Earth's orbit within 0.05 AU) are only a first step toward applying countermeasures to prevent an impact on Earth. Because 'early' may mean only a few weeks or days in the case of a Tunguska-sized object or a long-period comet, deflecting the object by changing its orbit is beyond the means of current technology, and destruction and dispersal of its fragments may be the only reasonable solution. Highly capable countermeasures - always at the ready - are essential to defending against an object with such short warning time, and therefore short reaction time between discovery and impending impact. We present an outline for a comprehensive plan for countermeasures that includes smaller (Tunguska-sized) objects and long-period comets, focuses on short warning times, uses non-nuclear methods (e.g., hyper-velocity impactor devices and conventional explosives) whenever possible, uses nuclear munitions only when needed, and launches from the ground. The plan calls for international collaboration for action against a truly global threat.

  12. Physical features of accumulation and distribution processes of small disperse coal dust precipitations and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

    2012-01-01

    The physical features of absorption process of radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filters of the type of AU-1500 at the nuclear power plants are researched. It is shown that the non-homogenous spatial distribution of absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter, probed by the gamma-activation analysis method, is well correlated with the spatial distribution of small disperse coal dust precipitations in the iodine air filter. This circumstance points out to an important role by the small disperse coal dust fractions of absorber in the absorption process of radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the iodine air filter. The physical origins of characteristic interaction between the radioactive chemical elements and the accumulated small disperse coal dust precipitations in an iodine air filter are considered. The analysis of influence by the researched physical processes on the technical characteristics and functionality of iodine ...

  13. 1. 7084 " The Carbon Matrices Made of Pyrolised Bis-Phtalocyanines as a Base for Encapsulation of the Long-Lived Nuclides of Iodine, Technetium and Minor Actinides" Valeri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    for Encapsulation of the Long-Lived Nuclides of Iodine, Technetium and Minor Actinides" Valeri Tichonov, Pavel

  14. Mechanism of singlet oxygen deactivation in an electric discharge oxygen – iodine laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azyazov, V N; Mikheyev, P A; Torbin, A P; Pershin, A A; Heaven, M C

    2014-12-31

    We have determined the influence of the reaction of molecular singlet oxygen with a vibrationally excited ozone molecule O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}?) + O{sub 3}(?) ? 2O{sub 2} + O on the removal rate of O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}?) in an electric-discharge-driven oxygen – iodine laser. This reaction has been shown to be a major channel of O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}?) loss at the output of an electric-discharge singlet oxygen generator. In addition, it can also contribute significantly to the loss of O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}?) in the discharge region of the generator. (lasers)

  15. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, D.G.; McDaniel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields. 8 refs.

  16. Features of adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in iodine air filters AU-1500 at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neklyudov, I M; Dikiy, N P; Ledenyov, O P; Lyashko, Yu V

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of research is to investigate the physical features of spatial distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the iodine air filters of the type of AU1500 in the forced exhaust ventilation systems at the nuclear power plant. The gamma activation analysis method is applied to accurately characterize the distribution of the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the granular filtering medium in the AU1500 iodine air filter after its long term operation at the nuclear power plant. The typical spectrum of the detected chemical elements and their isotopes in the AU1500 iodine air filter, which was exposed to the bremsstrahlung gamma quantum irradiation, produced by the accelerating electrons in the tantalum target, are obtained. The spatial distributions of the detected chemical element 127I and some other chemical elements and their isotopes in the layer of absorber, which was made of the cylindrical coal granule...

  17. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  18. Many-body potentials of an open shell atom: Spectroscopy of spin-orbit transitions of iodine in crystalline Xe and Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    in crystalline Xe and Kr W. G. Lawrencea) and V. A. Apkarian Department of Chemistry, Institute of Sulfate April 1994) Temperature dependent emission spectra of spin excited iodine in crystalline Xe and Kr state potential energy surfaces of atomic iodine isolated in crystalline Xe and Kr, and calibrate our

  19. Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

    2013-06-11

    The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

  20. Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

    1985-01-01

    In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

  1. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  2. Stable n-CuInSe/sub 2/iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.

    1984-09-20

    In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe/sub 2/ electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br/sub 2//MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu/sup +/ or Cu/sup 2 +/ salts and in In/sup 3 +/ salts.

  3. Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of...

  4. Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

    2013-02-18

    The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of the aerodynamic resistance of a model of the vertical iodine air filter is completed. The comparative analysis of the technical characteristics of the vertical and horizontal iodine air filters is also made.

  5. Construction of an inexpensive molecular Iodine spectrometer using a self developed Pohl wavemeter around 670 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We describe construction of an inexpensive Iodine Spectrometer with a home made Iodine vapour cell and a self developed wavemeter based on Pohl Interferometer, around 670 nm wavelength.This can be easily realised in an undergraduate teaching laboratory to demonstrate use of a diode laser interferometry using a Pohl interferometer and measurement of wavelength using image processing techniques.Visible alternative to the IR diode lasers, 670 nm diode laser used here give chance to undergraduate students to perform comprehensive though illustrative atomic physics experiments including the Zeeman effect, the Hanle effect, Magneto Optic Rotation (MOR) effect with a little tweaking in the present spectrometer. The advantage of the spectrometer is its ease of construction with readily available optics, electronics, evacuation and glass blowing facilities and easy analysis algorithm to evaluate the wavelength. The self developed algorithm of raster scanning and circular averaging gives the researcher insight into the...

  6. Predissociation of high-lying Rydberg states of molecular iodine via ion-pair states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomolov, Alexandr S. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Grüner, Barbara; Mudrich, Marcel [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kochubei, Sergei A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, ac. Lavrent'yev ave., 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, ac. Lavrent'yev ave., 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Baklanov, Alexey V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation) [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya Str. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Str. 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    Velocity map imaging of the photofragments arising from two-photon photoexcitation of molecular iodine in the energy range 73?500–74?500 cm{sup ?1} covering the bands of high-lying gerade Rydberg states [{sup 2}?{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;0{sub g}{sup +} and [{sup 2}?{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;2{sub g} has been applied. The ion signal was dominated by the atomic fragment ion I{sup +}. Up to 5 dissociation channels yielding I{sup +} ions with different kinetic energies were observed when the I{sub 2} molecule was excited within discrete peaks of Rydberg states and their satellites in this region. One of these channels gives rise to images of I{sup +} and I{sup ?} ions with equal kinetic energy indicating predissociation of I{sub 2} via ion-pair states. The contribution of this channel was up to about 50% of the total I{sup +} signal. The four other channels correspond to predissociation via lower lying Rydberg states giving rise to excited iodine atoms providing I{sup +} ions by subsequent one-photon ionization by the same laser pulse. The ratio of these channels varied from peak to peak in the spectrum but their total ionic signal was always much higher than the signal of (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of I{sub 2}, which was previously considered to be the origin of ionic signal in this spectral range. The first-tier E0{sub g}{sup +} and D{sup ?}2{sub g} ion-pair states are concluded to be responsible for predissociation of Rydberg states [{sup 2}?{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;0{sub g}{sup +} and [{sup 2}?{sub 1/2}]{sub c}6d;2{sub g}, respectively. Further predissociation of these ion-pair states via lower lying Rydberg states gives rise to excited I(5s{sup 2}5p{sup 4}6s{sup 1}) atoms responsible for major part of ion signal. The isotropic angular distribution of the photofragment recoil directions observed for all channels indicates that the studied Rydberg states are long-lived compared with the rotational period of the I{sub 2} molecule.

  7. Khazar Iodine Production Plant Site Remediation in Turkmenistan. NORM Contaminated Waste Repository Establishment - 12398

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelbutovskiy, Alexander B.; Cheremisin, Peter I.; Troshev, Alexander V.; Egorov, Alexander J.; Boriskin, Mikhail M.; Bogod, Mikhail A. [JSC 'ECOMET-S', Sosnoviy Bor, Leningrad region, 188540 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Radiation safety provisions for NORM contaminated areas are in use in a number of the former Soviet republics. Some of these areas were formed by absorbed radionuclides at the iodine and bromine extraction sites. As a rule, there are not any plant radiation monitoring systems nor appropriate services to ensure personnel, population and environmental radiation safety. The most hazardous sites are those which are situated in the Caspian Sea coastal zone. The bulk of the accumulated waste is represented by a loose mixture of sand and charcoal, which was basically used as the iodine extraction sorbent. The amounts of these wastes were estimated to be approximately 20,000 metric tons. The waste contamination is mainly composed of Ra-226 (U-238 decay series) and Ra-224, Ra-228 (Th-232 decay series). In 2009, the 'ECOMET-S', a Closed Joint-Stock Company from St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, was authorized by the Turkmenistan government to launch the rehabilitation project. The project includes D and D activities, contaminated areas remediation, collected wastes safe transportation to the repository and its disposal following repository closure. The work at the Khazar chemical plant started in September, 2010. Comprehensive radiological surveys to estimate the waste quantities were carried out in advance. In course of the rehabilitation work at the site of the Khazar chemical plant additional waste quantities (5,000 MT, 10,000 m{sup 3}) were discovered after the sludge was dumped and drained. Disposal volumes for this waste was not provided initially. The additional volume of the construction wastes was required in order to accommodate all the waste to be disposed. For the larger disposal volume the project design enterprise VNIPIET, offered to erect a second wall outside the existing one and this solution was adopted. As of May, 2011, 40,575 m{sup 3} of contaminated waste were collected and disposed safely. This volume represents 96.6% of the initial repository volume. Now work is underway to erect the second repository wall, which will allow housing of the additional 16,800 m{sup 3} The Khazar chemical plant territory restoration work is underway as well. (authors)

  8. Preoperative irradiation, lymphadenectomy, and 125iodine implantation for patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLaney, T.F.; Shipley, W.U.; O'Leary, M.P.; Biggs, P.J.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Fifty-four patients with clinically and surgically localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with low-dose preoperative irradiation (1050 cGy), pelvic lymphadenectomy, and interstitial /sup 125/Iodine implantation. The follow-up range is 2 to 9 years with a median follow-up of 5 years. Overall local tumor control is 92%. Actuarial 5-year survival is 86% and the actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years is 73%. Patients with poorly differentiated tumors have a significantly worse actuarial survival (62%) at 5 years than patients with well (95%) or moderately well differentiated tumors (93%), p = 0.04. Disease-free survival at 5 years was influenced by grade: well (100%), moderate (60%), and poor (48%), p = 0.03. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that only the degree of differentiation (p = 0.05) significantly impacts on survival. Both degree of differentiation (p = 0.04) and nodal status (p = 0.03) significantly influence disease-free survival. Potency has been maintained in 71% of patients potent at the time of implantation. Late reactions have been acceptable to date: bladder outlet obstruction (13%), mild proctitis (13%), cystourethritis (6%), incontinence (2%), and prostatic calculi (2%).

  9. Abatement of Xenon and Iodine Emissions from Medical Isotope Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doll, Charles G.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Friese, Judah I.; Hayes, James C.; Hoffman, Emma L.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2014-04-01

    The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes.

  10. Chalcogen-based aerogels as a multifunctional platform for remediation of radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ryan, Joseph V.; Matyas, Josef; Li, Xiaohong S.; Matson, Dean W.; Sundaram, S. K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-12-22

    Aerogels employing chalcogen-based (i.e., S, Se, and/or Te) structural units and interlinking metals are termed chalcogels and have many emerging applications. Here, chalcogels are discussed in the context of nuclear fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste remediation. Motivated by previous work on removal of heavy metals in aqueous solution, we explored the application of germanium sulfide chalcogels as a sorbent for gas-phase I2 based on Pearson's Hard/Soft Acid-Base (HSAB) principle. This work was driven by a significant need for high-efficiency sorbents for I-129, a long-lived isotope evolved during irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel reprocessing. These chalcogel compositions are shown to possess an affinity for iodine gas, I2(g), at various concentrations in air and the affinity is attributed to a strong chemical attraction between the chalcogen and I2(g), according to the HSAB principle. The high sorption efficiency is facilitated by the high porosity as well as the exceptionally large surface area of the chalcogels.

  11. Subwavenumber charge-coupled device spectrometer calibration using molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Joseph G. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hernandez-Diaz, Carlos; Williamson, J. Charles [Department of Chemistry, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon 97301 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Spectrometers configured with charge-coupled devices (CCD) or other array-based detectors require calibration to convert from the pixel coordinate to a spectral coordinate. A CCD calibration method well suited for Raman spectroscopy has been developed based on the 514.5 nm Ar{sup +} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of room-temperature molecular iodine vapor. Over 360 primary and secondary I{sub 2} LIF calibration lines spanning 510-645 nm were identified as calibrant peaks using an instrumental resolution of 1 cm{sup -1}. Two instrument calibration functions were evaluated with these peaks: a second-order polynomial and a function derived from simple optomechanical considerations. The latter function provided better fitting characteristics. Calibration using I{sub 2} LIF was tested with measurements of both laser light scattering and Raman spectra. The I{sub 2} LIF reference spectra and the signal spectra were recorded simultaneously, with no cross talk, by separating the two signals spatially along the vertical axis of the CCD imager. In this way, every CCD image could be independently calibrated. An accuracy and a precision of {+-}0.05 cm{sup -1} were achieved with this calibration technique.

  12. The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

    1913-01-01

    as in 0.2 per cent hydro? , s H SN s H OD S UH . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E A W A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 a chloric acid, and that after extraction with acid the remaining phosphorus was no longer soluble in water, but could be dissolved in 0.2..., and that after extraction with acid the remaining phos? ,936,93IL6 U H . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E AW A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 hh phorus was no longer Soluble in water, but soluble in 0.2 per cent am? monia. The principal acid-soluble and ammonia...

  13. LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

    2012-09-30

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington produced plutonium for several decades and in the process generated billions of gallons of radioactive waste. Included in this complex mixture of waste was 50 Ci of iodine-129 ({sup 129}I). Iodine-129’s high abundance, due to its high fission yield, and extreme toxicity result in iodine-129 becoming a key risk driver at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The mobility of radioiodine in arid environments, such as the Hanford Site, depends largely on its chemical speciation and is also greatly affected by many other environmental factors, especially natural sediment organic matter (SOM). Groundwater radioiodine speciation has not been measured in arid regions with major plumes or large disposed {sup 129}I inventories, including the Hanford Site, Idaho National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. In this study, stable iodine-127 and radioiodine-129 speciation, pH, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of groundwater samples collected from seven wells located in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were investigated. The most striking finding was that iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) was the most abundant species. Unexpectedly, iodide (I{sup -}), which was likely the form of iodine in the source materials and the expected dominant groundwater species based on thermodynamic considerations, only accounted for 1-2% of the total iodine concentration. It is likely that the relatively high pH and the low abundance of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) that is present at the site slowed down or even inhibited the reduction of iodate, as SOM abiotically reduce iodate into iodide. Moreover, a study on the kinetics of iodide and iodate uptake and aqueous speciation transformation by three representative subsurface Hanford sediments was performed over a period of about one month. This study was carried out by using iodide-125 or iodate-125 at the ambient iodine-127concentration found at the site. Iodate K{sub d} values were on average 89% greater than iodide K{sub d} values, and the K{sub d} values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied {sup 129}I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe{sup 2+}. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O{sub 2}/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 ± 8 ?g/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO{sub 2} as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ {sup 129}I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural attenuation, or long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal sites.

  14. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  15. Experimental Substantiation of the Possibility of Developing Selenium- and Iodine-Containing Pharmaceuticals Based on Blue-Green Algae Spirulina Platensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosulishvili, L M; Belokobylsky, A I; Khisanishvili, L A; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, C C; Gundorina, S F

    2001-01-01

    The great potential of using blue-green algae Spirulina platensis as a matrix for the production of selenium- and iodine-containing pharmaceuticals is shown experimentally. The background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (using -reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th) in Spirulina platensis biomass were determined by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The dependence of selenium and iodine accumulation in spirulina biomass on a nutrient medium loding of the above elements was characterised. To demonstrate the possibilities of determining toxic element intake by spirulina biomass, mercury was selected. The technological parameters for production of iodinated treatment-and-prophylactic pills are developed.

  16. Analysis of the chemical behavior of iodine in the suppression tank of the LOFT facility during experiment LP-FP-2 with IODE and IMPAIR-2/M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L.E.; Polo, J. (Nuclear Technology Inst., Madrid (Spain). Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas)

    1994-05-01

    The significance of iodine for source term quantification has been studied by investigating its chemical behavior under the prototypical conditions of a hypothetical severe accident within the containment. As a result, some computer codes were developed and their validation is currently under way. The loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) program was one of the most relevant research projects in the area of nuclear safety. Its last experiment, LP-FP-2, simulated a V-sequence. A great deal of information was recorded on the fission product release, transport, and deposition. A theoretical approach to the chemical behavior of iodine in the blowdown suppression tank (BST) of the LOFT facility was attempted with the IODE and IMPAIR-2/M codes. The comparison of the predictions with the existing experimental data led to the conclusion that the BST system behaved as a low-volatility system, with most of the iodine in the form of the soluble nonvolatile species iodide. Only a partial conversion to volatile molecular iodine was observed due to the presence of radiation. However, the intensity of the [gamma] field was so weak that this transformation was not quantitatively meaningful.

  17. Studies on Thermoelectric Properties of n-type Polycrystalline SnSe[subscript 1-x]S[subscript x] by Iodine Doping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qian

    Iodine-doped n-type SnSe polycrystalline by melting and hot pressing is prepared. The prepared material is anisotropic with a peak ZT of ?0.8 at about 773 K measured along the hot pressing direction. This is the first ...

  18. Grain-by-grain study of the mechanisms of crack propagation during iodine stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haddad, R.E. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dorado, A.O. [CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the tests conducted to determine the conditions leading to cracking of a specified grain of metal, during the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium alloys, focusing on the crystallographic orientation of crack paths, the critical stress conditions, and the significance of the fractographic features encountered. In order to perform crystalline orientation of fracture surfaces, a specially heat-treated Zircaloy-4 having very large grains, grown up to the wall thickness, was used. Careful orientation work has proved that intracrystalline pseudo-cleavage occurs only along basal planes. the effects of anisotropy, plasticity, triaxiality, and residual stresses originated in thermal contraction have to be considered to account for the influence of the stress state. A grain-by-grain calculation led to the conclusion that transgranular cracking always takes place on those bearing the maximum resolved tensile stress perpendicular to basal planes. Propagation along twin boundaries has been identified among the different fracture modes encountered.

  19. Study of the kinetics of the gas-phase, iodine catalyzed elimination of HBr from isobutylbromide: the tertiary C-H bond dissociation energy in isobutylbromide. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirustithipong, Pongsiri

    1975-01-01

    EXPERIMENTAL A. Apparatus A schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus is shown in Fig. 2. The reactions were carried out in a constant volume, pyrex vessel (A), which was heated in an aluminium block furnace (B). The vessel was connected via a... Aluminium Block Furnace Differential Pressure Transducer Transducer Indicator Front-Side Vacuum System Back-Side Vacuum System Sample Outlets Iodine Reservior Hot Box Dibutylphathalate (oil) Manometer Mercury Manometer Mercury Manometer Liquid...

  20. Renal tubular receptor imaging with iodine-131-labeled peanut lectin: pharmacokinetics and renal clearance mechanism in animals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boniface, G.R.; Suresh, M.R.; Willans, D.J.; Tam, Y.K.; Shysh, A.; Longenecker, B.M.; Noujaim, A.A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenously administered peanut lectin (PNA), iodinated with /sup 131/I ((/sup 131/I)PNA), is rapidly cleared from the plasma by the kidneys in dogs (clearance (total body) = 17.52 +/- 8.74 ml/min). Dynamic gamma camera renal scintigraphy demonstrated renal accumulation and excretion phases of the (/sup 131/I)PNA renogram in dogs and rabbits (% injection dose-at-peak = 21.8 +/- 3.3% and 19.6 +/- 4.3%, time-to-peak = 44.6 +/- 4.8 min and 37.2 +/- 6.9 min, respectively). Immunoperoxidase staining of kidney sections, following i.v. administered PNA, demonstrated predominant accumulation by the proximal tubules of mice, rabbits, and dogs. The basement membrane was intensely stained at early times p.i. while intracellular and luminal PNA was evident within 1 hr. Urine analysis confirmed the presence of intact (/sup 131/I)PNA in the bladder contents, while protein degradation products, and a small percentage of the free iodide (less than 5%) were noted within 1 hr p.i. The relative proportion of free iodide increased at later times p.i. (greater than 6 hr). A receptor mediated excretion mechanism is proposed for the clearance of PNA and may be useful for the study of renal tubular function.

  1. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krema, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  2. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  3. Portal Vein Embolization Using a Nitinol Plug (Amplatzer Vascular Plug) in Combination with Histoacryl Glue and Iodinized Oil: Adequate Hypertrophy with a Reduced Risk of Nontarget Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Clare L., E-mail: clare_bent@yahoo.co.uk; Low, Deborah; Matson, Matthew B.; Renfrew, Ian; Fotheringham, Tim [Barts and The London NHS Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 {+-} 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre- and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 {+-} 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% {+-} 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.

  4. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  5. Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P

    2013-01-01

    The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

  6. Models of the formation of oxide phases in nanostructured materials based on lead chalcogenides subjected to treatment in oxygen and iodine vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru; Moshnikov, V. A.; Tairov, Yu. M. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University 'LETI' (Russian Federation)] [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University 'LETI' (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Model concepts concerning control over the formation of oxide layers during the course of oxidation are developed on the basis of experimental results of studies of systematic features of the formation of nanostructured layers after diffusion annealing. Data on a variation in the composition of oxide phases as the extent of deviation from stoichiometry is changed in the initial lead chalcogenide are presented. Model concepts related to the possibility of varying the thickness of the coating oxide phases using annealing in an oxygen-containing medium are developed. It is shown that annealing in an iodine atmosphere ensures the effective penetration of oxygen into the grains, which is necessary for an increase in the photoluminescence efficiency.

  7. Fission gas and iodine release measured in IFA-430 up to 15 GWd/t UO/sub 2/ burnup. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Turnbull, J.A.; White, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The release of fission products from fuel pellets to the fuel-cladding gap is dependent on the fuel temperature, the power (fission rate) and the burnup (fuel structure). As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Fuel Behavior Program, EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fission product release studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. This paper presents a summary of the results up to December, 1982. The data cover fuel centerline temperatures ranging from 700 to 1500/sup 0/C for average linear heat ratings of 16 to 35 kW/m. The measurements have been performed for the period between 4.2 and 14.8 GWd/t UO/sub 2/ of burnup of the Instrumented Fuel Assembly 430 (IFA-430). The measurement program has been directed toward quantifying the release of the short-lived radioactive noble gases and iodines.

  8. Feeding Programs for Preschool Children in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Flowayne

    1975-01-01

    .43 0.35 0.43 0.52 0.55 0.43 0.92 0.28 0+41 0.47 0.17 Iron mg 10 3.36 5.50 4.25 4.65 3.46 3.56 2.64 4.11 6.28 3.96 4.05 4.16 1.02 Phos- phorus gm 0.8 0.54 0.46 0.52 0.38 0.44 0.44 0.47 0.47 0.94 0.35 0.49 0.50 0.16 Magnesium mg 200 60.46 64,03 80... 1328 876 738 770 811 896 1514 882 7 929 251 Protein gm 30 32 31 28 30 28 27 28 34 59 29 30 32 9 Fats gm ---- 38 38 70 34 32 31 36 36 64 39 32 41 13 Carbo- hydrates gm ---- 84 86 154 112 84 97 91 111 182 107 98 110 31 Calciua gm 0.8 0.55 0.34 0...

  9. Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

    2013-06-14

    The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

  10. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brian; Sankreacha, Raxa; Rakovitch, Eileen; O'Brien, Peter; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  11. Java Defensive Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Haoqing

    2015-01-01

    Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .annotation optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Opt. is the time after optimization. Anno- phos is the time

  12. Iodine solubility in a low-activity waste borosilicate glass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4651; fax: +1 (509)372 5997. E-mail address: brian.riley@pnnl.gov (B.J. Riley). Journal of Nuclear Materials 452 (2014) 178-188 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect...

  13. Iodine valence and local environments in borosilicate waste glasses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    319 5226; fax: +1 (202) 319 4469. E-mail address: davidm@vsl.cua.edu (D.A. McKeown). Journal of Nuclear Materials 456 (2015) 182-191 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect...

  14. The standard potential of the iodate/iodine electrode 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spitz, Rodney Dwight

    1973-01-01

    & i inc e Ier)! 10, . 3& ilojr?)PSP of Tjr. ?&) }ion ? }'&Iui lih&)3u)&1 ')1 ' 01&3i c ic&datr) sr-1 i)t:. in?;= . I, estr&bli j&e &. JB' y S30&". 3& (2) t pa&cti- c"u3 a)c ?& Rt . & 0'&' 00)10Pn ' &"r. ?Ons of loc3). 0 dc'. ? ". ' '311 ) 1... xeaccion (15), The values obtained for the equilibxiun& constant of the Dushman reaction axe in good agreement !~i h the values deter!ai tie 3 c)&e-. !ical ly by pan~ s" t (1) . suthorc c!I shc's t 0 c'. ; ri . . '=' li- Bp, !3. . ' cis Cion to ti!c fc...

  15. The crystal structure of the triphenylphosphine sulfide - iodine addition complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweikert, William Walter

    1966-01-01

    -6 -8 -1 ? 1 -2 36. &BGQ 4. &. 7 -&GO 32. 7 (Gn &3. 5. on 'S &GO 3'i. 5 7 n!3 34. 75OO 2 5. 1 7 C(, ' 3 ') . 7 ( (i !i ? 7. 2 3 Gin ? '3. 7 COO Zci. C ( GO ?5 ~ 73QO 2 '- . I 3 6 F' , G 43. B?Qn 1'3. 7 )no 2 ~ '& 2 n Q ?&3. 4& n Bc.... Zan 1 120 ~ Zl-! p ~ 4 117. 7a5. 2 125. 2i4. 5 115. 9+5. 5 127, 2+4, 3 118 ' 3+4, 4 113, 4+4. 5 125, 6+5. 8 113 ' 4a4o7 124. ~ 1+4. ~ 6 116. 3a5. 7 C(17) -C(10) -C(13) C(10) -C (13) -C( 1)g) 10)i ~ 9+6. 3 131. 3+6. 3 29 Table 7...

  16. Measurement of the resistivity versus temperature in iodine single crystals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somoano, Robert Bonner

    1964-01-01

    ''oner?-y dud thc nobility activaticu ever~ At lcw, 'tespbrutur "s, ' the c. obility ectivction encrI y 'is lar, . . . e:end contributes sip;uificsut1y to the. total -ctivation ener~y, thereby yicldinj: the high value. , . ;However, ' as highs...

  17. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine Riley...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tin-sulfide; aerogel This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National...

  18. The contribution of oceanic methyl iodide to stratospheric iodine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    CH 3 I transport from the surface to the cold point (giventhe vertical transport from the surface to the cold point atCH 3 I transport from the ocean surface to the cold point in

  19. Chalcogenide aerogels as sorbents for radioactive iodine (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,Textit ChandraSciTech Connect| SciTech Connect

  20. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTechSciTech

  1. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) |

  2. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine (Technical Report) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010MesoscopyStaffEfficiency

  3. Method for the simultaneous preparation of radon-211, xenon-125, xenon-123, astatine-211, iodine-125 and iodine-123

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    The invention relates to a practical method for commercially producing radiopharmaceutical activities and, more particularly, relates to a method for the preparation of about equal amount of Radon-211 (/sup 211/Rn) and Xenon-125 (/sup 125/Xe) including a one-step chemical procedure following an irradiation procedure in which a selected target of Thorium (/sup 232/Th) or Uranium (/sup 238/U) is irradiated. The disclosed method is also effective for the preparation in a one-step chemical procedure of substantially equal amounts of high purity /sup 123/I and /sup 211/At. In one preferred arrangement of the invention almost equal quantities of /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe are prepared using a onestep chemical procedure in which a suitably irradiated fertile target material, such as thorium-232 or uranium-238, is treated to extract those radionuclides from it. In the same one-step chemical procedure about equal quantities of /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I are prepared and stored for subsequent use. In a modified arrangement of the method of the invention, it is practiced to separate and store about equal amounts of only /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe, while preventing the extraction or storage of the radionuclides /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I.

  4. Palladium-catalyzed coupling of functionalized primary and secondary amines with aryl and heteroaryl halides: two ligands suffice in most cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maiti, Debabrata

    We report our studies on the use of two catalyst systems, based on the ligands BrettPhos and RuPhos, which provide the widest scope for Pd-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions to date. Often low catalyst loadings and ...

  5. Synthesis and study of ligands for Pd-catalyzed C-O and C-N coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Nicole R. (Nicole Rose)

    2009-01-01

    A new ligand, AdBrettPhos, was synthesized and its use, along with tBuBrettPhos, in C-O coupling reactions at low temperatures was investigated. Using Pd catalysts containing these ligands, electron-neutral aryl bromides ...

  6. AKIE YOSHINO AND YOICHI IITAKA 67 thermal vibrations of the iodine atoms were also ob-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    Industries for use of an IBM 7090 computer. References AMIYA, T. (1960). Bull. Chem. Soc. Japan, 33, 1175 PETER MAIN AND MICHAEL G. ROSSMANN Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, Lafayette

  7. Impact of Foliar Fertilizer Containing Iodine on “Golden Delicious” Apple Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szwonek, Eugeniusz

    2009-01-01

    on marketable Golden Delicious/M.9 apple production. At thecontaining fertilizer on apple fruits firmness and theirold “Golden Delicious/M.9” apple trees Trees were spaced at

  8. Capture of Solar and Higher-Energy Neutrinos by Iodine 127

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Engel; S. Pittel; P. Vogel

    1994-02-17

    We discuss and improve a recent treatment of the absorption of solar neutrinos by ${}^{127}$I, in connection with a proposed solar neutrino detector. With standard-solar-model fluxes and an in-medium value of -1.0 for the axial-vector coupling constant $g_A$, we obtain a ${}^8$B-neutrino cross section of 3.3$\\times 10^{-42}$, about 50\\% larger than in our previous work, and a ${}^7$Be cross section that is less certain but nevertheless also larger than before. We then apply the improved techniques to higher incoming energies that obtain at the LAMPF beam dump, where an experiment is underway to finalize a calibration of the ${}^{127}$I with electron neutrinos from muon decay. We find that forbidden operators, which play no role in solar-neutrino absorption, contribute nonnegligibly to the LAMPF cross section, and that the preliminary LAMPF mean value is significantly larger than our prediction.

  9. Volatility literature of chlorine, iodine, cesium, strontium, technetium, and rhenium; technetium and rhenium volatility testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langowski, M.H.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    A literature review pertaining to the volatilization of Sr, Cs, Tc (and its surrogate Re), Cl, I and other related species during the vitrification of Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW) streams has been performed and the relevant information summarized. For many of these species, the chemistry which occurs in solution prior to the waste stream entering the melter is important in dictating their loss at higher temperatures. In addition, the interactive effects between the species being lost was found to be important. A review of the chemistries of Tc and Re was also performed. It was suggested that Re would indeed act as an excellent surrogate for Tc in non-radioactive materials testing. Experimental results on Tc and Re loss from sodium aluminoborosilicate melts of temperatures ranging from 900--1350{degrees}C performed at PNL are reported and confirm that Re behaves in a nearly identical manner to that of technetium.

  10. Distribution coefficient values describing iodine, neptunium, selenium, technetium, and uranium sorption to Hanford sediments. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    Burial of vitrified low-level waste (LLW) in the vadose zone of the Hanford Site is being considered as a long-term disposal option. Regulations dealing with LLW disposal require that performance assessment (PA) analyses be conducted. Preliminary modeling efforts for the Hanford Site LLW PA were conducted to evaluate the potential health risk of a number of radionuclides, including Ac, Am, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cs, Eu, 1, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pu, Ra, Ru, Se, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, U, and Zr (Piepho et al. 1994). The radionuclides, {sup 129}I, {sup 237}Np, {sup 79}Se, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 234,235,238}U, were identified as posing the greatest potential health hazard. It was also determined that the outcome of these simulations were very sensitive to the parameter describing the extent to which radionuclides sorbed to the subsurface matrix, described as a distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). The distribution coefficient is a ratio of the radionuclide concentration associated with the solid phase to that in the liquid phase. The literature-derived K{sub d} values used in these simulations were conservative, i.e., lowest values within the range of reasonable values used to provide an estimate of the maximum health threat. Thus, these preliminary modeling results reflect a conservative estimate rather than a best estimate of what is likely to occur. The potential problem with providing only a conservative estimate is that it may mislead us into directing resources to resolve nonexisting problems.

  11. Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

    2010-01-01

    Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

  12. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionaliz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    removal and immobilization of radioiodine from the gas streams in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. One of these new sorbents, Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels, shows great...

  13. Carrier envelope phase stabilization of a femtosecond laser and iodine spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng

    2006-10-30

    saturation spectroscopy was set up to provide a precise frequency reference to which a CW dye laser can be locked on. The near future goal is to accurately measure this frequency stabilized dye laser with the optical frequency synthesizer....

  14. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements of structural genomicsOffice of ScientificArthur B.Silica

  15. Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect CollidertransferMetal/Radionuclide-reducing BacteriaConnect

  16. Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect CollidertransferMetal/Radionuclide-reducing

  17. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Assessing the Role(Technical

  18. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Assessing the Role(TechnicalSilica

  19. Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in(Journal Article) |(Conference)plants

  20. Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in(Journal Article) |(Conference)plantsSciTech

  1. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fed. Sci. Tech. Inform., AD 1968, AD-676351, 44 pp. 194. Kwang-Shaun Huang, Kee-Chuan Pan and Chao-Nan Perng, "Pyrolysis of Cellulose. I. Effect of Diamrnonium Phos- phate...

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Hydroxylation of Aryl and Heteroaryl Halides Enabled by the Use of a Palladacycle Precatalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Chi Wai

    A method for the hydroxylation of aryl and heteroaryl halides, promoted by a catalyst based on a biarylphosphine ligand tBuBrettPhos (L5) and its corresponding palladium precatalyst (1), is described. The reactions allow ...

  3. COMPARISON OF FAT SOURCES ON DIGESTION AND RUMINAL BIOHYDROGENATION IN CATTLE CONSUMING A FEEDLOT RATION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baber, Jessica

    2014-01-15

    supplemental fats (animal fat, VOP, interphase and phos) on digestion and biohydrogenation of the ration, the fatty acid profile reaching the duodenum, and on the profile of absorbed fatty acids. Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated Angus steers were used...

  4. The effect of 2 mMol glutamine supplementation on HSP70 and TNF-a release by LPS stimulated blood from healthy children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, L.V.; Pathan, N.; Meyer, R.; Wright, V.J.; Habibi, P.

    2014-12-23

    the efficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributing to the bioenergetics failure of the mitochondria (a feature of critical illness), where engorged mitochondria are not able to meet adenosine tri phos- phate demands of tissues, resulting in cell...

  5. Filling Narrow Trenches by Iodine-Catalyzed CVD of Copper and Manganese on Manganese Nitride Barrier/Adhesion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electromigration.1,2 The dual-damascene process, which involves copper electroplating in preformed trenches deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD), the electroplating process has the ability to fill sub

  6. Molecular Physics, Vol. 104, No. 8, 20 April 2006, 12491266 Quantum logic gates in iodine vapor using timefrequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    ) We present a numerical investigation of the implementation of quantum logic gates through time. Possible experimental constraints are investigated, including the necessary precision in the timing the implementation of a sequence of quantum operations. The results of our simulations suggest that TFRCARS

  7. The level of serum protein-bound iodine, its repeatability and relationship to rate of gain in immature beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, George G.

    1958-01-01

    fJxdf$x sxd*, ;dlhxow Jf'*xsGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG 21 9- M*,,fdg lm kf'k*'fhx0 hGJf'*xsGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG F 29 B? Wux dx'fholwsuo; lm f$x hl sxd*, $'lH*'ow fw0 sxd*, f'H*,owGGGG 29 R: M*,,fdg lm fJxdf$x sxd*, ;dlhxowGHl*w0 ol0...owx Jf'*xsF ?F GGGGG 96 mxl Wux dx'fholwsuo; lm NTL hl $fowGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG G 35 I: Wux dx'fholwsuo; lm $fow hl NTLvsxd*, $'lH*'ow fw0 NTLvsxd*, f'H*,owGGGGGGGGGGGGGG GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG 9R 8 : n kl,;fdoslw lm...

  8. Inorg. Chem. 1995,34, 2095-2100 2095 Facile Electrophilic Iodination of Icosahedral Carboranes. Synthesis of Carborane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Zhiping

    , tetragonal, space group Z41/a,a = 9.446(2) A, c = 39.949(8) A, V = 3564.1(1) (6) A, b = 14.9718(6)A, c = 13.4734

  9. A study of the reactions related to the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the iodate-iodine couple 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simic, Radmilo

    1970-01-01

    has 0 been studied from 1G to 50 C, and the temperature coef- ficient was found to be 2. 3 per 10 C, the activation 0 energy being 15. 6 keel/mole. The rate was measured by following oxygen evolution from the mixtures saturated witn respect... - -2. 2x1D was in accord with his 3 previous conclusion. A rate law for Reaction 2 was first proposed by 5 6, 7 Dushman. Abel and co-workers, ' in a revision of Dushman's work, have shown that the rate law is (4) -d [1051f'dt Ftdd 1 Ft ]F" 1 [kdf...

  10. The influence of iodinated casein and high fat diets on the performance and incidence of fatty livers in laying hens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Louis Lee

    1967-01-01

    over the twelve 28-day periods. Egg produc- tion by replicates was calculated. for statistical com- parison of mean hen-day production. Feed consumption was calculated by replicates monthly. Zt was expressed as average feed consumption per bird per... not only depressed feed consumption and conse- quently choline consumption, but also increased. the choliz:e requirement. As a result, egg production was depressed in this treatment. When 100 gzams of Pzotamone was add. ed to the high energy diet (diet...

  11. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  12. 129 Iodine: A New Hydrologic Tracer for Aquifer Recharge Conditions Influenced by River Flow Rate and Evapotranspiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, K. A.; Santschi, P. H.; Moran, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    To better study frequency related e?ects such as attenuation and tuning, we developed a frequency dependent seismic re?ection analysis. Comprehensive tests on full waveform synthetics and observations from the Teal South ...

  13. Forcing of Turing Patterns in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction with Strong Visible Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Light Raphael Nagao,, Irving R. Epstein, and Milos Dolnik*, Department of Chemistry and Volen Center to illumination by strong white light. Intense illumination results in an increase of [I- ], in contrast with black and white stripes, a dark state with high [I- ] is produced in the illuminated domain and a light

  14. Ab initio potential energy curves of the valence, Rydberg, and ion-pair states of iodine monochloride, ICl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalemos, Apostolos; Prosmiti, Rita

    2014-09-14

    We present for the first time a coherent ab initio study of 39 states of valence, Rydberg, and ion-pair character of the diatomic interhalogen ICl species through large scale multireference variational methods including spin-orbit effects coupled with quantitative basis sets. Various avoided crossings are responsible for a non-adiabatic behaviour creating a wonderful vista for its theoretical description. Our molecular constants are compared with all available experimental data with the aim to assist experimentalists especially in the high energy regime of up to ?95?000 cm{sup ?1}.

  15. Chirped pulse enhancement of multiphoton absorption in molecular iodine Vladislav V. Yakovlev, Christopher J. Bardeen, Jianwe Che, Jianshu Cao,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    - hancement results from a combination of wave packet mo- tion and the position-dependent energy detuning considerations and model calculations suggest that wave packet dynamics play an important role. © 1998 American impor- tance of multiphoton absorption, coupled with recent ad- vances in ultrafast laser technology

  16. Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.korinthenberg@uniklinik-freiburg.d [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Neuburger, Daniela [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido [Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Neurocentre, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

  17. The effect of vitamin B 12 and various levels of iodine in the diet of growing chicks and mature hens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banta, Edward Mack

    1957-01-01

    ~. $0?0 age. 10?0 ags? 1000. 0 age. 1?4 gas, 4. 0 gae. 1000. 0 ags. 10, 0 ags, l?4 gas? 0. 8 ag? S?0 ags? 8?0 gas? 1. 0 ag? The% V CCWPQSITIl% OF SYSTINTIC RINRRAL RIXTSRR INORRDIS Calciua Ca! boaate (CaCC$) Dioalciuu Phosphate (Ca+%4... LRHQRN RRN RSOS AVNRJSR OROUP SWSRR NO+ RRSS QIST RATCB NUBBSR TILITI kBILITI NSOS PNRTILR (4-mena HWOSTR SRT BOSS PSRIOQ) Pire) Basal 8 Vftaaia SIR 1SSO SSS 4 Basal 8 Pish lss Solubles SS, O Sd. e e Pish Soimies A Vftaain Blg RSS 14V SOTS...

  18. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    NICKEL ARSENIDE SULFIDE NICKEL CARBONYL NICKEL REFINERY DUSTsulfide iodine pentafluoride methyl bromide methyl chloride methyl silane nickel carbonylsulfide iodine pentafluoride methyl bromide methyl chloride methyl silane nickel carbonyl

  19. THERMODYNAMIC TABLES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION, V.1: AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Silvester, L.F.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen . Iodine Iron Lanthanum .. Chlorine had Neptunium .. Nickel Nitrogen .. Oxygen .. Palladium .Hydrogen Iodine Iridium * Iron Key Values Lanthanum Lead Magnesium Manganese * Molybdenum * Neodymium * Neptunium Nickel Nitrogen Oxygen Palladium

  20. Analysis of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1957-58. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudge, J. F.

    1958-01-01

    - West rganite Hu-Nite Sol Mission Mr. N. Mule Na-Churs Naturizer Nichols Nitra-Phos Nitro-Form N. 0. M. N-Rich-R Nu-Green Nurish Old Black Joe Old Dutch Mill Oleander Org U Phos Ortho Ortho-Gro Ozark Palo Duro Pasturgro P. D. Q.... Pelleform Phillips 66 Plainsman Plantabbs Plantation Plant-Gro Plantrons of the den 3W I n-- - --- Sul- Swf Swf Swf cT---4? Red Steer Reliance Reuter's Spe Robot Gardn R S. S. Ruhm's Scott's Sequestrene Shur-Crop Shur-Green Sod...

  1. Savorphos as an All Natural Phosphate Replacer in Water and Oil Based Marinades for Rotisserie Birds and Boneless-Skinless Breast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casco Montenegro, Gerardo

    2013-05-03

    attributes negatively (Keeton et al., 2003; Fernandez-Gines et al., 2004; Aleson-Carbonell et al., 2005). SavorPhos is a proprietary blend of all natural flavorings, citrus flour, and less than two percent of sodium carbonate as a processing aid... phosphates, provided they are used as recommended. New products are being created and tested, and are found to be as functional as phosphate blends. SavorPhos is a proprietary blend of all natural flavorings, citrus flour, and less than 2% of sodium...

  2. 326 IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUMELECTRONICS, VOL. QE-18, NO. 3, MARCH 1982 CW Iodine Ion Laser Excited by an Electron Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    by an Electron Beam Abstract-CW laser oscillation has been obtained on the 5760.7 and 6127.5 A transitions of a dc electron beam created plasma as a new active medium for CW ion lasers. We report in this paper the generation of CW laser os- cillation in a He-12gas mixture using electron beam pumping. CW laser radiation

  3. Bromine and iodine chemistry in a global chemistry-climate model: description and evaluation of very short-lived oceanic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    2007. World Meteorological Organization (WMO): Scientific2011. World Meteorological Organization (WMO): Scientific2003. World Meteorological Organization (WMO): Scientific

  4. Bromine and iodine chemistry in a global chemistry-climate model: description and evaluation of very short-lived oceanic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    ical Data for Atmospheric Chemistry: Supplement VIII,Species Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry, J. Phys. Chem.cal data for atmospheric chemistry: web version February

  5. Mature Follow-Up for High-Risk Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Sublobar Resection and Intraoperative Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colonias, Athanasios, E-mail: acolonia@wpahs.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Betler, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Trombetta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bigdeli, Ghazaleh [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Keenan, Robert [Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Werts, E. Day; Parda, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Drexel University College of Medicine, Allegheny Campus, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Allegheny General Hospital experience of high-risk Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with sublobar resection and intraoperative {sup 125}I Vicryl mesh brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 5, 1996 and February 19, 2008, 145 patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who were not lobectomy candidates because of cardiopulmonary compromise underwent sublobar resection and placement of {sup 125}I seeds along the resection line. The {sup 125}I seeds embedded in Vicryl suture were attached with surgical clips to a sheet of Vicryl mesh, inserted over the target area, and prescribed to a 0.5-cm planar margin. Results: The mean target area, total activity, number of seeds implanted, and prescribed total dose was 33.3 cm{sup 2} (range, 18.0-100.8), 20.2 mCi (range, 11.1-29.7), 46 (range, 30-100), and 117 Gy (range, 80-180), respectively. The median length of the surgical stay was 6 days (range, 1-111), with a perioperative mortality rate of 3.4%. At a median follow-up of 38.3 months (range, 1-133), 6 patients had developed local recurrence (4.1%), 9 had developed regional failure (6.2%), and 25 had distant failure (17.2%). On multivariate analysis, no patient- or tumor-specific factors or surgical or dosimetric factors were predictive of local recurrence. The overall median survival was 30.5 months with a 3- and 5-year overall survival rate of 65% and 35%, respectively. Conclusion: {sup 125}I brachytherapy for high-risk, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer after sublobar resection is well tolerated and associated with a low local failure rate.

  6. Bromine and iodine chemistry in a global chemistry-climate model: description and evaluation of very short-lived oceanic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Geophys. Res. , 106, 32401– Rayner, N. A. , Parker, D. E. ,atures and sea-ice extent (Rayner et al. , 2003) are set as

  7. Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

    2012-01-01

    The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

  8. Energy Deposition and Nanodosimetry of Iodine-125 and Tin-117m Labeled Gold Nanoparticles: A Computational Model Using Geant4-DNA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulley, Marina Lee

    2015-08-12

    of metastatic cancer is evolving, and therapeutic strategies need to evolve with it. Gold nanoparticles have been extensively used in the medical field. In this study, gold nanoparticles containing Auger emitting radionuclides of 125I or 117mSn were modeled...

  9. Investigating a Back Door Mechanism of Actin Phosphate Release by Steered Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wriggers, Willy

    - dependent self-assembly in the cell cytoplasm plays an important role in processes involving cell motility.1Investigating a Back Door Mechanism of Actin Phosphate Release by Steered Molecular Dynamics Willy-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois ABSTRACT In actin-based cell motility, phos- phate (Pi) release after ATP hydrolysis

  10. Integrative Genomic Approaches Identify IKBKE as a Breast Cancer Oncogene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that activation of the ERK and phos- phatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling path- ways cooperate to transform T (LT) and small t (ST) oncoproteins, and an activated allele of H-RAS (H-RASV12 ) render a wide range exhibited by human epi- thelial cancers complicates efforts to identify mutations critical for malignant

  11. Institutt for fysikk og teknologi High p T Physics in Heavy Ion Collisions at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are studied and compared to other experiments and model calculations. Finally, an outlook on high p T physics; Acknowledgments First I would like to express my sincerest gratitude to my advisor, Prof. Dieter Rohrich. Since on the data acquisition system for the PHOS beam test. I am particularly grateful to Dr. Mikhail Ippolitov

  12. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B 120 (1998) 1726 Integrating metabolic pathway fluxes with gene-to-enzyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClelland, Grant B.

    1998-01-01

    pathways and is consistent with the `economic design' expectations of symmorphosis. (ii) In the glycolytic factor 5; MyoD, myoblast differentiation regulatory protein; PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex; PFK, phospoglucomutase; PHOS, glycogen phosphorylase; PK, pyruvate kinase; VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor

  13. TL1A induces the expression of TGF-b-inducible gene h3 (big-h3) through PKC, PI3K, and ERK in THP-1 cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won-Ha

    TL1A induces the expression of TGF-b-inducible gene h3 (big-h3) through PKC, PI3K, and ERK in THP-1 of protein kinase C (PKC), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphoinositide kinase-3 (PI3K blocked the phos- phorylation of AKT without affecting ERK phosphorylation. On the other hand, suppression

  14. A Lipid-modified Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (TcPI-PLC) Is Involved in Differentiation of Trypomastigotes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Randall

    A Lipid-modified Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C (TcPI-PLC) Is Involved C (PI- PLC) is an important component of the inositol phos- phate/diacylglycerol signaling pathway. A newly discov- ered Trypanosoma cruzi PI-PLC (TcPI-PLC) is lipid modified in its N terminus, targeted

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600263

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xumu

    Palladium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation DOI: 10.1002/anie.200600263 A Highly Enantioselective, Pd­TangPhos- Catalyzed Hydrogenation of N-Tosylimines** Qin Yang, Gao Shang, Wenzhong Gao, Jingen Deng, and Xumu Zhang to the asymmetric hydrogenation of imines. However, this method has been less successful than the hydrogenation

  16. Microchemical systems for singlet oxygen generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Tyrone F. (Tyrone Frank), 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Lasers (COIL) are a technology of interest for industrial and military audiences. COILs are flowing gas lasers where the gain medium of iodine atoms is collisionally pumped by singlet delta oxygen ...

  17. MAP Estimation with Gaussian Mixture Markov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;§Dual energy CT example · 12 clusters. · Display 2 dimensions out of 8 · Water/iodine decomposition GMM

  18. Novel 125 I production and recovery system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Adwitiya

    2009-05-15

    ????????????......... 32 5 Recovery of iodine versus initial mass (measured by spectrometry).............. 33 6 Recovery of iodine following distillation of extracted solution (measured by NAA)????????????????????????? ...... 34 7 Iodine recovery from... (6) In both cases the new isotope will carry the same mass number but a different atomic number than its parent. The iodine-125 formed will now undergo electron capture and decay to stable tellurium-125 completing the radioactive decay process...

  19. Looking before we leap: an ongoing, quantative investigation of asteroid and comet impact hazard mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huebner, Walter F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    There are many outstanding questions about the correct response to an asteroid or comet impact threat on Earth. Nuclear munitions are currently thought to be the most efficient method of delivering an impact-preventing impulse to a potentially hazardous object (PHO). However, there are major uncertainties about the response of PHOs to a nuclear burst, and the most appropriate ways to use nuclear munitions for hazard mitigation.

  20. Thyroid status of dogs continuously exposed to one-half atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David Harris

    1966-01-01

    , Thyroid Counts 2. External Monitoring, Rump Counts 3. Packed Cell Volumes Page 46 47 4. Mean Body Weight 5. Serum 17-Hydroxycorticosteroids 6. Serum Protein-Bound Iodine 47 48 48 7. Iodine-131 Uptake Mean Values, Pre-experimental 49 8. Iodine.... Graded "High Activity" 54 14. Unapparent Endoplasmic Reticulum Cysternae. Graded "Low Activity" 54 15. High Cuboidal Cell Shape. Graded "High Activity" 55 16. Low Flattened Cell Shape. Graded "Low Activity 55 17. Large Cytoplasmic Granules...

  1. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver Functionalized Aerogel Nick Soelberg Tony Watson MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES aerogel iodine...

  2. Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson 12 MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES aerogel; iodine...

  3. Project Status: Hawai'i National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUNDED - Ozone - Iodine bubbles · Turbine purchase, installation, shakedown - $1.7M unfunded - · Power Cycle / Dynamics Testing - $2.2M unfunded - #12;

  4. Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-10-26

    This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

  5. Fundus image fusion in EYEPLAN software: an evaluation of a novel technique for ocular melanoma radiation treatment planning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    melanoma radiation I125 brachytherapy ver- sus helium ionions versus iodine 125 brachytherapy in the management ofmelanoma treatment with brachytherapy. 26–28 One of the

  6. Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakao, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Saunders, R. W. : Atmospheric Chemistry of Iodine, Chemicalmodelling: a review, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 5,emerging issues, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 5155-

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wainwright, Katlyn E.

    2008-01-01

    M. Pavlo. 2005. Do iodine water purification tablets provideof Toxoplasma gondii in water from wells located on farms.Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water. App. Environ. Micro. 73,

  8. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation...

  9. Active Phosphoric Acid and Its Relation to the Needs of the Soil for Phosphoric Acid in Pot Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1909-01-01

    . These, and 1~recipitatecl calciunl pliospl~ate, wpre .use(-7, Pho.cpl/crf~ of -47~imin~in1.---TT'avellite, 4-IlPO,, ?Al(OH) 3+ 1ZH,O I~asic aluminium phos1)liate. variscite, ,11PO, + 2H,O all~minium phosphate, ancl 13rwipitaterl alluilinium pl..., for most of the arorli was done with this solvent, v-e find that the phosphates of lime are completely soluble, the precipitated phosphates of iron and aluminium are completely soluble, and virianite and triplite are nearlv so. The aluminium phosphates...

  10. Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold during 1956-57. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudge, J. F.

    1957-01-01

    . The grade of fertilizers should be part of the name of the product; for example, Jupiter Brand Super- phosphate D-20-0 or Mars Brand 5-10-5 Ferti- lizer. Labels The law requires the following information to be printed on the bag or on a tag attached... Anchor Aqua c A rradi: * -. - - - - - Arkans Quali Ark-Mc ,'Zrmoul 4 -----. r\\ero-rhos 12gco Agri-Chem Agri-Sul ,\\]I-Weather Phos d a try Ln as Farmers ity ) r Pebble .~rn~uur Rig Crop .\\mow Atlas Ractex Ral-Jac Randini Best...

  11. The effect of fertilizer treatments on several amino acids of Dallis grass grown in the Gulf Coast region of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, Wilfred Leo

    1956-01-01

    blook experiment with twelve treatments each replioated four times. It was set up as a pasture fertilizer test with sulfur, sources of phosphorus and lime used as fertilizer for the treatments. Table 1 gives the field randomiza- tion of the twelve... Super and 46 Sulfur Lime and Super 47 Hock Phos. and Sulfur Super Lime and Super and Sulfur Rock Pbos. 1954. The spr1ng and summer had been especially dry at the location of this test; therefore the forage d1d not have good growth...

  12. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 32: 375395, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Glasow, Roland

    Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 32: 375­395, 1999. © 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 375 Iodine Chemistry and its Role in Halogen Activation and Ozone Loss in the Marine Boundary set of reactions treating the gas and aqueous phase chemistry of the most important iodine species

  13. Ethyl iodide decomposition on Cu(1 1 1) and Cu(2 2 1) Dougyong Sung, Andrew J. Gellman *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Received 18 and adsorbed iodine atoms. The ethyl groups decompose by b-hydride elimination to desorb as ethylene leaving adsorbed iodine atoms. The kinetics of b-hydride elimination on the Cu(2 2 1) surface are similar to those

  14. Recent Experiments and Post-Discharge Modeling of the ElectricOIL Laser System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    ) used to pump the iodine was produced by a radio frequency excited electric discharge. The electric of a hybrid electrically powered oxygen-iodine laser have been performed with electric discharges to produce Gas Mixing Section NO2Electrical Power Heat rf Discharge NO He Flow Exhaust N2I2 Supersonic Nozzle

  15. Milestone Report - M4FT-14OR0312022 - Co-absorption studies - Design system complete/test plan complete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Spencer, Barry B.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this test plan is to describe research that will determine the effectiveness of silver mordenite and molecular sieve beds to remove iodine and water (tritium) from off-gas streams arising from used nuclear fuel recycling processes, and to demonstrate that the iodine and water can be recovered separately from one another.

  16. Aerosol Releases from the ICPP July 2005 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1 4.2 Major Alpha-emitting Nuclides........................................................................... 4-5 5.0 Nuclides Comprising the BETA-MINUS IODINE Readings ............................................................... 5-4 5.4 Calculation Procedure and Nuclides Comprising the Beta-minus Iodine Material in Ra

  17. Hierarchical Trigger of the ALICE Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Hans [CERN, Geneva, Switzerland; Awes, Terry C [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high p{sub T} photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high p{sub T} gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  18. SU-E-T-56: Brain Metastasis Treatment Plans for Contrast-Enhanced Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, L; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Vautrin, M; Benkebil, M; Sihanath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iodine-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of an iodinated contrast agent in brain tumors with irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays. The aim of this study is to compare dynamic stereotactic arc-therapy and iodineenhanced SSRT. Methods: Five patients bearing brain metastasis received a standard helical 3D-scan without iodine. A second scan was acquired 13 min after an 80 g iodine infusion. Two SSRT treatment plans (with/without iodine) were performed for each patient using a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning system (TPS) based on the ISOgray TPS. Ten coplanar beams (6×6 cm2, shaped with collimator) were simulated. MC statistical error objective was less than 5% in the 50% isodose. The dynamic arc-therapy plan was achieved on the Iplan Brainlab TPS. The treatment plan validation criteria were fixed such that 100% of the prescribed dose is delivered at the beam isocentre and the 70% isodose contains the whole target volume. The comparison elements were the 70% isodose volume, the average and maximum doses delivered to organs at risk (OAR): brainstem, optical nerves, chiasma, eyes, skull bone and healthy brain parenchyma. Results: The stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy remains the best technique in terms of dose conformation. Iodine-enhanced SSRT presents similar performances to dynamic arc-therapy with increased brainstem and brain parenchyma sparing. One disadvantage of SSRT is the high dose to the skull bone. Iodine accumulation in metastasis may increase the dose by 20–30%, allowing a normal tissue sparing effect at constant prescribed dose. Treatment without any iodine enhancement (medium-energy stereotactic radiotherapy) is not relevant with degraded HDVs (brain, parenchyma and skull bone) comparing to stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy. Conclusion: Iodine-enhanced SSRT exhibits a good potential for brain metastasis treatment regarding the dose distribution and OAR criteria.

  19. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    ) Treatment of iodide A with water gives a product B with no iodine atom. Amazingly, it also has no OH groups of heat is produced. If one burns compound B, a different amount of heat is produced. Which compound gives

  20. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 509 (2003) 315320 X-ray imaging with a silicon microstrip detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    2003-01-01

    applications to dual energy mammography and angiography, is presented. A silicon microstrip detector with 100, such as mammography and angiogra- phy at the iodine K-edge, the dual energy technique makes it possible to isolate

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd

    2011-01-01

    be done with both dual-energy and fluorescent tomography atsensitivity of the dual energy tomography technique at themake. However, using the dual energy mode at the iodine edge

  2. Combinatorial design and synthesis of peptidomimics and small molecules for protein-protein interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chihyo

    2007-04-25

    pharmacophores and to adjust the solubilities of the products. The fluorinated template also gave libraries of cyclic peptidomimetics on solid phase in good yields and purities. These libraries have improved water solubility over the iodinated libraries. The 3...

  3. APPENDIX A Acronyms, Abbreviations, Symbols, and Notation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constant capacitance (adsorption) model CDTA Trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane tetra-acetic acid CEAM Center Hafnium Hg Mercury Ho Holmium I Iodine In Indium Ir Iridium K Potassium Kr Krypton La Lanthanum Li Lithium

  4. Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

  5. CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF PELLET-CLADDING INTERACTION IN LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    in LWR Fuel Pods Relevant to PCI Failures", paper presented1981). D. R. Olander, "Is PCI an Iodine SCC Phenomenon?" ,pellet-cladding interaction(PCI) in light water reactor fuel

  6. CORRECTING ILLUMINATION VARIATIONS IN PHOTOMICROGRAPH MOSAICS OF DAGUERREOTYPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    polished silver plate made light sen- sitive by iodine vapors and exposed in camera could form a direct positive image when exposed to mercury fumes. Heated mercury vapor condensed on the plate and combined

  7. Hypothetical Reactor Accident Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POPULATIONS; IODINE 131; MELTDOWN; METEOROLOGY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; P CODES; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIATION in a Typical BWR and in a typical PWR. Comparison with WASH-1400 by C F . Højerup 202 APPENDIX 3. Calculation

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    related to nuclear science and technology (2) iodine (2) molecules (2) pulses (2) solvents (2) synchrotrons (2) x radiation (2) x-ray diffraction (2) xfel, inst (2) basic...

  9. ATMOSPHERIC SOURCE TERMS FOR THE IDAHO CHEMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................................. 1-1 1.2.1 Operational RaLa Releases............................................................................................... 2-9 2.5 Iodine and Other Fission Product Distribution Tests ................................................ 2-20 2.7 Off-Gas Flow System

  10. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 4158-4200; doi:10.3390/ijerph110404158 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    by the United States government and other governments with nuclear reactors is probably ineffective. Thus we are at risk for iodine deficiency disorder (IDD), the world's leading cause of preventable brain damage

  11. MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrouzet, Stephen 1987-

    2011-04-21

    analysis of the vessel’s response to the implant with greater sensitivity and specificity while reducing beam-hardening artifact from stent struts. The developed staining techniques included iodine-potassium iodide, phosphomolybdic acid...

  12. Initial Assessment of the Consolidation of Chalcogels into a Viable Waste Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-08-31

    This report provides some preliminary data for the consolidation of chalcogen-based aerogels. The chalcogels tested to date at PNNL show great promise as iodine sorbents and preliminary consolidation research shows that they can be melted into a phase-pure glass at moderate temperatures. The preliminary consolidation experiments show that these materials might attack fused quartz so an alternative crucible material will likely need to be used to prevent this. The next steps will be to • Consider melting other chalcogel chemistries, e.g., Sn-Sb-S, Ge-Sn-S chalcogels • Consider melting chalcogels with adsorbed iodine to monitor iodine loss during melting • Optimize the consolidation temperatures to minimize the iodine loss and volatilization

  13. Assessing beef hide interventions as a means to reduce carcass contamination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Bridget Elaine

    2007-04-25

    following a water wash. Treatments (distilled water, isopropyl alcohol, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% L-lactic acid, 1% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and 10% Povidone-iodine) then were applied to each section and sampled for aerobic plate counts (APCs...

  14. Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerme, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

  15. Precision absolute frequency laser spectroscopy of argon II in parallel and antiparallel geometry using a frequency comb for calibration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lioubimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-14

    important reference lines. In the current work we conducted absolute measurements of spectral lines of Ar ions using parallel and antiparallel geometries. To provide a reference for the laser wavelength iodine saturation spectroscopy was used. The precision...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes from nuclear facilities iodine (1) nuclear fuel cycle and fuel materials (1) nuclear fuel cycle and fuel materials deep-bed adsorption...

  17. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  18. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

    1984-04-27

    The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Mariela E. Sola Horacio G. Rotstein Julio C. Baza n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotstein, Horacio G.

    (s)/AgI(s)/graphite solid cell as iodine sensor: speed of response and use of Cs-doped AgI as electrolyte Received: 19 both pure AgI and CsI doped AgI as electrolyte. The use of doped silver iodide expanded considerably Iodine sensor á Doped electrolyte á Time response Introduction It is already well known [1, 2, 3

  20. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 2. External neutron- and gamma flux measurements by sample activation. Section 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggers, W.A.; Brown, L.J.

    1985-09-01

    The Greenhouse operation consisted of a series of four shots conducted at Eniwetok during the Srping of 1951. The external neutron threshold measurements consisted of the use of good samples to measure integrated thermal neutron fluxes and sulfur, iodine, and zirconium samples to measure fluxes of higher-energy neutrons. The iodine also measured high-energy gamma-ray intensity. Measurements were also made on slow- and fast-neutron intensities as a function of time.

  1. Nutritive Value of Foods. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anoymous,

    1982-01-01

    5atu- u .... tu,118d Carbo- Calcium Phos- Iron (e) Pn ant 42 52 37 37 37 79 79 79 82 80 54 48 49 18 18 18 41 72 74 31 37 39 42 43 48 81 81 74 74 energy rated Oleic Lino- hydrate phorul (Iulol/) leic (0) (E) (F) (G...) (H) (I) (J) (K) (L) (M) Coli? C,ams C'olms C,ams C,ams C,ams C'olInS Mil/i- Mil/i- Mil/i ? uri~s g,ams g,ams g'olms 100 115 115 70 455 235 220 205 165 125 100 90 80 455 25 130 100 430 340 110 105 105 95 95 8f) 315 20 470...

  2. Study of the neutral mesons in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucia Leardini; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2014-12-05

    The $\\pi^{0}$ and $\\eta$ meson production in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV is studied with the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The $\\pi^{0}$ invariant yields and nuclear modification factor $R_{\\mbox{AA}}$ are presented here in six centrality classes. The results are a combined measurement using the Photon Conversion Method (PCM) and the PHOS detector, in the transverse momentum range 0.4 $studied in different centrality classes and compared with results from experiments at lower energies, both as a function of transverse momentum. The $\\eta$ meson production is studied using the PCM and the EMCal detector. The combination of the individual results will make possible the measurement of the $\\eta$ differential invariant cross section as a function of transverse momentum from 1 to 22 GeV/$c$ in different centrality classes.

  3. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  4. Complete Phase I Tests As Described in the Multi-lab Test Plan for the Evaluation of CH3I Adsorption on AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, S. H.; Jubin, R. T.

    2014-09-30

    Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified as a potential sorbent for iodine present in the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In such a facility, both elemental and organic forms of iodine are released from the dissolver in gaseous form. These species of iodine must be captured with high efficiency for a facility to avoid radioactive iodine release above regulatory limits in the gaseous effluent of the plant. Studies completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) examined the adsorption of organic iodine in the form of CH3I by AgZ. Upon breakthrough of the feed gas through the sorbent bed, elemental iodine was observed in the effluent stream, despite the fact that the only source of iodine in the system was the CH3I in the feed gas.1 This behavior does not appear to have been reported previously nor has it been independently confirmed. Thus, as a result of these prior studies, multiple knowledge gaps relating to the adsorption of CH3I by AgZ were identified, and a multi-lab test plan, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), INL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories, was formulated to address each in a systematic way.2 For this report, the scope of work for ORNL was further narrowed to three thin-bed experiments that would characterize CH3I adsorption onto AgZ in the presence of water, NO, and NO2. Completion of these three-thin bed experiments demonstrated that organic iodine in the form of CH3I was adsorbed by reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) to a 50% higher loading than that of I2 when adsorbed from a dry air stream. Adsorption curves suggest different adsorption mechanisms for I2 and CH3I. In the presence of NO and NO2 gas, the loading of CH3I onto Ag0Z is suppressed and may be reversible. Further, the presence of NO and NO2 gas appears to oxidize CH3I to I2; this is indicated by an adsorption curve similar to that of I2 on Ag0Z. Finally, the loss of organic iodine loading capacity by Ag0Z in the presence of NOx is unaffected by the addition of water vapor to the gas stream; no marked additional loss in capacity or retention was observed.

  5. Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tina M. Nenoff; Mark Rodriguez; Nick Soelberg; Karena W. Chapman

    2014-12-01

    The effective capture and storage of radiological iodine (129I) remains a strong concern for safe nuclear waste storage and safe nuclear energy. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for iodine capture. In nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, complex gas streams will be present and the need for high selectivity of all iodine containing compounds is of the utmost importance for safety and the environment. In particular, a molecular level understanding of the sorption of organic iodine compounds is not well understood. Here we probe the structure and distribution of methyl iodide sorbed by silver-containing MOR using a combination of crystallographic and materials characterization techniques including: infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, Micro-X-ray Fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. The iodine is captured inside the MOR pore in the form of AgI nanoparticles, that is consistent with the pores sizes of the MOR, indicating that the molecule is both physically and chemically captured in the Ag-MOR. The organic component is surface catalyzed by the zeolite via the formation of Surface Methoxy Species (SMS) that result in downstream organics of dimethyl ether and methanol formation.

  6. Reactions of methyl groups on a non-reducible metal oxide: The reaction of iodomethane on stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Yujung; Brooks, John D.; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R.; Cox, David F.

    2015-06-10

    The reaction of iodomethane on the nearly stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane, and surface iodine adatoms. The reaction is first initiated by the dissociation of iodomethane into surface methyl fragments, -CH3, and iodine adatoms. Methyl fragments bound at surface Cr cation sites undergo a rate-limiting dehydrogenation reaction to methylene, =CH2. The methylene intermediates formed from methyl dehydrogenation can then undergo coupling reactions to produce ethylene via two principle reaction pathways: (1) direct coupling of methylene and (2) methylene insertion into the methyl surface bond to form surface ethyl groups which undergo ?-H elimination to produce ethylene. Themore »liberated hydrogen also combines with methyl groups to form methane. Iodine adatoms from the dissociation of iodomethane deactivate the surface by simple site blocking of the surface Cr3+ cations.« less

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  12. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Fission product source terms for the LWR loss-of-coolant accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1980-07-01

    Models for cesium and iodine release from light-water reactor (LWR) fuel rods failed in steam were formulated based on experimental fission product release data from several types of failed LWR fuel rods. The models were applied to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) undergoing a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) temperature transient. Calculated total iodine and cesium releases from the fuel rods were 0.053 and 0.025% of the total reactor inventories of these elements, respectively, with most of the release occurring at the time of rupture. These values are approximately two orders of magnitude less than releases used in WASH-1400, the Reactor Safety Study.

  14. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  15. Failure of the Shockley-Haynes Mobility Experiment with organic semiconducting materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehme, Hollis Clyde

    1961-01-01

    of the teflon cylinder was 0. 20$ cm + 0. 00$ cm whioh was slight- ly smaller than the graphite rods used, This arrapgement provided an airtight seal to prevent the sublimation of iodine from the samples after pressing Small holes were drilled through...-iodine was lower than that reported, The upper limit of 3000 lb/i. n for the pressure used to 2 oompress the samples was dictated by the graphite rods used and the wall thickness of the teflon oylinders. Pressures above $000 lb/in oaused either the ends...

  16. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the “effective K{sub d}” for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PA’s conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, supplement au n6, Tome 44, juin 1983 page C3-687

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Renewables Division, Building 701, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, U.S.A. Résumé - Nous or iodine vapor at Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC02, U.S.A. Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphyscol

  18. CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    of heat is produced. If one burns compound B, a different amount of heat is produced. Which compound gives means. E Starting Material Alkene Products A #12;Name: -7- 4) (15 pts) a) Treatment of iodide A with water gives a product B with no iodine atom. Amazingly, it also has no OH groups! Propose a structure

  19. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 514 (2003) 206214 A silicon strip detector coupled to the RX64 ASIC for X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    2003-01-01

    , such as mammography and angiography at the iodine K-edge, the dual energy technique [3] makes it possible to isolate. The system is capable of single photon counting in digital X-ray imaging, with possible applications to dual energy mammography and angiography. The main features of the detecting system are low noise, good spatial

  20. 11 August 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 326 2000 110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    11 August 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 326 2000 1­10 www.elsevier.nlrlocatercplett Imaging-2025, USA Received 20 April 2000; in final form 7 June 2000 The memory of Kent R. Wilson, one of whose many-frequency plane. We illustrate this for the rovibronic coherence of molecular iodine in the gas phase. q 2000

  1. O R E G O N of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Hanford's iodine-131, researchers studied a group of people with a wide range of radiation doses to the thyroid, from higher doses to low doses. All of the participants were from the Hanfordregion. Inthisway,researchers to a potentially harmful agent such as radiation. HTDS RESEARCH TEAM The HTDS was managed by the Centers

  2. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  3. Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Neklyudov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin; O. P. Ledenyov

    2013-01-24

    The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a developed experimental model of the iodine air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules.

  4. SHUKLA ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    Graduate School, School of Materials Science and Engineering, § Energy Research Institute, ) Division in energy harvest- ing systems such as in sensitized solar cells,5 as a catalyst for oxygen reduction6 Iron Pyrite Thin Film Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: High Efficiency for Iodine

  5. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 883895, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/883/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    molecular iodine emissions in a coastal marine environment: the link to new particle formation A. Saiz has been the subject of numerous studies over the past two decades (Chameides and Davis, 1980; Jenkin in the fine aerosol mode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that in the coarse mo

  6. X-ray phase-contrast CO angiography for sub-10 m vessel imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation dose. In this paper we further investigate the potential and limitations of this method times less radiation dose than conventional iodine-based absorption contrast for observing sub-50 m (Lundstr¨om et al 2012). In this paper we demonstrate such low-dose imaging of microvasculature down to 8 m

  7. A literature Review on Radioactivity Transfer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , resuspension, and translocation are the transfer processes dis- cussed. Theory and experimental data; IODINE 131; MATHEMAT- ICAL MODELS; PARTICLE RESUSPENSION; PLANTS; PRECIPITATION SCAV- ENGING 53 6.2. Retention during initial phase 53 6.3. Weathering 55 7. RESUSPENSION 60 7.1. Introduction 60

  8. This is the author's version of a work that was submitted/accepted for pub-lication in the following source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Paul

    particles such as electrons and neutrons, since small objects like electrons and neutrons behave very important in monitoring climate change, for example satellites use microwave radiation to measure a computer system for planning the implantation of radioactive iodine pellets in people with aggressive forms

  9. Noninvasive Monitoring of Local Drug Release Using X-ray Computed Tomography: Optimization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    profiles of drug-loaded biodegradable implants were noninvasively monitored and characterized using X yielded a sensitivity of 0.21 mg/mL (or 95 mg iodine/mL) for this agent. In vitro validation of the method samples, and/or removed implants.1 The release profile of a particular drug delivery method

  10. A Case for Changing I-131 Transfer Factors Based on Changes in Dairy Industry Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dromgoole, Lainy Elizabeth

    2013-02-01

    in the biological system. TFs exist for several radionuclides but special attention is paid to isotopes which might enter our food chain following a radiological event. Iodine-131 is one of these radionuclides and if ingested by a cow, it will pass through...

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1332713335, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/13327/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    microalgae species U. R. Thorenz1,*, L. J. Carpenter2, R.-J. Huang1,3,4, M. Kundel1, J. Bosle1, and T and microalgae play a dom- inant role in the emission of these compounds (Carpenter et al., 1999; Huang et al microalgae species Since molecular iodine and iodocarbons are photochemi- cally unstable (lifetimes between

  12. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: A modeling study for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from-model Death risks The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Japan resulted with iodine isotopes and noble gasses) after nuclear releases. The main purpose is to provide preliminary

  13. Validating Annual Growth Bands of Deep-Sea Black Corals and Calculating Ocean Reservoir Ages from the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohon, Leslye M

    2014-08-13

    Deep–sea black corals have been found to be long-lived and grow in a tree like fashion depositing rings in their skeleton that have been suggested to be annual growth bands. Iodine was used in this study to develop a novel dating method to measure...

  14. RIS-M-2299 CALCULATION OF DOSE CONSEQUENCES OF A HYPOTHETICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but there is a failure to isolate the containment. This release is represented by the PWR-4 release. The third and cesium decrease by a decade from BWR-2 to PWR-4, and from PWR-4 to BEED, while the release fractions POPULATIONS; IODINE 131; MELTDOWN; PWR TYPE REAC- TORS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION HAZARDS; RARE GASES

  15. A study of the effect and efficiency of germicides on bacteria that produce ropiness in bread 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashby, Gerald K

    1937-01-01

    , . ~~QIBI (Van graengsa) Holland is not sterilised ly Q chroaio soid, 0. 1+ iodine, or ~ formaldehyde when sub/ected to these agents at 37 G i'or one hoar. 9KggaLaia Suspensions of spores for death rate studies vers prepared as seeded from ths stock...

  16. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  17. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  18. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croes, Kenneth James; Garino, Terry J.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  19. Department of Earth Sciences Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    : Developing sensitive tests for detecting water chemistry changes associated with shale bed methane production in Gas Hydrate Fields: Implications for the Transport of Iodine and Methane in Active Margins" Advisor of the River Thames: Assessing potential adaption strategies. Hydrology Research, vol. 43, pp.902-916. doi: 10

  20. Bryan Balkenbush Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station `Issue'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    on reactor 2 since it used a fuel known as mox or mixed oxide because it contains reclaimed plutonium which of iodine although the EPA states that it is far below levels that would be of concern April 4th : 11,500 : The reactor temperature is approximately 580 degrees Fahrenheit (normal is around 500 degrees, if it were

  1. Bacterial Production Lab State variables and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    . · Bacteria must utilize for growth · Must be able to measure at low concentrations. Low detection limitsI) 8.06 d , Iodine-125 (125I) 60 d Types Helium nuclei Electron Gamma ray For bacterial in counts per min. (CPM) Due to some losses, CPM detection SA: 371 mCi (mmol 14C)-1 Measure

  2. ARTICLE IN PRESS Aerosol and Air Quality Research, x: 1-10, xxxx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ying

    with sulfur, chlorine, or iodine, are the most effective sorbents for mercury capture, especially in systems Capture by Nano-structured Titanium Dioxide Sorbent during Coal Combustion: Lab-scale to Pilot, mercury capture efficiency peaked at 94% at a sorbent feed rate of 71 mg/m3 , with sorbent to coal ratio

  3. Waste Form Release Calculations for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B PETER.

    2005-07-26

    A set of reactive chemical transport calculations was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal system located on the Hanford Site. Two-dimensional simulations were run until the waste form release rates reached a quasi-stationary-state, usually after 2,000 to 4,000 yr. The primary difference between the waste form release simulations for the 2001 ILAW PA, and the simulations described herein, is the number of different materials considered. Whereas the previous PA considered only LAWABP1 glass, the current PA also describes radionuclide release from three different WTP glasses (LAWA44, LAWB45 and LAWC22), two different bulk vitrification glasses (6-tank composite and S-109), and three different grout waste forms (containing Silver Iodide, Barium Iodide and Barium Iodate). All WTP and bulk vitrification glasses perform well. However, the radionuclide release from the salt in the cast refractory surrounding the bulk vitrification waste packages is 2 to 170 times higher than the glass release rate, depending on the water recharge rate. Iodine-129 release from grouted waste forms is highly sensitive to the solubility of the iodine compound contained in the grout. The normalized iodine release rate from grout containing barium iodate is a factor of 10 higher than what the normalized release rate would be if the iodine were contained in LAWA44 glass.

  4. Apple Maturity Protocol Tests for apple flesh firmness and starch conversion are important tools for monitoring crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apple Maturity Protocol Tests for apple flesh firmness and starch conversion are important tools dissolved. A magnetic stir plate with a plastic coated stir bar works well. Add 2.2 grams of iodine crystals the solution on the cut surface of an immature apple. Dip the cut surface for a second or two. It should stain

  5. Method of concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Mark A; Meike, Annemarie; Anderson, Brian L

    2015-04-28

    A system for concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases. Materials are be added (e.g., via coating the ceramic substrate, use of loose powder(s), or other means) to a HEPA filter (ceramic, metal, or otherwise) to collect gases (e.g., radioactive gases such as iodine). The gases could be radioactive, hazardous, or valuable gases.

  6. Microanalysis of the reaction product in Karnovsky and Roots histochemical localization of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, J.P.; Sehgal, S.S.; Malhotra, S.K.

    1982-05-01

    X-ray energy dispersive microanalysis of the reaction product in Karnovsky and Roots histochemical localization of acetylcholinesterase indicated the presence of sulfur, iodine, copper, and iron. The reaction was run in vitro using purified acetylcholinesterase from the electric eel to confirm our previous results on similarly treated neuromuscular junction in situ.

  7. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimmel, J.G. . Social and Economic Sciences Research Center); Beck, D.M. )

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  8. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimmel, J.G.; Beck, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  9. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA); Bosuego, Gail P. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  10. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moding, Everett J. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ghaghada, Ketan [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Johnson, G. Allan [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Badea, Cristian T., E-mail: cristian.badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  11. Carbon aging mechanisms and effects on retention of organic iodides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The activated carbon used to treat the off-gas from the Savannah River Plant prodution reactor building was studied to determine the chemical changes occurring in this carbon during its service life. The carbon is a coconut-shell charcoal impregnated with 1% triethylenediamine (TEDA) and 2% KI. It was known that during its 30-month service life the carbon becomes more acidic and less effective for retaining iodine in organic form. The study showed that the most important change occurring in the carbon is the reaction of KI to give other chemical forms of iodine. The reacted iodine is unavailable for exchange with alkyl iodides. The results suggest that the carbon reacts with KI to form organic compounds, but small amounts of oxidized iodine may also be presnt. There is also evidence that some iodide is lost from the carbon altogether. The TEDA impregnant is lost from the carbon very quickly, and has no importance after a few months. The specific reactions by which the impregnant is lost have not been identified. However, mathematical analysis shows that the carbon performance data are consistent with the reaction of iodide impregnant with impurities in the air flowing through the carbon bed. Additional mathematical analysis, based on electron microscopic observation of the carbon particles, indicates that the external surfaces of the carbon are mainly responsible for their effectiveness in retaining iodine. Consequently, the condition of the impregnants on a relatively small fraction of the carbon surface can have a large effect on its performance. 4 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was observed in solutions with 50 wppm iodine (the actual SHINE process expects 0.1–1 wppm) with the highest corrosion rates (up to ~6 mil/year) observed on specimens exposed in the vapor phase. Lower concentrations of iodine species (5 or 28 wppm) proved much less corrosive, and the planned-interval data indicated that metal corrodibility decreased with time for all immersed exposures and, with one minor exception, all vapor exposures. Little change in susceptibility to corrosion was observed as a result of nitric acid additions to the test environment (simulating radiolysis products). The trend toward reduced corrosion (immersion and vapor phase) with decreasing iodine concentration suggests that, at the expected conditions in the SHINE process, it is unlikely that iodine species will generate a general corrosion concern for the candidate stainless steels.

  13. Charge Transfer Induced Molecular Hole Doping into Thin Film of Metal-Organic-Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Boukhvalov, Danil W; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the highly porous nature with significantly large surface area, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) can be hardly used in electronic, and optoelectronic devices due to their extremely poor electrical conductivity. Therefore, the study of MOF thin films that require electron transport or conductivity in combination with the everlasting porosity is highly desirable. In the present work, thin films of Co3(NDC)3DMF4 MOFs with improved electronic conductivity are synthesized using layer-by-layer and doctor blade coating techniques followed by iodine doping. The as-prepared and doped films are characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, UV/Visible spectroscopy, XPS, current-voltage measurement, photoluminescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and incident photon to current efficiency measurements. In addition, the electronic and semiconductor property of the MOF films are characterized using Hall Effect measurement, which reveals that in contrast to the insulator behavior of the as-prepared MOFs, the iodine doped MOFs ...

  14. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, John H. (La Jolla, CA); Russell, Jr., John L. (La Jolla, CA); Porter, II, John T. (Del Mar, CA); McCorkle, Kenneth H. (Del Mar, CA); Roemer, Thomas S. (Cardiff, CA); Sharp, Robert (Del Mar, CA)

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  15. Purified silicon production system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  16. Distribution of Radioactive Materials in the Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan - 13567

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandergraaf, Tjalle T.; Mamedov, Gudrat G.; Ramazanov, Mahammadali A.; Badalov, Vatan H.; Naghiyev, Jalal A.; Mehdiyeva, Afat A.

    2013-07-01

    The Absheron Peninsula forms the extreme Eastern part of Azerbaijan and juts into the Caspian Sea. The region has a long history of oil and gas exploration, transport, and processing and includes a number of abandoned chemical plants that were used in the separation of iodine from formation waters. As a result of lax environmental standards during the Soviet era, the industrial activity has led to serious contamination from oils residues, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Radiometric surveys performed over a wide range of the Absheron Peninsula showed generally low NORM concentrations. However, radiation levels two to three orders of magnitude above background levels were detected at two abandoned iodine separation plants near the capital city, Baku. These elevated radiation levels are mainly due to Ra-226 and U-238 with lower contributions from Ra-228 and U-235. (authors)

  17. Workshop on development of radionuclide getters for the Yucca Mountain waste repository: proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Lukens, Wayne W. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository, located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility for permanent disposal of spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, and neptunium, all of which are highly mobile in the environment. Containment of these radionuclides within the repository is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). These proceedings review current research and technology efforts for sequestration of the radionuclides with a focus on technetium, iodine, and neptunium. This workshop also covered issues concerning the Yucca Mountain environment and getter characteristics required for potential placement into the repository.

  18. Effect of a liquid multi-vitamin-mineral supplement on anaerobic exercise performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, Andrew C.; Bloomer, Richard J.; Falvo, Michael J.; Moore, Chris A.; Schilling, Brian K.; Weiss, Lawrence W.

    2006-01-01

    IU 150 Vitamin E 45 IU 150 Calcium 60 mg 8 Chromium 150 ?g — Iodine 150 ?g 100 Iron 150 ?g 66 Magnesium 100 mg — Manganese 5 mg — Potassium 100 mg — Selenium 150 ?g — Sodium 5 mg 2 Zinc 23 mg 150 Each 1 oz. serving contains bromide, cerium, cesium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, gallium, germanium, gold, hafnium, holmium, indium, iridium, kjeldhal, lanthanum, lithium, molybde- num, neodymium, nickel...

  19. Environmental Levels Of 129I Present In Bovine Thyroid And Fresh Water In Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Carnellia, P. F. F.; Barbara, E. de; Figueira, J. M.; Fimiani, L.; Heimanna, D. M.; Zalazara, L.; Fernandez Niello, J.; La Gamma, A. M.; Wallner, A.

    2010-08-04

    Concentrations of {sup 129}I in bovine thyroid and fresh water samples coming from all over Argentina were analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and total iodine present in samples by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Once we complete this study, it will be the first set of data of this kind from an extended region of the south American subcontinent.

  20. Soy Isoflavone Supplementation and Biochemical Recurrence After Curative Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camey, Sarah

    2013-08-31

    beam radiation include cystitis, hematuria, incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and secondary malignancies (24). Brachytherapy involves the placement of radioactive seeds directly in the prostate (23,24). The seeds contain iodine or cesium..., non-toxic approach to help prevent or delay biochemical recurrence. Soy and soy isoflavones One novel approach to delaying or preventing biochemical recurrence is the use of soy and soy isoflavones. Soy foods contain a class of phytochemicals known...

  1. Diffusion of vaporous guests into a seemingly non-porous organic crystal

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herbert, Simon A.; Janiak, Agnieszka; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Barbour, Leonard J.

    2014-10-07

    In this research, the tetragonal apohost phase of p-tert-butyltetramethoxythiacalix[4]arene absorbs hydrochloric acid and iodine. These guest molecules occupy different sites in the solid-state structure -- either within the small intrinsic voids of the macrocycle or within the interstitial spaces between the host molecules. This study illustrates the dynamic deformation of the host, providing strong mechanistic insight into the diffusion of guests into this seemingly non-porous material.

  2. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. I. Overall assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.; Finney, B.C.

    1980-06-01

    This report is concerned with an overall assessment of the feasibility of and incentives for partitioning (recovering) long-lived nuclides from fuel reprocessing and fuel refabrication plant radioactive wastes and transmuting them to shorter-lived or stable nuclides by neutron irradiation. The principal class of nuclides considered is the actinides, although a brief analysis is given of the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I. The results obtained in this program permit us to make a comparison of the impacts of waste management with and without actinide recovery and transmutation. Three major conclusions concerning technical feasibility can be drawn from the assessment: (1) actinide P-T is feasible, subject to the acceptability of fuels containing recycle actinides; (2) technetium P-T is feasible if satisfactory partitioning processes can be developed and satisfactory fuels identified (no studies have been made in this area); and (3) iodine P-T is marginally feasible at best because of the low transmutation rates, the high volatility, and the corrosiveness of iodine and iodine compounds. It was concluded on the basis of a very conservative repository risk analysis that there are no safety or cost incentives for actinide P-T. In fact, if nonradiological risks are included, the short-term risks of P-T exceed the long-term benefits integrated over a period of 1 million years. Incentives for technetium and iodine P-T exist only if extremely conservative long-term risk analyses are used. Further RD and D in support of P-T is not warranted.

  3. Formation of sporangia and zoospores by a Labyrinthomyxa sp. parasitic in Macoma Balthica Linne 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valiulis, George Arvidas

    1968-01-01

    in sea water. Cells isolated from the host by the Waring blender isolation method. 1125X 35 FORMATION OF SPORANGIA AND ZOOSPORES BY A LABYRINTHOMYXA SP. PARASITIC IN MACOMA BALTHICA LINNE INTRODUCTION A technique for diagnosing oysters infected... with the fungal pathogen Labyrinthomyza marina was developed by Ray (1952), This method consisted of placing sections of oyster tissue in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (F. T. M. ) for 48 hrs then staining with Lugol's iodine. This caused the fungal cells...

  4. Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6-(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6- .sup.18 F!fluoro-1-dopa

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Bishop, Allyson J. (Wahnemuhle, DE); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Bida, Gerald T. (Shreveport, LA)

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb.sub.3 ; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to .ltoreq.7.

  5. Recovery of commercially valuable products from scrap tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, C.

    1993-07-20

    A process is described for producing carbon black by vacuum pyrolysis of used rubber tires, which comprises pyrolysing used rubber tire material at a temperature in the range of about 490 C to about 510 C under an absolute pressure of less than about 5 kPa, and recovering a solid carbonaceous material containing carbon black having an iodine adsorption number of about 130 to about 150 mg/g.

  6. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy /sup 18/F, /sup 34m/Cl, and /sup 76/Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,..gamma..) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied.

  7. A theoretical comparison of x-ray angiographic image quality using energy-dependent and conventional subtraction methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is widely used for vascular imaging. However, the need to subtract a mask image can result in motion artifacts and compromised image quality. The current interest in energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors offers the promise of eliminating motion artifacts and other advanced applications using a single exposure. The authors describe a method of assessing the iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that may be achieved with energy-resolved angiography (ERA) to enable a direct comparison with other approaches including DSA and dual-energy angiography for the same patient exposure. Methods: A linearized noise-propagation approach, combined with linear expressions of dual-energy and energy-resolved imaging, is used to describe the iodine SNR. The results were validated by a Monte Carlo calculation for all three approaches and compared visually for dual-energy and DSA imaging using a simple angiographic phantom with a CsI-based flat-panel detector. Results: The linearized SNR calculations show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results. While dual-energy methods require an increased tube heat load of 2x to 4x compared to DSA, and photon-counting detectors are not yet ready for angiographic imaging, the available iodine SNR for both methods as tested is within 10% of that of conventional DSA for the same patient exposure over a wide range of patient thicknesses and iodine concentrations. Conclusions: While the energy-based methods are not necessarily optimized and further improvements are likely, the linearized noise-propagation analysis provides the theoretical framework of a level playing field for optimization studies and comparison with conventional DSA. It is concluded that both dual-energy and photon-counting approaches have the potential to provide similar angiographic image quality to DSA.

  8. Diffusion of vaporous guests into a seemingly non-porous organic crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, Simon A.; Janiak, Agnieszka; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Barbour, Leonard J.

    2014-10-07

    In this research, the tetragonal apohost phase of p-tert-butyltetramethoxythiacalix[4]arene absorbs hydrochloric acid and iodine. These guest molecules occupy different sites in the solid-state structure -- either within the small intrinsic voids of the macrocycle or within the interstitial spaces between the host molecules. This study illustrates the dynamic deformation of the host, providing strong mechanistic insight into the diffusion of guests into this seemingly non-porous material.

  9. Family Shelter Planning. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Laura J.; Riney, Bobye J.

    1964-01-01

    , standard water purification methods such as (1) boil- ing, (2) chlorination, (3) purification tab- lets or (4) iodine drops. 8 SANITATION Tightly ,covered cans for garbage (wrap garbage in newspaper before putting in can). Human waste... Sanitation area located near entrance for dis- posal ease. Food and water storage area located above and below food preparatior counter for convenience to serving table. HINGED WALL TABLE Size, 27" x 48" attached to wall so that it can be raised when...

  10. Insights on the binding of thioflavin derivative markers to amyloid fibril models and A?{sub 1-40} fibrils from computational approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Rodriguez-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-10-06

    The present contribution analyzes the binding of ThT and neutral ThT derivatives to a ?-sheet model by means of quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we study the properties of four molecules: (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) and their respective iodinated compounds, HBXI and HBTI, in binding to amyloid fibril models and A?{sub 1-40}fibrils by using a combination of docking, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations.

  11. Similar to final submission www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 324 12 JUNE 2009 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    -shaped crystals upon dropping tincture of iodine into the urine of a dog that had been fed quinine (1). Herapath is quinine, C20H24N2O2 (9, 10). In 1896, herapathite was used to s- tudy x-rays rather than vice versa from quinine, concentrated sulfuric acid, and I2 in 1:1 ethanol:acetic acid (3). Herapath-like needles

  12. Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

    1988-01-01

    unique treatment be cause of chemical make-up or physical characteristics. (Examples: chewing gum, iodine, lead pencil) Stain Removal Products Bleaches Chlorine bleaches contain a hypochlorite com pound. Do not use them on wool, silk, polyurethane... foam, spandex or blends of these fibers; on finishes which are embossed or flame retardant; or on fabrics labeled no chlorine bleach. Avoid contact with metal. Always follow package instructions for dilu tion. Liquid chlorine bleaches lose strength...

  13. Factors affecting the adsorption of xenon on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underhill, D.W.; DiCello, D.C.; Scaglia, L.A.; Watson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    The presence of water vapor was found to interfere strongly with the dynamic adsorption of /sup 133/Xe on coconut-base activated charcoal. The percent loss in the xenon adsorption coefficient was similar to values reported earlier for the adsorption of krypton on humidified charcoal. Attempts to increase the adsorption of xenon by (a) using a petroleum-based adsorbent with an extremely high surface area and (b) by impregnation of the adsorbent with iodine were not successful.

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project is focused on novel approaches to remove risk related to the development of hybrid perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). Researchers will synthesize a new and chemically stable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite that eliminates decomposition of the absorber layer upon exposure to water vapor, which is a chief obstacle to widespread use of HPSC technology. They will also demonstrate a unique and industrially-scalable chemical vapor deposition method without halides or iodine, which are the main contributors to perovskite degradation.

  15. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  16. Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2010-11-22

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

  17. Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-1-dopa

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Bishop, A.J.; Namavari, M.; Bida, G.T.

    1996-04-23

    A process is revealed for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb{sub 3}; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to {<=}7. 1 fig.

  18. Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neklyudov, I M; Poltinin, P Ya; Ledenyov, O P

    2013-01-01

    The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a ...

  19. Use of CAP88 PC to infer differences in the chemical form of I-129 emitted from a fuel reprocessing facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Phillips, Nathan RJ

    2013-06-17

    Emissions of 129I from nuclear fuel separations conducted at the Hanford Site in Washington State have been occurring since the 1940’s. Fuel separation on the Hanford Site stopped in 1988, but emissions of 129I have continued as venting of the building occurred. In this study, atmospheric measurements of 129I concentrations were coupled with an EPA approved plume dispersion model (CAP-88PC) to evaluate the effectiveness of the dispersion model for estimating ambient concentrations at the Hanford Site. This evaluation led to the hypothesis of different chemical forms of iodine being emitted over the years; this hypothesis was developed as an explanation for the model agreeing with measurements over some time periods, but not over all time periods. The model was then run with modified emissions to simulate the short atmospheric half-life of the suspected reactive chemical form of iodine being emitted. This modification resulted in good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations over the entire 20 year study period, and provided evidence that the hypothesis of a reactive form of iodine being emitted was correct.

  20. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  1. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  2. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  3. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  4. Chalcogen-Based Aerogels as Sorbents for Radionuclide Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C.; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J.; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-06-13

    The efficient capture of radionuclides having long half-lives such as technetium-99 (99Tc), uranium-238 (238U), and iodine-129 (129I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, a new nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogel, called a chalcogel, is shown to be very effective to capture ionic forms of 99Tc and 238U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for 129I), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. Some of the chalcogels performed better than others but the PtGeS sorbent performed the best with capture efficiencies of 98% and 99.4% for 99Tc and 238U, respectively. All sorbents showed >99% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This unified sorbent would be an attractive option in environmental remediation for various radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production, wastes from nuclear power production, or potential future nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  5. Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Two Aerogel sorption tests that have been performed this fiscal year. The maximum iodine decontamination factor (DF) was measured to be over 10,000, above the 1,000-10,000 target DF range. The mass transfer zone may be as short as 0.5 inches under the sorption conditions of the first test. Only a small fraction of the iodine sorbed on Bed 1 was desorbed during the purge periods. The silver-functionalized Aerogel appears to have potential to be a very effective and efficient iodine sorbent.

  6. Microphase separation in copolymers of hydrophilic PEG blocks and hydrophobic tyrosine-derived segments using simultaneous SAXS/WAXS/DSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murthy, N.S.; Wang, W.; Kohn, J. (Rutgers); (Vermont)

    2010-10-22

    Hydration- and temperature-induced microphase separations were investigated by simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in a family of copolymers in which hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blocks are inserted randomly into a hydrophobic polymer made of either desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE) or iodinated I{sub 2}DTE segments. Iodination of the tyrosine rings in I{sub 2}DTE increased the X-ray contrast between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in addition to facilitating the study of the effect of iodination on microphase separation. The formation of phase-separated, hydrated PEG domains is of considerable significance as it profoundly affects the polymer properties. The copolymers of DTE (or I{sub 2}DTE) and PEG are a useful model system, and the findings presented here may be applicable to other PEG-containing random copolymers. In copolymers of PEG and DTE and I{sub 2}DTE, the presence of PEG depressed the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the copolymer relative to the homopolymer, poly(DTE carbonate), and the DTE/I{sub 2}DTE segments hindered the crystallization of the PEG segments. In the dry state, at large PEG fractions (>70 vol%), the PEG domains self-assembled into an ordered structure with 14-18 nm distance between the domains. These domains gave rise to a SAXS peak at all temperatures in the iodinated polymers, but only above the T{sub g} in non-iodinated polymers, due to the unexpected contrast-match between the crystalline PEG domains and the glassy DTE segments. Irrespective of whether PEG was crystalline or not, immersion of these copolymers in water resulted in the formation of hydrated PEG domains that were 10-20 nm apart. Since both water and the polymer chains must be mobile for the phase separation to occur, the PEG domains disappeared when the water froze, and reappeared as the ice began to melt. This transformation was reversible, and showed hysteresis as did the melting of ice and freezing of the water incorporated into the polymer. PEG-water complexes and PEG-water eutectics were observed in WAXS and DSC scans, respectively.

  7. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ?88% for FBP and PLQ, and ?95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ?95% for FBP and PLQ, and ?98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a fixed iodine concentration of 5 mg/ml and reconstructions maximizing overall accuracy across the range of insert diameters, the minimum diameter classified with accuracy >80% was ?15 mm for FBP and PLQ and ?10 mm for PLTV, improving to ?7 mm for FBP and PLQ and ?3 mm for PLTV at 15.6 mGy. The results indicate similar performance for FBP and PLQ and showed improved classification accuracy with edge-preserving PLTV. A slight preference for increased smoothing of the HE data was found. DE CBCT discrimination of iodine and bone in the knee was demonstrated with FBP and PLTV at 6.2 mGy total dose. Conclusions: For iodine concentrations >5 mg/ml and detail size ?20 mm, material classification accuracy of >90% was achieved in DE CBCT with both FBP and PL at total doses <10 mGy. Optimal performance was attained by selection of reconstruction parameters based on the differences in noise between HE and LE data, typically favoring stronger smoothing of the HE data, and by using penalties matched to the imaging task (e.g., edge-preserving PLTV in areas of uniform enhancement)

  8. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  9. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  10. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, G.A.

    1985-03-05

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  11. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  12. SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de S et Nucl ire, IRSN, BP 3 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Herranz, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining conditions for new experiments. Regarding predictability of iodine species exiting the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), which affects the amount entering the containment, iodine behaviour in the circuit and silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) release have been reviewed. New experiments are being discussed and performed, and SIC degradation and release models are being improved. For the radioactive aerosol source term, work is conducted in the risk-relevant areas of steam generator (SG) tube rupture, transport through cracks in containment walls and revaporization from previous deposits in the RCS that could lead to a delayed source term. Models for aerosol retention in containment cracks and interpretation of data on retention in the SG secondary side are proposed. For radioactive iodine release to the environment, many physical and chemical processes affect the iodine concentration in the containment atmosphere; of these effects, mass transfer phenomena and radiolytic oxidation are being investigated first. (authors)

  13. Development of a Parallel Strategy for the Synthesis of a Library of 2-(3-Formyl-5-arylfuran-2-yl)ethylcarbamates from Dihydropyridinones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, An Na

    2008-09-09

    by Comins and co-workers. 35 They preformed the iodination at C5 of 5 in the presence of NIS and a catalytic amount of [hydroxy(tosyloxy)- iodo]benzene(HTIB) followed by a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction to give 5-iodo-2,3-dihydropyridin-4-one... by Pal and co-workers during their studies of the palladium-catalyzed reaction of 3-iodothioflavone with a terminal alkyne. 51 It is known that Cu(I) acts as a co-catalyst in Sonogashira reactions to activate terminal alkynes to form a Cu- 14 acetylide...

  14. 'Naked' radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, Paul E. . E-mail: pwallner@rtsx.com

    2006-10-01

    The term 'naked' radiopharmaceuticals, more appropriately, 'unbound' radiopharmaceuticals, refers to any radioisotope used for clinical research or clinical purposes that is not attached to a chemical or biological carrier, and that localizes in various tissues because of a physiologic or chemical propensity/affinity, or secondary to focal anatomic placement. Although they remain useful in selected clinical circumstances, the available agents (except for Iodine-131) have been relegated to an unfortunate and somewhat secondary role. The agents remain useful and worthy of consideration for new clinical investigation and clinical use.

  15. Characterization of illuminated semiconductor/solid-electrolyte junctions. photoelectrochemical investigation of a poly(ethylene oxide) cell. Interim technical report 1 Mar-30 Apr 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.; Ang, P.G.P.

    1983-05-01

    Photoelectrochemical effects have been observed with solid-state cells using a poly(ethylene oxide) .NaSCN solid polymer electrolyte containing a Na2S/S redox couple. Photoeffects were observed at the interface of this electrolyte with p-InP, n-GaAs, and in a two-photoelectrode cell of configuration p-InP/PEO-NaSCN, Na2S,S/n-CdS. In this latter cell, photopotentials of 540 mV were generated using 100 mW/cm2 quartz iodine illumination.

  16. Effect of chronic gamma irradiation on leukocyte chromosomes of the Spanish goat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wortman, Donna Chesser

    1967-01-01

    ch ( 2, 3, 4, 5 ) on the chromosomes of. s evera l human ma ] es who were invo lved in accid~ nts resulting in ti eir exposu"e to radiation (doses frora 22 ~ 8 to 365 rads) has aroused considerable interest, since it has documented the long... radiation emitter s as radi os ct ive phosphorus ( 1 ] ), iodine ( 12, 13), and thor] um diox: dc ( ]4). All th- reports ment ioned above have involved relatively large do. , es compared to tho e rect I~i' d by most ind ividua ] s from back:round ~ medi...

  17. Prosper: image and robot-guided prostate brachytherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Hungr, Nikolai; Leroy, Antoine; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Martin, Sébastien; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer consists in destroying cancer by introducing iodine radioactive seeds into the gland through hollow needles. The planning of the position of the seeds and their introduction into the prostate is based on intra-operative ultrasound (US) imaging. We propose to optimize the global quality of the procedure by: i) using 3D US; ii) enhancing US data with MRI registration; iii) using a specially designed needle-insertion robot, connected to the imaging data. The imaging methods have been successfully tested on patient data while the robot accuracy has been evaluated on a realistic deformable phantom.

  18. Radioiodine Biogeochemistry and Prevalence in Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Denham, Miles E.; Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Xu, Chen; Schwehr, Kathy; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2014-08-03

    129I is commonly either the top or among the top risk drivers, along with 99Tc, at radiological waste disposal sites and contaminated groundwater sites where nuclear material fabrication or reprocessing has occurred. The risk stems largely from 129I having a high toxicity, a high bioaccumulation factor (90% of all the body’s iodine concentrates in the thyroid), a high inventory at source terms (due to its high fission yield), an extremely long half-life (16M yr), and rapid mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that 129I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define 129I mass balance and flux at sites, but cannot predict accurately its response to changes in the environment. As a consequence of some of these characteristics, 129I has a very low Drinking Water Standard, DWS, which is set at 1 pCi/L, the lowest of all radionuclides in the Federal Register. Recently, significant advancements have been made in detecting iodine species at ambient groundwater concentrations, defining the nature of the organic matter and iodine bond, and quantifying the role of naturally occurring sediment microbes to promote iodine oxidation and reduction. These recent studies have led to a more mechanistic understanding of radioiodine biogeochemistry. The objective of this review is to describe these advances and to provide a state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport in the terrestrial environment and provide information useful for making decisions regarding the stewardship and remediation of 129I contaminated sites. As part of this review, knowledge gaps were identified that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating 129I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of 129I waste. Together the information gained from addressing these knowledge gaps will not alter the observation that 129I is primarily mobile, but it will likely permit demonstration that the entire 129I pool in the source term is not moving at the same rate and some may be tightly bound to the sediment, thereby “smearing” the modeled 129I peak and reducing maximum calculated risk.

  19. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  20. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  1. Los Alamos Air Monitoring Data Related to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is collecting air data and analyzing the data for fission products. At present, we report preliminary data from three high-volume air samplers and one stack sampler. Iodine-131 (I-131) is not optimally measured by our standard polypropylene filters. In addition to the filter data, we have one measurement obtained from a charcoal cartridge. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides are adequate for a preliminary assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi do not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos.

  2. Measurement of Fukushima Aerosol Debris in Sequim and Richland, WA and Ketchikan, AK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Engelmann, Mark D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kiddy, Robert A.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Landen, Jonathan W.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Lidey, Lance S.; Litke, Kevin E.; Morris, Scott J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Thompson, Robert C.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Woods, Vincent T.; Biegalski, Steven R.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol collections were initiated at several locations by PNNL shortly after the Great East Japan Earthquake of May 2011. Aerosol samples were transferred to laboratory high-resolution gamma spectrometers for analysis. Similar to treaty monitoring stations operating across the Northern hemisphere, iodine and other isotopes which could be volatilized at high temperature were detected. Though these locations are not far apart, they have significant variations with respect to water, mountain-range placement, and local topography. Variation in computed source terms will be shown to bound the variability of this approach to source estimation.

  3. Process for Polycrystalline film silicon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu (Littleton, CO); Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing polycrystalline silicon on substrates, including foreign substrates, occurs in a chamber at about atmospheric pressure, wherein a temperature gradient is formed, and both the atmospheric pressure and the temperature gradient are maintained throughout the process. Formation of a vapor barrier within the chamber that precludes exit of the constituent chemicals, which include silicon, iodine, silicon diiodide, and silicon tetraiodide. The deposition occurs beneath the vapor barrier. One embodiment of the process also includes the use of a blanketing gas that precludes the entrance of oxygen or other impurities. The process is capable of repetition without the need to reset the deposition zone conditions.

  4. Elastomeric organic material for switching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiju, K., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Praveen, T., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com; Preedep, P., E-mail: shijuvenus@gmail.com, E-mail: pravymon@gmail.com, E-mail: ppredeep@gmail.com [Laboratory for Molecular Photonics and Electronics (LAMP), Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala, 673601 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Organic Electronic devices like OLED, Organic Solar Cells etc are promising as, cost effective alternatives to their inorganic counterparts due to various reasons. However the organic semiconductors currently available are not attractive with respect to their high cost and intricate synthesis protocols. Here we demonstrate that Natural Rubber has the potential to become a cost effective solution to this. Here an attempt has been made to fabricate iodine doped poly isoprene based switching device. In this work Poly methyl methacrylate is used as dielectric layer and Aluminium are employed as electrodes.

  5. The synthesis of phosphonyl dichlorides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yun-Ger

    1958-01-01

    quantity oi' alumina, dried over night at 200 & was used to treat 660 ml, tetx'ahydrofuran, The magnesium turnings were shaved from an ingot of Dow's highest purity magnesium& The alkyl snd aryl halides were the purest gxades available) they were... be divided into the following four stepsc 1 ~ Preparation of the Orignard Beagsnt One and one tenth mole of magnesium turnings was placed in a 2 1 ~ reaction flask, A crystal of iodine& 20 to 30 ml, of solvent (ether or tetrahydrofuran) taken from...

  6. The effect of temperature, acid concentration and time on the bromination of phenol for quantitative determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weith, Archie J.

    1913-01-15

    shaker,^ several half- i : liter ground-stoppered bottles, and standard- I I ized burettes. The solutions used were as follows: N/10 sodium thiosulphate, N/lO bromide-bromate, N/10 phenol, 20% (by Wt. ) potassium iodide, hydrochloric acid (S.G. 1.2.... As no account was taken of temperature in their experiments (laborat­ ory temperatures), it is very probable that the 1/2% error which they record as due to incompleteness in the freeing of the iodine in one minute may be more properly attributed...

  7. Engineering Design Elements of a Two-Phase Thermosyphon to Trannsfer NGNP Nuclear Thermal Energy to a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwal

    2009-07-01

    Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis, which uses both heat and electricity; the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur iodine process primarily using heat. Both processes require a high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of the NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100 m.

  8. Effects of Cotton Seed and Cotton Seed Meal on Butter, Beef Tallow, Lard and Sheep Suet. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Adriance, Duncan

    1893-01-01

    I .- - .. - I 89% 46 51 .ozg41 .048i 93 76 52 20 278 ; Very Dark. 1 Fed on Cotton Seed Meal. 2 1 'S982 y, i! 0~8drrace 91 74 a o3 287 6 None. Boowht in Bryatl. 3 / :x9661 ;y 6 ,6200 ,521 94 881 54 76i 305 o Notle. 31aG it1 L.... The melting point of butter is raised several degrees by a feed of cottoll seed or cotton seed meal. The Iodine absorption is also increased. The volatile acids are greatly lowered. 2nd. The effect became apparent on a one-fourth ration ot meal or seed...

  9. Application of the Franck-Condon principle to the 3000-5000Å absorption spectrum of ClO? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John Kidd

    1954-01-01

    If it is not possible to boil the water, strain it as in listed in Step 1 above, then disinfect it with bleach or iodine, whichever is available: Disinfecting Water after a Disaster Liquid chlorine bleach (from the home laundry or grocery store). Use common..., unscented house- hold laundry bleach. Read the product label to find percentage of chlorine and use this table to determine how much bleach to add to the water: ? Add bleach to the water and stir or shake the container thoroughly. ? Let the water stand...

  10. Production of activated carbon from coconut shell char in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai, P.M.S.; Ahmed, J. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Kalpakkam (India). Centralised Waste Management Facility; Krishnaiah, K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Activated carbon is produced from coconut shell char using steam or carbon dioxide as the reacting gas in a 100 mm diameter fluidized bed reactor. The effect of process parameters such as reaction time, fluidizing velocity, particle size, static bed height, temperature of activation, fluidizing medium, and solid raw material on activation is studied. The product is characterized by determination of iodine number and BET surface area. The product obtained in the fluidized bed reactor is much superior in quality to the activated carbons produced by conventional processes. Based on the experimental observations, the optimum values of process parameters are identified.

  11. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  12. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-08-23

    An electrochemical cell is described having an alkali metal negative electrode such as sodium and a positive electrode including Ni or transition metals, separated by a [beta] alumina electrolyte and NaAlCl[sub 4] or other compatible material. Various concentrations of a bromine, iodine and/or sulfur containing additive and pore formers are disclosed, which enhance cell capacity and power. The pore formers may be the ammonium salts of carbonic acid or a weak organic acid or oxamide or methylcellulose. 6 figs.

  13. The Control of Transit and Storage Decays in Texas Lemons. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryall, A. Lloyd (Albert Lloyd); Godfrey, G. H. (George Harold)

    1948-01-01

    (Penicilliurn italicurn) and green mold (Peni- n digitaturn) on Valencia oranges. A, blue mold; note the dark spore-bearing central region surrounded by a rather narrow white belt of fungus mycelium, then a narrow zone of water-soaked rind, the advancing... metaborate by ad- ditions of iodine or other materials. In testing new materials, a standard treatment such as with borax was frequently included as n basis of comparison. Each fruit sample for treatment consisted of 200 fruits in most of the tests...

  14. The effect of hydrogen sulfide on straight-run gasoline during storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Alvin Junius

    1934-01-01

    %hah ihs tiaiaeeae eaa of the seas ceder se bbo ', ~ salfi4e scasosexeht~e? sails bbo flask iodine ?stsos sass yrso&tosllg the esse ss4 isdstaostosh sf ths sassy ef hp48egsa satft4O ta hho saaates This tsasseee tn iodtss ~ stth btsio of sbarsgo seo... obsero?4 ts aeat4oce of . Xt fosr fsasbtoss? The sssalte of sasttcaiio ef the second fsssbios? %able t+ sgs tsdtoo Wee ef ltNLO ssaohton? & aaatl aeewA of ebtoyheeae ~ fees', sa4 Ofhce abes0 otx oeeha a ?4sshs g~~tttf of s~sw&- suthe sos fosao4 ia hho...

  15. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  16. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  17. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  18. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, George A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1986-01-01

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  19. Methods For Calculating Thyroid Doses to The Residents Of Ozersk Due to 131I Releases From The Stacks of The Mayak Production Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovny, Sergey I.; Mokrov, Y.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Beregich, D. A.; Teplyakov, I. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was established in the late 1940s in accordance with a special Decree of the USSR Government for the production of nuclear weapons. In early years of MPA operation, due to the lack of experience and absence of effective methods of RW management, the enterprise had extensive routine (designed) and non-routine (accidental) releases of gaseous radioactive wastes to the atmosphere. These practices resulted in additional technogenic radiation exposure of residents inhabiting populated areas near the MPA. The primary objective of ongoing studies under JCCRER Project 1.4 is to estimate doses to the residents of Ozersk due to releases of radioactive substances from the stacks of MPA. Preliminary scoping studies have demonstrated that releases of radioactive iodine (131I) from the stacks of the Mayak Radiochemical Plant represented the major contribution to the dose to residents of Ozersk and of other nearby populated areas. The behavior of 131I in the environment and of 131I migration through biological food chains (vegetation-cows-milk-humans) indicated a need for use of special mathematical models to perform the estimation of radiation doses to the population. The goal of this work is to select an appropriate model of the iodine migration in biological food chains and to justify numerical values of the model parameters.

  20. A radioisotope based methodology for plant-fungal interactions in the rhizosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenberger, A. G.; Bonito, G.; Lee, S.; McKisson, J. E.; Gryganskyi, A.; Reid, C. D.; Smith, M. F.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Welch, B.

    2013-10-01

    In plant ecophysiology research there is interest in studying the biology of the rhizosphere because of its importance in plant nutrient-interactions. The rhizosphere is the zone of soil surrounding a plant's root system where microbes (such as fungi) are influenced by the root and the roots by the microbes. We are investigating a methodology for imaging the distribution of molecular compounds of interest in the rhizosphere without disturbing the root or soil habitat. Our intention is to develop a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system (PhytoSPECT) to image the bio-distribution of fungi in association with a host plant's roots. The technique we are exploring makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules that bind to fungal-specific compounds of interest and to image the fungi distribution in the plant and/or soil. We report on initial experiments designed to test the ability of fungal-specific compounds labeled with an iodine radioisotope that binds to chitin monomers (N-acetylglucosamine). Chitin is a compound not found in roots but in fungal cell walls. We will test the ability to label the compound with radioactive isotopes of iodine ({sup 125}I, and {sup 123}I).

  1. Driving photochemistry by clustering: The ICl-Xe case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glodic, Pavle; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N.; Farnik, Michal; Samartzis, Peter C.

    2012-10-21

    We present slice imaging data demonstrating the influence of clustering on the photodissociation dynamics of a diatomic molecule: iodine monochloride (ICl) was dissociated at 235 nm in He and Xe seed gasses, probing both Cl and I photofragment energy and angular distributions. We observe that the kinetic energy releases of both Cl and I fragments change from He to Xe seeding. For Cl fragments, the seeding in Xe increases the kinetic energy release of some Cl fragments with a narrow kinetic energy distribution, and leads to some fragments with rather broad statistical distribution falling off exponentially from near-zero energies up to about 2.5 eV. Iodine fragment distribution changes even more dramatically from He to Xe seeding: sharp features essentially disappear and a broad distribution arises reaching to about 2.5 eV. Both these observations are rationalized by a simple qualitative cluster model assuming ICl dissociation inside larger xenon clusters and 'on surface' of smaller Xe species.

  2. Polymerization of phenylacetylene by triethyl aluminum and titanium tetraethoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, A.C. (Pitney Bowes, Inc., Danbury, CT); Waters, P.F.; Aldridge, M.H.

    1982-07-01

    The polymerization of phenylacetylene to polyphenylacetylene was accomplished with the combined catalysts triethyl aluminum and titanium tetraethoxide. The progress of the reaction was monitored by gas chromatography. The parameters included temperature (-80, 25, 140/sup 0/C), solvent (benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, cyclohexane, and nitrobenzene), mole ratio of catalysts (Al/Ti; 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 9.0), aging times of catalysts (2, 10, and 40 min), and order of addition of reagents. Derivatives of polyphenylacetylene were obtained by the acylation of polyphenylacetylene with p-nitrobenzoyl chloride, the sulfonation of polyphenylacetylene with benzenesulfonyl chloride, and the formation of polyphenylacetylene complexes with complexing agents such as bromine, iodine, iodine chloride, boron trifluoride, and ferric chloride. A new phenylacetylene-acetylene product mixture was produced by the polymerization of phenylacetylene and acetylene at 25 and -80/sup 0/C. The electrical conductivity of polyphenylacetylene and its derivatives is in the range of 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -3/ ..cap omega../sup -1/ cm/sup -1/.

  3. Suspension chemistry and electrophoretic deposition of zirconia electrolyte on conducting and non-conducting substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Debasish; Basu, Rajendra N.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Stable suspension of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) obtained in isopropanol medium. • Suspension chemistry and process parameters for electrophoretic deposition optimized. • Deposited film quality changed with iodine and water (dispersants) concentration. • Dense YSZ film (?5 ?m) fabricated onto non-conducting porous NiO-YSZ anode substrate. - Abstract: Suspensions of 8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particulates in isopropanol medium are prepared using acetylacetone, iodine and water as dispersants. The effect of dispersants concentration on suspension stability, particle size distribution, electrical conductivity and pH of the suspensions are studied in detail to optimize the suspension chemistry. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been conducted to produce thin and dense YSZ electrolyte films. Deposition kinetics have been studied in depth and good quality films on conducting substrate are obtained at an applied voltage of 15 V for 3 min. YSZ films are also fabricated on non-conducting NiO-YSZ anode substrate using a steel plate on the reverse side of the substrate. Upon co-firing at 1400 °C for 6 h a dense YSZ film of thickness ?5 ?m is obtained. Such a half cell (anode + electrolyte) can be used to fabricate a solid oxide fuel cell on applying a suitable cathode layer.

  4. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  5. Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used.

  6. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  7. Calculation of room temperature conductivity and mobility in tin-based topological insulator nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandenberghe, William G. Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2014-11-07

    Monolayers of tin (stannanane) functionalized with halogens have been shown to be topological insulators. Using density functional theory (DFT), we study the electronic properties and room-temperature transport of nanoribbons of iodine-functionalized stannanane showing that the overlap integral between the wavefunctions associated to edge-states at opposite ends of the ribbons decreases with increasing width of the ribbons. Obtaining the phonon spectra and the deformation potentials also from DFT, we calculate the conductivity of the ribbons using the Kubo-Greenwood formalism and show that their mobility is limited by inter-edge phonon backscattering. We show that wide stannanane ribbons have a mobility exceeding 10{sup 6} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Contrary to ordinary semiconductors, two-dimensional topological insulators exhibit a high conductivity at low charge density, decreasing with increasing carrier density. Furthermore, the conductivity of iodine-functionalized stannanane ribbons can be modulated over a range of three orders of magnitude, thus rendering this material extremely interesting for classical computing applications.

  8. Measuring Radioactivity from Fukushima Daiichi in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaughton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was damaged by the tsunami that followed the 'Great East Japan Earthquake,' and the reactor subsequently leaked radioactive material. In response, LANL augmented the routine ambient (AIRNET) and stack (Rad-NESHAP) measurements with three high-volume samplers: No.167 at the Old White Rock Fire Station; No.173 at the TA-49 gate, and No.211 at the Los Alamos Medical Center. Previous accidents, such as the Three-Mile-Island accident in 1979 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986, indicated that the most likely releases were (a) the noble gases: krypton and xenon; and (b) the volatile elements: cesium, tellurium, and iodine. At the latitude of Fukushima, the predominant winds across the Pacific Ocean are from west to east, and models predicted that the plume would arrive in the western US on about March 18. By this time the shorter-lived isotopes would have decayed. Therefore, the expected radionuclides were xenon-133, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132. As expected, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132 were all detected by all three high-volume samplers during March 17-21. The concentrations peaked during the March 24-28 period. After this, concentrations of all nuclides declined. In general, the concentrations were consistent with those measured by the EPA RadNet system and many other monitoring systems throughout the world. At the time of writing, preliminary results from the AIRNET and Rad-NESHAP systems are being reported. More detailed results are described in LA-UR-11-10304 and will be reported in full in the annual environmental report for 2011. All previous releases from nuclear reactors have been dominated by noble gases, primarily krypton and xenon, which are not measured by the high-volume samplers or the AIRNET system. However, in sufficient concentrations these and other fission products would be detected by NEWNET. Consistent with this possibility, all NEWNET detectors recorded an increase of 0.2 {micro}R/h from March 19-1, followed by an additional increase of 0.1 {micro}R/h on March 24 (Figure 1). The consistency of the NEWNET stations is indicated by the error bars, which represent the standard error of the mean of the individual stations. Over the next 10 days, the NEWNET readings declined with approximately the 5-day half life of xenon-133, returning to near normal levels on April 2. After this, any further decrease was masked by high radon concentrations on April 3, by a weather system that moved into New Mexico on April 4, and by rainfall on April 6-9. Furthermore, it is likely that all NEWNET detectors responded to a gradually increasing trend in terrestrial radiation during the month of March as the ground dried out. It is difficult to distinguish the hypothetical effects of xenon-133 from the fluctuations of radon decay products. However, at present we do not have an alternative hypothesis for the sharp increase that was observed in all NEWNET stations from March 19-21. Perhaps some of the increase was caused by radon or terrestrial radiation, in which case the observed increase is an upper limit to that caused by releases from Fukushima. LANL data are consistent with those of the EPA RadNet monitoring system. The EPA has repeatedly stated that 'The levels detected are far below levels of concern.'

  9. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

  10. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-06

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the test methods performed throughout the lifetime of the project has focused on different aspects of the concrete waste form weathering process. Diffusion of different analytes [technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-125 (I-125), stable iodine (I), uranium (U), and rhenium (Re)] has been quantified from experiments under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The water-saturated conditions provide a conservative estimate of the concrete’s performance in situ, and the unsaturated conditions provide a more accurate estimate of the diffusion of contaminants from the concrete.

  11. Comparison of Fission Product Yields and Their Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Harrison

    2006-02-01

    This memorandum describes the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Space Nuclear Power Program (SNPP) interest in determining the expected fission product yields from a Prometheus-type reactor and assessing the impact of these species on materials found in the fuel element and balance of plant. Theoretical yield calculations using ORIGEN-S and RACER computer models are included in graphical and tabular form in Attachment, with focus on the desired fast neutron spectrum data. The known fission product interaction concerns are the corrosive attack of iron- and nickel-based alloys by volatile fission products, such as cesium, tellurium, and iodine, and the radiological transmutation of krypton-85 in the coolant to rubidium-85, a potentially corrosive agent to the coolant system metal piping.

  12. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

  13. Method oil shale pollutant sorption/NO.sub.x reburning multi-pollutant control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boardman, Richard D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carrington, Robert A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-06-10

    A method of decreasing pollutants produced in a combustion process. The method comprises combusting coal in a combustion chamber to produce at least one pollutant selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen-containing pollutant, sulfuric acid, sulfur trioxide, carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, chlorine, hydroiodic acid, iodine, hydrofluoric acid, fluorine, hydrobromic acid, bromine, phosphoric acid, phosphorous pentaoxide, elemental mercury, and mercuric chloride. Oil shale particles are introduced into the combustion chamber and are combusted to produce sorbent particulates and a reductant. The at least one pollutant is contacted with at least one of the sorbent particulates and the reductant to decrease an amount of the at least one pollutant in the combustion chamber. The reductant may chemically reduce the at least one pollutant to a benign species. The sorbent particulates may adsorb or absorb the at least one pollutant. A combustion chamber that produces decreased pollutants in a combustion process is also disclosed.

  14. Origin of carrier generation in photovoltaic perovskite variant Cs2SnI6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Zewen; Kamiya, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Cs2SnI6 is an air-stable & non-toxic variant of perovskite-type photovoltaic materials. In this letter, stability of intrinsic defects in Cs2SnI6 was examined by density functional theory calculations. We found that iodine vacancy and tin interstitial are the dominant defects, mainly responsible for the intrinsic n-type conductivity in Cs2SnI6. However, the transition levels of the dominant defects are deep, which makes it difficult to achieve high-density n-type doping. Tin vacancy is expected for p-type doping, but it has a very high formation energy > 3.6 eV because of the strong Sn-I covalent bonds and can hardly be generated. Instead, cesium vacancy is formed at an extremely Cs-poor condition and explains already-reported p-type conductivity by SnI2 doping.

  15. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely withmore »Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.« less

  16. Accumulation and tissue distribution of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) from algal phytoplankton by the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuvin-Aralar, Ma.L.A. ); Umaly, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Radioactive wastes discharged from establishments involved in the use of radioisotopes such as nuclear-powered industries, tracer research and nuclear medicine are a potential public health hazard. Such wastes contain radionuclides, particularly Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), produced in fission with a yield of about 3%. Radionuclides in waste waters are known to be taken up by molluscs such as mussels, oysters, and clams. This study aims to determine the uptake of {sup 131}I from algal phytoplankton (Chroococcus dispersus) fed to the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis as well as the organ/tissue distribution. The results will be compared with a previous study on {sup 131}I uptake from water by the same clams.

  17. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. (Laboratorio Unificado de Control de Alimentos y Medicamentos (LUCAM) (Guatemala))

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  18. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  19. Thermal Stability of Acetohydroxamic Acid/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-03-13

    The transmutation of transuranic actinides and long-lived fission products in spent commercial nuclear reactor fuel has been proposed as one element of the Advanced Accelerator Applications Program. Preparation of targets for irradiation in an accelerator-driven subcritical reactor would involve dissolution of the fuel and separation of uranium, technetium, and iodine from the transuranic actinides and other fission products. The UREX solvent extraction process is being developed to reject and isolate the transuranic actinides in the acid waste stream by scrubbing with acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). To ensure that a runaway reaction will not occur between nitric acid and AHA, an analogue of hydroxyl amine, thermal stability tests were performed to identify if any processing conditions could lead to a runaway reaction.

  20. Qualifying composition dependent p and n self-doping in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong; Xie, Haipeng; Lyu, Lu; Liu, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yongli

    2014-10-20

    We report the observation of self-doping in perovskite. CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was found to be either n- or p-doped by changing the ratio of methylammonium halide (MAI) and lead iodine (PbI{sub 2}) which are the two precursors for perovskite formation. MAI-rich and PbI{sub 2}-rich perovskite films are p and n self-doped, respectively. Thermal annealing can convert the p-type perovskite to n-type by removing MAI. The carrier concentration varied as much as six orders of magnitude. A clear correlation between doping level and device performance was also observed.

  1. Structural analysis of Cr aggregation in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamawaki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kuroda, S.; Mitome, M.; Bando, Y.

    2013-12-04

    The Cr aggregation in a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te was studied by performing precise analyses using TEM and XRD of microscopic structure of the Cr-aggregated regions formed in iodine-doped Zn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}Te films with a relatively high Cr composition x ? 0.2. It was found that the Cr-aggregated regions are composed of Cr{sub 1??}Te nanocrystals of the hexagonal structure and these hexagonal precipitates are stacked preferentially on the (111)A plane of the zinc-blende (ZB) structure of the host ZnTe crystal with its c-axis nearly parallel to the (111){sub ZB} plane.

  2. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  3. CT of the liver and spleen with EOE-13: review of 225 examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.L.; Vermess, M.; Doppman, J.L.; Simon, R.M.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; O'Leary, T.J.; Grimes, G.; Chatterji, D.G.; Willis, M.

    1984-08-01

    EOE-13 is an experimental liver-spleen-specific computed tomographic (CT) contrast agent developed at the National Institutes of Health. Experience with this agent in 225 clinical examinations is described. On average, use of EOE-13 increases the attenuation of normal liver by 32.5 H and that of normal spleen by 52.3 H. Tumors in these organs increase only 2.6 H, making them more easily detectable. Most of the iodine in EOE-13 appears to clear from the liver and spleen by 24 hr after injection. No deaths or permanent morbidity have been observed. The complication rate is 3.6%. EOE-13 is valuable for the detection of hepatic and splenic tumors.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T. [Department Of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar, Gujarat, 388120 (India)

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  5. Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O'Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2012-10-01

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

  6. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  7. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  8. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  9. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few ?m in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one graduate student meant that data acquisition with the packed bed systems ended up competing for the graduate student’s available time with the electrodynamic balance redesign and assembly portions of the project. This competition for available time was eventually mitigated to some extent by the later recruitment of an undergraduate student to help with data collection using the packed bed system. It was only the recruitment of the second student that allowed the single particle balance design and construction efforts to proceed as far as they did during the project period. It should be added that some significant time was also spent by the graduate student cataloging previous work involving graphite. This eventually resulted in a review paper being submitted and accepted (“Adsorption of Iodine on Graphite in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems: A Review,” Kyle L. Walton, Tushar K. Ghosh, Dabir S. Viswanath, Sudarshan K. Loyalka, Robert V. Tompson). Our specific revised objectives in this project were as follows: Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using an EDB and a temperature controlled EDB; Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using a packed column bed apparatus; Explore the effect that charge has on the adsorption isotherms of iodine by varying the charges on and the voltages used to suspend the microscopic particles in the EDB; and To interpret these results in terms of the existing models (Langmuir, BET, Freundlich, and others) which we will modify as necessary to include charge related effects.

  10. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste materials in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Recently, carbonaceous materials were proved to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste decomposition in supercritical water. Gasification of the carbonaceous catalyst itself is also expected, however, under supercritical conditions. Thus, it is essential to determine the gasification rate of the carbonaceous materials during this process to determine the active lifetime of the catalysts. For this purpose, the gasification characteristics of granular coconut shell activated carbon in supercritical water alone (600-650{degrees}C, 25.5-34.5 MPa) were investigated. The gasification rate at subatmospheric pressure agreed well with the gasification rate at supercritical conditions, indicating the same reaction mechanism. Methane generation under these conditions is via pyrolysis, and thus is not affected by the water pressure. An iodine number increase of 25% was observed as a result of the supercritical water gasification.

  11. Status of initial testing of the H2SO4 section of the ILS experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Gelbard, Fred

    2007-12-01

    A sulfuric acid catalytic decomposer section was assembled and tested for the Integrated Laboratory Scale experiments of the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle. This cycle is being studied as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Tests confirmed that the 54-inch long silicon carbide bayonet could produce in excess of the design objective of 100 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} at 2 bar. Furthermore, at 3 bar the system produced 135 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} with only 31 mol% acid. The gas production rate was close to the theoretical maximum determined by equilibrium, which indicates that the design provides adequate catalyst contact and heat transfer. Several design improvements were also implemented to greatly minimize leakage of SO{sub 2} out of the apparatus. The primary modifications were a separate additional enclosure within the skid enclosure, and replacement of Teflon tubing with glass-lined steel pipes.

  12. GROUNDWATER RADIOIODINE: PREVALENCE, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, AND POTENTIAL REMEDIAL APPROACHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.; Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.

    2009-09-23

    Iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) has not received as much attention in basic and applied research as other contaminants associated with DOE plumes. These other contaminants, such as uranium, plutonium, strontium, and technetium are more widespread and exist at more DOE facilities. Yet, at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site {sup 129}I occurs in groundwater at concentrations significantly above the primary drinking water standard and there is no accepted method for treating it, other than pump-and-treat systems. With the potential arrival of a 'Nuclear Renaissance', new nuclear power facilities will be creating additional {sup 129}I waste at a rate of 1 Ci/gigawatts energy produced. If all 22 proposed nuclear power facilities in the U.S. get approved, they will produce more {sup 129}I waste in seven years than presently exists at the two facilities containing the largest {sup 129}I inventories, ({approx}146 Ci {sup 129}I at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site). Hence, there is an important need to fully understand {sup 129}I behavior in the environment to clean up existing plumes and to support the expected future expansion of nuclear power production. {sup 129}I is among the key risk drivers at all DOE nuclear disposal facilities where {sup 129}I is buried, because of its long half-life (16 million years), high toxicity (90% of the body's iodine accumulates in the thyroid), high inventory, and perceived high mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that {sup 129}I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define {sup 129}I mass balance and flux at sites, but can not accurately predict its response to changes in the environment. This uncertainty is in part responsible for the low drinking water standard, 1 pCi/L {sup 129}I, and the low permissible inventory limits (Ci) at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the former Yucca Mountain disposal facilities. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile the background information necessary to understand behavior of {sup 129}I in the environment, (2) discuss sustainable remediation approaches to {sup 129}I contaminated groundwater, and (3) identify areas of research that will facilitate remediation of {sup 129}I contaminated areas on DOE sites. Lines of scientific inquiry that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating {sup 129}I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of {sup 129}I waste are: (1) Evaluation of amendments or other treatment systems that can sequester subsurface groundwater {sup 129}I. (2) Develop analytical techniques for measurement of total {sup 129}I that eliminate the necessity of collecting and shipping large samples of groundwater. (3) Develop and evaluate ways to manipulate areas with organic-rich soil, such as wetlands, to maximize {sup 129}I sorption, minimizing releases during anoxic conditions. (4) Develop analytical techniques that can identify the various {sup 129}I species in the subsurface aqueous and solid phases at ambient concentrations and under ambient conditions. (5) Identify the mechanisms and factors controlling iodine-natural organic matter interactions at appropriate environmental concentrations. (6) Understand the biological processes that transform iodine species throughout different compartments of subsurface waste sites and the role that these processes have on {sup 129}I flux.

  13. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely with Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.

  14. Incompatibility of Contrast Medium and Trisodium Citrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delcour, Christian Bruninx, Guy

    2013-02-15

    To test the compatibility of trisodium citrate, a catheter lock solution, with iodinated contrast medium. Iohexol, iobitridol, iodixanol, ioxaglate, ioxithalamate, iomeprol, and iopromide were tested. In all tests, 2 ml of contrast medium were mixed with 2 ml of trisodium citrate solution. Iodixanol and ioxaglate provoked a highly viscous gluelike precipitation when mixed with trisodium citrate. A brief transient precipitate was observed with iohexol, iomeprol, and ioxithalamate. Permanent precipitation occurred with iobitridol and iopromide. One must be aware of the potential for precipitation when contrast medium is mixed with trisodium citrate solution. Before trisodium citrate solution is injected, the catheter should be thoroughly flushed with saline if a contrast medium has previously been injected through it.

  15. Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertch, Timothy C,

    2014-03-31

    General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

  16. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

  17. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, R?zvan; Muller, Serge; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters ? and ?. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, ? and ?, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers ? to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing ? by about 0.07 compared to DM, with ? unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases ? by about 2 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2}, and lowers ? by about 0.14 compared to LE images. A comparison of SE and DE CEDM at 4 min postcontrast shows equivalent power law parameters in unprocessed images, and lower ? and ? by about 3 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2} and 0.50, respectively, in DE versus SE subtracted images.Conclusions: Image subtraction in both SE and DE CEDM reduces ? by over a factor of 2, while maintaining ? below that in DM. Given the equivalent ? between SE and DE unprocessed CEDM images, and the smaller anatomical noise in the DE subtracted images, the DE approach may have an advantage over SE CEDM. It will be necessary to test this potential advantage in future lesion detectability experiments, which account for realistic lesion signals. The authors' results suggest that LE images could be used in place of DM images in CEDM exam interpretation.

  18. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part I. Single-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Muller, Serge; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The use of an intravenously injected iodinated contrast agent could help increase the sensitivity of digital mammography by adding information on tumor angiogenesis. Two approaches have been made for clinical implementation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM), namely, single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) imaging. In each technique, pairs of mammograms are acquired, which are then subtracted with the intent to cancel the appearance of healthy breast tissue to permit sensitive detection and specific characterization of lesions. Patterns of contrast agent uptake in the healthy parenchyma, and uncanceled signal from background tissue create a 'clutter' that can mask or mimic an enhancing lesion. This type of 'anatomical noise' is often the limiting factor in lesion detection tasks, and thus, noise quantification may be useful for cascaded systems analysis of CEDM and for phantom development. In this work, the authors characterize the anatomical noise in CEDM clinical images and the authors evaluate the influence of the x-ray energy used for acquisition, the presence of iodine in the breast, and the timing of imaging postcontrast administration on anatomical noise. The results are presented in a two-part report, with SE CEDM described here, and DE CEDM in Part II. Methods: A power law is used to model anatomical noise in CEDM images. The exponent, {beta}, which describes the anatomical structure, and the constant {alpha}, which represents the magnitude of the noise, are determined from Wiener spectra (WS) measurements on images. A total of 42 SE CEDM cases from two previous clinical pilot studies are assessed. The parameters {alpha} and {beta} are measured both from unprocessed images and from subtracted images. Results: Consistent results were found between the two SE CEDM pilot studies, where a significant decrease in {beta} from a value of approximately 3.1 in the unprocessed images to between about 1.1 and 1.8 in the subtracted images was observed. Increasing the x-ray energy from that used in conventional DM to those of typical SE CEDM spectra with mean energies above 33 keV significantly decreased {alpha} by about a factor of 19, in agreement with theory. Compared to precontrast images, in the unprocessed postcontrast images at 30 s postinjection, {alpha} was larger by about 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mm{sup 2} and {beta} was decreased by 0.2. While {alpha} did not vary significantly with the time after contrast administration, {beta} from the unprocessed image WS increased linearly, and {beta} from subtracted image WS increased with an initial quadratic relationship that plateaued by about 5 min postinjection. Conclusions: The presence of an iodinated contrast agent in the breast produced small, but significant changes in the power law parameters of unprocessed CEDM images compared to the precontrast images. Image subtraction in SE CEDM significantly reduced anatomical noise compared to conventional DM, with a reduction in both {alpha} and {beta} by about a factor of 2. The data presented here, and in Part II of this work, will be useful for modeling of CEDM backgrounds, for systems characterization and for lesion detectability experiments using models that account for anatomical noise.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of erythropoietin in intact and anephric dogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, J.S.; Lertora, J.J.; Brookins, J.; Rice, J.C.; Fisher, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    The present studies were performed to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin in intact and anephric dogs by use of unlabeled crude native erythropoietin (nEp) and iodine 125-labeled purified recombinant erythropoietin (rEp) given by intravenous infusion for 15 minutes. Sephadex G-75 gel filtration was used to confirm that the 125I-rEp molecule remained iodinated in dog plasma during the 24-hour period of these studies. The plasma disappearance of erythropoietin conformed to a biexponential equation for both nEp and 125I-rEp, with the central compartment being larger than the peripheral compartment. The mean distribution half-life of 75.3 +/- 21.2 minutes for nEp was significantly (p less than 0.05) longer than that of 125I-rEp (23.7 +/- 5.0 minutes) in intact dogs. The intercompartmental clearance (CIic) for nEp (0.018 +/- 0.006 L/kg/hr) was significantly smaller than that of 125I-rEp (0.068 +/- 0.018 L/kg/hr) in intact dogs (p less than 0.05). There were no significant differences in apparent volume of distribution, elimination half-life, and elimination clearance (CIe) for nEp and rEp in intact dogs. The mean elimination half-life for 125I-rEp in intact dogs (9.0 +/- 0.6 hours) and anephric dogs (13.8 +/- 1.4 hours) was significantly different (p less than 0.05). The CIe for 125I-rEp in anephric dogs (0.008 +/- 0.001 L/kg/hr) was significantly (p less than 0.05) smaller than that of 125I-rEp in intact dogs (0.011 +/- 0.001 L/kg/hr). There were no significant differences in apparent volume of distribution, distribution half-life, and CIic for 125I-rEp in intact and anephric dogs.

  20. Use of oxide decompositions in advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles for solar heat sources. Experimental results on the low-temperature reactions for the tricobalt tetraoxide-cobalt monoxide pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of utilizing oxide decompositions in advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles for solar heat sources is introduced. It has particular interest in allowing direct transmission of energy to the process through an air window. A cycle for the Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/-CoO pair would be, schematically: (1) Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ = 3CoO + 1/2 O/sub 2/; (2) I/sub 2/(s,1) + Mg(OH)/sub 2/ + 3CoO = MgI/sub 2/(aq) + Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O(1); (3) H/sub 2/O + MgI/sub 2/(aq) = MgO + 2HI; (4) 2 HI = H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/; (5) MgO + H/sub 2/O = Mg(OH)/sub 2/. Reaction (2) should give a high concentration of MgI/sub 2/ that would be favorable for (3). The solutions would also contain iodine dissolved as polyiodide, partly offsetting this advantage. Preliminary results indicate that reaction (2) is slow at 150/sup 0/C. It is surmised that the mechanism of (2) consists of the iodine disproportionation reaction (6), followed by reaction (7). (6) I/sub 2/(s,1) + Mg(OH)/sub 2/ = 5/6 MgI/sub 2/(aq) + 1/6 Mg(IO/sub 3/)/sub 2/(aq) + H/sub 2/O(1); (7) 1/6 Mg(IO/sub 3/)/sub 2/(aq) + 3 CoO = 1/6 MgI/sub 2/(aq) + Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/. Other workers have found (6) to be relatively fast and with a good yield at 150/sup 0/C. We have found the independently studied reaction (7) to be sufficiently slow at 150/sup 0/C to account for the slowness of (2). The yield of (7) was found to be proportional to the square root of the time, which suggests that iodate must diffuse through an adherent, accumulating Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ layer. Since (7) is much faster when Mg(IO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ is replaced by KIO/sub 3/, the Mg/sup 2 +/ ion may catalyze formation of an adherent Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ spinel layer. The reactivity of CoO in the KIO/sub 3/ analog of (7) is greatly decreased by exposure to high temperature.

  1. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting that iodine contrast based imaging and visualization of interventional devices could potentially be optimized for dose using similar x-ray beam spectra.

  2. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  3. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  4. Determination of total chlorine and bromine in solid wastes by sintering and inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterlund, Helene Rodushkin, Ilia; Ylinenjaervi, Karin; Baxter, Douglas C.

    2009-04-15

    A sample preparation method based on sintering, followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) for the simultaneous determination of chloride and bromide in diverse and mixed solid wastes, has been evaluated. Samples and reference materials of known composition were mixed with a sintering agent containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZnO and placed in an oven at 560 deg. C for 1 h. After cooling, the residues were leached with water prior to a cation-exchange assisted clean-up. Alternatively, a simple microwave-assisted digestion using only nitric acid was applied for comparison. Thereafter the samples were prepared for quantitative analysis by ICP-SFMS. The sintering method was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs) and by comparison with US EPA Method 5050 and ion chromatography with good agreement. Median RSDs for the sintering method were determined to 10% for both chlorine and bromine, and median recovery to 96% and 97%, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) were 200 mg/kg for chlorine and 20 mg/kg for bromine. It was concluded that the sintering method is suitable for chlorine and bromine determination in several matrices like sewage sludge, plastics, and edible waste, as well as for waste mixtures. The sintering method was also applied for determination of other elements present in anionic forms, such as sulfur, arsenic, selenium and iodine.

  5. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A.

    1992-01-01

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of [alpha]-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  6. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A.

    1992-10-01

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of {alpha}-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  7. Final Report for "Boron and Tin in Nuclear Medicien: The Development of Reactive Solid-State Reagents for PET and SPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Kabalka

    2006-01-13

    The research program was directed at the use of functionalized organometallic reagents that would rapidly react with radiolabeled agents generated by a medical cyclotron or reactor. The radioisotopes included fluorine-18, oxgygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11 and iodine-123; all short lived nuclides of importantce in nuclear medicine imaging studies utilizing emission tomography techniques. The early studies led to the development of extensive new isotope incorporation chemistry. These studies validated the feasibility of using reactive intermediates, such as the organoboranes, and acted as a catalyst for others to investigate organometallic agents based on mercury, tin, and silicon. A large number of radiolabeling techniques and radiopharmaceuticals were developed. These included agents for use in oncology, neurology, and metabolism. The research resulted in the generation of one hundred and one journal articles, eighty seven refereed published abstracts and forty one invited lectures. Thirteen postdoctoral students, fourteen graduate students, and twenty eight undergraduate students were trained in the scientific aspects of nuclear medicine imaging under the asupices of this grant.

  8. Fast dose kernel interpolation using Fourier transform with application to permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Derek Sloboda, Ron S.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. Methods: The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractional shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Results: Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. Conclusions: A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.

  9. IMPROVED MODELING OF THE ROSSITER-McLAUGHLIN EFFECT FOR TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Narita, Norio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sato, Bun'ei, E-mail: hirano@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    We present an improved formula for the anomalous radial velocity of the star during planetary transits due to the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. The improvement comes from a more realistic description of the stellar absorption line profiles, taking into account stellar rotation, macroturbulence, thermal broadening, pressure broadening, and instrumental broadening. Although the formula is derived for the case in which radial velocities are measured by cross-correlation, we show through numerical simulations that the formula accurately describes the cases where the radial velocities are measured with the iodine absorption-cell technique. The formula relies on prior knowledge of the parameters describing macroturbulence, instrumental broadening, and other broadening mechanisms, but even 30% errors in those parameters do not significantly change the results in typical circumstances. We show that the new analytic formula agrees with previous ones that had been computed on a case-by-case basis via numerical simulations. Finally, as one application of the new formula, we reassess the impact of the differential rotation on the RM velocity anomaly. We show that differential rotation of a rapidly rotating star may have a significant impact on future RM observations.

  10. Overview of vegetation monitoring data, 1952--1983. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This report is the third in a series that documents the information available on measurements of iodine-131 concentrations in vegetation. The first two reports provide the data for 1945--1951. This report provides an overview of the historical documents, which contain vegetation data for 1952--1983. The overview is organized according to the documents available for any given year. Each section, covering one year, contains a discussion of the media sampled, the sampling locations, significant events if there were any, emission quantities, constituents measured, and a list of the documents with complete reference information. Because the emissions which affected vegetation were significantly less after 1951, the vegetation monitoring data after that date have not been used in the HEDR Project. However, access to these data may be of interest to the public. This overview is, therefore, being published.

  11. Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard; Ohno, Shuji; Zeyen, Roland

    2010-09-01

    An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

  12. SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11

    U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (Idaho Operations Office) briefing about the SL-1 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown. The SL-1, or Stationary Low-Power Reactor Number One, was a United States Army experimental nuclear power reactor which underwent a steam explosion and meltdown on January 3, 1961, killing its three operators. The direct cause was the improper withdrawal of the central control rod, responsible for absorbing neutrons in the reactor core. The event is the only known fatal reactor accident in the United States. The accident released about 80 curies (3.0 TBq) of Iodine-131, which was not considered significant due to its location in a remote desert of Idaho. About 1,100 curies (41 TBq) of fission products were released into the atmosphere. The facility, located at the National Reactor Testing Station approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was part of the Army Nuclear Power Program and was known as the Argonne Low Power Reactor (ALPR) during its design and build phase. It was intended to provide electrical power and heat for small, remote military facilities, such as radar sites near the Arctic Circle, and those in the DEW Line. The design power was 3 MW (thermal). Operating power was 200 kW electrical and 400 kW thermal for space heating. In the accident, the core power level reached nearly 20 GW in just four milliseconds, precipitating the reactor accident and steam explosion.

  13. Nutrition and Feeding of Show Poultry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartwright, A. Lee

    2003-11-03

    % 0.15 0.15 0.15 Magnesium mg 600 600 600 Manganese mg 60.0 60.0 60.0 Zinc mg 40.0 40.0 40.0 Iron mg 80.0 80.0 80.0 Copper mg 8.0 8.0 8.0 Iodine mg 0.35 0.35 0.35 Selenium mg 0.15 0.15 0.15 Vitamin A IU 1,500 1,500 1,500 Vitamin D ICU 200 200 200....0 0.85 0.75 0.65 0.55 Phosporus, available % 0.6 0.5 0.42 0.38 0.32 0.28 Potassium % 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 Sodium % 0.17 0.15 0.12 0.12 0.12 0.12 Chlorine % 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.12 0.12 0.12 Magnesium mg 600 600 600 600 600 600 Manganese mg 60 60 60 60...

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  15. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  16. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  17. Characterization of supersonic mixing in a nonreacting Mach 2 combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollo, S.D.; Mcdaniel, J.C.; Hartfield, R.J., JR. )

    1992-01-01

    Planar measurements of the injection mole fraction distribution and the velocity field within a nonreacting model SCRAMJET combustor have been made using laser-induced iodine fluorescence. The combustor geometry investigated in this work is staged transverse injection of air into a Mach 2 freestream. A complete three-dimensional survey of the injectant mole fraction distribution has been generated and a single planar velocity measurement has been completed. The measurements reveal the dramatic effect of streamwise vortices on the mixing of the injectant in the near field of the injectors, as well as the rapid mixing generated by staging two field injectors. Analysis of the downstream decay of the maximum injectant mole fraction in this and other nonreacting combustor geometries indicates that the relative rate of injectant mixing well downstream of the injectors is independent of combustor geometry, combustor Mach number, and injectant molecular weight. Mixing within this region of the combustor is dominated by turbulent diffusion within the injectant plume. The transition of the dominant mixing mechanism, from vortex-driven mixing in the near field to turbulent diffusion in the far field, was found to occur in the region between 10 and 20 jet diameters downstream of the injectors. 22 refs.

  18. Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

  19. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pence, Dallas T. (San Diego, CA); Chou, Chun-Chao (San Diego, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  20. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  1. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  2. H-Area seepage basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    Groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) is monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SCl-890-008-989. The monitoring wells network is composed of 130 HSB wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Data from 16 HSL wells are included in this report only to provide additional information for the HASB. Monitoring results are compared to the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix IIID-A of the permit. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, and zinc) during the first half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB, and Aquifer Unit IIA.

  3. Summary Report on the Volatile Radionuclide and Immobilization Research for FY2011 at PNNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2011-09-01

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2011, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogen-based aerogels (i.e., chalcogels). A silica aerogel was tested at ORNL for total I2 sorption capacity. It was determined to have 48 mass% capacity while having little physisorbed I2 (I2 not taken up in the aerogel pores). For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated and a new MOF with about 8 mass% capacity for Xe and Kr. The selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by lowering the temperature below 0 C. A patent disclosure has been filed. Lastly, silicon carbide (SiC) was loaded with Kr. The diffusion of Kr in SiC was found to be less than detectable at 500 C.

  4. Investigation and Optimization of Biodiesel Chemistry for HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G. [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Joyce, Blake [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W. [Rincon Ranch Consulting

    2014-06-23

    Over the past 5 years, ORNL has run 95 diesel range fuels in homogene-ous charge compression ignition (HCCI), including 40 bio-diesels and associated diesel fuels in their blending. The bio-diesel blends varied in oxygen content, iodine number, cetane, boiling point distribution, chemical composition, and some contained nitrogen. All fuels were run in an HCCI engine at 1800 rpm, in the power range of 2.5 to 4.5 bar IMEP, using intake air heating for combustion phasing control, and at a compression ratio of 10.6. The engine response to fuel variables has been analyzed statistically. Generally, the engine responded well to fuels with lower nitrogen and oxygen, lower cetane, and lower aromatics. Because of the wide range of fuels combined in the model, it provides only a broad overview of the engine response. It is recommended that data be truncated and re-modeled to obtain finer resolution of engine response to particular fuel variables.

  5. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  6. Source-term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    For a severe pressurized water reactor accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the stream generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating causes a water boil-off. Without effective decay heat removal, the fuel elements will be uncovered. Eventually, steam will oxidize the overheated cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as cesium and iodine, that are major contributors to the radiological source term will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  7. TREAT source-term experiment STEP-1 simulating a PWR LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Blomquist, C.A.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    In a hypothetical pressurized water reactor (PWR) large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in which the emergency core cooling system fails, fission product decay heating causes water boil-off and reduced heat removal. Zircaloy cladding is oxidized by the steam. The noble gases and volatile fission products such as cesium and iodine that constitute a principal part of the source term will be released from the damaged fuel at or shortly after the time of cladding failure. TREAT test STEP-1 simulated the LOCA environment when the volatile fission products would be released using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The principal objective was to collect a portion of the releases carried by the flow stream in a region as close as possible to the test zone. In this paper, the test is described and the results of an analysis of the thermal and steam/hydrogen environment are compared with the test measurements in order to provide a characterization for analysis of fission product releases and aerosol formation. The results of extensive sample examinations are reported separately.

  8. Labelled biomolecules with sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm, sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, and sup 9 sup 0 Y for targeted radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mushtaq, A; Perverz, S

    1998-01-01

    A somatostatin analogue Lanreotide was labelled with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m and sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I. Labelling was accomplished by reduction of cysteine bridge, which provided sulfhydryl groups for chelation with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re/ sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m. Stannous chloride was used as reducing agent, while tartrate acted as transchelating agent. The lower redox potential of ReO sub 4 sup - than TcO sub 4 sup - required the addition of excess SnCl sub 2 and medium-chelating agent for stabilizing the excess of SnCl sub 2 in solution. ITLC and HPLC techniques employed for monitoring the labelling yield revealed >95% labelling efficiency. Radioiodination of lanreotide was carried out by Chloramine-T and iodogen methods. The radiolabelling yield varied between 40-80%. Chloramine-T method was found more suitable than Iodogen method, because approx 25% of the initial iodine activity was adsorbed on Iodogen coating. Avidin-biotin system is widely used in medical research, especially in pretargete...

  9. Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; O���¢��������Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-11-05

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

  10. THE HARPS-TERRA PROJECT. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE ALGORITHMS, PERFORMANCE, AND NEW MEASUREMENTS ON A FEW REMARKABLE STARS OBSERVED BY HARPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul

    2012-06-01

    Doppler spectroscopy has uncovered or confirmed all the known planets orbiting nearby stars. Two main techniques are used to obtain precision Doppler measurements at optical wavelengths. The first approach is the gas cell method, which consists of least-squares matching of the spectrum of iodine imprinted on the spectrum of the star. The second method relies on the construction of a stabilized spectrograph externally calibrated in wavelength. The most precise stabilized spectrometer in operation is the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS), operated by the European Southern Observatory in La Silla Observatory, Chile. The Doppler measurements obtained with HARPS are typically obtained using the cross-correlation function (CCF) technique. This technique consists of multiplying the stellar spectrum by a weighted binary mask and finding the minimum of the product as a function of the Doppler shift. It is known that CCF is suboptimal in exploiting the Doppler information in the stellar spectrum. Here we describe an algorithm to obtain precision radial velocity measurements using least-squares matching of each observed spectrum to a high signal-to-noise ratio template derived from the same observations. This algorithm is implemented in our software HARPS-TERRA (Template-Enhanced Radial velocity Re-analysis Application). New radial velocity measurements on a representative sample of stars observed by HARPS are used to illustrate the benefits of the proposed method. We show that, compared with CCF, template matching provides a significant improvement in accuracy, especially when applied to M dwarfs.

  11. Final Technical Report for the Period September 2002 through September 2005; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: SI-Based Plant; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: HTE-Based Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Richards; A. Shenoy; L. Brown; R. Buckingham; E. Harvego; K. Peddicord; M. Reza; J. Coupey

    2006-04-19

    For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For electricity production, the MHR operates with an outlet helium temperature of 850 C to drive a direct, Brayton-cycle power-conversion system with a thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 48 percent. This concept is referred to as the Gas Turbine MHR (GT-MHR). For hydrogen production, both electricity and process heat from the MHR are used to produce hydrogen. This concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. This report provides pre-conceptual design descriptions of full-scale, nth-of-a-kind H2 MHR plants based on thermochemical water splitting using the Sulfur-Iodine process and High-Temperature Electrolysis.

  12. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  13. Exclusive Vector Meson Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Klein; Joakim Nystrand

    1999-02-06

    Exclusive vector meson production reactions such as $Au + Au \\to Au + Au + V$, where $V=\\rho, \\omega, \\phi$ or $J/\\psi$ can proceed through photon-Pomeron and photon-meson interactions. Photons from the electromagnetic field of one nucleus interact coherently with the other nucleus. Photonuclear cross sections are scaled from $\\gamma p$ data, and convoluted with the photon spectrum to find the exclusive rates. The cross sections at the RHIC and LHC heavy ion colliders are huge, 10% of the total hadronic cross section at RHIC, and 50% at LHC. These accelerators may be useful as vector meson factories. With iodine beams at RHIC, 640 $\\rho$ are produced each second (10^{10}/year); with calcium at the LHC the rate is 240 kHz. The $\\phi$ rates are 39 Hz at RHIC and 15 kHz at LHC, while the $J/\\psi$ rate is 0.3 Hz at RHIC and 780 Hz at the LHC. Because of the coherent couplings, the reactions kinematics are similar to coherent two-photon interactions; we discuss the interplay between the two reactions.

  14. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  15. Nuclear-waste-management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development, alternate waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  16. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  17. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Dennis R. (San Diego, CA); Norman, John H. (San Diego, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  18. Enhanced Jahn-Teller response induced by low-dose 10?MeV I{sup +} irradiation of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3??} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, V. G., E-mail: v.harris@neu.edu; Chen, Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Byers, J. M.; Stroud, R. M.; Osofsky, M. S.; Knies, D.; Grabowski, K. S. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6360, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Browning, V. M.; Fuller-Mora, W. W. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6340, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kim, J. [Neocera, LLC, 10000 Virginia Manor Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    2014-05-26

    The structural response of pulsed laser deposited La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn0{sub 3??} films to low-level 10?MeV I{sup +} irradiation is correlated with magnetic and electronic properties. A series of annealed pulsed laser deposited films were subjected to ion irradiation at doses of 0.5–2.0 × 10{sup 13} 10?MeV iodine ions/cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction measurements show no measurable increase in the full width at half maximum values of major reflections before and after irradiation. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure analyses (EXAFS), employing both a model independent fitting using expanded cumulants as well as a nonlinear least squares multiple scattering model based on FEFF generated theoretical EXAFS data, were employed to measure local properties relative to the Mn ions. Increasing irradiation doses lead to an unambiguous evolution of MnO{sub 6} octahedra from highly symmetric (i.e., undistorted) to a clear bimodal structure in which the MnO{sub 6} octahedra are measured to undergo a c-axis stretching bearing resemblance to a Jahn-Teller distortion. Concomitantly, the metal to insulator transition temperature decreases more than 270?K and the magnetoresistance increases from 10{sup 2}% to 10{sup 6}%.

  19. Wastes associated with recycling spent MOX fuel into fast reactor oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foare, G.; Meze, F. [AREVA EP, SGN - 1, rue des Herons, 18182 Montigny-le-Bretonneux (France); McGee, D.; Murray, P.; Bader, S. [AREVA Federal Services LLC - 7207 IBM Drive, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A study sponsored by the DOE has been performed by AREVA to estimate the process and secondary wastes produced from an 800 MTIHM/yr (initial metric tons heavy metal a year) recycling plant proposed to be built in the U.S. utilizing the COEX process and utilized some DOE defined assumptions and constraints. In this paper, this plant has been analyzed for a recycling campaign that included 89% UO{sub x} and 11% MOX UNF to estimate process and secondary waste quantities produced while manufacturing 28 MTIHM/yr of SFR fuel. AREVA utilized operational data from its backend facilities in France (La Hague and MELOX), and from recent advances in waste treatment technology to estimate the waste quantities. A table lists the volumes and types of the different final wastes for a recycling plant. For instance concerning general fission products the form of the final wastes is vitrified glass and its volume generation rate is 135 l/MTHM, concerning Iodine 129 waste its final form is synthetic rock and its volume generation rate is 0.625 l/MTIHM.

  20. SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-25

    U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (Idaho Operations Office) briefing about the SL-1 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown. The SL-1, or Stationary Low-Power Reactor Number One, was a United States Army experimental nuclear power reactor which underwent a steam explosion and meltdown on January 3, 1961, killing its three operators. The direct cause was the improper withdrawal of the central control rod, responsible for absorbing neutrons in the reactor core. The event is the only known fatal reactor accident in the United States. The accident released about 80 curies (3.0 TBq) of Iodine-131, which was not considered significant due to its location in a remote desert of Idaho. About 1,100 curies (41 TBq) of fission products were released into the atmosphere. The facility, located at the National Reactor Testing Station approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was part of the Army Nuclear Power Program and was known as the Argonne Low Power Reactor (ALPR) during its design and build phase. It was intended to provide electrical power and heat for small, remote military facilities, such as radar sites near the Arctic Circle, and those in the DEW Line. The design power was 3 MW (thermal). Operating power was 200 kW electrical and 400 kW thermal for space heating. In the accident, the core power level reached nearly 20 GW in just four milliseconds, precipitating the reactor accident and steam explosion.

  1. Sensor apparatus using an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thakur, Mrinal

    2003-07-01

    A method for sensing mechanical quantities such as force, stress, strain, pressure and acceleration is disclosed. This technology is based on a change in the electrochemically generated voltage (electromotive force) with application of force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration. The change in the voltage is due to a change in the internal resistance of the electrochemical cell with a change in the relative position or orientation of the electrodes (anode and cathode) in the cell. The signal to be detected (e.g. force, stress, strain, pressure or acceleration) is applied to one of the electrodes to cause a change in the relative position or orientation between the electrodes. Various materials, solid, semisolid, gel, paste or liquid can be utilized as the electrolyte. The electrolyte must be an ion conductor. The examples of solid electrolytes include specific polymer conductors, polymer composites, ion conducting glasses and ceramics. The electrodes are made of conductors such as metals with dissimilar electro negativities. Significantly enhanced sensitivities, up to three orders of magnitude higher than that of comparable commercial sensors, are obtained. The materials are substantially less expensive than commercially used materials for mechanical sensors. An apparatus for sensing such mechanical quantities using materials such as doped 1,4 cis-polyisopropene and nafion. The 1,4 cis-polyisopropene may be doped with lithium perchlorate or iodine. The output voltage signal increases with an increase of the sensing area for a given stress. The device can be used as an intruder alarm, among other applications.

  2. Preparation of activated carbon from coconut shell chars in pilot-scale microwave heating equipment at 60 kW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Wei [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Science, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Peng Jinhui [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)], E-mail: jhpeng_ok@yeah.net; Zhang Libo; Yang Kunbin; Xia Hongying; Zhang Shimin; Guo Shenghui [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Experiments to prepare activated carbon by microwave heating indicated that microwave energy can decrease reaction temperature, save the energy and shorten processing time remarkably compared to conventional heating, owing to its internal and volumetric heating effects. The above results were based on the laboratory-scale experiments. It is desirable to develop a pilot-scale microwave heating equipment and investigate the parameters with the aim of technological industrialization. In the present study, the components and features of the self-invented equipment were introduced. The temperature rise curves of the chars were obtained. Iodine numbers of the activated carbons all exceed the state standard of China under the following conditions: 25 kg/h charging rate, 0.42 rev/min turning rate of ceramic tube, flow rate of steam at pressure of 0.01 MPa and 40 kW microwave heating power after 60 kW pre-activation for 30 min. Pore structure of the sample obtained at a time point of 46 h, which contained BET surface area, and pore size distributions of micropores and total pores, was tested by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K.

  3. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  4. Scoping Analyses on Tritium Permeation to VHTR Integarted Industrial Application Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tritium permeation is a very important current issue in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) because tritium is easily permeated through high temperature metallic surfaces. Tritium permeations in the VHTR-integrated systems were investigated in this study using the tritium permeation analysis code (TPAC) that was developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL TPAC is a numerical tool that is based on the mass balance equations of tritium containing species and hydrogen (i.e. HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, TI) coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and thermal neutron caption reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including high temperature electrolysis (HTSE) and sulfur-iodine processes.

  5. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Phifer, M.

    2010-07-30

    An air and radon pathways analysis was conducted for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. Additionally, the dose to the MEI was estimated at a seepage outcrop located 1600 m from the facility. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

  6. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

  7. Yucca Mountain Project - Science & Technology Radionuclide Absorbers Development Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong-Nian Jow; R.C. Moore; K.B. Helean; S. Mattigod; M. Hochella; A.R. Felmy; J. Liu; K. Rosso; G. Fryxell; J. Krumhansl; Y. Wang

    2005-01-14

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository is anticipated to be the first facility for long-term disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The facility, located in the southern Nevada desert, is currently in the planning stages with initial exploratory excavations completed. It is an underground facility mined into the tuffaceous volcanic rocks that sit above the local water table. The focus of the work described in this paper is the development of radionuclide absorbers or ''getter'' materials for neptunium (Np), iodine (I), and technetium (Tc) for potential deployment in the repository. ''Getter'' materials retard the migration of radionuclides through sorption, reduction, or other chemical and physical processes, thereby slowing or preventing the release and transport of radionuclides. An overview of the objectives and approaches utilized in this work with respect to materials selection and modeling of ion ''getters'' is presented. The benefits of the ''getter'' development program to the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) are outlined.

  8. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  9. SU-E-I-24: Design and Fabrication of a Multi-Functional Neck and Thyroid Phantom for Medical Dosimetry and Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdizadeh, S; Sina, S; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Faghihi, R; Babaei, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the design and fabrication of a multipurpose anthropomorphic neck and thyroid phantom for use in medical applications (i.e. quality control of images in nuclear medicine, and dosimetry). Methods: The designed neck phantom is composed of seven elliptic cylindrical slices with semi-major axis of 14 and semi-minor axis of 12.5 cm, each having the thickness of 2cm. Thyroid gland, bony part of the neck, and the wind pipe were also built inside the neck phantom. Results: The phantom contains some removable plugs,inside and at its surface to accommodate the TLD chips with different shapes and dimensions, (i.e. rod, cylindrical and cubical TLD chips)for the purpose of medical dosimetry (i.e. in radiology, radiotherapy, and nuclear medicine). For the purpose of quality control of images in nuclear medicine, the removable thyroid gland was built to accommodate the radioactive iodine. The female and male thyroid glands were built in two sizes separately. Conclusion: The designed phantom is a multi-functional phantom which is applicable for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, and quality control of images in nuclear medicine.

  10. Radwaste immobilization with the use of special protective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhitonov, Yury; Pokrovski, Yury; Kolobov, Evgeniy; Strelkov, Sergey [V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 194021, 28, 2nd Murinsky pr., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: One of the most important conditions for the realization of the concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle consists in the availability of highly developed infrastructure, including reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and further utilization of the resulted waste. The major way for increasing the safety of rad-wastes management is the development of advanced technologies, which would enable to reprocess the whole volume of high-level waste (HLW) and to obtain the solid products offering high chemical stability which would be suitable for long-term monitored storage and/or final disposal. At the same time another way to enhance the safety of solidified HLW storage and disposal is to apply a special coating on granulated wastes or to encapsulate solidified HLW using adequate materials. The object of this work was to conduct experimental study on technology development to obtain protective covering at ceramic materials containing cesium radionuclides. Physicochemical characteristics of these materials (data on cesium leaching rate) are presented. An alternative objective of the work was to perform experiments on increasing the chemical stability of matrix compositions based on 'reactor' palladium containing europium oxide and iodine. (authors)

  11. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.; Wernly, K.

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  12. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  13. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  14. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana-Pillai, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  15. Physics overview of AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solarz, R.W.

    1985-02-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) represents the largest-scale potential application of tunable lasers that has received serious attention within the chemical physics community. For over a decade the US Department of Energy has funded an aggressive program in AVLIS at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After extensive research, the underlying physical principles have been identified and optimized, the major technology components have been developed, and the integrated enrichment performance of the process has been tested under realistic conditions. The central physical processes are outlined, progress to date on the technology elements is reviewed, and scaling laws that can be used to scope out new applications are fomulated. The two primary applications of major interest to the Department of Energy are the production of light-water reactor fuel and the conversion of fuel-grade plutonium to weapons-grade material. In FY 1984 the total AVLIS funding level for these two missions was approximately $150M. In addition to these primary missions, a variety of applications exist that all potentially use a common base of AVLIS technology. These include missions such as the enrichment of mercury isotopes to improve fluorescent lamp efficiency, the enrichment of iodine isotopes for medical isotope use, and the cleanup of strontium from defense waste for recovering strontium isotopes for radio-thermal mechanical generators. We will see that the ability to rapidly assess the economic and technical feasibility of each mission is derived from the general applicability of AVLIS physics and AVLIS technology.

  16. Phase 1 summaries of radionuclide concentration data for vegetation, river water, drinking water, and fish. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, D.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Poston, T.M.; Thiede, M.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. As part of the HEDR Project, the Environmental Monitoring Data Task (Task 05) staff assemble, evaluate, and summarize key historical measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the environment as a result of Hanford operations. The scope of work performed during Phase I included initiating the search, recovery, and inventory of environmental reports. Summaries of the environmental monitoring data that were recovered and evaluated are presented for specific periods of interest. These periods include vegetation monitoring data (primarily sagebrush) for the years 1945 through 1947, Columbia River water and drinking water monitoring data for the years 1963 through 1966, and fish monitoring data for the years 1964 through 1966. Concern was limited to those radionuclides identified as the most likely major contributors to the dose potentially received by the public during the times of interest: phosphorous-32, copper-64, zinc-65, arsenic-76, and neptunium-239 in Columbia River fish and drinking water taken from the river, and iodine-131 in vegetation. This report documents the achievement of the Phase I objectives of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task.

  17. APIVT-Grown Silicon Thin Layers and PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Page, M. R.; Bauer, R. E.; Wang, Q.; Landry, M. D.

    2002-05-01

    Large-grained (5-20 ..mu..m) polycrystalline silicon layers have been grown at intermediate temperatures of 750-950C directly on foreign substrates without a seeding layer by iodine vapor transport at atmospheric pressure with rates as high as 3 mm/min. A model is constructed to explain the atypical temperature dependence of growth rate. We have also used this technique to grow high-quality epitaxial layers on heavily doped CZ-Si and on upgraded MG-Si substrates. Possible solar cell structures of thin-layer polycrystalline silicon on foreign substrates with light trapping have been examined, compared, and optimized by two-dimensional device simulations. The effects of grain boundary re-combination on device performance are presented for two grain sizes of 2 and 20 mm. We found that 104 cm/s recombination velocity is adequate for 20-m m grain-sized thin silicon, whereas a very low recombination velocity of 103 cm/s must be accomplished in order to achieve reasonable performance for a 2- mm grain-sized polycrystalline silicon device.

  18. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantommore »with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.« less

  19. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-09-01

    The United States is now re-assessing its nuclear waste disposal policy and re-evaluating the option of moving away from the current once-through open fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. In a closed fuel cycle, used fuels will be reprocessed and useful components such as uranium or transuranics will be recovered for reuse. During this process, a variety of waste streams will be generated. Immobilizing these waste streams into appropriate waste forms for either interim storage or long-term disposal is technically challenging. Highly volatile or soluble radionuclides such as iodine ({sup 129}I) and technetium ({sup 99}Tc) are particularly problematic, because both have long half-lives and can exist as gaseous or anionic species that are highly soluble and poorly sorbed by natural materials. Under the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), we have developed a suite of inorganic nanocomposite materials (SNL-NCP) that can effectively entrap various radionuclides, especially for {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc. In particular, these materials have high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation of waste forms incorporates radionuclides as nano-scale inclusions in a host matrix and thus effectively relaxes the constraint of crystal structure on waste loadings. Therefore, the new waste forms have an unprecedented flexibility to accommodate a wide range of radionuclides with high waste loadings and low leaching rates. Specifically, we have developed a general route for synthesizing nanoporous metal oxides from inexpensive inorganic precursors. More than 300 materials have been synthesized and characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area measurements, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The sorption capabilities of the synthesized materials have been quantified by using stable isotopes I and Re as analogs to {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc. The results have confirmed our original finding that nanoporous Al oxide and its derivatives have high I sorption capabilities due to the combined effects of surface chemistry and nanopore confinement. We have developed a suite of techniques for the fixation of radionuclides in metal oxide nanopores. The key to this fixation is to chemically convert a target radionuclide into a less volatile or soluble form. We have developed a technique to convert a radionuclide-loaded nanoporous material into a durable glass-ceramic waste form through calcination. We have shown that mixing a radionuclide-loaded getter material with a Na-silicate solution can effectively seal the nanopores in the material, thus enhancing radionuclide retention during waste form formation. Our leaching tests have demonstrated the existence of an optimal vitrification temperature for the enhancement of waste form durability. Our work also indicates that silver may not be needed for I immobilization and encapsulation.

  20. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

  1. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investi¬gate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a quali¬tative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simula¬tion period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial condi¬tions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contam¬inant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concen¬trations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the upland boundary fluxes 1) had little impact on regional flow directions and 2) accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher upland fluxes caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never exceeded the DWS. No significant effects on contaminant concentrations were identified at the Core Zone, Columbia River, or buffer zone area separating these two compliance boundaries. When lateral recharge at the upland boundaries was increased, more mass was transported out of the aquifer and discharged into the Columbia River. These concentrations, however, were diluted with respect to the Base Case, where no potential leakage from the proposed reservoir was considered.

  2. Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y.

    2011-06-21

    The cleanup activities of the Hanford tank wastes require stabilization and solidification of the secondary waste streams generated from the processing of the tank wastes. The treatment of these tank wastes to produce glass waste forms will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. Liquid wastes may include process condensates and scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids from the thermal waste treatment. The current baseline for solidification of the secondary wastes is a cement-based waste form. However, alternative secondary waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the secondary wastes. The Ceramicrete process has been demonstrated on four secondary waste formulations: baseline, cluster 1, cluster 2, and mixed waste streams. Based on the recipes provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the four waste simulants were prepared in-house. Waste forms were fabricated with three filler materials: Class C fly ash, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Class C fly ash + slag. Optimum waste loadings were as high as 20 wt.% for the fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3}, and 15 wt.% for fly ash + slag filler. Waste forms for physical characterizations were fabricated with no additives, hazardous contaminants, and radionuclide surrogates. Physical property characterizations (density, compressive strength, and 90-day water immersion test) showed that the waste forms were stable and durable. Compressive strengths were >2,500 psi, and the strengths remained high after the 90-day water immersion test. Fly ash and CaSiO{sub 3} filler waste forms appeared to be superior to the waste forms with fly ash + slag as a filler. Waste form weight loss was {approx}5-14 wt.% over the 90-day immersion test. The majority of the weight loss occurred during the initial phase of the immersion test, indicative of washing off of residual unreacted binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

  3. Sorption Modeling and verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Lin, Ronghong; Nan, Yue; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; Ladshaw, Austin; Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; DePaoli, David

    2015-04-29

    The project has made progress toward developing a comprehensive modeling capability for the capture of target species in off gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The effort has integrated experimentation, model development, and computer code development for adsorption and absorption processes. For adsorption, a modeling library has been initiated to include (a) equilibrium models for uptake of off-gas components by adsorbents, (b) mass transfer models to describe mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle and adsorption on the active sites of the particle, and (c) interconnection of these models to fixed bed adsorption modeling which includes advection through the bed. For single-component equilibria, a Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) code was developed to represent experimental data from a broad range of isotherm types; this is equivalent to a Langmuir isotherm in the two-parameter case, and was demonstrated for Kr on INL engineered sorbent HZ PAN, water sorption on molecular sieve 3A sorbent material (MS3A), and Kr and Xe capture on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The GSTA isotherm was extended to multicomponent systems through application of a modified spreading pressure surface activity model and generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory; the result is the capability to estimate multicomponent adsorption equilibria from single-component isotherms. This advance, which enhances the capability to simulate systems related to off-gas treatment, has been demonstrated for a range of real-gas systems in the literature and is ready for testing with data currently being collected for multicomponent systems of interest, including iodine and water on MS3A. A diffusion kinetic model for sorbent pellets involving pore and surface diffusion as well as external mass transfer has been established, and a methodology was developed for determining unknown diffusivity parameters from transient uptake data. Two parallel approaches have been explored for integrating the kernels described above into a mass-transport model for adsorption in fixed beds. In one, the GSTA isotherm kernel has been incorporated into the MOOSE framework; in the other approach, a focused finite-difference framework and PDE kernels have been developed. Issues, including oscillatory behavior in MOOSE solutions to advection-diffusion problems, and opportunities have been identified for each approach, and a path forward has been identified toward developing a stronger modeling platform. Experimental systems were established for collection of microscopic kinetics and equilibria data for single and multicomponent uptake of gaseous species on solid sorbents. The systems, which can operate at ambient temperature to 250°C and dew points from -69 to l7°C, are useful for collecting data needed for modeling performance of sorbents of interest. Experiments were conducted to determine applicable models and parameters for isotherms and mass transfer for water and/or iodine adsorption on MS3A. Validation experiments were also conducted for water adsorption on fixed beds ofMS3A. For absorption, work involved modeling with supportive experimentation. A dynamic model was developed to simulate C02 absorption with chemical reaction using high alkaline content water solutions. A computer code was developed to implement the model based upon transient mass and energy balances. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale column to determine model parameters. The influence of geometric parameters and operating variables on C02 absorption was studied over a wide range of conditions. This project has resulted in 7 publications, with 3 manuscripts in preparation. Also, 15 presentations were given at national meetings of ANS and AIChE and at Material Recovery and Waste Forms Campaign Working Group meetings.

  4. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin; Liu, Fang; Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup ?15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  5. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

  6. Anisotropy Characterization of I-125 Seed with Attached Encapsulated Cobalt Chloride Complex Contrast Agent Markers for MRI-Based Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tailor, Ramesh C.; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Martirosyan, Karen S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Stafford, R. Jason; Elliott, Andrew M. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sing, David; Choi, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mourtada, Firas; Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a novel MRI marker for prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in anisotropy when cobalt chloride complex contrast agent encapsulated contrast agent markers (C4-ECAM) were placed adjacent to an iodine-125 (I-125) titanium seed, and to verify that the C4-ECAMs were visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after radiation exposure. Two C4-ECAMs were verified to be MRI visible in a phantom before radiation exposure. The C4-ECAMs were then attached to each end of a 12.7-U (10-mCi) I-125 titanium seed in a polymer tube. Anisotropy was measured and analyzed with the seed alone and with attached C4-ECAMs by suspending thermoluminescent dosimeters in a water phantom in 2 circles surrounding the radioactive source with radius of 1 or 2 cm. A T1-weighted MRI evaluation of C4-ECAMs was then performed after exposure to the amount of radiation typically delivered during 1 month of prostate brachytherapy. Measured values of the anisotropy function F(r, {theta}) for the I-125 seed with and without the C4-ECAMs were mutually statistically indistinguishable (standard error of the mean <4.2%) and agreed well with published TG-43 values for the bare seed. As expected, the anisotropy function {phi}{sub an}(r) for the 2 datasets (with and without C4-ECAMs) derived from the measured F(r, {theta}) did not exhibit statistically measurable difference. Both datasets showed agreement with the published TG-43 {phi}{sub an}(r) for the bare seed. The C4-ECAMs were well visualized by MRI after 1 month of radiation exposure. There were no changes in anisotropy when the C4-ECAMs were placed next to an I-125 radioactive seed, and the C4-ECAMs were visualized after radiation exposure.

  7. Identifying the Theory of Dark Matter with Direct Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Gluscevic; Moira I. Gresham; Samuel D. McDermott; Annika H. G. Peter; Kathryn M. Zurek

    2015-06-15

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin-, momentum-, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either "heavy" or "light" mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  8. Short-Term Effects of Ankaferd Hemostat for Renal Artery Embolization: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozbek, Orhan; Acar, Kadir; Koc, Osman; Saritas, Kadir; Toy, Hatice; Solak, Yalcin; Ozbek, Seda; Kucukapan, Ahmet; Guler, Ibrahim; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celaleddin

    2013-04-15

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that is utilized in a number of disorders. Ankaferd is a novel hemostatic agent with a new mechanism of action independent of clotting factors. We used Ankaferd for RAE in a sheep model. Seven adult female sheep were included in the study. Selective renal arteriogram using 5-F diagnostic catheter was performed to make sure that each kidney was fed by a single renal artery and the animal had normal renal vasculature. Coaxial 2.7-F microcatheter was advanced to the distal main renal artery. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 2 mL of Ankaferd mixed with 2 mL of nonionic iodinated contrast agent was slowly injected. Fluoroscopy was used to observe the deceleration of flow and stagnation. Control renal angiograms were performed just after embolization. After the procedure, the animals were observed for 1 day and then sacrificed with intravenous sodium thiopental. The technical success was observed in seven of the seven animals.. After embolization procedure, none of the animals died or experienced a major systemic adverse event. On macroscopic examination of the embolized kidneys, thrombus at the level of main renal artery formed after Ankaferd embolization was more compact compared with the thrombi that was not Ankaferd-associated, which was observed elsewhere. Microscopically, majority of the renal tubular cells (80-90 %) were necrotic, and there was epithelial cell damage in a small portion of the cells (10-20 %). RAE was safe and effective in the short-term with Ankaferd in studied animals. Further studies should be conducted to better delineate the embolizing potential of this novel hemostatic agent.

  9. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  10. TAILORING X-RAY BEAM ENERGY SPECTRUM TO ENHANCE IMAGE QUALITY OF NEW RADIOGRAPHY CONTRAST AGENTS BASED ON GD OR OTHER LANTHANIDES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DILMANIAN,F.A.; WEINMANN,H.J.; ZHONG,Z.; BACARIAN,T.; RIGON,L.; BUTTON,T.M.; REN,B.; WU,X.Y.; ZHONG,N.; ATKINS,H.L.

    2001-02-17

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin Germany, in use in clinical MPI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-my beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a ''truly'' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's Ku line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with {approximately} twice higher output become available.

  11. ACCELERATOR TRANSMUTATION OF WASTE TECHNOLOGY AND IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. BELLER; G. VAN TUYLE

    2000-11-01

    During 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy, in conjunction with its nuclear laboratories, a national steering committee, and a panel of world experts, developed a roadmap for research, development, demonstration, and deployment of Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW). The ATW concept that was examined in this roadmap study was based on that developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during the 1990s. The reference deployment scenario in the Roadmap was developed to treat 86,300 tn (metric tonnes initial heavy metal) of spent nuclear fuel that will accumulate through 2035 from existing U.S. nuclear power plants (without license extensions). The disposition of this spent nuclear reactor fuel is an issue of national importance, as is disposition of spent fuel in other nations. The U.S. program for the disposition of this once-through fuel is focused to characterize a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for a geological repository for spent fuel and high-level waste. The ATW concept is being examined in the U.S. because removal of plutonium minor actinides, and two very long-lived isotopes from the spent fuel can achieve some important objectives. These objectives include near-elimination of plutonium, reduction of the inventory and mobility of long-lived radionuclides in the repository, and use of the remaining energy content of the spent fuel to produce power. The long-lived radionuclides iodine and technetium have roughly one million year half-lives, and they are candidates for transport into the environment via movement of ground water. The scientists and engineers who contributed to the Roadmap Study determined that the ATW is affordable, doable, and its deployment would support all the objectives. We report the status of the U.S. ATW program describe baseline and alternate technologies, and discuss deployment scenarios to support the existing U.S. nuclear capability and/or future growth with a variety of new fuel cycles.

  12. Composite analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 area plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kincaid, C.T.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis) prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Implementation Plan for the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-2. The Composite Analysis is a companion document to published analyses of four active or planned low-level waste disposal actions: the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 West Area, the solid waste burial grounds in the 200 East Area, the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility, and the disposal facilities for immobilized low-activity waste. A single Composite Analysis was prepared for the Hanford Site considering only sources on the 200 Area Plateau. The performance objectives prescribed in U.S. Department of Energy guidance for the Composite Analysis were 100 mrem in a year and examination of a lower dose (30 mrem in a year) to ensure the {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} concept is followed. The 100 mrem in a year limit was the maximum allowable all-pathways dose for 1000 years following Hanford Site closure, which is assumed to occur in 2050. These performance objectives apply to an accessible environment defined as the area between a buffer zone surrounding an exclusive waste management area on the 200 Area Plateau, and the Columbia River. Estimating doses to hypothetical future members of the public for the Composite Analysis was a multistep process involving the estimation or simulation of inventories; waste release to the environment; migration through the vadose zone, groundwater, and atmospheric pathways; and exposure and dose. Doses were estimated for scenarios based on agriculture, residential, industrial, and recreational land use. The radionuclides included in the vadose zone and groundwater pathway analyses of future releases were carbon-14, chlorine-36, selenium-79, technetium-99, iodine-129, and uranium isotopes.

  13. OSPREY Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

  14. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  15. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

  16. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-11-03

    A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

  17. F-area seepage basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1. First and second quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    Groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) is monitored in compliance with Module 111, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SCl-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 86 FSB wells and well HSB 85A. These wells are screened in the three hydrostratigraphic Units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1900. Data from 9 FSL wells are included in this report only to provide additional information for this area; the FSL wells are not part of Permit SCl-890-008-989. Monitoring results are compared to the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), which is specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit (November 1992). Historically and currently, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the first half of 1995, notably aluminum, iodine-129, pH, strontium-90, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the first half of 1995.

  18. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  19. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  20. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A.; Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk.

  1. Investigation Of Plasma Produced By High-Energy Low-Intensity Laser Pulses For Implantation Of Ge Ions Into Si And Sio2 Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosinski, M.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Boody, F. P.; Gammino, S.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Mezzasalma, A.; Torrisi, L.

    2006-01-15

    The development of implantation techniques requires investigation of laser plasma as a potential source of multiply charged ions. The laser ion source delivers ions with kinetic energy and a charge state dependent on the irradiated target material and the parameters of the laser radiation used. By the focusing the laser beam on the solid target the higher current densities of ions than by using other currently available ion sources can be produced. The crucial issue for efficiency of the ion implantation technology is selection of proper laser beam characteristics. Implantation of different kinds of laser-produced ions into metals and organic materials were performed recently at the PALS Research Center in Prague, in cooperative experiments using 0.4-ns iodine laser pulses having energies up to 750 J at wavelength of 1315 nm or up to 250 J at wavelength of 438 nm. In this contribution we describe the characterization and optimization of laser-produced Ge ion streams as well as analysis of the direct implantation of these ions into Si and SiO2 substrates. The Ge target was irradiated with the use of laser pulses of energy up to 50 J at radiation intensities of {approx}1011 W/cm2 and {approx}2'1013 W/cm2. The implanted samples were placed along the target normal at distances of 17, 31 and 83 cm from the target surface. The ion stream parameters were measured using the time-of-fight method. The depth of ion implantation was determined by the Rutherford backscattering method (RBS). The maximum depth of implantation of Ge ions was {approx}450 nm. These investigations were carried out for optimization of low and medium energy laser-generated Ge ion streams, suitable for specific implantation technique, namely for fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures within the SRAP 'SEMINANO' project.

  2. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  3. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7; Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 ; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 ; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 ; Lee, Ting-Yim; Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7; Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 ; Wong, Eugene; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  4. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

  5. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    Rat tissue distribution properties of IQNP,'' a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

  6. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    Rat tissue distribution properties of ``IQNP,`` a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

  7. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  8. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swanson, David A. [Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdnaderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  9. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Test case release consequence analysis for a spent fuel repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, J.R.; Bond, F.W.; Cole, C.R.; Nelson, R.W.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Washburn, J.F.; Norman, N.A.; Mote, P.A.; Segol, G.

    1980-01-01

    Geologic and geohydrologic data for the Paradox Basin have been used to simulate movement of ground water and radioacrtive contaminants from a hypothetical nuclear reactor spent fuel repository after an assumed accidental release. The pathlines, travel times and velocity of the ground water from the repository to the discharge locale (river) were determined after the disruptive event by use of a two-dimensional finite difference hydrologic model. The concentration of radioactive contaminants in the ground water was calculated along a series of flow tubes by use of a one-dimensional mass transport model which takes into account convection, dispersion, contaminant/media interactions and radioactive decay. For the hypothetical site location and specific parameters used in this demonstration, it is found that Iodine-129 (I-129) is tthe only isotope reaching the Colorado River in significant concentration. This concentration occurs about 8.0 x 10/sup 5/ years after the repository has been breached. This I-129 ground-water concentration is about 0.3 of the drinking water standard for uncontrolled use. The groundwater concentration would then be diluted by the Colorado River. None of the actinide elements reach more than half the distance from the repository to the Colorado River in the two-million year model run time. This exercise demonstrates that the WISAP model system is applicable for analysis of contaminant transport. The results presented in this report, however, are valid only for one particular set of parameters. A complete sensitivity analysis must be performed to evaluate the range of effects from the release of contaminants from a breached repository.

  10. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  11. Self-assembled ultra small ZnO nanocrystals for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patra, Astam K.; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a facile chemical approach to produce self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous zinc oxide nanocrystals using sodium salicylate (SS) as a template under hydrothermal conditions. These ZnO nanomaterials have been successfully fabricated as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) in the presence of N719 dye and iodine–triiodide electrolyte. The structural features, crystallinity, purity, mesophase and morphology of the nanostructure ZnO are investigated by several characterization tools. N{sub 2} sorption analysis revealed high surface areas (203 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}) and narrow pore size distributions (5.1–5.4 nm) for different samples. The mesoporous structure and strong photoluminescence facilitates the high dye loading at the mesoscopic void spaces and light harvesting in DSSC. By utilizing this ultra-small ZnO photoelectrode with film thickness of about 7 ?m in the DSSC with an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.74 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 3.83 mA cm{sup ?2} and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Ultra-small ZnO nanocrystals have been synthesized with sodium salicylate as a template and using it as a photoanode in a dye-sensitized solar cell 1.12% power conversion efficiency has been observed. - Highlights: • Synthesis of self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous ZnO nanocrystals by using sodium salicylate as a template. • Mesoporous ZnO materials have high BET surface areas and void space. • ZnO nanoparticles serve as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). • Using ZnO nanocrystals as photoelectrode power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved.

  12. Method for forming H2-permselective oxide membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gavalas, G.R.; Nam, S.W.; Tsapatsis, M.; Kim, S.

    1995-09-26

    Methods are disclosed for forming permselective oxide membranes that are highly selective to permeation of hydrogen by chemical deposition of reactants in the pore of porous tubes, such as Vycor{trademark} glass or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes. The porous tubes have pores extending through the tube wall. The process involves forming a stream containing a first reactant of the formula RX{sub n}, wherein R is silicon, titanium, boron or aluminum, X is chlorine, bromine or iodine, and n is a number which is equal to the valence of R; and forming another stream containing water vapor as the second reactant. Both of the reactant streams are passed along either the outside or the inside surface of a porous tube and the streams react in the pores of the porous tube to form a nonporous layer of R-oxide in the pores. The membranes are formed by the hydrolysis of the respective halides. In another embodiment, the first reactant stream contains a first reactant having the formula SiH{sub n}Cl{sub 4{minus}n} where n is 1, 2 or 3; and the second reactant stream contains water vapor and oxygen. In still another embodiment the first reactant stream containing a first reactant selected from the group consisting of Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 2}OSiCl{sub 3}, and mixtures thereof and the second reactant stream contains water vapor. In still another embodiment, membrane formation is carried out by an alternating flow deposition method. This involves a sequence of cycles, each cycle comprising introduction of the halide-containing stream and allowance of a specific time for reaction followed by purge and flow of the water vapor containing stream for a specific length of time. In all embodiments the nonporous layers formed are selectively permeable to hydrogen. 11 figs.

  13. Centrifugal contactor operations for UREX process flowsheet. An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George F.

    2014-08-01

    The uranium extraction (UREX) process separates uranium, technetium, and a fraction of the iodine from the other components of the irradiated fuel in nitric acid solution. In May 2012, the time, material, and footprint requirements for treatment of 260 L batches of a solution containing 130 g-U/L were evaluated for two commercial annular centrifugal contactors from CINC Industries. These calculated values were based on the expected volume and concentration of fuel arising from treatment of a single target solution vessel (TSV). The general conclusions of that report were that a CINC V-2 contactor would occupy a footprint of 3.2 m 2 (0.25 m x 15 m) if each stage required twice the nominal footprint of an individual stage, and approximately 1,131 minutes or nearly 19 hours is required to process all of the feed solution. A CINC V-5 would require approximately 9.9 m 2 (0.4 m x 25 m) of floor space but would require only 182 minutes or ~ 3 hours to process the spent target solution. Subsequent comparison with the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) at Savannah River Site (SRS) in October 2013 suggested that a more compact arrangement is feasible, and the linear dimension for the CINC V-5 may be reduced to about 8 m; a comparable reduction for the CINC V-2 yields a length of 5 m. That report also described an intermediate-scale (10 cm) contactor design developed by Argonne in the early 1980s that would better align with the SHINE operations as they stood in May 2012. In this report, we revisit the previous evaluation of contactor operations after discussions with CINC Industries and analysis of the SHINE process flow diagrams for the cleanup of the TSV, which were not available at the time of the first assessment.

  14. Synthesis and reactions of Cp-linked phosphine complexes of rhodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefort, L.; Crane, T.W.; Farwell, M.D.; Baruch, D.M.; Kaeuper, J.A.; Lachicotte, R.J.; Jones, W.D.

    1998-08-31

    The linked Cp ligand [C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}]{sup {minus}} has been used to synthesize several rhodium derivatives. Reaction with [RhClL{sub 2}]{sub 2} where L = C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 8}H{sub 14}, or CO, gives ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh(L) complexes, which have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Reaction of the ethylene complex with CO or PMe{sub 3} gives the carbonyl- and phosphine-substituted derivatives, respectively. Irradiation of the ethylene complex in the presence of hydrogen gives a new binuclear polyhydride, also structurally characterized, in which the chelating ligand spans the two metal centers. Reaction of the ethylene complex with iodine leads to the formation of the diiodide ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})RhI{sub 2}, which in turn can be converted to the dihydride ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})RhH{sub 2} by reaction with NaAl(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. The reactivity of the dihydride toward C-H bond activation has been investigated. While benzene does not give a stable oxidative addition adduct, pentafluorobenzene yields ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh(C{sub 6}F{sub 5})H, which was structurally characterized as its chloro derivative. Reaction of the dihydride with C{sub 6}F{sub 6} gives the {eta}{sup 2} complex ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}F{sub 6}), also structurally characterized.

  15. CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years’ effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400°C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts, development and testing of metal oxide based H2SO4 catalysts, support of the ILS for catalyst studies, conducting a long term catalyst stability test at anticipated operating temperatures and pressures, and developing capabilities for conducting pressurized catalyst tests.

  16. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead to improved monitoring while simultaneously reducing costs. This paradigm is being tested at the SRS F-Area where an innovative passive remedial system is being monitored and evaluated over the long term prior to traditional regulatory closure. Contaminants being addressed at this site are uranium, strontium-90, iodine-129, and tritium. We believe that the proposed strategies will be more effective in early identification of potential risks; these strategies will also be cost effective because controlling variables are relatively simple to measure. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate large cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

  17. Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-09-01

    A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in the VHTR systems including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used for development of the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and a various form of hydrogen (i.e., HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, and TI) coupled with a variety of tritium source, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of HT and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were importantly considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including both high-temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. The TPAC has unlimited flexibility for the system configurations, and provides easy drag-and-drops for making models by adopting a graphical user interface. Verification of the code has been performed by comparisons with the analytical solutions and the experimental data based on the Peach Bottom reactor design. The preliminary results calculated with a former tritium analyses code, THYTAN which was developed in Japan and adopted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency were also compared with the TPAC solutions. This report contains descriptions of the basic tritium pathways, theory, simple user guide, verifications, sensitivity studies, sample cases, and code tutorials. Tritium behaviors in a very high temperature reactor/high temperature steam electrolysis system have been analyzed by the TPAC based on the reference indirect parallel configuration proposed by Oh et al. (2007). This analysis showed that only 0.4% of tritium released from the core is transferred to the product hydrogen. The amount of tritium in the product hydrogen was estimated to be approximately an order less than the gaseous effluent limit for tritium.

  18. DESCRIPTION OF MODELING ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF THE 200-ZP-1 REMEDIAL DESIGN/REMEDIAL ACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VONGARGEN BH

    2009-11-03

    The Feasibility Study/or the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-28) and the Proposed Plan/or Remediation of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-33) describe the use of groundwater pump-and-treat technology for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) as part of an expanded groundwater remedy. During fiscal year 2008 (FY08), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport (flow and transport) model was developed to support remedy design decisions at the 200-ZP-1 OU. This model was developed because the size and influence of the proposed 200-ZP-1 groundwater pump-and-treat remedy will have a larger areal extent than the current interim remedy, and modeling is required to provide estimates of influent concentrations and contaminant mass removal rates to support the design of the aboveground treatment train. The 200 West Area Pre-Conceptual Design/or Final Extraction/Injection Well Network: Modeling Analyses (DOE/RL-2008-56) documents the development of the first version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS model of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau, as well as the initial application of that model to simulate a potential well field for the 200-ZP-1 remedy (considering only the contaminants carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99). This document focuses on the use of the flow and transport model to identify suitable extraction and injection well locations as part of the 200 West Area 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOEIRL-2008-78). Currently, the model has been developed to the extent necessary to provide approximate results and to lay a foundation for the design basis concentrations that are required in support of the remedial design/remediation action (RD/RA) work plan. The discussion in this document includes the following: (1) Assignment of flow and transport parameters for the model; (2) Definition of initial conditions for the transport model for each simulated contaminant of concern (COC) (i.e., carbon tetrachloride, technetium-99, iodine-129, nitrate [as NO{sub 3}], trichloroethene [TCE], total chromium, tritium), plus uranium; (3) Assumptions underlying the predictive simulations, including the phased implementation of the final full remedy; (4) Approximate number, locations, and rates of extraction and injection wells; and (5) Predicted amounts of contaminant mass extracted and influent concentrations at individual extraction wells for each COC and for uranium. This document is a companion report to pre-conceptual design document (DOE/RL-2008-56). Together these documents describe the sequential, progressive development of the modeling analyses and design basis for the 200-ZP-1 OU remedy.

  19. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  20. Structure of AgI-doped Ge-In-S glasses: Experiment, reverse Monte Carlo modelling, and density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Jovari, P.; Kaban, I.; Gruner, S.; Kavetskyy, T.; Borc, J.; Wang, W.; Ren, J.; Chen, G.; Yannopoulos, S.N.

    2012-08-15

    We report an investigation of the structure and vibrational modes of Ge-In-S-AgI bulk glasses using X-ray diffraction, EXAFS spectroscopy, Reverse Monte-Carlo (RMC) modelling, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The combination of these techniques made it possible to elucidate the short- and medium-range structural order of these glasses. Data interpretation revealed that the AgI-free glass structure is composed of a network where GeS{sub 4/2} tetrahedra are linked with trigonal InS{sub 3/2} units; S{sub 3/2}Ge-GeS{sub 3/2} ethane-like species linked with InS{sub 4/2}{sup -} tetrahedra form sub-structures which are dispersed in the network structure. The addition of AgI into the Ge-In-S glassy matrix causes appreciable structural changes, enriching the Indium species with Iodine terminal atoms. The existence of trigonal species InS{sub 2/2}I and tetrahedral units InS{sub 3/2}I{sup -} and InS{sub 2/2}I{sub 2}{sup -} is compatible with the EXAFS and RMC analysis. Their vibrational properties (harmonic frequencies and Raman activities) calculated by DFT are in very good agreement with the experimental values determined by Raman spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: Experiment (XRD, EXAFS, RMC, Raman scattering) and density functional calculations are employed to study the structure of AgI-doped Ge-In-S glasses. The role of mixed structural units as illustrated in the figure is elucidated. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping Ge-In-S glasses with AgI causes significant changes in glass structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experiment and DFT are combined to elucidate short- and medium-range structural order. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indium atoms form both (InS{sub 4/2}){sup -} tetrahedra and InS{sub 3/2} planar triangles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (InS{sub 4/2}){sup -} tetrahedra bond to (S{sub 3/2}Ge-GeS{sub 3/2}){sup 2+} ethane-like units forming neutral sub-structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed chalcohalide species (InS{sub 3/2}I){sup -} offer vulnerable sites for the uptake of Ag{sup +}.

  1. Objectives, Strategies, and Challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Piet; Brent Dixon; David Shropshire; Robert Hill; Roald Wigeland; Erich Schneider; J. D. Smith

    2005-04-01

    This paper will summarize the objectives, strategies, and key chemical separation challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The major objectives are as follows: Waste management - defer the need for a second geologic repository for a century or more, Proliferation resistance - be more resistant than the existing PUREX separation technology or uranium enrichment, Energy sustainability - turn waste management liabilities into energy source assets to ensure that uranium ore resources do not become a constraint on nuclear power, and Systematic, safe, and economic management of the entire fuel cycle. There are four major strategies for the disposal of civilian spent fuel: Once-through - direct disposal of all discharged nuclear fuel, Limited recycle - recycle transuranic elements once and then direct disposal, Continuous recycle - recycle transuranic elements repeatedly, and Sustained recycle - same as continuous except previously discarded depleted uranium is also recycled. The key chemical separation challenges stem from the fact that the components of spent nuclear fuel vary greatly in their influence on achieving program objectives. Most options separate uranium to reduce the weight and volume of waste and the number and cost of waste packages that require geologic disposal. Separated uranium can also be used as reactor fuel. Most options provide means to recycle transuranic (TRU) elements - plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), curium (Cm). Plutonium must be recycled to obtain repository, proliferation, and energy recovery benefits. U.S. non-proliferation policy forbids separation of plutonium by itself; therefore, one or more of the other transuranic elements must be kept with the plutonium; neptunium is considered the easiest option. Recycling neptunium also provides repository benefits. Americium recycling is also required to obtain repository benefits. At the present time, curium recycle provides relatively little benefit; indeed, recycling curium in thermal reactors would significantly increase the hazard (hence cost) of the resulting fuel. Most options separate short-lived fission products cesium and strontium to allow them to decay in separate storage facilities tailored to that need, rather than complicate long-term geologic disposal. This can also reduce the number and cost of waste packages requiring geologic disposal. These savings are balanced by costs for separation and recycle systems. Several long-lived fission products, such as technetium-99 and iodine-129 go to geologic disposal in improved waste forms, recognizing that transmutation of these isotopes would be a slow process; however, the program has not precluded their transmutation as a future alternative.

  2. Dynamic Complexity Study of Nuclear Reactor and Process Heat Application Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J'Tia Patrice Taylor; David E. Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Abstract This paper describes the key obstacles and challenges facing the integration of nuclear reactors with process heat applications as they relate to dynamic issues. The paper also presents capabilities of current modeling and analysis tools available to investigate these issues. A pragmatic approach to an analysis is developed with the ultimate objective of improving the viability of nuclear energy as a heat source for process industries. The extension of nuclear energy to process heat industries would improve energy security and aid in reduction of carbon emissions by reducing demands for foreign derived fossil fuels. The paper begins with an overview of nuclear reactors and process application for potential use in an integrated system. Reactors are evaluated against specific characteristics that determine their compatibility with process applications such as heat outlet temperature. The reactor system categories include light water, heavy water, small to medium, near term high-temperature, and far term high temperature reactors. Low temperature process systems include desalination, district heating, and tar sands and shale oil recovery. High temperature processes that support hydrogen production include steam reforming, steam cracking, hydrogen production by electrolysis, and far-term applications such as the sulfur iodine chemical process and high-temperature electrolysis. A simple static matching between complementary systems is performed; however, to gain a true appreciation for system integration complexity, time dependent dynamic analysis is required. The paper identifies critical issues arising from dynamic complexity associated with integration of systems. Operational issues include scheduling conflicts and resource allocation for heat and electricity. Additionally, economic and safety considerations that could impact the successful integration of these systems are considered. Economic issues include the cost differential arising due to an integrated system and the economic allocation of electricity and heat resources. Safety issues include changes in regulatory constraints imposed on the facilities. Modeling and analysis tools, such as System Dynamics for time dependent operational and economic issues and RELAP5 3D for chemical transient affects, are evaluated. The results of this study advance the body of knowledge toward integration of nuclear reactors and process heat applications.

  3. Prostate Brachytherapy With Oblique Needles to Treat Large Glands and Overcome Pubic Arch Interference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Bon; Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario ; Bax, Jeff; Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario ; Edirisinge, Chandima; Lewis, Craig; Chen, Jeff; D'Souza, David; Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario ; Fenster, Aaron; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario ; Wong, Eugene; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: First, to show that low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy plans using oblique needle trajectories are more successful than parallel trajectories for large prostates with pubic arch interference (PAI); second, to test the accuracy of delivering an oblique plan by using a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided mechatronic system. Methods and Materials: Prostates were contoured for 5 subjects' 3D TRUS images showing a maximum PAI of {<=}1 cm and a prostate volume of <50 cc. Two planning studies were done. First, prostate contours were artificially enlarged to 45 to 80 cc in 5- to 10-cc increments for a single subject. Second, all subject prostate contours were enlarged to 60 cc. For each study, three types of plans were manually created for comparison: a parallel needle template (PT) plan, a parallel needle no-template (PNT) plan, and an oblique needle no-template (OBL) plan. Needle positions and angles were not discretized for nontemplate plans. European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology dose-volume histogram guidelines, iodine-125 (145-Gy prescription, 0.43 U), and needle angles of <15 Degree-Sign were used. An OBL plan was delivered to a pubic arch containing a 60-cc prostate phantom that mimicked the anatomy of the subject with the greatest PAI (23% by volume). Results: In the increasing-prostate volume study, OBL plans were successful for prostates of {<=}80 cc, and PT plans were successful for prostates of <65 cc. In paired, one-sided t tests for the 60-cc volume study, OBL plans showed dosimetric improvements for all organs compared to both of the parallel type plans (p < 0.05); PNT plans showed a benefit only in planning target volumes receiving more than 100 Gy compared to PT plans. A computed tomography scan of the phantom showed submillimeter seed placement accuracy in all directions. Conclusion: OBL plans were significantly better than parallel plans, and an OBL plan was accurately delivered to a 60-cc prostate phantom with 23% PAI by volume.

  4. TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

  5. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU analyses. Additionally, current analyses suggest that the NUREG-1465 release fractions are conservative by about a factor of 2 in terms of release fractions and that release durations for in-vessel and late in-vessel release periods are in fact longer than the NUREG-1465 durations. It is currently planned that a subsequent report will further characterize these results using more refined statistical methods, permitting a more precise reformulation of the NUREG-1465 alternative source term for both LBU and HBU fuels, with the most important finding being that the NUREG-1465 formula appears to embody significant conservatism compared to current best-estimate analyses.

  6. Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides with CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structures: RECuZnAs{sub 2}, REAgZnP{sub 2}, and REAgZnAs{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Ramachandran, Krishna K.; Blanchard, Peter E.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Rosmus, Kimberly A.; Aitken, Jennifer A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides REMM?Pn{sub 2} (M=Cu, Ag; M?=Zn; Pn=P, As) have been prepared by reaction of the elements at 800 °C, with crystal growth promoted through the addition of iodine. The extent of RE substitution is broad in these series: RECuZnAs{sub 2} (RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd–Lu), REAgZnP{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, Gd–Dy), and REAgZnAs{sub 2} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy). Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that they adopt the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure (space group P3{sup ¯}m1, Z=1), in which Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the unique tetrahedrally coordinated transition-metal site. Magnetic measurements indicated Curie–Weiss behavior for several members of the RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} series. Core-line X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) collected on some RECuZnAs{sub 2} members corroborate the charge assignment deduced by the Zintl concept for these compounds, (RE{sup 3+})(M{sup 1+})(Zn{sup 2+})(Pn{sup 3?}){sub 2}. Optical diffuse reflectance spectra and valence band XPS spectra established that these compounds are small band-gap semiconductors (up to ?0.8 eV in REAgZnP{sub 2}) or semimetals (RECuZnAs{sub 2}). Band structure calculations also support this electronic structure and indicate that the band gap can be narrowed through appropriate chemical substitution (RE=smaller atoms, M=Cu, and Pn=As). - Graphical abstract: Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the tetrahedral site within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs in three series of quaternary pnictides adopting the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. - Highlights: • Three series (comprising 25 compounds) of pnictides REMM'Pn{sub 2} were prepared. • Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs. • They are semimetals or small band-gap semiconductors. • RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} are generally paramagnetic.

  7. Quantity of 135I Released from the AGR 1, AGR 2, and AGR 3/4 Experiments and Discovery of 131I at the FPMS Traps during the AGR-3/4 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Scates

    2014-09-01

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The HPGe detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About 2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that its production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the parent, and its concentration in the flowing gas stream will appear to decay with the parent half life. This equilibrium condition enables the determination of the amount of 135I released from the fuel particles by measurement of the 135mXe at the FPM following reactor shutdown. In this paper, the 135I released will be reported and compared to similar releases for noble gases as well as the unexpected finding of 131I deposition from intentional impure gas injection into capsule 11 of experiment AGR 3/4.

  8. Laser-produced aluminum plasma expansion inside a plastic plasma envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Parys, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Renner, O.; Rohlena, K. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-09-15

    Previous experimental results demonstrated that the plasma pressure decreases with the growing atomic number of the target material. In this context, a question arose if the Al plasma outflow could be collimated using the plastic plasma as a compressor. To solve this problem, an experiment using a plastic target with an Al cylindrical insert was performed. The focal spot diameter substantially larger than that of the insert ensured simultaneous heating both target materials. This experiment proved that a production of Al plasma jets collimated by an action of outer plastic plasma is feasible [Kasperczuk et al., Laser Part. Beams 30, 1 (2012)]. The results of investigations presented here provide additional information on distributions of electron temperature in the outflowing plasma and time and space characteristics of ion emission, both registered at bare and constrained-flow Al targets. The experiment was carried out at the Prague asterix laser system iodine laser facility. The laser provided a 250 ps (full width at half maximum) pulse with the energy of 130 J at the third harmonic frequency ({lambda}{sub 3} = 0.438 {mu}m). A plastic target with an Al cylindrical insert of 400 {mu}m in diameter as well as a bare Al target (for comparison) was used. The focal spot diameter ({Phi}{sub L}) 1200 {mu}m ensured the lateral pressure effect of the plastic plasma strong enough to guarantee the effective Al plasma compression. The electron temperature measurements have shown that such Al plasma compression is accompanied by the increase of its temperature, dominance of which starts at distance of 0.5 mm from the target surface. Measurements of ion emission characteristics confirm the earlier numerical simulation prediction that in these conditions the plasma expansion geometry is closer to planar. The constrained Al plasma jet is very narrow and its axial velocity is considerably larger than the velocity of freely expanding Al plasma stream. It means that the plastic plasma envelope, besides the Al plasma compression, also strongly accelerates the Al plasma in its axial motion.

  9. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Hsieh, B.T.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

    1993-07-01

    The ``IQNP`` agent is an antagonist for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor. Since the IQNP molecule has two asymmetric centers and either cis or trans isomerism of the vinyl iodide, there are eight possible isomeric combinations. In this report, the systematic synthesis, purification and animal testing of several isomers of radioiodinated ``IQNP`` are reported. A dramatic and unexpected relation between the absolute configuration at the two asymmetric centers and the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodide on receptor specificity was observed. The E-(R)(R) isomer shows specific and significant localization (per cent dose/gram at 6 hours) in receptor-rich cerebral structures (i.e. Cortex = 1.38 + 0.31; Striatum = 1.22 + 0.20) and low uptake in tissues rich in the M{sub 2} subtype (Heart = 0.10; Cerebellum = 0.04). In contrast, the E-(R)(S) isomer shows very low receptor-specific uptake (Cortex = 0.04; Striatum = 0.02), demonstrating the importance of absolute configuration at the acetate center. An unexpected and important observation is that the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodine appears to affect receptor subtype specificity, since the Z-(R,S)(R) isomer shows much higher uptake in the heart (0.56 + 0.12) and cerebellum (0.17 + 0.04). Studies are now in progress to confirm these exciting results in vitro. Progress has also continued during this period with several collaborative programs. The first large-scale clinical tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator prototype (500 mCi) was fabricated and supplied to the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology (CMMI), in Newark, New Jersey, for Phase I clinical trials of rhenium-188-labeled anti CEA antibodies for patient treatment. Collaborative studies are also continuing in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department at the University of Massachusetts where a generator is in use to compare the biological properties of {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect{close_quotes} labeled antibodies.

  10. Analysis of the JINR p(660 MeV) + [sup 129]I, [sup 23]Np, and [sup 231]Am measurements with eleven different models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, S. G. (Stepan G.); Pronskikh, V. S.; Adam, J.; Balabekyan, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Filinova, V. P.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Brandt, R.; Odoj, R.; Sierk, A. J. (Arnold J.); Prael, R. E. (Richard E.); Gudima, K. K. (Konstantin K.); Baznat, M. I. (Mircha Ivanovich)

    2004-01-01

    Isotopically enriched {sup 129}I (85% {sup 129}I and 15% {sup 127}I), {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am targets were irradiated with a beam of 660-MeV protons at the JINR DLNP Phasotron and cross sections of formation of 207 residual products (74 from {sup 129}I, 53 from {sup 237}Np, and 80 from {sup 241}Am) were determined using the {gamma}-spectrometry method. Here, they analyze all these data using eleven different models, realized in eight codes: LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, INCL+ABLA, and INCL+RAL options), CASCADE, CEM95, CEM2k, LAQGSM+GEM2, CEM2k+GEM2, LAQGSM+GEMINI, and CEM2k+GEMINI, in order to validate the tested models against the experimental data and to understand better the mechanisms for production of residual nuclei. The agreement of different models with the data varies quite a bit. They find that most of the codes are fairly reliable in predicting cross sections for nuclides not too far away in mass from the targets, but differ greatly in the deep spallation, fission, and fragmentation regions. None of the codes tested here except GEMINI allow fission of nuclei as light as iodine, therefore the best agreement with the {sup 129}I data, especially in the A = 40-90 region, is shown by the codes CEM2k and LAQGSM when they are merged with GEMINI. At the same time, GEMINI is not yet very reliable for an accurate description of actinides and the {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am data are reproduced better by LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, or INCL+RAL/ABLA options), and by CEM2k and LAQGSM merged with GEM2 and not so well when using GEMINI. They conclude that none of the codes tested here are able to reproduce well all these data and all of them need to be further improved; development of a better universal evaporation/fission model should be of a high priority.

  11. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2007-09-17

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

  12. PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caloglu, Murat, E-mail: caloglumurat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente-Ohio, Parma, OH (United States); Magi-Galuzzi, Christina [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

  13. Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Vision Prognostication Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Niloufer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bena, James [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Singh, Arun D., E-mail: singha@ccf.org [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To generate a vision prognostication model after plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: All patients with primary single ciliary body or choroidal melanoma treated with iodine-125 or ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010, were included. The primary endpoint was loss of visual acuity. Only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/50 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/50 at the end of the study, and only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/200 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/200 at the end of the study. Factors analyzed were sex, age, cataracts, diabetes, tumor size (basal dimension and apical height), tumor location, and radiation dose to the tumor apex, fovea, and optic disc. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards were used to determine the influence of baseline patient factors on vision loss. Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank analysis) were used to estimate freedom from vision loss. Results: Of 189 patients, 92% (174) were alive as of February 1, 2011. At presentation, visual acuity was better than or equal to 20/50 and better than or equal to 20/200 in 108 and 173 patients, respectively. Of these patients, 44.4% (48) had post-treatment visual acuity of worse than 20/50 and 25.4% (44) had post-treatment visual acuity worse than 20/200. By multivariable analysis, increased age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.01 [1.00-1.03], P=.05), increase in tumor height (HR of 1.35 [1.22-1.48], P<.001), and a greater total dose to the fovea (HR of 1.01 [1.00-1.01], P<.001) were predictive of vision loss. This information was used to develop a nomogram predictive of vision loss. Conclusions: By providing a means to predict vision loss at 3 years after treatment, our vision prognostication model can be an important tool for patient selection and treatment counseling.

  14. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Wang, Ge [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 –69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub ?} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom can be well identified and quantified. Conclusions : Although the XFM method in this investigation is still studied at the technical level and is not yet practical for routinein vivo mapping tasks with GNPs, the current penetrability measurements and phantom study strongly suggest the feasibility to establish and develop a 3D XFM system.

  15. A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8) government policies, among others. This paper offers a perspective on this likely long and arduous journey toward establishing a 'new normal' that will ultimately take shape. Toward this end, it is important to evaluate the 'optimization' process advocated by the international community in achieving long-term recovery from this particularly fateful event in Fukushima. In the process, experience and lessons learned from past events will be fully evaluated and considered. (author)

  16. Development of XFCT imaging strategy for monitoring the spatial distribution of platinum-based chemodrugs: Instrumentation and phantom validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Medical Physics Program, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-3037 (United States); Pratx, Guillem; Bazalova, Magdalena; Qian Jianguo; Meng Bowen; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Developing an imaging method to directly monitor the spatial distribution of platinum-based (Pt) drugs at the tumor region is of critical importance for early assessment of treatment efficacy and personalized treatment. In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of imaging platinum (Pt)-based drug distribution using x-ray fluorescence (XRF, a.k.a. characteristic x ray) CT (XFCT). Methods: A 5-mm-diameter pencil beam produced by a polychromatic x-ray source equipped with a tungsten anode was used to stimulate emission of XRF photons from Pt drug embedded within a water phantom. The phantom was translated and rotated relative to the stationary pencil beam in a first-generation CT geometry. The x-ray energy spectrum was collected for 18 s at each position using a cadmium telluride detector. The spectra were then used for the K-shell XRF peak isolation and sinogram generation for Pt. The distribution and concentration of Pt were reconstructed with an iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. The capability of XFCT to multiplexed imaging of Pt, gadolinium (Gd), and iodine (I) within a water phantom was also investigated. Results: Measured XRF spectrum showed a sharp peak characteristic of Pt with a narrow full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) (FWHM{sub K{alpha}1}= 1.138 keV, FWHM{sub K{alpha}2}= 1.052 keV). The distribution of Pt drug in the water phantom was clearly identifiable on the reconstructed XRF images. Our results showed a linear relationship between the XRF intensity of Pt and its concentrations (R{sup 2}= 0.995), suggesting that XFCT is capable of quantitative imaging. A transmission CT image was also obtained to show the potential of the approach for providing attenuation correction and morphological information. Finally, the distribution of Pt, Gd, and I in the water phantom was clearly identifiable in the reconstructed images from XFCT multiplexed imaging. Conclusions: XFCT is a promising modality for monitoring the spatial distribution of Pt drugs. The technique may be useful in tailoring tumor treatment regimen in the future.

  17. Position Paper on Practicable Performance Criteria for the Removal Efficiency of Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. T. Jubin; N. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan

    2012-03-01

    As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides may be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. The question we attempted to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examined the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012). These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and to a particular organ - the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, we provided several cases. We first looked at the inventories for these radionuclides for three fuel types (PWR UOX, PWR MOX, and AHTGR), several burn-up values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculated doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) with the EPA code CAP-88 (Rosnick 1992). Finally, we looked at two dose cases. Allocating all of the allowable dose to be used by the volatile radionuclides is one case, but, perhaps, unrealistic. In lieu of this, we arbitrarily selected a value of 10% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. We calculated the required decontamination factors (DFs) for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I were the main contributors. With respect to 129I doses, we found that the highest dose was calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scaled as the fraction of the total 129I that was particulate. Therefore, we assumed for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I was particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs.

  18. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

  19. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range. Compared with no sinogram smoothing, sinogram smoothing can dramatically reduce noise in the DECT-derived attenuation map. Through appropriate selection of tube currents for high and low kVp scans, DECT can deliver roughly the same amount of radiation dose as that of a single kVp CT scan, but could be used for PET attenuation correction with reduced bias in contrast agent regions by a factor of ?2.6 and slightly reduced RMSE for the total image. Conclusions: When DECT is used for attenuation correction at higher energies, there is a noise amplification that is dependent on the energy of the synthesized monoenergetic image of linear attenuation coefficients. Sinogram smoothing reduces the noise amplification in DECT-derived attenuation maps without increasing bias. With an appropriate selection of CT techniques, a DECT scan with the same radiation dose as a single CT scan can result in a PET image with improved quantitative accuracy.

  20. Fuel Cycle Scenario Definition, Evaluation, and Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Christopher T. Laws; Lee C. Cadwallader; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Robert N. Hill; J. D. Smith; Andrew S. Goldmann; George Bailey

    2006-08-01

    This report aims to clarify many of the issues being discussed within the AFCI program, including Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) versus Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel, single-pass versus multi-pass recycling, thermal versus fast reactors, potential need for transmutation of technetium and iodine, and the value of separating cesium and strontium. It documents most of the work produced by INL, ANL, and SNL personnel under their Simulation, Evaluation, and Trade Study (SETS) work packages during FY2005 and the first half of FY2006. This report represents the first attempt to calculate a full range of metrics, covering all four AFCI program objectives - waste management, proliferation resistance, energy recovery, and systematic management/economics/safety - using a combination of "static" calculations and a system dynamic model, DYMOND. In many cases, we examine the same issue both dynamically and statically to determine the robustness of the observations. All analyses are for the U.S. reactor fleet. This is a technical report, not aimed at a policy-level audience. A wide range of options are studied to provide the technical basis for identifying the most attractive options and potential improvements. Option improvement could be vital to accomplish before the AFCI program publishes definitive cost estimates. Information from this report will be extracted and summarized in future policy-level reports. Many dynamic simulations of deploying those options are included. There are few "control knobs" for flying or piloting the fuel cycle system into the future, even though it is dark (uncertain) and controls are sluggish with slow time response: what types of reactors are built, what types of fuels are used, and the capacity of separation and fabrication plants. Piloting responsibilities are distributed among utilities, government, and regulators, compounding the challenge of making the entire system work and respond to changing circumstances. We identify four approaches that would increase our ability to pilot the fuel cycle system: (1) have a recycle strategy that could be implemented before the 2030-2050 approximate period when current reactors retire so that replacement reactors fit into the strategy, (2) establish an option such as multi-pass blended-core IMF as a downward plutonium control knob and accumulate waste management benefits early, (3) establish fast reactors with flexible conversion ratio as a future control knob that slowly becomes available if/when fast reactors are added to the fleet, and (4) expand exploration of blended assemblies and cores, which appear to have advantages and agility. Initial results suggest multi-pass full-core MOX appears to be a less effective way than multi-pass blended core IMF to manage the fuel cycle system because it requires higher TRU throughput while more slowly accruing waste management benefits. Single-pass recycle approaches for LWRs (we did not study the VHTR) do not meet AFCI program objectives and could be considered a "dead end". Fast reactors appear to be effective options but a significant number of fast reactors must be deployed before the benefit of such strategies can be observed.