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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Economics of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected summary is presented of the resource, technical, and financial considerations which influence the economics of geothermal energy in the US. Estimates of resource base and levelized busbar cost of base load power for several types of geothermal resources are compared with similar estimates for more conventional energy resources. Current geothermal electric power plants planned, under construction, and on-line in the US are noted.

Morris, G.E.; Tester, J.W.; Graves, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis GTMax: A New Deregulated Power Market Analysis Tool Opportunity Decision and Information Sciences Division Center for Energy, Environmental & Economic hourly energy transactions, costs, and revenues. GTMax has a user-friendly geographical information

Kemner, Ken

3

Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Simulations Opportunity Decision and Information Sciences Division Center for EnergyEnergy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis ENPEP-BALANCE: A Tool for Long-term Nuclear Power, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis A resurgence of interest in nuclear energy is taking place

Kemner, Ken

4

Essays in Energy Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can reduce residential energy usage,” NBER Working Pa- per.washers were matched with energy usage data, measured inbe matched to the FTC energy usage data, and therefore must

Spurlock, Cecily Anna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Essays in Energy Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Minimum & Energy Star Standards Price Price Price MarketEnergy Star Standards 2.2 Model of Consumer Durables and Market Power 2.2.1 Monopoly Priceaffect on market prices of either the minimum or Energy Star

Spurlock, Cecily Anna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy Efficiency Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency and conservation are considered key means for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving other energy policy goals, but associated market behavior and policy responses have engendered debates in the economic literature. We review economic concepts underlying consumer decisionmaking in energy efficiency and conservation and examine related empirical literature. In particular, we provide an economic perspective on the range of market barriers, market failures, and behavioral failures that have been cited in the energy efficiency context. We assess the extent to which these conditions provide a motivation for policy intervention in energy-using product markets, including an examination of the evidence on policy effectiveness and cost. While theory and empirical evidence suggest there is potential for welfare-enhancing energy efficiency policies, many open questions remain, particularly relating to the extent of some of the key market and behavioral failures.

Kenneth Gillingham; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Energy and Depletable Resources: Economics and Policy, 1973-98 (Revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that anyone involved in energy policy realizes contribute toJorgenson, Dale W. , “ Energy Policy And Economic Growth,substantial study of US energy policy, the Energy Policy

Kolstad, Charles D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Resource & Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. (Manitoba, Canada) Resource & Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc....

9

Renewable Energy Economic Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · Renewable energy / Smart grid · Electric/hybrid vehicles 38 Proprietary & Confidential Global utility ­ Who Are We? · Industry leader in planning, architecture, engineering, procurement, construction

10

Economics of Energy Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past 10 years energy costs at Union Carbide's Texas City Plant have risen tremendously. Most of this increase can be related to the rapid escalation in fuel prices. Because of the large cost increases and impact on product flow, it has become necessary to accurately measure energy usage (primarily fuel and steam) throughout the plant. There are currently several projects in the million dollar range to upgrade and add new metering to these flows. This paper will discuss the justification of one of these projects and give a brief overview of the project status.

Duncan, J. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

2012 Reservation Economic Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Summit Indian Energy & Energy Infrastructure to be Showcased at RES 2012 in Las Vegas Glossary of Energy Related Terms 2012 Renewable Energy Technology Conference...

12

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS): A New Long-term Power Market Simulation Tool Opportunity Decision and Information Sciences Division Center for Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis Energy systems are being privatized

Kemner, Ken

13

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Louis-Benoit Desroches In the last several years, there has been a significant growth in the activities of the Department of Energy's Appliance and Commercial Equipment Standards program. EETD's Energy Efficiency Standards group has been heavily involved in the analyses supporting recently published federal energy conservation standards, for a diverse set of appliances and commercial equipment. In this talk, I will review the EES group's efforts supporting these energy conservation standards. Collectively, they are estimated to save the nation between 14.15 to 15.17 quads (quadrillion Btu)

14

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Competitiveness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the global renewable energy market. NREL's economic competitiveness analysis efforts focus on assessing: jobs creation, workforce development needs, manufacturing...

15

U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of Energy Efficiency at the Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic...

16

Economic and Environmental Analysis of Photovoltaic Energy ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 22, 2012 ... Economic and Environmental Analysis of Photovoltaic Energy ... However, their approach is based on a specific net tariff system that was used ...

17

Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic and Financial Analysis Economic and Financial Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis[1] Resources South Africa: Renewable Energy Market Transformation (REMT) Project, Draft Report, Economic and Financial Analysis Due Diligence Estimating Air Pollution Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in the Electricity Sector in Mexico, North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation New Energy for America, The Apollo Jobs Report: Good Jobs & Energy

18

PERI Green Economics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PERI Green Economics PERI Green Economics Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PERI Green Economics Agency/Company /Organization: Political Economy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Website: www.peri.umass.edu/green_economics0/

19

HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENRECO has prepared this paper on HVAC energy recovery to provide the engineer with an overview of the design engineering as well as the economic analysis considerations necessary to evaluate the potential benefits of energy recovery.

Kinnier, R. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development project  

SciTech Connect

Energy costs impact low income communities more than anyone else. Low income residents pay a larger percentage of their incomes for energy costs. In addition, they generally have far less discretionary energy use to eliminate in response to increasing energy prices. Furthermore, with less discretionary income, home energy efficiency improvements are often too expensive. Small neighborhood businesses are in the same situation. Improved efficiency in the use of energy can improve this situation by reducing energy costs for residents and local businesses. More importantly, energy management programs can increase the demand for local goods and services and lead to the creation of new job training and employment opportunities. In this way, neighborhood based energy efficiency programs can support community economic development. The present project, undertaken with the support of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, was intended to serve as a demonstration of energy/economic programming at the neighborhood level. The San Francisco Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development (NEED) project was designed to be a visible demonstration of bringing the economic development benefits of energy management home to low-income community members who need it most. To begin, a Community Advisory Committee was established to guide the design of the programs to best meet needs of the community. Subsequently three neighborhood energy/economic development programs were developed: The small business energy assistance program; The youth training and weatherization program; and, The energy review of proposed housing development projects.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind Energy and Economic Development in Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes a recent report by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Economic Development Benefits from Wind Power in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office, which focuses on the estimated economic development impacts in Nebraska from development and operation of wind power in the state as envisioned in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030.

Lantz, E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Economics of Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economics of Wind Energy Economics of Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Economics of Wind Energy Agency/Company /Organization: European Wind Energy Association Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/reports/E The Economics of Wind Energy Screenshot References: The Economics of Wind Energy [1] Overview "This report provides a systematic framework for the economic dimension of wind energy and of the energy policy debate when comparing different power generation technologies. A second contribution is to put fuel price risk directly into the analysis of the optimal choice of energy sources for power generation."

23

Energy Use in Distillation Operation: Nonlinear Economic Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distillation operations are major consumers of energy, by some estimates comprising forty percent of the energy usage in the refining and chemicals industry. Obtaining the maximum energy efficiency from this unit operation is obviously very important. For many distillation columns there is a tradeoff in operation between energy usage and product recovery and setting the proper usage target involves a calculation of the economic tradeoff between these two factors. However, distillation is a non-linear process and normal economic evaluations add more non-linearities to the economic objective functions. In addition, the normal product quality variability observed leads to requirements for statistical evaluation. Hence, calculation of the correct target can be complicated. In this paper, these non-linear economic effects are reviewed and techniques to calculate the correct usage targets presented.

White, D. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Who's Involved | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thomas Energy Information Agency: Michele Simmons Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence: Patrick Mahony Office of the Secretary: Danielle Dirickson Office of...

25

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbine blades wind their way by train through Denver. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20894 Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will lead to benefits to rural landowners and towns, the manufacturing sector, and infrastructure across America.[1] The following provide more information about wind energy and economic development: Resources European Wind Energy Association. Economic Benefits of Wind This page outlines the economic benefits of wind energy in Europe. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (March 2013). Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado. Accessed November 29, 2013. This fact sheet summarizes a recent analysis, commissioned by the Wyoming

26

Taking Economics Seriously in US Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Taking Economics Seriously in US Energy Policy Speaker(s): Severin Borenstein Date: October 22, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Description: From environmental externalities, to...

27

International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Vol. 3, No. 1, 2013, pp.60-74 ISSN: 2146-4553 www.econjournals.com 60 Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs Benjamin D. Leibowicz Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, United States. Email: bleibowicz@stanford.edu Maria Roumpani Management Science and Engineering Department,

28

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economics Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Economics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September...

29

Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. (Manitoba, Canada) Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc....

30

Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers Title Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers...

31

Center for Chinese Energy Economics Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Chinese Energy Economics Research Place Xiamen, Fujian Province, PRC Website http:ice.xmu.edu.cnenglish References http:ice.xmu.edu.cnenglishshowletter.aspx?newsid26...

32

International Energy Outlook - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2004 World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2004 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2025. Figure 12. World Primary Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 Figure Data Figure 13. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 14. World Primary Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data

33

Integration of hydrothermal-energy economics: related quantitative studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison of ten models for computing the cost of hydrothermal energy is presented. This comparison involved a detailed examination of a number of technical and economic parameters of the various quantitative models with the objective of identifying the most important parameters in the context of accurate estimates of cost of hydrothermal energy. Important features of various models, such as focus of study, applications, marked sectors covered, methodology, input data requirements, and output are compared in the document. A detailed sensitivity analysis of all the important engineering and economic parameters is carried out to determine the effect of non-consideration of individual parameters.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

35

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

36

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

37

Community Economic Analysis Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Economic Analysis Guide Community Economic Analysis Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Community Economic Analysis How-to manual Agency/Company /Organization: R. Hustedde, R. Shaffer, G. Pulver Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/greenkit/pdfs/howto.pdf 100 page manual on how to analyze a community's economy. Useful for those not interested in building a detailed model. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Community_Economic_Analysis_Guide&oldid=332592" Categories: Tools Community Energy Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

38

Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida) Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida) Energy Economic Zone Pilot Program (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Florida Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Florida Department of Economic Opportunity In the 2009 Legislative Session, the Florida Legislature established the

39

Solving Energy Storage Economics with the Energy Operating System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solving Energy Storage Economics with the Energy Operating System Speaker(s): Ryan Wartena Date: September 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Dr. Ryan Wartena, CEO and founder of...

40

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy economics: growth, resources and policies  

SciTech Connect

The book reviewed here tries to bring together different aspects of energy - in particular, economic and technical aspects - in a unified and self-contained treatment, designed for a wide and nonspecialized readership. The presentation is set out under five headings: energy demand (two chapters with an introduction); supply factors (six extended chapters, comprising some 40% of the text); the market for energy; the world energy outlook; and issues of energy policy. At each stage there is in effect a blend of information and analysis, the proportions varying according to the precise topic. The main unifying theme is that of the present world predicament. Energy Economics is a useful and in many ways impressive book, and an encouraging instance of interdisciplinary teamwork. But unfortunately, it does not fully make good the claim implied in its title.

Eden, R.; Posner, M.; Bending, R.; Crouch, E.; Stanislaw, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Renewable energy consumption and economic efficiency: Evidence from European countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic efficiency. For this reason

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Top Management Involvement in the Adoption of Energy Efficiency Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adoption: The Case of Energy- Efficiency Audits. Resource695. Expert Group on Energy Efficiency. 2007. Realizing theDiscount Rates and Energy Efficiency. Contemporary Economic

Blass, Vered; Corbett, Charles J.; Delmas, Magali A; Muthulingam, Suresh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Minority Economic Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minority Economic Impact Minority Economic Impact Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions...

45

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers...

46

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers? Title Can combining economizers with...

47

Wind Energy for Rural Economic Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry contributes to the economies of 46 states, and the outlook for regional economic growth from wind energy is heartening. Wind energy projects provide new jobs, a new source of revenue to farmers and ranchers, and an increased local tax base for rural communities. And wind energy is homegrown energy that helps secure our energy future during uncertain times while reducing pollution emissions and preserving our precious water resources. In fact, achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative during the next 20 years will create$60 billion in capital investment in rural America, provide$1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners, and create 80,000 new jobs. Wind energy is the fastest-growing energy source in the world, and rural communities are poised to reap the benefits. This brochure provides rural stakeholders with information about wind energy projects and rural economic development, including case studies an d resources for those interested in bringing wind energy to their communities.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Energy Information Administration / Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Im  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 1 Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 October 2007 This paper responds to a September 18, 2007, letter from Senators Barrasso, Inhofe, and Voinovich, hereinafter referred to as the BIV request, seeking further energy and economic analysis to supplement information presented in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent analysis of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 1 . The BIV request raises issues that would also apply in the context of EIA analyses of other policy proposals. A copy of the request letter is provided in Appendix A. To meet the Senators' desire for an expedited response, this paper is organized around the main issues

49

Get Involved with Home Energy Score | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Get Involved with Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Get Involved with Home Energy Score Get Involved with Home Energy Score The Department of Energy's (DOE) Home Energy Score helps homeowners understand the energy performance of their homes and how they compare to other homes nationwide. Energy professionals and organizations can use the Score to promote energy efficiency to homeowners and encourage investments in energy improvements. Information for Homeowners Information for Interested Organizations Information for Interested Assessors Highlights Home Energy Scoring Tool Updated Home Energy Scoring Tool v.2014 features improved calculation methodology, user interface and mobility on the 10-point scale. Visit the Research and Background webpage and DOE's Progress Alert to learn more.

50

Economic analysis of geothermal energy costs  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the computer program, GEOCOST, and its application to some analyses of the economics of geothermal energy. GEOCOST combines both technical and economic factors into one systematic cost accounting framework. The program, which simulates production of electricity from most types of geothermal resources, is composed of two parts: a reservoir model which simulates the costs associated with the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir; and a power-plant model which simulates the costs associated with the design, construction, and operation of the power plant. The costs from the reservoir model become the energy supply costs to the power plant. The combined reservoir and power plant models represent the complete energy production system. (LBS)

Bloomster, C.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Economic Outlook and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 8 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Coal Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

52

Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

Central Energy Systems - Applications to Economic Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The City of San Antonio's Office of Public Utilities has developed an innovative process to assess predesign energy conservation strategies for new buildings. This assessment also provides direction for the community's overall economic development objectives. The process utilizes two computer-aided programs to evaluate quickly and cost effectively the energy efficiency of new buildings. The City uses the Predesign Energy Program (PREP) to analyze efficiency in new individual buildings during the conceptual stage of design. The second program, Central Energy Systems Analysis Program (CESAP) analyzes energy efficiency for a group of buildings and determines if a new district heating and cooling (DHC) system would be a cost effective application to serve the development project's energy requirements. The combination of these programs have given the City of San Antonio the ability to: (1) help builders, owners and architects to reduce energy and construction costs; and (2) evaluate the feasibility of new district heating and cooling systems as a means to promote economic development within the City of San Antonio.

Myers, M. S.; Diserens, S. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last yearÂ’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

55

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variables Affecting Economic Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy E. Lantz and S. Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at WINDPOWER 2008 Houston, Texas June 1-4, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-500-43506 July 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

56

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

57

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Database Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.olade.org/sieeEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

58

American Energy Markets ¤ Forthcoming in Energy Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using recent advances in the Żeld of applied econometrics, we explore the strength of shared trends and shared cycles between North American natural gas and crude oil markets. In doing so, we use daily data from January 1991 to April 2001 on spot U.S. Henry Hub natural gas and WTI crude oil prices. The results show that has been `de-coupling ' of the prices of these two sources of energy as a result of oil and gas deregulation in the United States. We also investigate the inter-connectedness of North American natural gas markets and Żnd that North American natural gas prices are largely deŻned by the U.S. Henry Hub price trends.

Apostolos Serletis; Ricardo Rangel-ruiz; Apostolos Serletis Y; Ricardo Rangel-ruiz

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Office of Economic Impact and Diversity | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Women @ Energy features the stories, tips, and ideas of STEM employees who are making a difference at the Energy Department. Read about...

60

Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference[1] Resources Techno-Economic Comparison of Off-grid Options -- Assessment of Household, Battery Charging and Isolated Micro-Grid Systems Economic Analysis of Solar PV Systems Component References ↑ "Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference" Retrieved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Economics of Plant Energy Savings Projects in a Changing Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy prices have exhibited significant volatility in recent years. For example, natural gas prices ranged from $4 to $15 per MM BTU's in calendar years 2005 through 2011. Future prices are uncertain but are likely to retain a high level of volatility. This volatility complicates analysis of potential plant capital investments to reduce energy usage, in particular those that involve consideration of alternate energy sources, since traditional financial investment valuation assumes that future cash flows are known exactly. Yet, this is clearly not the case for many energy saving investments. In addition, future price probability functions may be best characterized as non symmetric and economic objective functions as non-linear further complicating investment analysis. Failure to recognize these effects can result in incorrectly valuing the potential financial return of the investment. In this paper, appropriate techniques to evaluate such investments are presented along with case studies illustrating the approach.

White, D. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy. This will...

63

Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant, ER-B-97-02 Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant, ER-B-97-02 Audit of the...

64

Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new employees to name a few. The energy and economic impact of these projects can vary widely and be difficult to demonstrate. This paper and presentation will explore the appropriate application and bottom line economics of distributed wind energy through the review of two case studies.

Trapanese, A.; James, F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Community Involvement Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Involvement Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Overview The success of EM's legacy waste cleanup mission depends largely on the support of informed and engaged stakeholders. Cleanup activities have the potential to affect the health of the public, the environment, and the future of the communities that either host or are located near EM sites. Therefore, it is critical that EM receive public input from local citizens and community organizations prior to making cleanup decisions. In December 2010, EM partnered with the New Mexico Community Foundation

66

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector 2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2006 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social, and demographic factors. This chapter outlines the IEO2006 projections for

67

Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Get Involved with Home Get Involved with Home Energy Score to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Get Involved with Home Energy Score on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Get Involved Partners Research & Background FAQs Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

68

Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility managers and Designers; Second Edition Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility managers and Designers; Second Edition A nuts-and-bolts resource guide compiled to increase energy and resource efficiency, cut waste, and improve the performance of Federal buildings and facilities. Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility managers and Designers; Second Edition More Documents & Publications From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet) Rebuilding It Better; BTI-Greensburg, John Deere Dealership (Brochure)

69

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low Economic Growth Case Projection  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

70

Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic and Climate Challenges in Talks with World Energy Ministers March 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - In recent discussions with a broad range of world energy ministers, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed the need for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. Over the past several weeks, Secretary Chu's dialogue with representatives of both energy producing and consuming nations has reinforced the Obama Administration's commitment to energy independence and stressed the shared opportunities to create jobs and boost the global economy through energy

71

Micro Renewable Energy Systems: Synergizing Technology, Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro Renewable Energy Systems: Synergizing Technology, Economics and Policy Narayanan Komerath suggested. Keywords ­ Micro Renewable Energy, Public Policy, Algae, Biofuel, Energy Efficiency I@gatech.edu Abstract ­ This paper studies the technological, economic and public policy issues and opportunities

72

THE ECONOMICS OF CONSERVED-ENERGY "SUPPLY" CURVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-028 THE ECONOMICS OF CONSERVED-ENERGY "SUPPLY" CURVES Steven Stoft April 1995 This paper "SUPPLY" CURVES Steven Stoft April 1995 #12;Table of Contents The Economics of Conserved-Energy "Supply is part of the working papers series of the Program on Workable Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER

California at Berkeley. University of

73

The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices and economically impact the well-being of the agricultural sector. An U.S. agricultural sector model, a dynamic, nonlinear, mathematical program, determined the economic effects of using increased supplies of agricultural biomass for energy. The model incorporated production and use of potential biomass energy feedstocks, such as switchgrass and short rotation poplar. Also, the model introduced future biomass technologies, based on current research involving more productive biomass crops and more efficient conversion activities which produce ethanol and biomass electricity. The forced supply of new biomass crops, along with corn, involves several levels of energy production. This forced supply was based on projected ethanol demands and land capability for biomass production. The model determined the optimal mix of corn and energy crops to meet the biomass feedstock goals for energies. The resultant model appraises the effects of increasing biomass feedstocks for the years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results show that initially, fuel prices using biomass feedstocks may be as much as 50 % greater than equivalent fossil fuel supplied energy. But due to technology the price of biomass feedstocks decreases over time. The analysis predicts that the agricultural feedstock price and the price of fossil fuels may equalize between the years 201 0 and 2020. The forced production of agricultural energy crops changes cropping patterns and prices for conventional crops as well. The agricultural energy crops and corn receive a greater allocation of farm land to meet the forced biomass energy supplies. Most conventional crop prices rise and all biomass feedstock prices rise with increasing feedstock production. As a consequence, farmers receive increased profits. Consumers, however, experience a loss in well-being due to the higher cost of energy feedstock and food products. National well-being experiences a net loss.

Jerko, Christine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electricity from hot dry rock geothermal energy: technical and economic issues  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of energy from hot dry rock would make available a nearly unlimited energy source. Some of the technical problems and possible economic tradeoffs involved in a power generating system are examined and possible solutions proposed. An intertemporal optimization computer model of electricity production from a hot dry rock geothermal source has been constructed. The effects of reservoir degradation, variable fluid flow rate, and drilling operations are examined to deetermine optimal strategies for reservoir management and necessary conditions for economic feasibility.

Tester, J.W.; Morris, G.E.; Cummings, R.G.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of...

78

Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOEGO-102001-1165 GREENING FEDERAL FACILITIES An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility Managers and Designers SECOND EDITION i Greening Federal...

79

RECIPIENT:MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: SEP - Farm Audit Implementation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA...

80

Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Development Economic Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development Name Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂĽr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Partner German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website http://www.gtz.de/en/weltweit/ Program Start 2006 Program End 2013 Country Ghana Western Africa References Sustainable Economic Development in Ghana[1] GTZ is working with Ghana on this project with the following objective: "The judicial, economic and institutional framework conditions and the access to energy as well as to financial and non-financial services has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-High Economic Growth Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

82

Biofuels Techno-Economic Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Techno-Economic Models Biofuels Techno-Economic Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biofuels Techno-Economic Models Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/analysis/tools.html#2 OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Biofuels Techno-Economic Models Language: English References: Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol[1] Model the production cost for ethanol to assess its competitiveness and market potential; quantify the economic impact of individual conversion performance targets and prioritize these in terms of their potential to

83

Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air distribution design and the fan parameters associatedfan energy than the baseline case, as the economizer designfans. Energy demand for servers, UPS, and lighting are constant, unaffected by the different design

Shehabi, Arman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Regional variation in solar energy economic performance  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos/UNM solar economic performance code (EASE-III) is used to indicate the extent of production function variations as applied to a Trombe wall solar design incorporated in a new home. The economic performance of the solar heated residence is compared to the alternative non-solar home heated by the characteristic conventional fuel of each region. These economic results are used to discuss the impact of subsidy programs.

Brunton, D.; Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S.; Roach, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Districts (Indiana) Improvement Districts (Indiana) Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Bond Program Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Indiana Economic Development Corporation A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to issue revenue

86

The Economics of Green Building | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Economics of Green Building Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

87

Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Address Montana Economic Development Address Montana Economic Development Summit Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit September 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. -Tuesday, September 14, 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will speak at the 2010 Montana Economic Development Summit. This year's summit will discuss the mechanics of a healthy recovery and how to get workers back into good-paying jobs. At the invitation of Senator Max Baucus, Secretary Chu will discuss how Montana can seize the clean energy opportunity and highlight the investments the administration has made in the state's clean energy sector. The summit will be webcast live. What: U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu to give keynote address at Montana Economic Development Summit

88

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Low Economic Growth Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main Low Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary Low Economic Growth Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year Low Economic Growth Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions

89

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - High Economic Growth Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main High Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary High Economic Growth Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Excel Gif

90

A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Jump to: navigation, search Name A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Agency/Company /Organization Government of Scotland Sector Energy, Land Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Res Country United Kingdom UN Region Western Europe References A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland[1] Abstract The Low Carbon Economic Strategy is an integral part of the Government's Economic Strategy (GES) to secure sustainable economic growth, and is a key component of our broader approach to meeting Scotland's climate change targets and securing the transition to a low carbon economy in Scotland "The Low Carbon Economic Strategy is an integral part of the Government's

91

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity Figure 32. Average annual growth rates fo real GDP, labor force, and productivity, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 33. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data AEO2008 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth AEO2008 presents three views of economic growth for the 2006-2030 projection period. Economic growth depends mainly on growth in the labor force and productivity. In the reference case, the labor force grows by an average of 0.7 percent per year; labor productivity in the nonfarm business

92

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Photovoltaics Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaics Economics Calculator Photovoltaics Economics Calculator Web-based tool which allows you to describe your solar system in detail and provides a detailed breakdown of what sort of power you'll get out of it and how economical of a investment the system will be. It uses the TMY2 solar data from the NREL Renewable Resource Data Center. This calculator allows users to customize their setup, providing greater feedback on how much power is provided when, and most importantly, a detailed economics breakdown of how the investment works out. It also keeps track of battery charge states for off-grid users. Screen Shots Keywords solar, photovoltaic, economics Validation/Testing Validated against PVWatts, a widely recognized solar power output calculator. When given the exact same conditions, power production is

93

World Economic Forum | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Economic Forum World Economic Forum Jump to: navigation, search Logo: The World Economic Forum (WEF) Name The World Economic Forum (WEF) Address World Economic Forum Switzerland 91-93 route de la Capite, CH-1223 Cologny/Geneva Switzerland Year founded 1971 Website http://www.weforum.org Coordinates 46.2169537°, 6.18583° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2169537,"lon":6.18583,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. (Manitoba, Canada) Resource and Energy Investment Program - First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. (Manitoba, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $2,000,000 (Canada) Program Info Funding Source Government of Canada, Manitoba Hydro and First Peoples Economic Growth Fund State Manitoba Program Type Loan Program Provider First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. The Resource and Energy Investment Program is intended to provide debt or

95

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Benefits of President Bush's Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City Secretary Bodman Highlights Economic Benefits of President Bush's Energy Initiatives in Kansas City March 10, 2006 - 11:46am Addthis KANSAS CITY, MO - Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today highlighted America's robust economy and the role the energy sector plays to ensure its continued growth, while speaking to the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. During his remarks, Secretary Bodman discussed the American Competitiveness and Advanced Energy Initiatives, announced by President Bush in the State of the Union address. These initiatives promote America's continued economic vitality through the development and use of alternative energy sources and aim to provide our next generation of

98

Economical Energy Responsive Housing with the Lowest ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management ... A Suggestion for Establishing Energy Management Policy in Primary Aluminum Industry ...

99

Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Place Albany, New York Zip NY 12207-1 Sector Renewable Energy Product US-based non-profit organisation sponsored by New York State Government. It takes initiatives in many projects in the field of renewable energy as a coordinator. References Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc is a company located in Albany, New York . References ↑ "Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc" Retrieved from

100

New Industrial Park Energy Supply for Economical Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new industrial park energy supply (NIPES) concept is an attractive approach for providing a stable, long-term domestic energy source for industrial plants at reasonable cost and reasonable financial risk. The NIPES concept consists of a system of energy supply stations and steam transmission lines that supply process heat and electricity to multiple users in an industrial park(s) setting. The energy supply stations grow along with the industrial park(s) as new industries are attracted by a reliable, reasonably priced energy source. This paper describes the generic NIPES concept and summarizes the results of the evaluation of a specific NIPES system for the Lake Charles, Louisiana, area. The economics of the specific NIPES system is compared to that of individual user-owned coal-fired facilities for new industrial plants and of individual user-owned oil-fired facilities for existing industrial plants. The results indicate substantial savings associated with the NIPES system for both new and existing users and/or a potential for high return on investment by third-party investors.

Scott, D.; Marda, R. S.; Hodson, J. S.; Williams, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Three Essays on Energy Economics and Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains three independent essays relating energy economics. The first essay investigates price asymmetry of diesel in South Korea by using the error correction model. Analyzing weekly market prices in the pass-through of crude oil, this model shows asymmetric price response does not exist at the upstream market but at the downstream market. Since time-variant residuals are found by the specified models for both weekly and daily retail prices at the downstream level, these models are implemented by a Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) process. The estimated results reveal that retail prices increase fast in the rise of crude oil prices but decrease slowly in the fall of those. Surprisingly, retail prices rarely respond to changes of crude oil prices for the first five days. Based on collusive behaviors of retailers, this price asymmetry in Korea diesel market is explained. The second essay aims to evaluate the new incentive system for biodiesel in South Korea, which keeps the blend mandate but abolishes tax credits for government revenues. To estimate changed welfare from the new policy, a multivariate stochastic simulation method is applied into time-series data for the last five years. From the simulation results, the new biodiesel policy will lead government revenues to increases with the abolishment of tax credit. However, increased prices of blended diesel will cause to decrease demands of both biodiesel and blended diesel, so consumer and producer surplus in the transport fuel market will decrease. In the third essay, the Regression - Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (REGSARIMA) model is employed to predict the impact of air temperature on daily peak load demand in Houston. Compared with ARIMA and Seasonal Model, a REGARIMA model provides the more accurate prediction for daily peak load demand for the short term. The estimated results reveal air temperature in the Houston areas causes an increase in electricity consumption for cooling but to save that for heating. Since the daily peak electricity consumption is significantly affected by hot air temperature, this study makes a conclusion that it is necessary to establish policies to reduce urban heat island phenomena in Houston.

Shin, Yoon Sung

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

CO2 emissions, Nuclear energy, Renewable energy and Economic growth in Taiwan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When the government decided to energy policy, we must first understand the energy and economic growth with a causal link between carbon dioxide emissions, this… (more)

Lin, Yi-Ching

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Appliance and Equipment Standards Result in Large Energy, Economic, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance and Equipment Standards Result in Large Energy, Economic, Appliance and Equipment Standards Result in Large Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits Appliance and Equipment Standards Result in Large Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits Saving Consumers and Businesses Energy and Money by Setting Efficiency Standards Saving Consumers and Businesses Energy and Money by Setting Efficiency Standards The Building Technologies Office (BTO) implements minimum energy conservation standards for more than 50 categories of appliances and equipment. As a result of these standards, energy users saved about $40 billion on their utility bills in 2010. Since 2009, 18 new or updated standards have been issued, which will help increase annual savings by more than 50 percent over the next decade. By 2030, cumulative operating cost

104

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is also financing available to pay for training, certification, travel and exams for installers of energy efficient and renewable energy systems. Commercial loans are made...

105

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity AEO2009 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth Figure 27. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor force, and productivity in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 28. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 29. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

106

A Critique of Energy and Economic Policy Assessments: The Missing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Critique of Energy and Economic Policy Assessments: The Missing Physics and Behavioral Perspectives Speaker(s): John "Skip" Laitner Date: March 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Location:...

107

Energy Storage Economics and Policy and Market Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Economics and Policy and Market Interactions Speaker(s): Ramteen Sioshansi Date: November 19, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Ryan...

108

Human Drivers of Climate Change: Energy, Economic Growth, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Drivers of Climate Change: Energy, Economic Growth, and Trade Speaker(s): Steve Davis Date: October 1, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Ryan...

109

Appliance remanufacturing and life cycle energy and economic savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we evaluate the energy and economic consequences of appliance remanufacturing relative to purchasing new. The appliances presented in this report constitute major residential appliances: refrigerator, dishwasher, ...

Boustani, Avid

110

Using Economics to Determine the Efficient Curtailment of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the potential societal benefits to the energy market by allowing the dispatch of wind generation in times when it may enhance reliability and be economically advantageous to do so.

Ela, E.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integration of hydrothermal energy economics related quantitative studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of the existing hydrothermal energy economics related quantitative studies is provided. The objective is to present the similarities and differences in methodology and assumptions, and explain the impact of these differences on the energy price estimates. A brief summary of the study categories, economic evaluation methodology, technical and economic assumptions and major outputs of the studies is presented. The relative importance and the likely effects of the most important technical and economic factors on the cost of energy are discussed. The sensitivity analysis results provided are useful in judging the credibility as well as the relative weaknesses and strengths of the various cost of energy estimation studies. The major conclusions of the evaluation and the recommendations for future research are presented.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate the economic attractiveness of retrofitting HVAC industrial energy recovery equipment.

Graham, E. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

In the US, data center operations currently account for about 61 billion kWh/y of electricity consumption, which is more than 1.5percent of total demand. Data center energy consumption is rising rapidly, having doubled in the last five years. A substantial portion of data-center energy use is dedicated to removing the heat generated by the computer equipment. Data-center cooling load might be met with substantially reduced energy consumption with the use of air-side economizers. This energy saving measure, however, has been shown to expose servers to an order-of-magnitude increase in indoor particle concentrations with an unquantified increase in the risk of equipment failure. An alternative energy saving option is the use of water-side economizers, which do not affect the indoor particle concentration but require additional mechanical equipment and tend to be less beneficial in high humidity areas. Published research has only presented qualitative benefits of economizer use, providing industry with inadequate information on which to base their design decisions. Energy savings depend on local climate and the specific building-design characteristics. In this paper, based on building energy models, we report energy savings for air-side and water-side economizer use in data centers in several climate zones in California. Results show that in terms of energy savings, air-side economizers consistently outperform water-side economizers, though the performance difference varies by location. Model results also show that conventional humidity restrictions must by relaxed or removed to gain the energy benefits of air-side economizers.

Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Traber, Kim; Price, Hillary; Horvath, Arpad; Nazaroff, William W.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Minority Business and Economic Development | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business and Economic Development Business and Economic Development Minority Business and Economic Development The Office of Minority Business and Economic Development will be responsible for contract assistance, energy research, development, outreach and financial assistance for minority businesses. The Office was established in November 2013, and André H. Sayles, Ph.D., will serve as Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development. Get in touch: Email us at diversity@hq.doe.gov or call (202) 586-8383. * indicates required Email * Subscribe Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Blog Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion December 11, 2013 4:18 PM High school teams competing in the FIRST Robotics Competition should head over to this FIRST Robotics website to put in their bid for a free Cube 3D

115

Economics of Transition in the Power Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economics of Transition in the Power Sector Economics of Transition in the Power Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Economics of Transition in the Power Sector Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.iea.org/papers/2010/economics_of_transition.pdf References: The Economics of Transition in the Power Sector[1] The power sector carries a considerably great burden of the CO2 emission reductions required to address climate change, a feature common to many scenarios of emissions abatement. These reductions will only be possible if existing plants are replaced with more efficient, and less-emitting types of plants over the coming decades. This report considers: the risk factors

116

Economic analysis of electric energy storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a cost analysis of grid-connected electric energy storage. Various battery energy storage technologies are considered in the analysis. Life-cycle cost analysis is… (more)

Poonpun, Piyasak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Dollars from sense: The economic benefits of renewable energy  

SciTech Connect

This document illustrates direct economic benefits, including job creation, of renewable energy technologies. Examples of electricity generation from biomass, wind power, photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, and geothermal energy are given, with emphasis on the impact of individual projects on the state and local community. Employment numbers at existing facilities are provided, including total national employment for each renewable industry where available. Renewable energy technologies offer economic advantages because they are more labor-intensive than conventional generation technologies, and they use primarily indigenous resources.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 - Low Economic Growth Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Low Economic Growth Case Tables (2004-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Low Economic Growth Case Tables Low Economic Growth Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

119

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs EIA Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC Meeting Agenda Jim Turnure, Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 2 * EIA WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION (15 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF EIA RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODELS AND CURRENT METHODS FOR INCORPORATING ENERGY EFFICIENCY/EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS (30 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS GENERAL OVERVIEW AND DISCUSSION (45 minutes) * EXPERTS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION/BRAINSTROMING: HOW CAN EIA BENEFIT FROM APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ENERGY DEMAND MODELING?

120

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy in developing countries Zitouni Ould-Dada Head of Technology Unit UNEP, 15 rue de Milan 75009 Paris Renewable, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3

Canet, LĂ©onie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Analysis Department Changes in the Economic Value of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy #12;2 Environmental Energy Technologies is an evaluation of the economic value of the energy generated · Use a long-run modeling framework to evaluate economic benefits of several different VG technologies: · Wind, single-axis tracking photovoltaics (PV

122

NREL: Jobs and Economic Competitiveness - Clean Energy Innovation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Innovation Analysis Clean Energy Innovation Analysis With increased global competition for market share in alternative energy, innovation in energy will be a major contributor to national economic competitiveness in the coming decades. NREL's innovation analysis focuses on understanding the innovation dynamics of clean energy technologies to inform research investment decisions and innovation and technology transfer policy. NREL's innovation analysis studies show that: Different energy technology areas exhibit unique patterns of invention and innovation. New empirical methods of estimating technical and commercial impact (based on analysis of patent citations and web presence) to better target research expenditures could augment the speed and scale of innovation and deployment of clean energy technologies

123

DOE Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Standards DOE Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Standards DOE Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Standards. The Department of Energy is supportive of outside parties' negotiations efforts to reach consensus on energy conservation standards and test procedures that can be presented for consideration by the Department However, neither the Department nor any of its contractors can: offer advice or suggestion on any standard or test procedure under consideration by outside parties; take a position on any standard or test procedure under consideration by outside parties; negotiate with outside parties; or participate in any way in discussions among outside parties.

124

Cost study application of the guidebook on integrated community energy systems: indirect economic and energy impacts  

SciTech Connect

An ICES is being considered for a community located in a small New England city. (MCW) It is part of the city's newer development. It is a commercial park of offices, shopping center, bank, hospital, and hotel. The ICES for this community is designed to meet all heating, cooling, steam, and hot water needs. Electricity from the cogeneration unit is to be sold to the local utility, and electricity for the community will be purchased as at present. However, future electrical demand will be reduced, since absorption chillers, which will be powered by heat recovered from the central ICES unit, will partially replace electric air conditioners. In addition, hot-water heating from ICES will, in some cases, lower electrical use. Thus, the ICES involves substitution of energy forms as well as modification of fuel requirements. Examination of the integrated system, in comparison with existing energy systems, includes both indirect economic impacts (employment and fiscal effects on the city) and indirect energy impacts. The indirect economic analysis proceeds from an initial description of conditions that determine employment and fiscal results through specific estimates of employment and then revenues and costs to municipal government and finally to an evaluation of ICES's worth to the city. The indirect energy analysis compares energy resource requirements of the ICES with those for gas, oil, and electric systems now serving the community. (MCW)

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of Energy Efficiency at the Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Highlights the Economic Incentives of Energy Efficiency at the Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 January 6, 2006 - 9:10am Addthis PITTSBURGH, PA - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman joined Reps. Melissa Hart and Tim Murphy today for the Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 to discuss how communities and companies fuel Pittsburgh's economy and how the Energy Policy Act of 2005 will impact jobs and the economy of Pennsylvania. In particular, he highlighted the energy efficiency tax credits made available January 1, 2006. The Pittsburgh Energy Summit 2006 brought business and community leaders together to discuss America's energy challenges, the need for economic and

126

Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis, Background analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: Philippines South-Eastern Asia References: Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis[1] Background Economic Analysis of Solar Home Systems: A Case Study for the Philippines, Peter Meier, Prepared for The World Bank, Washington, D.C. References ↑ "Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis" Retrieved from

127

Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors The potential for SMR deployment will be largely determined by the economic value that these power plants would provide to interested power producers who would evaluate their prospects in relation to other options for generating electricity. To help better understand this proposition, DOE enlisted the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago in 2010 to conduct an economic analysis of SMRs based upon what is known today. Their findings were summarized in a paper by Robert Rosner and Stephen Goldberg, released in December, 2011, titled "Small Modular Reactors - Key to Future Nuclear Power Generation in the U.S." This brief paper will highlight some of the key finding from the study1

128

The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economics of Climate Change in Mexico Economics of Climate Change in Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Name The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico Agency/Company /Organization Government of Mexico Sector Energy Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.cop16.mx/assets/001 Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico[1] The Economics of Climate Change in Mexico Screenshot "The study which the reader now holds, and which we are most pleased to present, will be of immense usefulness in orienting strategy and guidelines for public policy. We also hope that it will be the first of a number of serious and though roughly researched such studies undertaken in Mexico, with the backing and encouragement of a diversity of public and private,

129

Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors Economic Aspects of Small Modular Reactors The potential for SMR deployment will be largely determined by the economic value that these power plants would provide to interested power producers who would evaluate their prospects in relation to other options for generating electricity. To help better understand this proposition, DOE enlisted the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago in 2010 to conduct an economic analysis of SMRs based upon what is known today. Their findings were summarized in a paper by Robert Rosner and Stephen Goldberg, released in December, 2011, titled "Small Modular Reactors - Key to Future Nuclear Power Generation in the U.S." This brief paper will highlight some of the key finding from the study1

130

Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) Focus Area: Solar Topics: System & Application Design Website: instance.celadonapps.com/insolation/insolation.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/photovoltaics-economic-calculator-uni Web-based tool that allows users to describe their solar system in detail and provides a detailed breakdown of power production and system economics. It uses the TMY2 solar data from the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Resource Data Center. This model is appropriate for U.S.-based users, but it could also serve as an adaptable model example for other countries. References

131

Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Community Economic Analysis: A How To Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Ronald J. Hustedde Partner: Ron Shaffer Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.epa.gov/greenkit/pdfs/howto.pdf Cost: Free References: Community Economic Analysis: A How To Manual[1] This how to guide is designed for an individual how is interested in analyzing a communities economy. Overview "This manual is intended for the individual interested in the analysis of a community's economy. It is not designed for direct use in citizens' meetings. Rather the publication is designed to assist individuals who need

132

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

133

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Project Summary Full Title: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are 'H2E-Stations' a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? Project ID: 244 Principal Investigator: Timothy Lipman Brief Description: This project expands on a previously conducted, preliminary H2E-Station analysis in a number of important directions. Purpose This analysis, based on an integrated Excel/MATLAB/Simulink fuel cell system cost and performance model called CETEEM, includes the following: several energy station designs based on different sizes of fuel cell systems and hydrogen storage and delivery systems for service station and office building settings; characterization of a typical year of operation

134

Renewable Energy Financing: The Role of Policy and Economics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have rapidly developed momentum in certain sections of the United States and throughout the world, primarily in response to climate and energy security concerns. This presentation at the RPS Symposium, sponsored by the Electric Utility Consultants Inc., will discuss renewable energy financing and the economics of such policies.

Cory, K.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Total Economics of Energy Efficient Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the large increases in cost of electrical energy in recent years, the energy savings attainable with the use of energy-efficient motors is very attractive to all motor users. But energy and electric demand charge savings tell only part of the story. Engineers responsible for the selection of motors for many varying uses must also consider many less tangible factors when deciding whether a price premium for an energy-efficient motor is justified. These important intangible factors may throw a borderline decision in favor of a premium motor; at other times these factors may dictate that the capital money could be spent more wisely in other areas. This paper will point out those factors which effect the decision of whether or not to buy a premium priced energy-efficient motor or a standard electric motor. It will also address the question of whether it is cost-effective to rewind an old motor which has failed or to replace it with a new energy-efficient motor.

Nester, A. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative (CEEDI) (Maryland...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is offering grants and loans to Maryland businesses to assist in the growth of the clean energy industry throughout the State. The program is available to both existing clean...

137

An assessement of global energy resource economic potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of global economic energy potentials for all major natural energy resources. This work is based on both an extensive literature review and calculations using natural resource assessment data. Economic potentials are presented in the form of cost-supply curves, in terms of energy flows for renewable energy sources, or fixed amounts for fossil and nuclear resources, with strong emphasis on uncertainty, using a consistent methodology that allow direct comparisons to be made. In order to interpolate through available resource assessment data and associated uncertainty, a theoretical framework and a computational methodology are given based on statistical properties of different types of resources, justified empirically by the data, and used throughout. This work aims to provide a global database for natural energy resources ready to integrate into models of energy systems, enabling to introduce at the same time uncertainty over natural resource assessments. The supplementary mate...

Mercure, J F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Greece, May 8, 2008 Peak in Global Oil Production? Bakhtiari, S. A-M. World Oil Production Capacity Model Suggests Output Peak by 2006-07 , Oil and Gas Journal (OGJ), May 2004 After 2020CERA After 2025Shell 2010 8, 2008 2008 Growth in Energy Availability · Petroleum demand · ~ 86 million barrels of oil per day

140

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fall in between. The clean energy incentives provided by theafter incentives, is the most economical clean energy source

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

RECIPIENT:MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: SEP - Farm Audit Implementation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000052 DE-EE0000166 GFO-O000166-037 GOO Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

142

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

143

The Economics of Energy (and Electricity) Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% electrical efficiency might be able to deliver electrical heat using half the gas of gas fired boiler with ‘90% efficiency’ (p.152-153). An electric car uses around 15 kWh per 100 km, around 5 times less than the average fossil fuel car. This implies... that there is always a wide-range of observed efficiencies in the economy, with the average efficiency of the provision of an energy service being significantly less than the efficiency of the most efficient. Current new fossil fuel cars and gas boilers are 50...

Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

144

Supplying Renewable Energy to Deferrable Loads: Algorithms and Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplying Renewable Energy to Deferrable Loads: Algorithms and Economic Analysis Anthony in order to mitigate the unpredictable and non-controllable fluctuation of renewable power supply. We cast for optimally supplying renewable power to time-flexible electricity loads in the presence of a spot market

Oren, Shmuel S.

145

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: Connecticut Department of Economic & Community Development Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Socio-Economic Website: www.chfcc.org/Publications/reports/Fuel_Cell_Plan%201-31-08_DECD.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/fuel-cell-economic-development-plan-h Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: "Safety Standards,Emissions Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

146

Property:DIA/Topic/Economic | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DIA/Topic/Economic Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DIA/Topics/Economic Property Type String Description Sub-property for DIA/Topic Development Impacts Assessment Toolkit property to help filter pages Used in Form/Template Tool Allows Values General;Gross Domestic Product;Energy Security;Sectoral Employment;Sectoral Outputs Pages using the property "DIA/Topic/Economic" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + General +, Gross Domestic Product +, Sectoral Outputs +, ... Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) + General +, Gross Domestic Product + C CDM Sustainable Development Tool + General +

147

Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Foundation Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Finance, Implementation, Baseline projection, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.unctad.org/en/docs/aldcafrica2010_en.pdf UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

148

Economic analysis of potential uses of geothermal energy in agriculture  

SciTech Connect

The economic feasibility and water quality considerations of the cultural practice of soil warming was evaluated using existing technical, agronomic, and economic data. It was hypothesized that it is technically and economically feasible to use geothermal energy in the cultural practice of soil warming for specific crops. The analysis attempted to reject the hypothesis. Since the hypothesis could not be rejected, the results are presented as a profit equation suitable for inclusion in the GEOCOST computer program. This determination of economic feasibility utilized heterogeneous crop yield data by comparing the elasticity of response with a normalized product-factor price ratio. Soil warming was determined to be feasible when the elasticity of production was equal to or greater than the normalized product-factor price ratio. A farm enterprise was determined profitable if net returns were positive. An empirical model in which the energy dissipation rate is a function of the difference between heat source temperature and mean monthly air temperature was transformed to utilize data describing the total heat applied during the growing season. Heat input was then measured as the total number of calories per square centimeter applied during the growing season.

Cone, B.W.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

U. S. energy and economic growth, 1975--2010  

SciTech Connect

This study projects economic growth (GNP) and energy demand for the U.S. to the year 2010. The main finding is that both GNP and total energy demand are likely to grow significantly more slowly than has been assumed in most analyses of energy policy. Projections of energy, GNP, and electricity (total and per capita) are summarized, with electricity demand expected to grow more rapidly than total energy demand. Two scenarios designated ''high'' and ''low'' were developed in this study. However, even the ''high'' scenario, 126 quads (q; 1 q equals 10/sup 15/ Btu) in 2000, is much lower than most previous estimates. It is felt that this raises serious questions about fundamental energy and energy R and D policies which, generally, have been based on perceptions of more lavish energy futures. Although the aggregate demands and GNP are projected to increase rather modestly, the energy demands per capita and GNP per capita increase at rates comparable to or even higher than historic rates. The authors believe that the projections developed in this study represent a logical culmination of many trends toward lower growth. These trends have not yet been factored into the older energy projections upon which so much energy policy is based. 136 references.

Allen, E.L.; Cooper, C.L.; Edmonds, F.C.; Edmonds, J.A.; Reister, D.B.; Weinberg, A.M.; Whittle, C.E.; Zelby, L.W.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits of the Solar America Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The President's Solar America Initiative (SAI) was launched in January 2006 as part of the administration's Advanced Energy Initiative. The SAI is being led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), with NREL providing analytical and technical support. The SAI has a goal of installing 5-10 GW of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States by 2015 and 70-100 GW of PV systems in the United States by 2030. To make PV cost-competitive with other energy resources, this requires that the installed cost of PV fall from approximately $8/Wdc in 2005 to $3.3/Wdc in 2015 and $2.5/Wdc in 2030. This report presents estimates of the potential energy, economic, and environmental benefits that could result should the SAI PV installation goals be achieved.

Grover, S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Role of the breeder in long-term energy economics  

SciTech Connect

Private and public decisions affecting the use of nuclear and other energy technologies over a long-run time horizon were studied using the ETA-MACRO model which provides for economic- and energy-sector interactions. The impact on the use of competing energy technologies of a public decision to apply benefit-cost analysis to the production of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere is considered. Assuming the public choice is to impose an appropriate penalty tax on those technologies which generate CO/sub 2/ and to allow decentralized private decisions to choose the optimal mix of energy technologies that maximize a nonlinear objective function subject to constraints, the study showed that breeder technology provides a much-larger share of domestically consumed energy. Having the breeder technology available as a substitute permits control of CO/sub 2/ without significant reductions in consumption or gross national product growth paths.

Kosobud, R.F.; Daly, T.A.; Chang, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Storage Technical and Economic Analysis Program. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Energy Storage program over the last several years has evaluated a large number of energy storage technologies, developed promising technologies, and successfully transferred new technologies to the private sector. In FY 1985 specific tasks involved in this area included: Battery Systems Requirements Analysis, Statistical Analysis of Battery Failures, and Research Needs for Corrosion Control and Prevention in Energy Conservation Systems. Battery cost analysis, R and D planning, and technology transfer/market analysis are also reported.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Residential energy use to the year 2000: conservation and economics  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the energy and direct economic effects of implementing various residential energy conservation programs. These evaluations are conducted using a detailed engineering-economic model that simulates residential energy use on an annual basis for 1970 through 2000. These programs include several authorized by the 94th Congress and expanded upon by the present administration: appliance-efficiency standards, thermal standards for construction of new residences and weatherization of existing housing units. In addition to these Federal programs that are being (or will be) implemented in some form, we consider two additional measures to save energy: large fuel-price increases and elimination of all market imperfections associated with production and purchase of new equipment and homes. Altogether, nine different residential energy ''futures'' are considered. The highest projection, which assumes constant real fuel prices from 1976-2000, shows residential energy use growing from 16 QBtu in 1976 to 28 QBtu in 2000, with an average annual growth rate of 2.3 percent. The baseline, which assumes rising fuel prices, yields an energy use estimate of 24 QBtu in 2000. Implementing all the Federal programs listed above would cut energy use in 2000 by 11 percent, to 22 QBtu. Adopting these programs also reduces energy-related costs to households by $27 billion. Raising fuel prices by 50 percent after 1984 and eliminating all market imperfections yields essentially zero energy growth in the residential sector. However, the cost to households of higher fuel prices amounts to about $60 billion.

Hirst, E.; Carney, J.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To deepen the understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

Judson, Ruth A.

155

Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To deepen understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

Judson, Ruth A.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.

156

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar (Redirected from How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2009 How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Screenshot References: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy[1] Logo: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project for

157

Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Economic Realities and Energy Efficient Polyphase Integral Horsepower Electric Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficient polyphase integral horsepower electric motors are currently being vigorously promoted as a profitable method of conserving energy in many industrial and commercial applications. While the goal to be attained is indeed laudable, and must be tenaciously pursued, the economic realities of investment payback on increased efficiency versus cost of change out, power factor, etc. must have a meaningful review before decision making. Actual savings on a discount cash flow basis must be documented. and validity of the claims for the energy efficient motor must be verified. This paper develops the procedures used by the chemical manufacturing divisions of the Union Carbide Corporation in developing a long range plan for evolution from a motor population of standard efficiency units to one of higher efficiency and increased reliability. It notes statistics publicized by the U.S. Department of Energy, Union Carbide's overall electric equipment efficiency review, their own efficiency testing of sample small electric motors, and a pilot program to determine the number of lightly loaded motors in plant location. It further depicts an economic appraisal on the payback of replacing a standard efficiency motor with a higher efficiency unit and an action plan for purchasing energy efficient motors while simultaneously securing optimization of other parameters.

Whittington, B. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Renewable Energy Positioning System: Energy Positioning: Control and Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GENI Project: The University of Washington and the University of Michigan are developing an integrated system to match well-positioned energy storage facilities with precise control technologies so the electric grid can more easily include energy from renewable power sources like wind and solar. Because renewable energy sources provide intermittent power, it is difficult for the grid to efficiently allocate those resources without developing solutions to store their energy for later use. The two universities are working with utilities, regulators, and the private sector to position renewable energy storage facilities in locations that optimize their ability to provide and transmit electricity where and when it is needed most. Expanding the network of transmission lines is prohibitively expensive, so combining well-placed storage facilities with robust control systems to efficiently route their power will save consumers money and enable the widespread use of safe, renewable sources of power.

None

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impacts of the national energy programme on solar economics  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy-price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) that account for combustion and heat-generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional-fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar-system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs, and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption in the IEO2009 reference case increases from 85 million barrels per day in 2006 to 107 million barrels per day in 2030. Unconventional liquids, at 13.4 million barrels per day, make up 12.6 percent of total liquids production in 2030. Figure 25. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 26. World Liquids Supply in Three Cases, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

162

Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth February 7, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Smart for Life received a loan from Palm Beach County’s revolving loan fund program to expand its production facility and boost its overall energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of Craig Stephens, Palm Beach County. Smart for Life received a loan from Palm Beach County's revolving loan fund program to expand its production facility and boost its overall energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of Craig Stephens, Palm Beach County. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What are the key facts? After making energy efficiency upgrades, Smart for Life expects to

163

OpenEI:Get Involved | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI:Get Involved OpenEI:Get Involved Jump to: navigation, search How to GET INVOLVED WITH OpenEI Get involved with OpenEI Easy Ways You Can Get Involved Beginner.jpg Newbie Are you new to OpenEI, but not sure how to get started? That's ok! Its easy to get involved and contribute to OpenEI. Sign up for an account then start contributing wiki content Use social media to help share the word about OpenEI Join a local energy or technology interest group Scientist.jpg Content Developer Are you interested in adding, contributing, and editing content on OpenEI? Find out how to create and grow OpenEI's content and contribute. Create a New Page Upload Dataset - txt, zip, xml, csv, xls, xlsx, doc, docx, pdf, json, cbwfdb format Upload File - png, gif, jpg, jpeg, pdf, ppt, pptx format Join an OpenEI Project - OpenEI projects tackle specific challenges

164

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.2191, the Lieberman-Warner ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2008-01. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 . April 2008. Energy Information Administration

165

Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. Energy Markets and Economic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Activity October 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was...

166

Economical Energy Storage Option Enhances Energy Purchasing Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chilled Water Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers benefits to both the electricity supplier and the electricity user. This well-established technology uses stratified chilled water to store energy in thermal form so that electricity can be purchased during off-peak periods for use during on-peak periods. This energy shift offers both the user and the generator an opportunity to match their needs to get a win-win arrangement. The advantages to the electricity user not only include lower energy costs (due to reduced demand charges or other means). Chilled Water TES has also been shown to provide added cooling for less than the chiller equipment that it offsets. Finally, the various non-standard rate structures available today offer opportunities for electricity users who have some control over their demand profile. For the electricity generator, Chilled Water TES shifts electrical load from on-peak periods to off-peak periods. This has the effect of increasing the demand for base-load power while decreasing the demand for peaking power. Also, since Chilled Water TES installations are usually fairly large (1 MW or more per site), a small number of installations will produce a significant impact on the generator’s peaking power generation requirements.

Hansen, D. W.; Winters, P. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy and economic savings from improved catalysts: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The energy, economic costs and benefits of applying the materials-by-design concept to catalysts were estimated. Catalysts are of particular interest because of the competitive challenge from Japan, West Germany, and France. Initial estimates developed in this study reveal a potential capital cost savings of $31 billion and an operating cost savings of $69 billion for chemical and petroleum refining plants over a 15-year period. The findings of this study substantiate the claim that a major US effort to enhance materials-by-design technology is warranted, at least for catalyst materials. In addition, this technology would ensure pre-eminence by the US industry.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2009 How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Screenshot References: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy[1] Logo: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials, this Webinar featured information for

169

Projected National Economic and Energy Savings from Water Heater...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Appliance Energy Standards China Electricity Markets Energy Policy India Industrial Energy International Energy Studies Public Sector Energy Efficiency...

170

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2011 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Due October 6. Grade by October 18. Total Points: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Due October 6. Grade/PP284) Fall 2011 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3

Kammen, Daniel M.

171

Renewable Energy Financing: The Role of Policy and Economics (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing: Financing: The Role of Policy And Economics Karlynn Cory Strategic Energy Analysis and Applications Center, NREL EUCI RPS Symposium Washington, DC March 27, 2008 NREL/PR-670-42918 2 Overview * Renewable Energy (RE) Valuation * Federal and State Incentives * The role of RECs in financing RE - How Policy Impacts RE Valuation * Financing Challenges 3 Renewable Project Costs & Revenues Finance Equity &/or Debt Capital Equip., O&M Resource Supply/ Uncertainty Cost of Money Debt: Interest Rate Equity: ROI Costs Electricity Sales Subsidies/ Incentives Attribute Sales (e.g. RECs) Revenues 4 Electric Generation - Cost Comparison Source: EIA's AEO 2007 Source: OH OCC (2007) Orig. sources: DOE, MIT, Solar Buzz, NREL 5 Federal Incentives * Investment Tax Credit (ITC) - 30% for solar and fuel cells* from 1/1/06 through 12/31/08

172

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the case of China for the period 1978 to 2008, Fang (2011) finds that a 1% increase in renewable energy the impacts of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption on economic activities to find out whether economic growth benefits from substituting renewable energy for non-renewable energy sources. Empirical

174

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Harrison Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC PI Name: Robert Harrison PI Email: harrisonrj@ornl.gov Institution: ORNL Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Researchers propose to focus on the problems of catalysis and heavy element chemistry for fuel reprocessing-both of which are of immediate interest to the Department of Energy (DOE), are representative of a very broad class of problems in chemistry, and demand the enormous computational resources anticipated from the next generation of leadership computing facilities. Also common to both is the need for accurate electronic structure

176

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of H.R. 2454, the American ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2009-05. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 . August 2009. Energy Information Administration

177

Economics of modifying harvesting systems to recover energy wood  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in the recovery of previously underutilized logging residues for energy has stimulated the development of a variety of technologies for bringing this resource to market. The most promising approach for the independent contractor working the south eastern United States is to incorporate residue recovery equipment into his existing harvesting system. Computer simulation was used to assess the potential impact of adding small chippers or residue balers to three common harvesting systems. The systems are used in pine plantations, and mixed pine hardwood and upland hardwood stands. Changes in both operating costs and capital used were used to measure the effect of moving from conventional products to total energy wood harvests and capturing residues for energy in conjunction with conventional products. Incremental analysis was used to assess the operating cost per ton and capitalization per ton of annual production associated with the addition of the residue recovery capability. In nearly every case the incremental cost per ton and the incremental capitalization per ton associated with adding capability (for recovering wood residues for energy) to conventional harvesting systems were considerably less than for establishing systems of the same configuration (to produce energy wood only). The flow of conventional products must not be interrupted by the residue recovery process. Clearcutting or thinning operations conducted primarily for the production of enery wood did not appear to be economical on any stand, given 1979 residue values, unless a proportion of the large diameter trees are merchandized as conventional products. This statement, of course, must take into account that the cost used for both conventional products and the full tree chips were based upon 1979 pulp chip prices. If the alternative value of this material as fuel rises above its current value for fiber, this situation may change.

Stuart, W.B.; Porter, C.D.; Walbridge, T.A.; Oderwald, R.G.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Secretary Chu Op-Ed on Energy Efficiency from the World Economic Forum |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Op-Ed on Energy Efficiency from the World Economic Op-Ed on Energy Efficiency from the World Economic Forum Secretary Chu Op-Ed on Energy Efficiency from the World Economic Forum March 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC -- An op-ed by Secretary Steven Chu appears in a new report by the World Economic Forum and IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates entitled "Energy Vision 2010: Towards a More Energy Efficient World." Read the full report (pdf- 1,456kb). The Secretary's piece is below and attached: Energy Efficiency: Achieving the Potential By Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy For the next few decades, energy efficiency is one of the lowest cost options for reducing US carbon emissions. Many studies have concluded that energy efficiency can save both energy and money. For example, a recent McKinsey report calculated the potential

179

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Impacts Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model is a user-friendly tool that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. EERE Information Center

180

EIA - Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Forecasts & Analysis >Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy market and Economic Impacts of th American Power Act of 2010 > Preface and Contacts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Economic growth and the use of non-renewable energy resources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is a contribution to the analysis of the relationship between the economic growth and the usage of non-renewable energy resources. More precisely, it… (more)

Pérez-Barahona, Agustín

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Buried Treasure: The Environmental, Economic, and Employment Benefits of Geothermal Energy (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This new publication supplants older DOE publications regarding environmental impacts, providing updated and new information on environmental, economic, and employment benefits and impacts of geothermal energy.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides a summary assessment of concentrating solar power and its potential economic return, energy supply impact, and environmental benefits for the State of California.

Stoddard, L.; Abiecunas, J.; O'Connell, R.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut) Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut) Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Loan Program Provider Connecticut Development Authority Companies relocating to or expanding within the state are eligible for CDA direct loans up to $5 million through its Economic Inducement Financing Program. proceeds may be used for working capital, equipment, facilities, or mortgages. Eligible companies must contribute to Connecticut's technology base, intellectual capital, urban infrastructure, economic base, employment, tax revenues, or export of products and services

185

Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides a first-look at the system elements involved in: (1) creating a market; (2) understanding and deriving the requirements; (3) performing analytical effort; (4) specifying equipment; and (5) synthesizing applications for a thermal energy storage (TES) function. The work reviews implicated markets, energy consumption patterns, TES technologies, and applications. Further, several concepts are developed and evaluated in some detail. Key findings are: (1) there are numerous technical opportunities for TES in the residential and industrial market sectors; (2) apart from sensible heat storage and transfer, significant R and D is required to fully exploit the superior heat densities of latent heat-based TES systems, particularly at temperatures above 600/sup 0/F; (3) industrial energy conservation can be favorably impacted by TES where periodic or batch-operated unit functions characterize product manufacturing processes, i.e. bricks, steel, and ceramics; and (4) a severe data shortage exists for describing energy consumption rates in real time as related to plant process operations--a needed element in designing TES systems.

Glenn, D.R.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More November 7, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Jobs and Economic

187

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters August 12, 2013 - 11:53am Addthis The White House Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy today released a new report that assesses how to best protect the nation's electric grid from power outages that occur during natural disasters. The Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages report finds that grid resilience is increasingly important as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of severe weather and estimates the economic impact of power outages on the nation's

188

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters August 12, 2013 - 11:53am Addthis The White House Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy today released a new report that assesses how to best protect the nation's electric grid from power outages that occur during natural disasters. The Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages report finds that grid resilience is increasingly important as climate change increases the frequency and intensity of severe weather and estimates the economic impact of power outages on the nation's

189

Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis, Background analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: Sri Lanka, Peru Southern Asia, South America Coordinates: 7.873054°, 80.771797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":7.873054,"lon":80.771797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri) Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri) Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Missouri Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development The Missouri Rural Economic Stimulus Act (MORESA) provides financial incentives for public infrastructure for the development of a renewable fuel production facility or eligible new generation processing entity facility, creating new jobs and agricultural product markets in rural Missouri. The local funding must be, at a minimum, 50% of the amount of the new local Economic Activity Tax (sales and utility tax, etc.), and 100% of

191

United Nations Economic and Social Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council Council Jump to: navigation, search Name United Nations Economic and Social Council Website http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/in References United Nations Economic and Social Council[1] LinkedIn Connections Background "ECOSOC was established under the United Nations Charter as the principal organ to coordinate economic, social, and related work of the 14 UN specialized agencies, functional commissions and five regional commissions. The Council also receives reports from 11 UN funds and programmes. The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) serves as the central forum for discussing international economic and social issues, and for formulating policy recommendations addressed to Member States and the United Nations system. It is responsible for: promoting higher standards of living, full employment, and economic

192

Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Review: Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry by Travis Bradford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to finance and alternative energy economics. Energyalternatives are discussed next with the author concluding that hydroelectric dams; nuclear power; wind energyalternatives for various reasons. The last chapter in this part is dedicated to solar energy.

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermo-economic assessment of end user value in home and community scale renewable energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs thermo-economic analysis to establish a homeowner-centric valuation of renewable energy technologies. The evaluation methodology is illustrated using several classes of renewable energy technology

David Oliver; Dominic Groulx

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The economic, energy, and environmental impacts of the Energy-Related Inventions Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the economic, energy, and environmental impacts of inventions supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) -- a program jointly operated by the US Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It describes the results of the latest in a series of ERIP evaluation projects that have been completed since 1980. The period of interest is 1980 through 1992. The evaluation is based on data collected in 1993 through mail and telephone surveys of 253 program participants, and historical data collected during previous evaluations for an additional 189 participants.

Brown, M.A.; Wilson, C.R.; Franchuk, C.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Jones, D.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NREL: Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Chapter 10. Economic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Databook Home More Search Options Search Site Map Featured Links Biomass Energy Data Book Buildings Energy Data Book Hydrogen Energy Data Book Transportation Energy Data Book...

197

Economic Development Fund (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Fund (New York) Economic Development Fund (New York) Economic Development Fund (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Loan Program Provider Empire State Development Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing and a range of

198

Gateway:U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Where can I find out about potential economic and environmental impacts related to clean energy development? Exploring the environmental and economic impacts of different energy choices is an increasingly important aspect of project and program planning in developing countries. With many competing technologies and resources available, it is important to understand how different clean energy portfolios will affect the economic, environmental and social settings in which they are to be applied. Environmental Impacts Center for Bioenergy Sustainability at ORNL The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) analyzes the impact of biomass use for energy and

199

Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

Lantz, E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy and economic benefits of residential energy conservation RD and D. [Projections to year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL residential energy model is used to evaluate the energy and direct economic effects of offering new technologies for providing residential services (e.g., space heating, water heating). These new technologies are assumed to be introduced as a consequence of government and private research, development and demonstration (RD and D) programs. The energy savings due to the new technologies considered here increase from 0.1 QBtu in 1980 to 0.9 QBtu in 1990 and 1.9 QBtu in 2000. Present and projected RD and D programs sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) are expected to account for one-third of the cumulative energy saving of 20 QBtu. Because these new systems are more energy-efficient than the conventional systems they replace, household fuel bills are reduced by $20 billion between 1977 and 2000. On the other hand, the higher initial cost of these advanced systems increases consumer costs on new equipment and structures by almost $3 billion. Thus, the net economic benefit to the nation's households is almost $18 billion. The DOE programs account for about 40% of this dollar saving.

Hirst, E.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Secretary Chu Stresses Global Cooperation on Energy, Economic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Mining and Energy Australia, Martin Ferguson, Minister for Resources and Energy Brazil, Edison Lobo, Minister of Mines and Energy Canada, Lisa Raitt, Minister of Natural...

202

Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation The Economic Development Tax Credit (ETC) program was enacted in 2009 and eliminated five existing tax credit programs (Agricultural Development Zones, Airport Development Zones, Community Development Zones, Enterprise

203

EIA Renewable Energy- Number of Companies Involved in Photovoltaic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable data table showing the number of companies involved with cell manufacturing, module/system design, prototype module and systems development, wholesale ...

204

Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

205

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

206

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Loan Program Provider Virginia Department of Business Assistance The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the acquisition of land or facilities, or the purchase of machinery or equipment. Projects must create new jobs or

207

Impact of Climate on Energy Sector in Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments of economic conditions by region or sector attempt to include relevant climatic variability through residual adjustment techniques. There is no direct consideration of climatic fluctuations. Three recent severe winters combined with ...

Henry E. Warren; Sharon K. LeDuc

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

Baker, Arnold Barry

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

Canon, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Smil, Vaclav, Does Energy Efficiency Explain Japan's Economic Success? , Current History, 90:555 (1991:Apr.) p.175  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smil, Vaclav, Does Energy Efficiency Explain Japan's Economic Success? , Current History, 90:555 (1991:Apr.) p.175 #12;Smil, Vaclav, Does Energy Efficiency Explain Japan's Economic Success? , Current History, 90:555 (1991:Apr.) p.175 #12;Smil, Vaclav, Does Energy Efficiency Explain Japan's Economic

Smil, Vaclav

211

ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs Center Map Learn More Risk Management Assessment Tool Recovery Act Top Line Messages EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned Report to Congress EM Recovery Act Videos News Flashes January 29, 2013 "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP November 2, 2012 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated August 14, 2012 SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Recovery Act news flashes Newsletters October 1, 2011 2011 ARRA Newsletters December 1, 2010 2010 ARRA Newsletters November 1, 2009 2009 ARRA Newsletters More Recovery Act newsletters Press Releases December 22, 2011

212

Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Job Creation, Retention and Enhancement Fund State Iowa Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority The Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) program provides financial assistance to those businesses and industries requiring such assistance in order to create new job opportunities. Assistance is provided to encourage

213

EIA Behavioral Economics & Energy Efficiency Workshop - Meeting Follow-Up and Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Memorandum Memorandum 1 To: Participants and Invitees to EIA Behavioral Economics & Energy Efficiency Workshop Held on July 17, 2013 From: Jay Ratafia-Brown, Jonathan Nunes, and Navid Nowakhtar, SAIC Subject: EIA Behavioral Economics & Energy Efficiency Workshop - Meeting Follow- Up and Summary Date: September 12, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a technical workshop on July 17, 2013 in Washington, D.C. to assess recent methodological developments in the field of behavioral economics as applied to energy demand analysis and energy efficiency programs. The meeting was jointly planned and facilitated by EIA and SAIC staff. This memo is being distributed with the authorization of Jim Turnure, Director, Office of Energy Consumption and

214

White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters August 12, 2013 - 9:38am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The White House Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy today released a new report that assesses how to best protect the nation's electric grid from power outages that occur during natural disasters. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected across parts of Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New

215

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

216

Economic valuation of energy storage coupled with photovoltaics : current technologies and future projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A practical framework for the economic valuation of current energy storage systems coupled with photovoltaic (PV) systems is presented. The solar-with-storage system's operation is optimized for two different rate schedules: ...

Mosher, Trannon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Economic Investigation of Community-Scale Versus Building Scale Net-Zero Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study presented in this report examines issues concerning whether achieving net-zero energy performance at the community scale provides economic and potentially overall efficiency advantages over strategies focused on individual buildings.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Reddy, T. A.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effects of the Uncertainty about Global Economic Recovery on Energy Transition and CO2 Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact that uncertainty over economic growth may have on global energy transition and CO2 prices. We use a general-equilibrium model derived from MERGE, and define several stochastic scenarios for ...

Durand-Lasserve, Olivier

219

Energy use, technical progress and productivity growth : a survey of economic issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a survey paper for non-specialists on interactions between energy and productivity growth. The first half of the paper surveys the general economic literature linking technical progress to realized gains in ...

Berndt, Ernst R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2013 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class, or before 5pm outside: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class peripheral buildings; at peak output, the plant generates 185,000 pounds of steam each hour. It has been

Kammen, Daniel M.

222

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 [ER200/PP284 of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 chillers v. Thermally enhanced oil recovery (Other answers acceptable) e) Approximately what percent

Kammen, Daniel M.

223

Energy Production and Economic Growth: A Causality Analaysis for Turkey Based on Computer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High levels of energy prices and the promise of international initiatives on decreasing the greenhouse gas emissions have regenerated the argument about the execution of energy conservation policies. This paper investigates the causal relationship between ... Keywords: Energy production, Economic growth, Engle-Granger cointegration, Error correction, Granger causality

Omer Ozkan; Muharrem Aktas; Huseyin Serdar Kuyuk; Serkan Bayraktaroglu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Economic and Financial Feasibility of Wind Energy -Case Study of Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic and Financial Feasibility of Wind Energy - Case Study of Philippines Jyoti Prasad Painuly), can help project make viable in this case. 1 Introduction Wind energy has been one of the most., indicating viability of wind energy for entrepreneurs in developing countries as well. There are varying

225

UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study (Redirected from UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Risoe - Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.uneprisoe.org/Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations[1] Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia Regional Studies: Andean Region, Southern African Development Community (SADC) References ↑ "Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNEP-Risoe-Economics_of_GHG_Limitations:_Country_Study_Series&oldid=377226"

226

Economics of Energy Conservation in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capital allocated to energy savings projects competes with that for new or revised plants. Thus, it must show the same or better rate of return. Usually the risk factor in energy savings projects is less than allocations for other uses. The categories of energy consumption on a chemical or petrochemical plant are defined. Distillation is often the largest energy consumer, hence, offering the most promising area for investigation of energy savings. Other unit operations and well as changes in process operations are explored for potential energy savings. The use of cogeneration as a method for net energy savings is explored and appears to be most promising, especislly where it is possible to upgrade the value of waste heat or combustible by-products in the process plant to produce steam and electrical energy which can be utilized or sold to others. A formal energy audit of process plants is suggested utilizing for engineering, operating as well as management personnel.

Nachod, J. E. Jr.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluating the economic costs, benefits and tradeoffs of dedicated biomass energy systems: The importance of scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and environmental costs, benefits and tradeoffs of bioenergy from dedicated biomass energy systems must be addressed in the context of the scale of interest. At different scales there are different economic and environmental features and processes to consider. The depth of our understanding of the processes and features that influence the potential of energy crops also varies with scale as do the quality and kinds of data that are needed and available. Finally, the appropriate models to use for predicting economic and environmental impacts change with the scale of the questions. This paper explores these issues at three scales - the individual firm, the community, and the nation.

Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

United Nations Economic Commission for Africa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa Africa Jump to: navigation, search Name United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Address Economic Commission for Africa, P.O. Box 3001, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Place Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Year founded 1958 Phone number +251 11 551 7200 Website http://www.uneca.org/index.htm Coordinates 9.022736°, 38.746799° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":9.022736,"lon":38.746799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Europe Europe Jump to: navigation, search Name United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Address UN Economic Commission for Europe Information Service Palais des Nations Place Geneva, Switzerland Year founded 1947 Phone number +41 (0) 22 917 44 44 Website http://www.unece.org/Welcome.h Coordinates 46.2266748°, 6.1404115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2266748,"lon":6.1404115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Program (Iowa) Bond Program (Iowa) Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Iowa Finance Authority State Iowa Program Type Bond Program Provider Iowa Finance Authority Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for repayment of the bonds rests with the applicant. Neither IFA nor the State of Iowa has

231

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 July 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by

232

ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Alternative Fuel Vehicles --Batteries --Biofuels --Clean Cities -Building Design --Solar Decathlon -Manufacturing Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar ---SunShot --Wind...

233

Economics and applications of geothermal energy in St. Lucia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assessment reported here consisted of three major tasks: first, a field geologic assessment of the physical extent of the Qualibou caldera geothermal resource; second, an engineering evaluation of the potential development of the geothermal resource; and third, a study of the potential economic impact upon St. Lucia associated with the development of the geothermal resource. The first task, the geologic assessment, is not discussed in detail.

Altseimer, J.H.; Burris, A.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Trocki, L.K.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

EIA-Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 This report responds to a request from Senators Kerry, Graham, and Lieberman for an analysis of the American Power Act of 2010 (APA). APA, as released by Senators Kerry and Lieberman on May 12, 2010, regulates emissions of greenhouse gases through market-based mechanisms, efficiency programs, and other economic incentives. Contents complete report PDF GIF Errata - as of July 20, 2010 Preface and Contacts Request Summary Analysis Cases Findings Additional Insights Study Table Results Browse data results Regional and supplemental tables available here also. Data can be charted and downloaded.

235

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Role of Behavioural Economics in Energy and Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

  consumption or  to  change energy?use habits. The policy  interventions discussed  in  this  section  focus  primarily on promoting energy curtailment in the household energy sector. In addition, we discuss how  changing the tariff or billing structure affects energy...  peak electricity usage. Traditionally, residential electricity customers faced flat  electricity  tariffs,  and were  insulated  from  fluctuating wholesale electricity prices  through  the day.  If  electricity demand becomes “flatter”, utilities will save on energy costs by minimizing usage of peaking  plants, which  are  usually  less...

Pollitt, Michael G.; Shaorshadze, Irina

237

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 XLS GIF Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) Table Title Formats Summary High Economic Growth Case Tables PDF GIF High Economic Growth Case Tables XLS GIF Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary XLS GIF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption XLS GIF Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions

238

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called ``market barriers`` to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland`s attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called market barriers'' to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland's attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effects of the uncertainty about global economic recovery on energy transition and CO2 price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact that uncertainty over economic growth may have on global energy transition and CO 2 prices. We use a general-equilibrium model derived from MERGE, and define several stochastic scenarios for economic growth. Each scenario is characterized by the likelihood of a rapid global economic recovery. More precisely, during each decade, global economy may- with a given probability- shift from the EIA's (2010) loweconomic-growth path to the EIA's (2010) high-economic-growth path. The climate policy considered corresponds in the medium term to the commitments announced after the Copenhagen conference, and in the long term to a reduction of 25 % in global energy-related CO 2 emissions (with respect to 2005). For the prices of CO 2 and electricity, as well as for the implementation of CCS, the branches of the resulting stochastic trajectories appear to be heavily influenced by agents ’ initial expectations of future economic growth and by the economic growth actually realized. Thus, in 2040, the global price of CO 2 may range from $21 (when an initiallyanticipated economic recovery never occurs) to $128 (in case of non-anticipated rapid economic recovery). In addition, we show that within each region, the model internalizes the constraints limiting the expansion of each power-generation technology through the price paid by the power utility for the acquisition of new production capacity. As a result, in China, the curves of endogenous investment costs for onshore and offshore wind are all

Co Price; Olivier Dur; Axel Pierru; Yves Smeers; Olivier Durand-lasserve; Axel Pierru; Yves Smeers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Techno economical study of photovoltaic energy installations within DCND.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concerns have risen in the last few years about global warming. It has been shown that energy is responsible for a big share of CO2… (more)

Dhomé, Diane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methods associated with the modeling of changing energy markets for purposes of public information and policy analysis. - EIA uses the NEMS tool, a computer-based,...

244

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Clean Energy Technology Economics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and greenhouse gases (GHGs) associated with the use of clean energy technologies for distributed power generation. Performer Principal Investigator: Tim Lipman Organization:...

245

EIA - Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191 - Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3 Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2006, DOE/EIA-0573(2006) (Washington, DC, November 2007), ...

246

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

247

Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pat Ledonne, U.S. Department of Energy Russell Leslie, RPI Lighting Research Center Leonard LeVee, National Association of Vertical Transportation Professionals Suzanne...

248

Underground nuclear energy complexes - technical and economic advantages  

SciTech Connect

Underground nuclear power plant parks have been projected to be economically feasible compared to above ground instalIations. This paper includes a thorough cost analysis of the savings, compared to above ground facilities, resulting from in-place entombment (decommissioning) of facilities at the end of their life. reduced costs of security for the lifetime of the various facilities in the underground park. reduced transportation costs. and reduced costs in the operation of the waste storage complex (also underground). compared to the fair share of the costs of operating a national waste repository.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kunze, Jay F [IDAHO STATE UNIV; Giraud, Kellen M [BABECOCK AND WILCOX; Mahar, James M [IDAHO STATE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Economics of Nuclear and Renewable Electricity Energy Science Coalition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear energy arose as a ‘spin-off ’ from nuclear weapons. Its use grew rapidly during the 1960s, nurtured by huge subsidies and the belief that nuclear electricity would soon become ‘too cheap to meter’. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the end of 2009 there were 438 operating nuclear power reactors in the world, total

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value  

SciTech Connect

This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Renewable Energy Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates the performance and cost tables from the 2006 EPRI Renewable Energy Technical Assessment GuideTAG-RE (EPRI report 1012722) for the seven highest priority renewable energy technologies. The report initiates a new series of reports that will supplement the on-going TAG-RE program by focusing on selected technologies.

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

254

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

Tester, Jefferson W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Economic Impact of Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act Advanced Vehicle Investments Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act Advanced Vehicle Investments July 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Ahead of President Obama's trip to Holland, MI tomorrow for the official groundbreaking of the new Compact Power plant, the Department of Energy today released a new report on the economic impact of Recovery Act investments in advanced batteries and vehicles. The report, "Recovery Act Investments: Transforming America's Transportation Sector," documents how Recovery Act funds are being matched with private capital to create new jobs, construct new plants, add new manufacturing lines, install electric vehicle charging stations across the country and help build the

257

Strategy analysis for energy conservation. Task 1: economic studies  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an analytical methodology to evaluate alternative research, development, and demonstration projects to allocate Federal funds in a manner consistent with overall DOE and National Energy Plan goals are presented. Documentation of the first step toward addressing these goals is presented. Historical consumption and efficiency of energy usage in the US are traced. Based on a variety of sources and assumptions, a set of no action projections of energy consumption through 2000 was developed. These projections were then compared to national goals derived from the NEP and other sources to identify specific requirements for energy conservation through efficiency improvements and fuel switching. These requirements will form the basis for development and implementation of the analytical methodology as part of Tasks 2 and 3. The methodology concept is discussed in detail.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Economic growth continues to drive China's growing need for energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which has grown at an average real rate of about 10 percent per year over the last 10 years, is a key driver of the increase in energy consumption, ...

259

Economic growth continues to drive China's growing need for energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China is the world's largest energy consumer. China's economy, which has grown at an average real rate of about 10 percent per year over the last 10 years, is a key ...

260

ESD.126 Energy Systems and Economic Development, Spring 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A team-based policy research subject focused on evaluation of energy technologies and their implementation within developing countries. Focuses on one or more specific nations, carries out a resource assessment, and develops ...

Tabors, Richard D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Economic Community of West African States | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West African States West African States Jump to: navigation, search Name Economic Community of West African States Address 101, Yakubu Gowon Crescent, Asokoro District Place Abuja, Nigeria Year founded 1975 Website http://www.ecowas.int/ Coordinates 9.058036°, 7.489061° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":9.058036,"lon":7.489061,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Technical and economic feasibility analysis of the no-fuel compressed air energy storage concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of no-fuel compressed air energy storage (CAES) concepts for utility peaking applications. The analysis uncovered no insurmountable problems to preclude the technical feasibility of the no-fuel CAES concept. The results of the economic analysis are sufficiently unfavorable to conclude that no-fuel CAES technology could not compete with conventional CAES or standard gas turbine peaking facilities for conditions foreseeable at this time.

Kreid, D.K.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in the program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the production economics of these...

264

On the theory of energy distributions of products of molecular beam reactions involving transient complexes*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the theory of energy distributions of products of molecular beam reactions involving transient October 1974) Theoretical energy distributions of reaction products in molecular beam systems for the energy distributions of the products when 1 > j and j > l. I. INTRODUCTION In recent years illuminating

Marcus, Rudolph A.

265

Phase VII update (1984) report for the Energy Economic Data Program EEDB-VII  

SciTech Connect

Objective of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program is to provide current, representative and consistent power plant technical and cost information to the US Department of Energy (DOE). These data are useful for program planning by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, because they are representative of current US power plant construction cost experience and are developed on a consistent, organized basis.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy Economic Data Base Program (EEDB-VIII): Phase VIII update (1986) report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program is to provide current, representative and consistent power plant technical and cost information to the US Department of Energy (DOE). These data are useful for program planning by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, because they are representative of current US power plant construction cost experience and are developed on a consistent, organized basis.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Federal involvement in: municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge energy recovery and conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a study concerning federal involvement in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) sludge energy recovery and conservation. The objectives of the study were to: determine and report the major agency programs and related MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects; determine and summarize the coordination efforts between federal agencies involved in MWWTP sludge; and recommend future U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects. Specific federal agencies designated for surveying include ERDA, EPA, USDA, Bureau of Mines, National Science Foundation, and National Commission on Water Quality. Past (post-1966), present, and planned federal involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation, research and development, demonstration, and study projects were considered.

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

THE SUPPLY OF ENERGY TO fuel economic development remains a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the impact that new hydro power plants or fossil-burning thermal generators have. Private investors leading in power plant technology is the aim of achieving high thermal efficiencies together with low emission and its dialogue with the environment 18 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 20061540

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

269

THE ECONOMICS OF ENERGY RECOVERY FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

re covery system or heat exchanger is to lower the gas temperature as a means of extracting energy GAS I IN t system to be responsive. In all probability a pre heated combustion chamber +·· .. ...,. .... + .. . ·- - + + ·· .. J. J. +. ". · · ..l- f. .. , STACK FIG.10 WASTE GAS INCINERATOR WITH HEAT EXCHANGER FOR OIL HEATING

Columbia University

270

Climate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis and energy security concerns have prompted policy action in the United States and abroad to reduce petroleum

271

OVERVIEW OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 13XXX Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance 10/27/2009 F&I Meeting President Obama Signing E.O. 13514 2 On October 5, 2009, President Obama Signed Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. Executive Order 13514 * Executive Order 13514 establishes numerous goals for Federal agencies. * E.O. 13514 represents a transformative shift in the way the government operates by: - establishing GHGs as the integrating metric for tracking progress in Federal sustainability - requiring a deliberative planning process - linking to budget allocations and OMB scorecards to ensure goal achievement. * E.O. 13423, Strengthening Federal

272

Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

Bustard, L.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Harrison, D.L. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Economic Costs and Benefits of Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this technical update is to provide an objective quantitative analysis of the current costs and benefits of DER, and thereby identify the factors that have the greatest impact on DER's cost-effectiveness. For the purposes of this analysis, DER as defined herein, are small generation units (1kW to 50MW), typically sited on the local T&D system and operated in parallel with the utility system. Energy storage technologies are not included in this technical update but may be considered in future ...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

An assessement of global energy resource economic potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials with specific calorific contents; renewable f lows, where energy may be extracted from continuously producing onshore or offshore surface areas with wind, so- lar irradiation, plant growth, river flows, waves, tides or various forms of heat... wind power, and about 58 EJ/y for offshore wind power (Krewitt et al., 2009). A global onshore value of 346 EJ/y has been derived by Hoogwijk et al. (2004), in whose work, used for the present analysis, estimations of av- erage wind speeds were applied...

Mercure, Jean-Francois; Salas, Pablo

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets  

SciTech Connect

Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

Woolley, R.D.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Non-Economic Determinants of Energy Use in Rural Areas of South Africa  

SciTech Connect

This project will begin to determine the forces and dimensions in rural energy-use patterns and begin to address policy and implementation needs for the future. This entails: Forecasting the social and economic benefits that electrification is assumed to deliver regarding education and women's lives; Assessing negative perceptions of users, which have been established through the slow uptake of electricity; Making recommendations as to how these perceptions could be addressed in policy development and in the continuing electrification program; Making recommendations to policy makers on how to support and make optimal use of current energy-use practices where these are socio-economically sound; Identifying misinformation and wasteful practices; and Other recommendations, which will significantly improve the success of the rural electrification program in a socio-economically sound manner, as identified in the course of the work.

Annecke, W. (Energy and Development Research Center, University of Cape Town, South Africa)

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Energy, economic and environmental implications of production of grasses as biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; McLaughlin, S.; Walsh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Perennial grasses for energy and conservation: Evaluating some ecological agricultural, and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; Walsh, M.; McLaughlin, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Economic Effect of Energy Price and Economic Feasibility and Potenhal of New Technology and Improved Management for Irrigation in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major contributing factor in crop production on the Texas High Plains. It is responsible for greatly increasing crop production and farm income for the region. Two factors, a declining groundwater supply and increasing production costs, are of primary concern because they impact on farm operations and producer economic viability. Recursive linear programming models for a typical Texas High Plains irrigated farm were developed to evaluate expected impact of energy and crop price changes, tenure and new technology. The model includes a Fortran sub-routine that adjusts irrigation factors each year based on the linear programming solution of the previous year. After calculating new pumping energy requirements, well yield, and pumping lift, the Fortran component updates the linear programming model. This procedure continues automatically to the end of a specified planning period or to economic exhaustion of the groundwater, whichever occurs first. Static applications of the model, in a deep water situation, showed that a natural gas price increase from $1.50 to $2.20 per thousand cubic feet (mcf) would result in reductions in irrigation levels. Irrigation was terminated when the price of natural gas reached about $7.00 per mcf. In a shallow water situation, much higher natural gas prices were reached ($3.60 per mcf) before short-run adjustments in farm organization began to occur. Under furrow irrigation, irrigation was terminated when the natural gas price reached $7.00 per mcf. Increased natural gas prices impact heavily on returns above variable costs (up to 15 percent reductions) for a 60 percent natural gas price increase. The effects of rising natural gas prices over a longer period of time were more significant. Annual returns (above variable and fixed costs) were reduced by as much as 30 percent, and the present value of returns to water was reduced by as much as 80 percent as the natural gas price was increased annually by $0.25 per mcf (from $1.50 per mcf). The economic life of deep groundwater was shortened by as much as 18 years. Renter-operators are even more vulnerable to rising natural gas prices than are owner-operators. With rising natural gas prices, profitability over time for the renter is low. As natural gas prices continue to increase, the greater will be the incentives for renter-operators to seek more favorable rental terms such as a sharing of irrigation costs. With the problem of a declining groundwater supply and rising natural gas prices, an economic incentive exists for producers to find new technologies that will enable them to make more efficient use of remaining groundwater and of natural gas. Substantial economic gains appear feasible through improved pump efficiency. Increasing pump efficiency from 50 to 75 percent will not increase the economic life of the water supply, but can improve farm profits over time; e.g., the present value of groundwater was increased 33 percent for a typical farm with an aquifer containing 250 feet of saturated thickness and 15 percent for 75 feet of saturated thickness. Improved irrigation distribution systems can help conserve water and reduce irrigation costs. Results indicate that irrigation can be extended by 11 or more years with 50 percent improved distribution efficiency. In addition, the increase in present value of groundwater on the 1.69 million irrigated acres of the Texas High Plains was estimated to be $995 million with 50 percent improved efficiency. New technology opportunities were expanded to include analysis of the economic feasibility of wind assisted irrigation pumping. Two wind machines were analyzed, with rate outputs of 40 to 60 kilowatts (KW). Each was applied to the Northern and Southern Texas High Plains over a range of land and water resource situations. Breakeven investment was estimated at discount rates of three, five and ten percent. Cropping patterns on the Southern High Plains were dominated by irrigated cotton and were insensit

Lacewell, Ronald D.; Hardin, D. C.; Petty, J. A.; Whitson, R. E.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Feasibility of the electric energy production through gasification processes of biomass: technical and economic aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass is one of the main sources for energy production, indeed, due to its chemical and physical peculiarities, it can be used very well in thermo chemical processes such as combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. Furthermore, the considerable variability ... Keywords: biomass production, economic aspect, gasification

Danilo Monarca; Massimo Cecchini; Andrea Colantoni; Alvaro Marucci

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Potential Energy Savings from Optimized Schedule and Economizer Cycles in the Moody Library at UTMB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study which was initiated in order to estimate the potential energy savings due to optimizing the HVAC operation schedule and using economizer cycles in the Moody Library Building located at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas (UTMB).

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

China report: Economic affairs. Energy: Status and development, 52, [September 5, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains information on national development and status of energy production in China with particular attention to technological progress and economical effectiveness in coal and oil industries. The report highlights regulations on nuclear power plant safety issues. Power network, hydroelectricity and thermal power are altogether discussed in detail.

NONE

1986-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electric automobiles: energy, environmental, and economic prospects for the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The book discusses the pros and cons of electric cars for the motorist as well as for the nation as a whole. For the motorist, it compares the prospective performance and costs of electric cars with those of conventional cars. For the nation, it projects the changes in energy use, petroleum use, air pollution, and traffic noise that would result from substituting electric cars for conventional cars. Specific projections are advanced for the years 1980, 1990, and 2000. Beginning with the reasons for the current interest in electric cars and why they have not yet come into widespread use, the book offers useful information on: prospective propulsion batteries, with projections of battery performance and capabilities; patterns for urban driving, which serve as a basis for determining the applicability of electric cars with different driving ranges and passenger capabilities; comprehensive projections of electric utility capacity and generation by fuel type, both with and without electric cars; the number of electric cars that may be recharged without adding utility capacity beyond that already planned; the requirements of electric cars for battery materials; and the impact of electric cars on urban air quality and traffic noise.

Hamilton, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Integrating Energy Planning and Techno-Economic Development: A Solid Basis for the . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper started by explaining the major issues of energy system in developing countries and their constraints for energy planning and policy making. It then proceeded to introduce a comprehensive approach for integrating energy planning and techno-economic development which can provide a solid context for to energy technology transfer to under-developed countries. 16 Through the analysis was made in this paper it was highlighted that energy system development should consider four major components: energy policy, energy planning, energy pricing and energy technology. They are interrelated to facilitate energy system development depending upon the integration of energy management and development perspective. It also became clear that individual energy demand (or energy supply) planning in these countries, is not effective while an interrelated planning based on energy demand, energy supply and substitutability of energy seems to be more accurate. This view within an integrated energy planning and technoeconomic development approach will address an appropriate context in which energy technology transfer can be effectively analysed. In this context, the assessment of energy technology depending on country's technological capability and local dominant, qualitative, and quantitative factors can broadly implement. The paper described how we can integrate these different variables (qualitative, quantitative, and knowledge-based) through the Analytic Hierarchy Process with respect to energy policy and energy technology factors in the Third World. The Analytic Hierarchy Process as an appropriate technique can be applied to define the energy planning objectives and also to assess candidate energy technology(ies). As it was pointed out, through a proposed nine-step framework, ...

Goel Kahen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Energy Economizer for Low Temperature Stack Gas: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bartlesville (Oklahoma) Energy Technology Center (BETC) engineers made a study of recycling waste heat from one of the Power Plant boilers. The study showed that a system could be designed that would reclaim this waste heat and then utilize it to preheat air for boiler operation. The system incorporated a heat pipe heat exchanger flanged in a stack by-pass loop that would efficiently capture and transfer heat at low temperature differences (?T 350-5000 F). After reclaiming heat from this source, the burner air supply is preheated by passing through the heat exchanger. Sensitive design problems that had to be resolved were: Overall cost-effectiveness; below dew point cooling of stack gas causing acid corrosion; and selection of an effective heat exchanger for this application The candidate boiler is one of two that generate high temperature hot water (HTHW) for BETC facility heating and cooling. One unit normally handles the heating and cooling load while the other is in standby status. The preheat system was designed by BETC engineers. The new stack assembly was fabricated by a local metal shop, and was installed by BETC maintenance personnel. The cost of the heat exchanger and other hard-ware was $7,562. Operational results show that boiler efficiency has increased between 6 and 7 percent, which reflects the percent of reduction in fuel consumption. At full-load conditions, the burner supply air is preheated to 350oF and stack gas is cooled to 310oF. Corrosion damage to the heat exchanger and other internal parts are non-existent. Natural gas is the boiler fuel, and as expected, no residue coating of the heat exchanger has developed. To date, we are well pleased with the performance of the system. The savings in fuel and dollars speaks for itself. We are optimistic that this approach of reclaiming heat is not only technically feasible, but also cost-effective for many industry boilers that emit low temperature stack gas.

Tipton, J. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

NUCLEAR ENERGY AGENCY ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policies designed: ? to achieve the highest sustainable economic growth and employment and a rising standard of living in Member countries, while maintaining financial stability, and thus to contribute to the development of the world economy; ? to contribute to sound economic expansion in Member as well as non-member countries in the process of economic development; and ? to contribute to the expansion of world trade on a multilateral, non-discriminatory basis in accordance

unknown authors

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" 7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas Benjamin Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates, Inc. Andrew Slaughter, Shell [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Glenn: Let me welcome you to the Natural Gas Session. This is the only session in this conference that's devoted exclusively to natural gas [laughs]. I'm Glenn Sweetnam and I'm with the Energy Information Administration, and we're very fortunate this morning to have 3 very astute and long-time observers of the natural gas market to

289

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Economic impacts of wood energy in the Northeast, 1985: State report: Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic impacts of wood energy for the 11 Northeastern states. The report begins with a brief description of the types of economic impacts estimated in the study. The direct economic impacts are the jobs and income directly attributable to wood energy activities. They are referred to as first round impacts since they reflect the economic activity generated by the first spending of the fuelwood dollar, from the consumer to the supplier. Direct impacts include employment in logging, transport, and end-use operations such as chimney sweeping and boiler operating. Direct impacts also include personal income to employees, payments of stumpage fees to landowners, and profits earned by fuelwood enterprises. Indirect employment and income result from purchases made by fuelwood supply businesses, purpose made by the employees of fuelwood supply businesses, and purchases made by wood burning households or companies for wood combustion system installation, construction, and maintenance. They include purchases of equipment, spare parts, supplies, and services, including financial services.

Chamberlin, R.; High, C.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Economic study of low temperature geothermal energy in Lassen and Modoc Counties, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using low cost, low temperature geothermal energy in job-producing industries to increase employment and encourage economic development was investigated. The study, encompassing all of Lassen and Modoc Counties, was to be site-specific, referencing candidate geothermal applications to known hot wells and springs as previously determined, or to new wells with specific characteristics as defined in the Scope of Work. The emphasis was to be placed on economically practical and readily achievable applications from known resources. Although both positive and negative findings were found in specific areas of investigation, it is felt that the overall long term prognosis for geothermal energy stimulus to industry in the area is excellent. The applications studied were; greenhouse heating, kiln drying, onion dehydration, feedlots, and aquaculture.

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Economic analysis for utilization of geothermal energy by North Dakota Concrete Products Co.  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota Concrete Products Company uses a steam curing process that accelerates the concrete curing so that 28-day strength is obtained within 24 hours. The cost of energy required to accomplish this is significant, amounting to approximately $80,000 in 1980. The present boilers are oil fired. Recently, fuel oil prices have increased substantially. Further, supply shortages in the past have threatened plant production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic feasibility of using deep formation warm water as an alternative energy source. A water-to-water heat pump system to replace the existing boiler system was investigated. TPI, Inc. economic and engineering findings for this particular potential geothermal application are disclosed. The operating cost savings of the geothermal system over the operating costs of the existing oilfired system would be insufficient to provide an acceptable rate of return on the investment at todays cost of money.

Zink, L.L.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system. Volume I. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An energy storage system which could be attractive for future electric utility peak-load applications is a modified gas turbine power system utilizing underground storage of very high pressure air. The compressed air energy storage (CAES) concept involves using off-peak electricity generated from indigenous coal or nuclear sources to compress air, storing the air in large underground facilities, and withdrawing the air during peak-load periods when it would be heated by combustion and expanded through gas turbines to generate power. The attractiveness of the CAES concept is based upon its potential to supply competitively priced peaking energy, to reduce peak-load power plant dependence on petroleum-based fuels, and to provide a means for leveling the utility system load demand. Therefore, a technical and economic assessment of coal-fired fluidized bed (FBC) combustor/compressed air energy storage (FBC/CAES) systems was performed and is described. The conclusions drawn from the FBC/CAES study program are encouraging. They indicate that pressurized FBC/CAES power plants should be technologically feasible, provide good performance, and be economically competitive. Specifically, it is concluded that: coal-fired FBC/CAES systems should be technically feasible in the near future and potentially attractive for peak-load power generation; and an open-bed PFBC/CAES configuration would provide the best candidate for early commercialization. It has relatively low risk combined with moderate cost and reasonable round-trip heat rate. It also has the potential for future growth options which tend to reduce costs and lower fuel consumption.

Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

China report: Economic affairs. Energy: Status and development, 53, [October 9, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains information on national development and status of energy production in China with particular attention to technological progress and economical effectiveness in coal and oil industries. The report highlights and covers research and development in nuclear fission reactors with a focus on nuclear safety engineering and progress of construction of nuclear power plants. The issues of power network, hydroelectricity and thermal power are altogether discussed in detail.

NONE

1986-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

Using best available scientific information in assessing the involvement of energy industries at Superfund sites  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress is currently reauthorizing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). Enacted in 1980, CERCLA has been criticized for its costly and time-consuming requirements, unfairness, need for better scientific information, and lack of progress in reducing health and environmental risks. This paper describes the development of a database of energy-industry involvement at Superfund sites, using the best available scientific information. It illustrates the difficulties in reporting, compiling, and assessing data as currently managed under CERCLA. It also presents analytical results, indicating the number of sites at which there has been energy-industry involvement (roughly one-fourth to one-third of all Superfund sites), and for these sites, the numbers of energy companies that are potentially responsible parties (about 500 individual companies), the estimated cleanup costs (an average of $18 million per site), and the volumetric shares of hazardous waste contributed by energy companies (up to one-third of the volume at sites with energy-industry involvement). Such results provide a basis for evaluating impacts of Superfund changes on energy companies.

Elcock, D.; Puder, M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The use of industrial energy in seven OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to analyze the industrial demand for energy in seven Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries with particular emphasis on fuel substitution between oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Changing fuel demand also results from economic growth, changes in industrial structure, and changes in the energy intensity of industrial output. A historical analysis of these factors and fuel substitution is undertaken for industry as an aggregate, and for 12 specific industries. The major results of the historical analysis are: (1) fuel use changes are a result of fuel switching, changing energy intensity, changing industrial structure, and economic growth; (2) fuel substitutability depends upon fuel use. The three fossil fuels are substitutes in the industrial heat market, but there are numerous special industrial processes where a particular fuel is required; (3) large substitutions have occurred between fuels; (4) fuel substitutions have been very different across countries, both in the type of substitutions that have occurred and the factors accounting for the substitutions; and (5) in most countries, major changes in fuel use can be explained by two or three industries, suggesting that future analyses be industry specific.

Sutherland, R.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Improved engineering-economic model of residential energy use. [1970-2000  

SciTech Connect

An improved version of the ORNL residential energy use model was developed to simulate energy use in the residential sector from 1970 through 2000. The model provides considerable detail on annual energy uses by fuel, end use, and housing type; and also estimates annual equipment installations and ownership, equipment energy requirements, structural thermal integrities, fuel expenditures, equipment costs, and costs for improving thermal integrities on new and existing housing units. Thus, the model provides considerable detail on residential energy uses and associated costs. These details are useful for evaluating alternative energy conservation policies, programs, and technologies for their energy and economic effects during the next quarter century. The present version of the model deals with four fuels, eight end uses, and three housing types. Each of these 96 fuel use components is calculated each year as a function of stocks of occupied housing units and new construction, equipment ownership by fuel and end use, thermal integrity of housing units, average unit energy requirements for each equipment type, and usage factors that reflect household behavior. Simulations of energy use from 1960 to 1975 show that the model accurately predicts historical data on aggregate energy use, energy use by fuel, energy use by end use, and equipment ownership market-shares. A reference projection developed with the model shows residential energy use growing from 17.5 GGJ (10/sup 18/ joules) in 1975 to 18.5 GGJ in 1980 and 26.6 GGJ in 2000, with an average annual growth rate of 1.7 percent. Electricity increases its share of the energy budget from 44 percent in 1975 to 67 percent in 2000. Shares provided by gas, oil, and other fuels all decline during this period.

Hirst, E.; Cope, J.; Cohn, S.; Lin, W.; Hoskins, R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5c. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5c Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5c. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Aluminum Industry (NAICS 3313), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Physical (Thousand Metric Tons) Primary Aluminum Production 3,713 2,707 2,284 Secondary Aluminum Production 3,440 2,930 3,560 Aluminum Imports 3,550 4,060 5,180 Aluminum Exports 1,590 1,590 2,820 Nominal Economic Indicators (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 57 48 42 Value Added 24 19 12 Real Economic Indicators (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 1 57 49 29 Value Added 2 23 20 8 Notes: 1. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value of shipments. 2. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value added.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects (Double-Gatefold Brochure)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

How Does WEF Work? How Does WEF Work? Inputs The user enters data about the project, including: * General assumptions * Capital costs * Operating expenses * Financing assumptions * Tax assumptions * Economic assumptions * Financial constraining assumptions. Extensive help notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net present value * Internal rate of return * Summary and detailed cash flows. As an alternative option, if the user enters a first-year energy payment, the program will calculate the rate of return, coverage ratios, etc. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects The National Renewable Energy Laboratory created

302

Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program: 1986 annual report. [Economic planning, technical assessment, field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program activities were initiated to provide economic planning, technical assessment and field testing support for the thermal energy storage program, as well as management of the overall program for the DOE. Economic planning included two assessment studies. In technical assessment, issues that might affect an assessment were outlined for the development of a standard methodology to conduct assessments; work is underway to establish ''market-based'' cost and performance goals for cool storage technologies in residential applications; planning has begun for investigation of benefits in incorporating aquifer thermal energy storage with heat pumps; and plans are being formulated to evaluate the potential benefit of using aquifer thermal energy storage to augment power plant cooling. Field testing to develop technologies for the recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat began with the instrumentation design for the ceramic/salt matrix in an operating brick-making plant. Work in advanced studies by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory continued on thermochemical conversion and storage using small particles as the heat exchanger catalyst. In SO/sub 3/ dissociation experiments at 645/sup 0/C using light and dark conditions, results clearly demonstrated the benefit in directly radiantly heating the catalyst to accomplish the endothermic step of a thermochemical storage reaction.

Drost, M.K.; Bates, J.M.; Brown, D.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Technical and economic review of wood energy systems for military bases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report combines two reports dealing with industrial-sized wood combustion technology. As part of its industrial wood combustion effort, SERI's former Industrial Applications and Analysis Branch (IAAB) contracted with the Air Force through the Department of Energy (DOE) to review wood fuels and equipment and to perform an economic sensitivity analysis of small-scale industrial-sized wood combustion investments that might be considered for steam and/or electricity generation at Air Force Bases. Additionally, in 1979, SERI's IAAB contracted with North Carolina State University to produce the Decision Makers' Guide to Wood Fuel for Small Industrial Energy Use. These two reports have been combined to provide the Air Force with a comprehensive guide to wood energy combustion. Discussion is presented under the headings: comparison of wood fuels with conventional boiler fuels; densified biomass; fuel storage; fuel handling and preparation; wood-fired equipment; gasification of wood; retrofitting fossil-fuel boilers; cogeneration; pollution abatement; wood energy system economics and procurement of wood fuels. (DMC)

Flowers, L.; Junge, D.; Levi, M.; O'Grady, M.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A techno-economic model for determining the critical energy ratio of co-generation in process industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A techno-economic model incorporating various operating parameters namely, cogeneration technology, primary process, thermodynamic efficiency, capital investment and interest rate has been developed and analysed to arrive at the optimum energy index ...

V. N. Vedamurthy; C. P. Sarathy

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Probabilistic policy experiments : the use of energy-economic-environmental models in the climate change policy process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses the Edmonds-Reilly model to explore an alternative approach for using energy-economic-environmental models when analyzing future CO2 emissions. This approach--conducting probabilistic policy experiments--can ...

Margolis, Robert M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Comparative Analysis of a Novel Approach to Economical Wind Energy Verterbi School of Engineering Research & Innovation Fund Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparative Analysis of a Novel Approach to Economical Wind Energy Verterbi School of the research project: Conventional wind energy generation is obtained from "wind farms" that are in high-wind infrastructures. It was expected that the proposed approach would reduce the cost of wind energy generation

Rohs, Remo

307

Value of thermal insulation in residential construction: economics and the conservation of energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential monetary and energy savings through the use of additional thermal insulation in residential construction were estimated. Insulation systems as required by Federal Housing Administration Minimum Property Standards for a southern, a central, and a northern region of the U.S. were used as the basis for comparison. Whereas the owner of a gas-heated home would generally realize small monetary savings from increased insulation, his energy savings could be as high as 30 to 50 percent at no economic penalty. The owner of an electrically heated home can save as much as approximately 1/3 of the cost of heating his home by using additional insulation and reduce the energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent.

Moyers, J.C.

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Analysis of the Double Window in Saving Energy and Economical Efficiency in Nanjing in the Winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid progress of the economy, heating in winter is widespread in the eastern area of China. According to the exterior-protected structure of buildings in Nanjing, the hourly and dynamic load of energy consumption during the time of heating in winter is simulated and calculated in the paper. Through calculations, the energy consumption of the different windows, walls and roofs is gained. By analyzing the results of these calculations, the conclusion that using a single frame-double plastic steel window can save energy by 37.68% is reached. As part of the economical efficiency analysis, an investment payback period is analyzed using the methods of static state and dynamic state. The analysis shows that by using single frame-double plastic steel window, the investment payback period is about 7 years.

Zhang, Y.; He, J.; Gao, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Improving the Contribution of Economic Models in Evaluating Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional representation of improved end-use efficiency in the manufacturing sector has tended to assume “a net cost” perspective. In other words, the assumption for many models is that any change within the energy end-use patterns must imply a cost without concomitant energy bill savings. This tends to significantly overstate the cost of new energy policies. Yes, the range of technologies available to satisfy end-use service demands does require (admittedly) a significant level of capital. But more often than not, there is a return on that investment; and that return on investment is typically overlooked in many of the standard economic policy models. This paper describes the differences between many of the conventional energy models now used for energy policy assessments compared to those which more properly reflect a trade-off between new capital investment and end-use energy savings – as both capital and energy are used to satisfy a specific industrial service demand. The paper builds on a discussion provided by Neal Elliott for approximating service demands within food products manufacturing (NAICS 311). It then shows how the proper treatment of investment flows may provide a different outcome for policy assessments than might be provided by the standard policy models.

Laitner, J. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The composition of a quad of buildings sector energy: Physical, economic, and environmental quantities  

SciTech Connect

In an analysis conducted for the US Department of Energy Office of Building Technologies (OBT), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined the fuel type composition of energy consumed in the US buildings sector. Numerical estimates were developed for the physical quantities of fuel consumed, as well as of the fossil fuel emissions (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) and nuclear spent fuel byproducts associated with that consumption. Electric generating requirements and the economic values associated with energy consumption also were quantified. These variables were quantified for a generic quad (1 quadrillion Btu) of primary energy for the years 1987 and 2010, to illustrate the impacts of a fuel-neutral reduction in buildings sector energy use, and for specific fuel types, to enable meaningful comparisons of benefits achievable through various OBT research projects or technology developments. Two examples are provided to illustrate how these conversion factors may be used to quantify the impacts of energy savings potentially achievable through OBT building energy conservation efforts. 18 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

Secrest, T.J.; Nicholls, A.K.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cost-Energy Dynamics: An Engineering - Economic Basis for Industrial Energy Conservation Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory called cost-energy dynamics that can be used to shape policies for industrial energy conservation. It is built on two hypotheses commonly observed in process engineering; namely, cost varies as positive power function while energy varies as negative power function of the system size and/ or complexity. These two hypotheses, which have roots in thermodynamics, give rise to a technological parameter (denoted c) that can be determined for each unit process. Cost-energy dynamics ranks energy conservation potentials of industrial processes by the technology parameter c, aggregates energy consumption by unit processes, considers energy embodied in the investment, considers the trade-offs between cost and energy, and distinguishes bases for decision making in the public and private sectors. Five unit processes are used to represent the U.S. manufacturing industry. The aggregated technology parameter for industry is determined to be about 3.5. This value and the data on existing energy consumption allow the determination of energy conservation potentials, extra capital investment requirements, and the possible energy picture by the year 2000. Several public policy tools are evaluated for their effectiveness in stimulating energy conservation.

Phung, D. L.; van Gool, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ECONOMIC DISPATCH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC DISPATCH ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 United States Department of Energy February 2007 ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Sections 1234 and 1832 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) 1 direct the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department, or DOE) to: 1) Study the procedures currently used by electric utilities to perform economic dispatch; 2) Identify possible revisions to those procedures to improve the ability of non-utility generation resources to offer their output for sale for the purpose of inclusion in

313

Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act August 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

314

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.2191, the Lieberman-Warner climate Security Act of 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 April 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by

315

Solar Photovoltaic Hydrogen: The Technologies and Their Place in Our Roadmaps and Energy Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Future solar photovoltaics-hydrogen systems are discussed in terms of the evolving hydrogen economy. The focus is on distributed hydrogen, relying on the same distributed-energy strengths of solar-photovoltaic electricity in the built environment. Solar-hydrogen residences/buildings, as well as solar parks, are presented. The economics, feasibility, and potential of these approaches are evaluated in terms of roadmap predictions on photovoltaic and hydrogen pathways-and whether solar-hydrogen fit in these strategies and timeframes. Issues with the ''hydrogen future'' are considered, and alternatives to this hydrogen future are examined.

Kazmerski, L. L.; Broussard, K.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

Glenn, D.R.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

University of Stuttgart Institute for Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy IER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Structure of Energy Demand, Market overview, Barrier analysis Task 2: Analysis of process design software Environment and Energy Management Agency Germany Project Management Organisation JĂĽlich (PTJ) Japan The New, database , training 16th October 2013EHPS 2013: Industrial heat pumps in Germany 5 #12;University

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

320

State energy fuel prices by major economic sector from 1960 through 1977  

SciTech Connect

The state energy fuel prices are described and displayed by major economic sector for 1960 to 1977. These prices support the Regional Energy Demand Model. The 7 major fuel commodities in the Price Data System fall into two groups: petroleum products (distillate, residual, kerosene, gasoline, and liquid petroleum gas) and non-petroleum product fuels (electric power and natural gas). The methodology for calculating each commodity is shown. A detailed description of the wholesale and retail price methodology is presented. Appendices A and B display the price series in calorific and physical units, respectively. Some data-supporting tables are presented in Appendix C and Appendix D describes the fuel identifiers for decoding information in Appendices A and B.

Galliker, J.P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for Basic Chemicals (NAICS 325), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Production1 (Million Short Tons) Inorganic Chemicals 179 163 170 Bulk Petrochemical 69 73 80 Organic Intermediate 73 73 64 Plastic Resins 40 48 50 Synthetic Rubber 2 2 NA Synthetic Fibers 5 5 4 Value of Shipments (Current Billion Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 25 25 34 Bulk Petrochemicals & Intermediates 39 45 90 Plastic Resins 45 47 78 Synthetic Rubber 5 5 7 Synthetic Fibers 13 8 9 Value of Shipments2 (Billion 2000 Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 27 25 26

322

Program reference book for the Energy Economic Data Base Program (EEDB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations that is of significance to the US Department of Energy (USDOE). The purpose of this Reference Book is to provide the historical content of the EEDB through the Fourth Update (1981). It contains important descriptive and tutorial information concerning the structure and use of the EEDB. It also contains reports of work done to support various aspects of the first four updates, together with significant reference data developed during those updates. As a convenience to the user, it is intended that the Reference Book be sufficiently stable that revisions are required no more frequently than once every five years.

Allen, R.E.; Brown, P.E.; Hodson, J.S.; Kaminski, R.S.; Ziegler, E.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9:24 Oct 07, 2009 9:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS Thursday, October 8, 2009 Part VII The President Executive Order 13514-Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance VerDate Nov2008 19:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS VerDate Nov2008 19:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS 52117 Federal Register Presidential Documents Vol. 74, No. 194 Thursday, October 8, 2009 Title3- The President Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic

325

Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9:24 Oct 07, 2009 9:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS Thursday, October 8, 2009 Part VII The President Executive Order 13514-Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance VerDate Nov2008 19:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS VerDate Nov2008 19:24 Oct 07, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\08OCE0.SGM 08OCE0 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with MISCELLANEOUS 52117 Federal Register Presidential Documents Vol. 74, No. 194 Thursday, October 8, 2009 Title3- The President Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic

326

Economic study of low temperature geothermal energy in Lassen and Modoc counties, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using low cost, low temperature geothermal energy in job-producing industries to increase employment and encourage economic development. The study, encompassing all of Lassen and modoc Counties, was to be site-specific, referencing candidate geothermal applications to known hot wells and springs as previously determined, or to new wells with specific characteristics as defined in the Scope of Work. The emphasis was to be placed on economically practical and readily achievable applications from known resources, thus complimenting the recently completed ERDA-Susanville Study where a designated community was used as a ''laboratory'' in which land-use planning, institutional aspects, geological assessments, technical modeling and socioeconomic impacts were all examined in overview. During the course of the study, monthly progress reports were prepared and reviewed with the Commission so that emphasis on particular features of study could be changed as necessary to reflect updated findings and to redirect efforts into additional areas of potential promise as they became apparent. In this manner, a degree of flexibility was maintained which allowed a more comprehensive study than would have been otherwise possible. Although the report generates both positive and negative findings in specific areas of investigation, it is felt that the overall long term prognosis for geothermal energy stimulus to industry in the area is excellent.

None

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Technical and Economic Potential for Electricity Energy Efficiency in a Semiconductor Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been renewed interest in energy efficiency in the semiconductor industry. The declining prices for semiconductor products has prompted semiconductor manufacturing plants to control costs so as to maintain profitability. This paper presents the potential for energy efficiency improvements at a semiconductor manufacturing plant from various energy efficiency measures such as high efficiency motors, adjustable speed drive motors, high efficiency HVAC, and high efficiency lighting. The effort was part of a utility-sponsored technical potential study. Although this paper describes energy efficiency options in a specific facility, the recommended actions have broad application. In this study, the results show that none of the group replacement with high efficiency motors, adjustable speed drive motors, and high efficiency lighting would yield paybacks of less than 3 years. However, the end-of-useful life replacement with high efficiency motors for abatement of exhaust and deionizing of water as well as high efficiency lighting would yield paybacks of less than 3 years. The installation of adjustable speed drive motors at the end of useful life would not yield average paybacks of less than 3 years. Although specific implementation plans to achieve the energy savings are not outlined in this paper, it is hoped that the results of this analysis will identify areas which merit further engineering and economic analyses.

Lee, A. H. W.; Golden, J. W.; Zarnikau, J. W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Impact of the national energy plan on solar economics. [Economic analysis of solar space heating and solar water heating by state  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) which account for combustion and heat generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Syllabus as of 2/27/2013. Will be updated as course progresses. Energy Economics and Policy Spring 2013 ENV/ENERGY 635  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syllabus as of 2/27/2013. Will be updated as course progresses. 1 Energy Economics and Policy of markets and policies for various energy supply sources (such as petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity of a variety of government policy responses, including energy price regulation, traditional and market

Ferrari, Silvia

330

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Economic impacts of wood energy in the Northeast, 1985: Summary report: Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood energy in the Northeast accounts for an estimated average of 1.96 jobs and $46,634 of income for every 1000 tons of wood burned by households and businesses. This translates into an estimated total of over 78,000 jobs and $1.8 billion of personal income for Northeast residents and businesses. In addition, a total of $589 million in state and federal tax revenues are generated by wood energy-related economic activity. By choosing wood over other fuels, Northeast households and businesses saved $1.2 billion in their 1985 fuel bills. In the Northeast in 1985, wood displaced over 1 billion gallons of oil, 37 million tcf of natural gas and propane, 138,000 tons of coal, and 1858 million kilowatt-hours of electricity. Projected growth in wood energy consumption in the industrial and residential sectors indicate that the Northeast wood energy industry will support approximately 165,000 jobs and $3.8 billion of personal and business income by the year 2000, if projected growth continues. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Chamberlin, R.; High, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

International Trade of Bio-Energy Products – Economic Potentials for Austria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRIOPOL studies the role of domestic bioenergy potentials for agriculture, the wider economy and international trade for Austria. In particular, agricultural biomass production can contribute to significant shares of energy provision in Austria. A detailed scenario is developed to explore the opportunities and challenges of enhanced domestic biomass production based on short rotation forestry (SRF) for heat supply which is currently among the most competitive technologies. To that end, TRIOPOL establishes a model linkage between a sectoral supply-model for Austrian agriculture and a national small open economy general equilibrium model. Model results show that a biomass premium of 65 € per ton dry matter is required to support 250,000 ha of SRF on cropland in Austria by 2020. The thus provided bioheat covers some 33 petajoule (PJ) heat energy demand in Austria; taking into account the likely rising of energy prices by 2020, this number rises to 47 PJ. Substantial land use changes may also be compensated by increases in land use intensity and as well as changes in imports and exports. Scenario results suggest that domestic food production of non-meat commodities falls by 1.3%. The sector meat products profits from the high competitiveness of Austrian livestock production and responds by a slight increase in net exports. The results of the quantitative analysis shall support the scientific and political debate on securing food and energy supply as well as economic development goals.

Olivia Kol; Martin Schönhart; Erwin Schmid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Analysis of the industrial sector representation in the Fossil2 energy-economic model  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil2 energy-economic model is used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for a variety of energy and environmental policy analyses. A number of improvements to the model are under way or are being considered. This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide a clearer understanding of the current industrial sector module of Fossil2 and to explore strategies for improving it. The report includes a detailed description of the structure and decision logic of the industrial sector module, along with results from several simulation exercises to demonstrate the behavior of the module in different policy scenarios and under different values of key model parameters. The cases were run with the Fossil2 model at PNL using the National Energy Strategy Actions Case of 1991 as the point of departure. The report also includes a discussion of suggested industrial sector module improvements. These improvements include changes in the way the current model is used; on- and off-line adjustments to some of the model's parameters; and significant changes to include more detail on the industrial processes, technologies, and regions of the country being modeled. The potential benefits and costs of these changes are also discussed.

Wise, M.A.; Woodruff, M.G.; Ashton, W.B.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Analysis of the industrial sector representation in the Fossil2 energy-economic model  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil2 energy-economic model is used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for a variety of energy and environmental policy analyses. A number of improvements to the model are under way or are being considered. This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide a clearer understanding of the current industrial sector module of Fossil2 and to explore strategies for improving it. The report includes a detailed description of the structure and decision logic of the industrial sector module, along with results from several simulation exercises to demonstrate the behavior of the module in different policy scenarios and under different values of key model parameters. The cases were run with the Fossil2 model at PNL using the National Energy Strategy Actions Case of 1991 as the point of departure. The report also includes a discussion of suggested industrial sector module improvements. These improvements include changes in the way the current model is used; on- and off-line adjustments to some of the model`s parameters; and significant changes to include more detail on the industrial processes, technologies, and regions of the country being modeled. The potential benefits and costs of these changes are also discussed.

Wise, M.A.; Woodruff, M.G.; Ashton, W.B.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Presentation to the EAC - Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem, Economic Impacts, Green Button and Open Energy Data - Chris Irwin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irwin - OE Smart Grid Investment Program Irwin - OE Smart Grid Investment Program EAC Update: Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem, Economic Impacts, Green Button and Open Energy Data October 2012 NIST Conceptual Reference Model GridWise Architecture Council Interoperability Framework Organizational (Pragmatics) 8: Economic/Regulatory Policy 7: Business Objectives 6: Business Procedures Political and Economic Objectives as Embodied in Policy and Regulation Strategic and Tactical Objectives Shared between Businesses Alignment between Operational Business Processes and Procedures Informational (Semantics) 5: Business Context 4: Semantic Understanding Relevant Business Knowledge that Applies Semantics with Process Workflow Understanding of Concepts Contained in the Message Data Structures Technical

338

Greening Federal Facilities: An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility managers and Designers; Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL FACILITIES FEDERAL FACILITIES An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility Managers and Designers SECOND EDITION DOE/GO-102001-1165 Section DOE/GO-102001-1165 NREL/BK-710-29267 May 2001 i Greening Federal Facilities An Energy, Environmental, and Economic Resource Guide for Federal Facility Managers and Designers SECOND EDITION "Then I say the earth belongs to each ... generation during its course, fully and in its own right, no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its own existence." Thomas Jefferson, September 6, 1789 Produced for: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program Produced by: BuildingGreen, Inc., Brattleboro, Vermont Under:

339

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Energy Sources: Where are We Now and Where Might We Be in the Near Future? (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Energy Sources: Where are We Now and Where Might We Be in the Near Future? NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Michael Woodhouse Additional NREL Authors: Alan Goodrich, Ted James, Robert Margolis, David Feldman, and Tony Markel 2 Strategic Energy Analysis Center and 2 Electric Vehicles Program The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Funding Provided by The United States DOE, Solar Energy Technologies Program Presented at the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conference (PVSC) 2011, June 19-24, 2011, Seattle, Washington NREL/PR-6A20-52311 Analysis Disclaimer DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

342

Stakeholder involvement and public outreach at two Department of Energy sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Outreach efforts at two U.S. Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington and Pantex Plant in the Texas panhandle) have involved a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical presentations and articles, information brochures and fact sheets, video productions; interactive exhibits; presentations at civic and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media, regulators and concerned citizens. In addition, representatives of local communities operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford, and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbors property is underway at Pantex. All major environmental programs (e.g., the reconstruction of past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford) are conducted with open public participation, the Pantex Plant has opened an Information office in Amarillo, Texas, and both sites now have Citizen`s Advisory Boards. This presentation describes Hanford and Pantex public outreach and involvement efforts, our successes and failures, and the lessons learned.

Gray, R.H. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hereinafter referred to as the BIV request, seeking further energy and economic analysis to supplement information presented in the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) recent analysis of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 1. The BIV request raises issues that would also apply in the context of EIA analyses of other policy proposals. A copy of the request letter is provided in Appendix A. To meet the Senators ’ desire for an expedited response, this paper is organized around the main issues raised in their request. While the discussion of modeling results focuses on areas directly related to the issues raised by the Senators, a full set of standard tables for all modeling runs is available on the EIA web site. 2 The topics addressed in this paper are: § the realism of scenarios in recent EIA modeling and concerns expressed regarding prospects for building new coal-fired power plants; § additional requested modeling scenarios that restrict the availability of nuclear, biomass, and coal with carbon capture and sequestration technology; § the time horizon and State/regional detail in energy modeling; and

Innovation Act Of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Socio-economic and communication factors influencing the diffusion of solar-energy equipment among California homeowners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the influence of socio-economic, communication, and social-psychological factors on the diffusion of solar-energy equipment among California homeowners. There were four specific objectives: (1) to critique previous studies on the diffusion of solar technology; (2) to critique fundamental aspects of current diffusion models and to formulate an alternative diffusion perspective; (3) to use the proposed theoretical perspective to predict solar diffusion; and (4) to test certain of the proposed predictions about solar diffusion. Data used to test some of the predictions were based on a state-wide random survey of 812 California homeowners. The dissertation presents two major findings. First, some of the best predictors of the solar-diffusion process were found to be age, socio-economic status, knowing solar owners, ownership of a swimming pool, utility costs, efficacy towards the energy situation, voluntary simplicity, energy consciousness, community size, and perceived community interest in solar. Second, these predictors were found to be strongly related to socio-economic status. The present study argues that these predictors are in fact post indicators of socio-economic status. Thus, whereas many of the previous studies tended to underestimate the influence of socio-economic factors, this study was able to demonstrate the crucial influence of socio-economic factors in determining the rate and pattern of solar diffusion. The data show that household solar-energy equipment is basically an innovation for high and medium socio-economic groups. The implications of these findings with regard to previous studies, policy, and future research are also discussed.

Mbindyo, J.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Economic impact of energy shortages on commercial air transportation and aviation manufacture. Volume 2. Aviation industries profiles and energy usage characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the economic impact of energy scarcity on the air transportation industry. Volume II provides a data base on the characteristics and operating performances of the air transportation industry and the aircraft, engines, and parts manufacturing industries, including energy usage characteristics and efficiency. (BYB)

Gorham, J.E.; Gross, D.; Snipes, J.C.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NREL: Energy Analysis - Suzanne Tegen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chain Fluent in German Primary research interests Economic and environmental impacts from energy production Wind power social acceptancepublic involvement Quantification of wind...

350

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand has consistently exceeded available supply in India. While the electricity deficit varies across states, nationally it was estimated to be of the order of 12percent on peak and 11percent for electricity during 2008-09. This paper explores a demand-side focused potential for energy efficiency improvement to eliminate the electricity deficit compared to a business as usual (BAU) supply-side focused scenario. The limited availability of finance and other legal and administrative barriers have constrained the construction of new power plant capacity in India. As a result, under the BAU scenario, India continues to face an electricity deficit beyond the end of the Twelfth Five Year Plan. The demand-side cost-effective potential achieved through replacement of new electricity-using products, however, is large enough to eliminate the deficit as early as 2013 and subsequently reduce the future construction of power plants and thus reduce air pollutant emissions. Moreover, energy efficiency improvements cost a fraction of the cost for new supply and can lead to a substantial increase in India's economic output or gross domestic product (GDP). Eliminating the deficit permits businesses that have experienced electricity cutbacks to restore production. We estimate the size of the cumulative production increase in terms of the contribution to GDP at a $505 billion between 2009 and 2017, the end of India's Twelfth Five Year Plan, which may be compared with India's 2007-08 GDP of $911 billion. The economic output is influenced by the size of the electricity savings and rate of penetration of energy efficient technologies, and that of self-generation equipment and inverters used by businesses faced with electricity cuts. Generation and inverters are estimated to service 23percent of these customers in 2009, which increase to 48percent by 2020. The reduction in the construction and operation of new power plants reduces the cumulative CO2 emissions by 65 Mt, and those of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides by 0.4 Mt each, while also reducing India's imports of coal and natural gas. By 2020, the cumulative GDP benefit increases to $608 billion, the CO2 savings expand to 333 Mt and SO2 and NOx to 2.1 Mt.

Sathaye, Jayant; Gupta, Arjun

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand has consistently exceeded available supply in India. While the electricity deficit varies across states, nationally it was estimated to be of the order of 12percent on peak and 11percent for electricity during 2008-09. This paper explores a demand-side focused potential for energy efficiency improvement to eliminate the electricity deficit compared to a business as usual (BAU) supply-side focused scenario. The limited availability of finance and other legal and administrative barriers have constrained the construction of new power plant capacity in India. As a result, under the BAU scenario, India continues to face an electricity deficit beyond the end of the Twelfth Five Year Plan. The demand-side cost-effective potential achieved through replacement of new electricity-using products, however, is large enough to eliminate the deficit as early as 2013 and subsequently reduce the future construction of power plants and thus reduce air pollutant emissions. Moreover, energy efficiency improvements cost a fraction of the cost for new supply and can lead to a substantial increase in India's economic output or gross domestic product (GDP). Eliminating the deficit permits businesses that have experienced electricity cutbacks to restore production. We estimate the size of the cumulative production increase in terms of the contribution to GDP at a $505 billion between 2009 and 2017, the end of India's Twelfth Five Year Plan, which may be compared with India's 2007-08 GDP of $911 billion. The economic output is influenced by the size of the electricity savings and rate of penetration of energy efficient technologies, and that of self-generation equipment and inverters used by businesses faced with electricity cuts. Generation and inverters are estimated to service 23percent of these customers in 2009, which increase to 48percent by 2020. The reduction in the construction and operation of new power plants reduces the cumulative CO2 emissions by 65 Mt, and those of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides by 0.4 Mt each, while also reducing India's imports of coal and natural gas. By 2020, the cumulative GDP benefit increases to $608 billion, the CO2 savings expand to 333 Mt and SO2 and NOx to 2.1 Mt.

Sathaye, Jayant; Gupta, Arjun

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Economic impact of corrosion and scaling problems in geothermal energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion and scaling problems have a significant impact on geothermal plant economics. A power plant must amortize the capital investment over a 20-year period and achieve satisfactory operating efficiency to achieve financial success. Corrosion and scale incrustations have been encountered in all geothermal plants, and to various degrees, adversely affected plant life times and power output. Using published data this report analyzes known geothermal corrosion and scaling phenomena for significant cost impacts on plant design and operation. It has been necessary to speculate about causes and mechanisms in order to estimate impacts on conceptual geothermal plants. Silica is highly soluble in hot geothermal water and solubility decreases as water is cooled in a geothermal power plant. Calculations indicate as much as 30,000 tons/year could pass through a 100 MWe water cycle plant. The major cost impact will be on the reinjection well system where costs of 1 to 10 mills/kwhr of power produced could accrue to waste handling alone. On the other hand, steam cycle geothermal plants have a definite advantage in that significant silica problems will probably only occur in hot dry rock concepts, where steam above 250 C is produced. Calculation methods are given for estimating the required size and cost impact of a silica filtration plant and for sizing scrubbers. The choice of materials is significantly affected by the pH of the geothermal water, temperature, chloride, and H{sub s} contents. Plant concepts which attempt to handle acid waters above 180 C will be forced to use expensive corrosion resistant alloys or develop specialized materials. On the other hand, handling steam up to 500 C, and pH 9 water up to 180 C appears feasible using nominal cost steels, typical of today's geothermal plants. A number of factors affecting plant or component availability have been identified. The most significant is a corrosion fatigue problem in geothermal turbines at the Geyser's geothermal plant which is presently reducing plant output by about 10%. This is equivalent to over $3 million per year in increased oil consumption to replace the power. In the course of assessing the cost implications of corrosion and scaling problems, a number of areas of technological uncertainty were identified which should be considered in R and D planning in support of geothermal energy. Materials development with both laboratory and field testing will be necessary. The economic analysis on which this report is based was done in support of an AEC Division of Applied Technology program to assess the factors affecting geothermal plant economics. The results of this report are to be used to develop computer models of overall plant economics, of which corrosion and scaling problems are only a part. The translation of the economic analysis to the report which appears here, was done on AEC Special Studies Funds.

Shannon, D.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Economic impact of corrosion and scaling problems in geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion and scaling problems have a significant impact on geothermal plant economics. A power plant must amortize the capital investment over a 20-year period and achieve satisfactory operating efficiency to achieve financial success. Corrosion and scale incrustations have been encountered in all geothermal plants, and to various degrees, adversely affected plant life times and power output. Using published data this report analyzes known geothermal corrosion and scaling phenomena for significant cost impacts on plant design and operation. It has been necessary to speculate about causes and mechanisms in order to estimate impacts on conceptual geothermal plants. Silica is highly soluble in hot geothermal water and solubility decreases as water is cooled in a geothermal power plant. Calculations indicate as much as 30,000 tons/year could pass through a 100 MWe water cycle plant. The major cost impact will be on the reinjection well system where costs of 1 to 10 mills/kwhr of power produced could accrue to waste handling alone. On the other hand, steam cycle geothermal plants have a definite advantage in that significant silica problems will probably only occur in hot dry rock concepts, where steam above 250 C is produced. Calculation methods are given for estimating the required size and cost impact of a silica filtration plant and for sizing scrubbers. The choice of materials is significantly affected by the pH of the geothermal water, temperature, chloride, and H{sub s} contents. Plant concepts which attempt to handle acid waters above 180 C will be forced to use expensive corrosion resistant alloys or develop specialized materials. On the other hand, handling steam up to 500 C, and pH 9 water up to 180 C appears feasible using nominal cost steels, typical of today's geothermal plants. A number of factors affecting plant or component availability have been identified. The most significant is a corrosion fatigue problem in geothermal turbines at the Geyser's geothermal plant which is presently reducing plant output by about 10%. This is equivalent to over $3 million per year in increased oil consumption to replace the power. In the course of assessing the cost implications of corrosion and scaling problems, a number of areas of technological uncertainty were identified which should be considered in R and D planning in support of geothermal energy. Materials development with both laboratory and field testing will be necessary. The economic analysis on which this report is based was done in support of an AEC Division of Applied Technology program to assess the factors affecting geothermal plant economics. The results of this report are to be used to develop computer models of overall plant economics, of which corrosion and scaling problems are only a part. The translation of the economic analysis to the report which appears here, was done on AEC Special Studies Funds.

Shannon, D.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simulation and optimization of hot dry rock geothermal energy conversion systems: process conditions and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently engaged in a field program aimed at designing and testing man-made geothermal reservoirs in hot granitic formations of low permeability created by hydraulic fracturing. A very important segment of the program is concerned with defining and optimizing several parameters related to the performance of the reservoir and their impact on the potential commercial feasibility of the hot dry rock technique. These include effective heat transfer area, permeation water loss, depth to the reservoir, geothermal temperature gradient, reservoir temperature, mass flow rate, and geochemistry. In addition, the optimization of the energy end use system (process or district heating, electricity or cogeneration) is directly linked to reservoir performance and associated costs. This problem has been studied using several computer modeling approaches to identify the sensitivity of the cost of power to reservoir and generation plant parameters. Also examined were a variety of important economic elements including rate of return on invested capital, discount or interest rates, taxes, cash flow, energy selling price, plant and reservoir lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, and royalties.

Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of community-scale solar systems that incorporate a centralized annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) coupled to a distribution system is examined. Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single-unit dwellings, 10-unit, and 200-unit apartment complexes in 50-, 200-, 400-, and 1000-unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: (1) identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and (2) identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system. In more northerly locations, collectors are a larger component of cost. In southern locations, distribution networks are a larger proportion of total cost. Larger, more compact buildings are, in general, less expensive to heat. For the two smaller-scale building configurations, a broad minima in total costs versus system size is often observed.

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Changing ventilation rates in U.S. offices: Implications for health, work performance, energy, and associated economics  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

Fisk, William; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant, ER-B-97-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S GRANT FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AT THE MOUND PLANT The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet at the following alternative addresses:

358

Comparative study of economic viability of rural electrification using renewable energy resources versus diesel generator option in Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to assess the economic viability of Saudi Arabia's renewable energy resources in electricity production in the rural and remote areas as against the use of diesel generators (DG). The methodology employed is to pick an existing isolated DG electric station for a rural community and assess the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) generated for incremental generation by adding either DG

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Economic Predictions for Heat Mining: A Review and Analysis of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components. The economic models reviewed include the following studies sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-Cummings and Morris (1979), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-Murphy, et al. (1982), United Kingdom (UK)-Shock (1986), Japan-Hori, et al. (1986), Meridian-Entingh (1987) and Bechtel (1988). A general evaluation of the technical feasibility of HDR technology components was also conducted in view of their importance in establishing drilling and reservoir performance parameters required for any economic assessment. In this review, only economic projections for base load electricity produced from HDR systems were considered. Bases of 1989 collars ($) were selected to normalize costs. Following the evaluation of drilling and reservoir performance, power plant choices and cost estimates are discussed in section 6 of the report. In Section 7, the six economics studies cited above are reviewed and compared in terms of their key resource, reservoir and plant performance, and cost assumptions. Based on these comparisons, the report estimates parameters for three composite cases. Important parameters include: (1) resource quality-average geothermal gradient (C/km) and well depth, (2) reservoir performance-effective productivity, flow impedance, and lifetime (thermal drawdown rate), (3) cost components-drilling, reservoir formation, and power plant costs and (4) economic factors-discount and interest rates, taxes, etc. In Section 8, composite case conditions were used to reassess economic projections for HDR-produced electricity. In Section 9, a generalized economic model for HDR-produced electricity is presented to show the effects of resource grade, reservoir performance parameters, and other important factors on projected costs. A sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using this model is given in Section 10. Section 11 treats a modification of the economic model for predicting costs for direct, non-electric applications. HDR economic projections for the U.S. are broken down by region in Section 12. In Section 13, the report provides recommendations for continued research and development to reduce technical and economic uncertainties relevant to the commercialization of HDR. [DJE-2005

Tester, Jefferson W.; Herzog, Howard J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pahoa geothermal industrial park. Engineering and economic analysis for direct applications of geothermal energy in an industrial park at Pahoa, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study evaluated the potential for developing a geothermal industrial park in the Puna District near Pahoa on the Island of Hawaii. Direct heat industrial applications were analyzed from a marketing, engineering, economic, environmental, and sociological standpoint to determine the most viable industries for the park. An extensive literature search produced 31 existing processes currently using geothermal heat. An additional list was compiled indicating industrial processes that require heat that could be provided by geothermal energy. From this information, 17 possible processes were selected for consideration. Careful scrutiny and analysis of these 17 processes revealed three that justified detailed economic workups. The three processes chosen for detailed analysis were: an ethanol plant using bagasse and wood as feedstock; a cattle feed mill using sugar cane leaf trash as feedstock; and a papaya processing facility providing both fresh and processed fruit. In addition, a research facility to assess and develop other processes was treated as a concept. Consideration was given to the impediments to development, the engineering process requirements and the governmental support for each process. The study describes the geothermal well site chosen, the pipeline to transmit the hydrothermal fluid, and the infrastructure required for the industrial park. A conceptual development plan for the ethanol plant, the feedmill and the papaya processing facility was prepared. The study concluded that a direct heat industrial park in Pahoa, Hawaii, involves considerable risks.

Moreau, J.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Geopressured-geothermal energy development: social and economic issues. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented relevant to rule-making for geopressured-geothermal development on state-owned lands. The analysis is focused on those potential social and economic effects of resource development, if any, which may require special attention during the leasing and permitting process. The social and economic impacts likely to result from resource development depend upon characteristics specific to the site and surrounding social and economic systems.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of2001) 465- Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) (2007). EnergyDeficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

Not Available

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

Mercure, Jean-Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy) (2006). “Fossil energy. ” http://fossil.energy.gov/.through reduction of fossil fuel energy consumption, andWith 85% of U.S. energy supplied by fossil fuels (US DOE

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 through 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

savings cumulative through 2030 and (2) net economic impactsfrom units shipped through 2030. We used an average lifetimeenergy savings from 2003 to 2030. Then we used the Excel

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume IV. Energy/economic comparison of coal-based automotive energy supply systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable debate has occurred in recent years about the relative merits of energy analysis versus traditional economic analysis. Some economists assert that energy analysis adds no new information to that in economic analysis; energy analysts claim that the explicit consideration of energy flows is necessary for a complete understanding of the implications of energy supply and use. In comparing the cost and energy consumption figures for the various automotive energy options, certain parallels are evident. Those system components that have the highest costs also require high levels of energy consumption. This is generally due to the severity of the processing conditions required to convert one energy form (e.g., coal) to another (e.g., methanol). These conditions require the use of capital-intensive equipment as well as the consumption of large amounts of energy. For some components that have relatively high costs but low energy requirements (e.g., fuel distribution), the costs are due to the many handling and transfer requirements. Overall, the capital- and energy-intensive energy conversion processes dominate the systems we have examined. Therefore, a comparison of cost with energy consumption for all the fuels considered shows a definite trend - increasing costs imply increasing energy consumption. Thus, decision makers concerned with promoting energy conservative supply options need not worry that their choices will be unduly costly. Rather, they will tend to be the least costly for the types of systems considered here. We caution against extrapolating these results to other systems, however, because systems that do not have the same kinds of capital- and energy-intensive components as those considered here may exhibit different trends.

Steele, R.V.; Sharma, K.J.; Dickson, E.M.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative energies: solar photovoltaic, wind and fuelof solar photovoltaic devices is the energy conversiongenerated electric energy by the photovoltaic devices. The

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact on national energy consumption by adoption of thecase forecast of national energy consumption assumes thatcase forecast of national energy consumption assumes the

Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Review: Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry by Travis Bradford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Present." A brief history of energy is presented first.solar energy. A short history of solar energy along with its

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumerthe Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and RenewableSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Asilomar,

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new metric for energy technology. ” Proc. of 15ththree alternative energy technologies, including solarselect the alternative energy technologies mainly based on

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Review: Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry by Travis Bradford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are renewable as well. Solar energy, one such resource, isThe Inevitability of Solar Energy," contains one chapter inenergy system, introduces solar energy with its merits and

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional first cost of energy efficiency design optionsadditional first cost of energy efficiency design optionsfor which higher energy efficiency is cost-effective, DOE

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES AWEA (American Wind Energy Association) (2006). “Wind energy projects throughout the United States ofWhile solar and wind energy are site-specific, fuel cells

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Use in Mexico: Structure, EnvironmentalPromote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J.Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heat-pump desuperheaters for supplying domestic hot water - estimation of energy savings and economic viability for residential applications  

SciTech Connect

The heat reclaimer is a double-wall heat exchange system that removes superheat from the heat pump (or central air conditioning) cycle and uses it to heat water for domestic uses. During summer operation, this heat would normally be rejected to the atmosphere without being used. Thus, water heating is accomplished using essentially no primary fuel. In winter, the heat extracted from the cycle would have been used for space heating. However, energy savings are possible above the heat pump balance point because water heating is performed at an enhanced efficiency. Potential energy savings and economic viability of the heat reclaimer were determined for 28 sites throughout the United States. These results indicate that the heat reclaimer is not economically attractive compared with gas- or oil-fired water heating systems. However, it is competitive with electric resistance water heaters. Based on these results, a calculational scheme has been developed that could be integrated into the model audit procedure.

Olszewski, M.; Fontana, E.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Laser-Mechanical Drilling for Geothermal Energy: Low-Contact Drilling Technology to Enable Economical EGS Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Foro Energy is developing a unique capability and hardware system to transmit high power lasers over long distances via fiber optic cables. This laser power is integrated with a mechanical drilling bit to enable rapid and sustained penetration of hard rock formations too costly to drill with mechanical drilling bits alone. The laser energy that is directed at the rock basically softens the rock, allowing the mechanical bit to more easily remove it. Foro Energy’s laser-assisted drill bits have the potential to be up to 10 times more economical than conventional hard-rock drilling technologies, making them an effective way to access the U.S. energy resources currently locked under hard rock formations.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Evaluation of the potential for using old-field vegetation as an energy feedstock: Biomass yield, chemical composition, environmental concerns, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major focus of current research on production of biomass for use as energy feedstock involves selection of species and genotypes best suited for specific regions of the United States and development of crop management techniques that maximize biomass productivity while minimizing environmental impacts and economic costs. The two experimental sites, and abandoned soybean field (AS) and an abandoned pasture (AP) were studied. At the AS site, the effects of two harvest frequencies (1 or 2 harvests annually), two nitrogen fertilizer treatments (1 or 2 harvests annually), two nitrogen fertilizer treatments (0 or 87 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}), and two phosphorous fertilizer treatments (0 or 111 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}) were determined. At the AP site, the effects of two harvest treatments (1 or 2 harvests annually), two fertilizer treatments (56:56:135 kg of N:P:K{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}), and two lime treatments (0 or 4600 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}) were determined. At both sites, treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block 2 {times} 2 {times} 2 factorial experiment. The results of this research indicated that old-field vegetation is: (1) sufficiently productive to provide significant quantities of energy feedstock; (2) chemically suitable as an energy feedstock; (3) environmentally benign with respect to impacts related to soil erosion and nutrient depletion; (4) relatively unresponsive to fertilizer and lime inputs; and (5) economically competitive with other biomass energy feedstock candidates. 38 refs., 8 figs., 68 tabs.

Johnston, J.W. Jr.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5f. Economic Indicators a for the Metalcasting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

f f Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5f. Economic Indicators 1 for the Metalcasting Industry (NAICS 3315), 1998, 2002, and 2006 MECS Survey Years Indicators 1998 2002 2006 Nominal Economic Indicator (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 29 27 33 Value Added 17 15 18 Real Economic Indicator (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 2 29 27 23 Value Added 3 17 16 12 Notes: 1. Physical indicators are not available. 2.Deflated using BEA's price indices for value of shipments for primary metal (NAICS 331). 3 Deflated using BEA's price indices for value added for primary metal (NAICS 331). Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries, 2001, 2004 and 2006; Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), "Value of Shipments by

384

Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix Jump to: navigation, search Welcome to the Digital Appendix for The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems. This digital appendix contains supplement material for the NREL technical report, The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems. Detailed results for each building type, location, and rate structure are provided in this appendix. Users may browse either by building type, or location using one of the two links in the "Detailed Charts and Data" section. Summary tables are also provided for reference. Summary Results Tables The summary tables provide overview results for all locations and building

385

Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance; Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook, July 2011, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook July 2011 Visit femp.energy.gov/pdfs/eo13514_fleethandbook.pdf for the latest version of this Handbook. i Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook Contacts Mark Reichhardt Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 202-586-4788 federal_fleets@ee.doe.gov FEMP General Contact Information EE-2L 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 202-586-5772 DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Information Center 877-337-3463 www.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter/ Acknowledgements This document was prepared by Julian Bentley of LMI in McLean, Virginia, and Ryan Daley of the

386

Essays on the Economics of Environmental Issues: The Environmental Kuznets Curve to Optimal Energy Portfolios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

states there is an increase in fossil fuel energy production over the increase in renewable energy production.

Meininger, Aaron G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 through 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted Froms_federal_energy_an d_water_conservation_standards_adopted_Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming Introduction Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state. Modeling Inputs New infrastructure projects considered in this analysis would be developed for the purpose of exporting Wyoming wind and natural gas

389

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Decision support system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources potential in wide areas for connection to high voltage networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decision support information system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources (RES) potential in wide areas is presented in this paper. The system estimates the RES potential in specific areas, examines ... Keywords: DSS, GIS, biomass, decision support systeoms, distributed generation, geographical information systems, high voltage network, renewable energy estimation, renewable energy forecasting, renewable energy potential, renewable energy sources, small hydro, wind energy, wind power

Michael Psalidas; Demosthenes Agoris; Vassilis Kilias; Kostas Tigas; Panagiotis Stratis; Giannis Vlachos

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use and Water Heating Energy Use in the U.S. : A Detailedand Carbon Equivalents From the U.S. Department of Energy’s2010 Buildings Energy Data Book. REFERENCES Meyers, S. , J.

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Abstract--This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS) which involve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS-inverter. The goal of control is to maximize wind energy extraction and this needs letting the wind turbine rotor wind energy extraction) only for one wind speed value depending on the considered value of turbine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Protecting the Investment in Heat Recovery with Boiler Economizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many people consider energy to be a crisis in remission -- even with continuing high fuel costs. Some voice concern over the long term security of an investment in flue gas heat recovery equipment. The concern generally involves the ability of an economizer or air heater to continue to perform efficiently without corrosion. The recognized economic advantages of an economizer result from its ability to convert heat losses into sources of energy. One of the most productive means of obtaining reduced energy costs lies in the improvements of the efficiency of steam generating boilers. Industrial and institutional boilers operating at pressures of 75 psig or greater are excellent applications. The maximum gain that can be safely achieved is governed by a number of technical and physical limitations. Among these are considerations of the economics, temperatures of the flue gas and water, and the potential for corrosion. This paper will discuss the economic and practical considerations of an economizer installation.

Roethe, L. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation of Solar Energy as a Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy as a Renewable Energy Source for the New Student Union Building Dana Vadisirisack, Ryan Kelly of a project/report". #12;1 AN INVESTIGATION OF SOLAR ENERGY AS A RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCE FOR THE NEW of Solar Energy as a Renewable Energy Source for the New Student Union Building" By Dana Vadisirisack, Ryan

396

Dan Miller Associate, Industrial and Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Name, Phone, e-mail address Name, Phone, e-mail address Dan Miller Associate, Industrial and Economic Development Dan Miller joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory in January, 2010 as an Associate in Industrial Partnerships and Economic Development. His responsibilities include leading and supporting initiatives in the energy storage portfolio focused on technology commercialization, economic development, and industrial partnerships. He also manages ORNL's relationships with companies involved in the Oak Ridge Science & Technology Park and is actively recruiting additional companies to locate there. Prior to joining ORNL, Dan was a Licensing Associate in Rice University Office of Technology Transfer, where he managed the patent portfolio of the university's physical science technologies.

397

Essays on the Economics of Environmental Issues: The Environmental Kuznets Curve to Optimal Energy Portfolios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

out with high costs surrounding the renewable energy market.use of the now cost e?cient renewable energy sector. Commonfor renewable energy. Financial Flows and Social Costs Given

Meininger, Aaron G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and capacity that had been determined in a recent tariffthe energy savings would all occur within one tariff block.energy charge applied to each consumption level (in the winter tariff

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.H. , “Decarbonized Fossil Energy Carriers And Their Energyparks or in central fossil energy complexes)? For fossil-Infrastructure for a Fossil Hydrogen Energy System with CO 2

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.H. , “Decarbonized Fossil Energy Carriers And Their Energyparks or in central fossil energy complexes)? For fossil-Infrastructure for a Fossil Hydrogen Energy System with CO 2

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Equitable economic energy efficiency : creating good jobs in low-income efficiency programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency is an important consideration in energy policy-making. So, a federal program aimed at funding "energy efficiency retrofits" for low-income households could be an important step in increasing the overall ...

Sarin, Amit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Forest Products Industry, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (NAICS 321 and NAICS 322) MECS Survey Years Indicators 1998 2002 2006 Physical Wood Products (Millions of Board Feet) 47,263 47,359 NA Paper Products (Thousand Short Tons) 96,315 91,138 NA Total paper 44,761 41,540 41,810 Total paperboard 49,793 48,126 50,415 Wet Machine Board 90 47 NA Building paper 759 578 NA Insulating Board 912 846 NA Nominal Economic Indicators (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 246 243 281 Gross Output 244 239 278 Value Added 107 111 124 Real Economic Indicators (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 1 259 245 253 Gross Output 2 257 245 249 Value Added 3 119 112 121 Notes: 1. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value of shipments.

403

Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Montgomery, AL Little Rock, AR Flagstaff, AZ Phoenix, AZ Tucson, AZ Arcata, CA LA, CA San Francisco, CA Boulder, CO Eagle County, CO Pueblo, CO Bridgeport, CT Wilmington, DE Miami, FL Tampa, FL Atlanta, GA Savannah, GA Des Moines, IA Mason, IA Boise, ID Chicago, IL Springfield, IL Indianapolis, IN Goodland, KS Wichita, KS Lexington, KY New Orleans, LA Shreveport, LA Boston, MA Baltimore, MD Caribou, ME Portland, ME Detroit, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Traverse City, MI International Falls, MN Minneapolis, MN Kansas City, MO Jackson, MS Billings, MT Greensboro, NC Wilmington, NC Bismarck, ND Minot, ND Omaha, NE Concord, NH Atlantic City, NJ Albuquerque, NM Las Vegas, NV Reno, NV New York, NY

404

The role of natural resource and environmental economics in determining the trade-offs in consumption and production of energy inputs: The case of biomass energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural resource economics issues deal with flows and funds of renewable and nonrenewable resources over time. These issues include topics concerned with management of fisheries, forests, mineral, energy resources, the extinction of species and the irreversibility of development over time. Environmental economics issues deal with regulation of polluting activities and the valuation of environmental amenities. In this study we outline a framework for studying both natural resource and environmental economics issues for any renewable or nonrenewable resource. Valuation from both the cost and benefit sides are addressed as they relate to the valuation of environmental programs or policies. By using this top-down approach to analyze and determine the costs and benefits of using renewable or nonrenewable resources, policy-makers on the global, national and local scales may be better informed as to the probable nonmarket and market ramifications of their natural resource and environmental policy decisions. This general framework for analysis is then focused to address biomass energy crops and their usage as inputs to energy production. As with any energy technology, a complete analysis must include an examination of the entire fuel cycle; specifically both production and consumption sides. From a production standpoint, market valuation issues such as crop management techniques, inputs to production, and community economics issues must be addressed as well as nonmarket valuation issues such as soil erosion, ground water effects and carbon sequestration. On the consumption side, market valuation considerations such as energy fuel efficiency and quality, cost of conversion and employment of labor are important factors while the critical nonmarket valuation factors are ambient air visibility, greenhouse gas release, and disposal of the by-products of conversion and combustion.

Downing, M.; Graham, R.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

BEA's chain-type price indices for value added for primary metal (NAICS 331). Sources: Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys 1998, 2002, and...

406

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Energy Storage for Use with Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Energy Storage for Use with Renewable Energy Generation in the New SUB Joel Beales, Jason Serwa, Andrea An Investigation into Energy Storage for Use with Renewable Energy Generation in the New SUB Team Members and Roles Assessment Submitted To: Dr. P.D. Mills Submission Date: Nov. 30, 2010 #12;1 Abstract Renewable energy

407

Economic Analysis of Building Distributed Energy System (BDES) in the Chinese Different Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the feasibility and its running mode of Building Distributed Energy System (BDES) are analyzed for large public buildings based on energy tariffs investigated in some Chinese cities and building's load factor-user's heat-to electric ratio. ... Keywords: Energy tariffs, Building Distributed Energy System, Running economy

Yuan Yina, Ruan Yingjun, Liu Qingrong, Zhou Weiguo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Renewable energy options in Saudi Arabia: the economic viability of solar photovoltaics within the residential sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy options, including solar power, are becoming progressively more viable and thus increasingly pose challenges to conventional sources of energy, such as oil, coal and natural gas. Solar Photovoltaic technology is one type of solar energy ... Keywords: Saudi Arabia, feasibility study, renewable energy, residential buildings, solar photovoltaics

Yasser Al-Saleh; Hanan Taleb

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY'S COMMITMENT TO GREEN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WHITE PAPER ON CLEAN ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and private funding and could position South Carolina as a leader in development of a wind energy industry and wind · Improving energy storage technology · Discovering breakthroughs and new technologies Chu ended of an offshore wind energy industry, and Immelt said that every job in the energy industry creates six more jobs

Stuart, Steven J.

410

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from US DOE, Energy Technology Characterization Handbook:Handbook: Environmental Pollution and Control Factqrs", DOE/

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Jump to: navigation, search Name UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Address United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), Bangkok Place Bangkok, Thailand Website http://www.unescap.org/ Coordinates 13.7638612°, 100.5087933° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":13.7638612,"lon":100.5087933,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Name Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Address 2, rue André Pascal Place Paris, France Zip 75775 Year founded 1961 Website http://oecd.org Coordinates 48.8609035°, 2.2691592° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.8609035,"lon":2.2691592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

An integrated approach for techno-economic and environmental analysis of energy from biomass and fossil fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass conversion into forms of energy is receiving current attention because of environmental, energy and agricultural concerns. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the environmental, energy, economic, and technological aspects of using a form of biomass, switchgrass (panicum virgatum), as a partial or complete replacement for coal in power generation and cogeneration systems. To examine the effects of such a substitution, an environmental biocomplexity approach is used, wherein the agricultural, technological, economic, and environmental factors are addressed. In particular, lifecycle analysis (LCA) and a three-dimensional integrated economic, energy and environmental analysis is employed. The effectiveness of alternate technologies for switchgrass preparation, harvest and use in terms of greenhouse gas impact, cost and environmental implications is examined. Also, different scenarios of cofiring and biomass preparation pathways are investigated. Optimization of the total biomass power generation cost with minimum greenhouse gas effect is undertaken using mathematical programming for various alternate competitive biomass processing pathways. As a byproduct of this work a generic tool to optimize the cost and greenhouse gas emissions for allocation of fuel sources to the power generating sinks is developed. Further, this work discusses the sensitivity of the findings to varied cofiring ratios, coal prices, hauling distances, per acre yields, etc. Besides electricity generation in power plants, another viable alternative for reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) is the utilization of biomass in conjunction with combined heat and power (CHP) in the process industries. This work addresses the utilization of biowaste or biomass source in a processing facility for CHP. A systematic algebraic procedure for targeting cogeneration potential ahead of detailed power generation network design is presented. The approach presented here effectively utilizes the biomass and biowaste sources as external fuel, and matches it with the use and dispatch of fuel sources within the process, heating and non-heating steam demands, and power generation. The concept of extractable energy coupled with flow balance via cascade diagram has been used as a basis to construct this approach. The work also discusses important economic factors and environmental policies required for the cost-effective utilization of biomass for electricity generation and CHP.

Mohan, Tanya

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Using Net-Zero Energy Projects to Enable Sustainable Economic Redevelopment at the Former Brunswick Air Naval Base  

SciTech Connect

A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites. The Brunswick Naval Air Station is a naval air facility and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Super Fund site that is being cleaned up, and closed down. The objective of this report is not only to look at the economics of individual renewable energy technologies, but also to look at the systemic benefits that can be gained when cost-effective renewable energy technologies are integrated with other systems and businesses in a community; thus multiplying the total monetary, employment, and quality-of-life benefits they can provide to a community.

Huffman, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas supplied to the fuel cell power plant is only involved in a chemical oxidation process, instead of burning, in the electricity generation

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 through 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are based on EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2012. We convertedoutputs in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2012. The values

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted Fromof the energy and water conservation standards that havewe estimate the water conservation standards, together with

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted FromFederal energy and water conservation standards adopted fromrespectively. The water conservation standards, together

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Economic and Physical Indicators...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

outputs. 3. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value added. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2004. (DOEEIA-0384(2004) Table 5.8...

420

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply pattern. On the other hand, wind electricity, with an ownership costcost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cells are all considered as clean and renewable energy

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J. Sathaye,Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico J. Sathaye,of U.S. and Canadian lighting programs for the residential,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency equipment is expected to come from private industry while that for the supply-Supply with Energy Efficiency (SEE) Scenario 2– Electricity Demand and Availability . 16 Figure 11: Commercial and LV-MV Industry

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Resource & Energy Investment Program- First Peoples Economic Growth Fund Inc. (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Resource and Energy Investment Program is intended to provide debt or equity financing to large-scale businesses in either the resource or energy sectors of the Manitoba economy. All...

425

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A higher penetration of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for household lighting can reduce growth in peak electricity demand, reduce sales of subsidized electricity, and lessen environmental impacts. This paper describes an economic analysis of a project designed to promote high penetration rates of CFLs in two cities in Mexico. Our analysis indicates that the project will bring substantial net economic benefits to Mexico, the utility, and the average customer. In the absence of any subsidy to CFLs, most customers will see a payback period longer than two years. By sharing some of the anticipated net benefit, CFE, the utility company, can reduce the payback period to a maximum of two years for all customers. CFE's role is thus crucial to the successful implementation of the project. Expanding the Ilumex project to a Mexico-wide program would make a significant contribution towards meeting the planned addition of generation capacity by the year 2000.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Friedmann, R.; Meyers, S.; de Buen, O.; Gadgil, A.J.; Vargas, E.; Saucedo, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clean energy incentives provided by the federal and stateenergies, both federal and state governments provide a number of incentives

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Renewable Energy Policy in Remote Rural Areas of Western China: Implementation and Socio-economic Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Policy in Remote Rural Areas of Western China: Implementation and Socio on renewable energy sources. However, such an option is not universally agreed upon. This dissertation examines a renewable energy-based rural electrification program, the `Township Electrification Program', launched

Huber, Bernhard A.

428

Structural And Economic Optimisation Of Bottom-Mounted Offshore Wind Energy Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general overview is presented of the Opti-OWECS project. In several fields, support structure design, installation of the offshore wind energy converters, operation and maintenance, dynamics of the entire offshore wind energy converter, structural reliability considerations, etc., the study demonstrated new propositions which will contribute significantly to a mature offshore wind energy technology.

M. Kühn; W. A. A. M. Bierbooms; G.J.W. van Bussel; M. C. Ferguson; B. Göransson; T.T. Cockerill; R. Harrison; L.A. Harland; J. H. Vugts; R. Wiecherink; Kvaerner Turbin Ab

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in leading the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) is actively involved in leading the (DOE) is actively involved in leading the development of advanced applications and tools to more effectively operate the electricity delivery system by enabling advanced analysis, visualization, monitoring and alarming, and decision support capabilities for grid operators. These applications use-and greatly increase the value of-data coming from high-resolution electrical measuring devices known as phasor measurement units (PMUs), whose deployment is being facilitated by the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative. The advanced applications research and development activities of DOE and its industry partners are a key component of the success of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) programs. By the time the ARRA projects are completed in 2014, several of these applications are expected to be fully

430

Economic and Policy Factors Affecting Energy Efficiency Improvements in the U. S. Paper Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. pulp, paper and paperboard industry has made significant improvements over the past eleven years in the energy efficiency of its operations. The industry is firmly committed to: increased utilization of important renewable domestic energy sources such as wood residues, pulping liquors, and hydropower; improved energy efficiency through cogeneration, product and process improvements; and reduced national dependence on foreign energy. The achievements are substantial and will be reviewed. The potential exists to expand the industry's energy self-sufficiency, use of more energy efficient technologies, and development of hydropower and cogeneration; however, national policies play a crucial role in allowing the industry to realize this potential. These national policies include issues associated with cogeneration, licensing and relicensing of private small scale hydroelectric projects, acid rain, and federal funding of energy technology research and development. The paper industry's actions and accomplishments arising from participation in the formulation and implementation of national policy will be addressed.

Freund, S. H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Design of an energy efficient and economical actuator for automobile windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and analysis of an efficient, yet low cost, drum driven window actuation system for an automotive power window. The design uses a novel approach that involves using cables to both actuate ...

Durand, Keith (Keith V.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Economic viability of biogas technology  

SciTech Connect

Biogas has emerged as a suitable technology for providing alternative and additional sources of energy, especially for rural areas of developing countries. Although the experience gained in China and India established its technological success, social scientists are still involved in the controversial issue of its economic viability. The available literature presents very contradictory situations, ranging between the two extreme poles of high economic viability and nonviability. Such contradictory conclusions are derived since economic benefits from the technology are influenced by a number of factors. A review of the literature reveals that various factors are either not considered, or that the economics have been worked out assuming a very ideal situation, while biogas plants are operating under very different conditions. Using the coal replacement method even as coal is seldom used by villages is only a single example of this approach. In most of the developing countries, rural populations depend mainly on non-commercial fuels like firewood, dungcakes, agricultural wastes and leaves for cooking and heating purposes. Under the present technological limitations, biogas can most commonly be used for cooking and lighting. For testing the economic viability of biogas systems, a number of authors have considered the benefits in terms of savings in traditional fuels. But considering the actual thermal efficiency of different non-commercial fuel items, as well as biogas, it has still be be decided at what point of the market prices of fuel items that the biogas system becomes economically viable and remains viable. The present paper thus reviews different approaches adopted and suggested for working out the economics or the cost-benefit ratio of the biogas technology at the first stage, and then spells out the factors influencing the economic benefits of the technology under various situations, with the help of empirical

Agrawal, S.C.; Agrawal, S.; Khare, O.P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal Sciences The thermal sciences area involves the study of energy conversion and transmission, power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, power generation, the flow of liquids and gases, and the transfer of thermal energy (heat) by means, Thermodynamics, a sophomore spring course. This is followed by ME 608, Fluid Dynamics in the fall of the junior - Analytical Fluid Dynamics ME 709 - Computational Fluids Dynamics ME 712 - Waves in Fluids #12;

Chini, Gregory P.

434

22 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 20081540-7977/08/$25.002008 IEEE ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY, ENERGY SECURITY, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JANUARY 2011 CEC3002010008CMF COMMISSION GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Third Edition CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION KAREN DOUGLAS, J.D. Chairman JAMES D. BOYD Vice Chair Commissioners JEFFREY D. BYRON

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

435

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Integrated Wind-Onsite Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Electric Power Research Institute project was to investigate the benefits of directly integrated energy storage and wind generation. The ability to store wind energy could provide higher wind farm capacity factors, improved locational marginal prices during high wind periods, and increased production tax credit benefits. The project's Phase I objective was to identify the most promising energy storage (ES) options available at this time. Technologies investigated included many batter...

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Das, (2006) Reducing Electricity Deficit through EnergyLV supply. Figure 12: Electricity Productivity (Commercialan interesting result. The electricity productivity in both

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Rosenquist. 1998. WHAM: A Simplified Energy ConsumptionWater Heater Analysis Model (WHAM) calculation method, whichcharacteristics of water heaters, WHAM uses parameters from

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business as Usual (BAU) Scenario 1 – Electricity Demand andEnergy Efficiency (SEE) Scenario 2– Electricity Demand andCA 94720 Abstract Electricity demand has consistently

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "involving energy economics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Renewable Energy Technology Engineering and Economic Evaluation: Biomass Power Plants 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study prepared an engineering and economic evaluation of 25-, 50-, and 100-MW biomass combustion power plants fired by 100% biomass fuel. The study estimated boiler efficiency, steam cycle heat rate, auxiliary power consumption, net plant heat rate, operation and maintenance (O&M) labor costs, maintenance materials, fuel needs, and raw material requirements. For both capital and annual O&M costs, the costs per kW or MWh are the lowest for 100-MW plants and the highest for 25-MW plants. Due to their ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Chapter 4 Technical and economics analysis of energy 4.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

options including the system of diesel electricity production, gas, solar hot water heaters, transport of fossil fuels and nuclear energy, and renewable sources of energy, comprising of wind, solar, biomass resources on the Islands, including wind, solar, biomass, hydro, wave, and geothermal. By marrying the range

443

Relative Economic Incentives for Hydrogen from Nuclear, Renewable, and Fossil Energy Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific hydrogen market determines the value of hydrogen from different sources. Each hydrogen production technology has its own distinct characteristics. For example, steam reforming of natural gas produces only hydrogen. In contrast, nuclear and solar hydrogen production facilities produce hydrogen together with oxygen as a by-product or co-product. For a user who needs both oxygen and hydrogen, the value of hydrogen from nuclear and solar plants is higher than that from a fossil plant because 'free' oxygen is produced as a by-product. Six factors that impact the relative economics of fossil, nuclear, and solar hydrogen production to the customer are identified: oxygen by-product, avoidance of carbon dioxide emissions, hydrogen transport costs, storage costs, availability of low-cost heat, and institutional factors. These factors imply that different hydrogen production technologies will be competitive in different markets and that the first markets for nuclear and solar hydrogen will be those markets in which they have a unique competitive advantage. These secondary economic factors are described and quantified in terms of dollars per kilogram of hydrogen.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Economic evaluation of biogas as energy and fertilizer in rural northeast Thailand  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of the 1974 oil crisis, Thailand faces a complex problem: agriculture is characterized by low productivity, and an increasing burden is now being placed on national forest reserves as the primary source of fuel. The nation is forced to choose: land for forests and fuel, or land for agriculture and food. In either case, current levels of land use are having serious environmental consequences. Biogas has been proposed as a possible remedy to alleviate these problems. In this study, three sizes of biogas plants are studied to facilitate cost estimates, and two Thai villages provide case studies of actual applications. Then a stratified random sample of 60 households is selected from the two villages, based on economic class groupings. The central question is to inquire whether biogas is feasible and profitable for villages with differing characteristics, for different income groups within those villages, and whether technological viability is affected by plant size. The results show that there are increasing returns to scale for larger biogas plants; that the poorer village obtains more benefits per unit of output than the more modernized village; that the poorest households within each village have the highest potential gains from biogas. It is recommended that Thailand implement biogas technology in those regions and for those villages where benefit-cost analysis demonstrates its economic feasibility.

Sombuntham, S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

RELATIVE ECONOMIC INCENTIVES FOR HYDROGEN FROM NUCLEAR, RENEWABLE, AND FOSSIL ENERGY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

The specific hydrogen market determines the value of hydrogen from different sources. Each hydrogen production technology has its own distinct characteristics. For example, steam reforming of natural gas produces only hydrogen. In contrast, nuclear and solar hydrogen production facilities produce hydrogen together with oxygen as a by-product or co-product. For a user who needs both oxygen and hydrogen, the value of hydrogen from nuclear and solar plants is higher than that from a fossil plant because 'free' oxygen is produced as a by-product. Six factors that impact the relative economics of fossil, nuclear, and solar hydrogen production to the customer are identified: oxygen by-product, avoidance of carbon dioxide emissions, hydrogen transport costs, storage costs, availability of low-cost heat, and institutional factors. These factors imply that different hydrogen production technologies will be competitive in different markets and that the first markets for nuclear and solar hydrogen will be those markets in which they have a unique competitive advantage. These secondary economic factors are described and quantified in terms of dollars per kilogram of hydrogen.

Gorensek, M; Charles W. Forsberg, C

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

RELATIVE ECONOMIC INCENTIVES FOR HYDROGEN FROM NUCLEAR, RENEWABLE, AND FOSSIL ENERGY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

The specific hydrogen market determines the value of hydrogen from different sources. Each hydrogen production technology has its own distinct characteristics. For example, steam reforming of natural gas produces only hydrogen. In contrast, nuclear and solar hydrogen production facilities produce hydrogen together with oxygen as a by-product or co-product. For a user who needs both oxygen and hydrogen, the value of hydrogen from nuclear and solar plants is higher than that from a fossil plant because 'free' oxygen is produced as a by-product. Six factors that impact the relative economics of fossil, nuclear, and solar hydrogen production to the customer are identified: oxygen by-product, avoidance of carbon dioxide emissions, hydrogen transport costs, storage costs, availability of low-cost heat, and institutional factors. These factors imply that different hydrogen production technologies will be competitive in different markets and that the first markets for nuclear and solar hydrogen will be those markets in which they have a unique competitive advantage. These secondary economic factors are described and quantified in terms of dollars per kilogram of hydrogen.

Gorensek, M; Charles W. Forsberg, C

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ensuring cleaner, more efficient, and more economical energy for our nation`s future  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Fossil Energy Program consists of four major elements: advanced technology development; strategic petroleum reserve program; naval petroleum and oil shale reserves program; and regulatory programs. Under advanced technology development, research, development, and demonstration programs are carried in three areas: advanced power systems; natural gas and liquid fuels supplies; and crosscutting research and development. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve is an emergency supply of crude oil stored in huge underground salt caverns along the coast line of the Gulf of Mexico. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve consist of three oil fields and three oil shale reserves in the Western United States. Regulatory programs carried out by the Office of Fossil Energy are required by statue, Executive, and Secretarial orders. These regulatory programs seek to foster the freest possible international trade in natural gas and electricity, consistent with national needs for energy security and environmental protection. This publication discusses the programs under these four major areas.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Feed Development Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

449

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 through 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effect of Efficiency Standards on Water Use and WaterEnergy Efficiency Standards for Equipment: Additionaland Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings/appliance_standards/residential/residential_of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential andand Equipment Efficiency Standards. American Council for an

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/Residential and Commercial Appliances. LBNL-63017. Lawrencefor New State Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards.

Meyers, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in urban areas like the Detroit region. In such a situation,energy supply based on in Detroit, MI, region in the Unitedsupply figures for the Detroit region where much of the U.S.

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schock, “Hydrogen as a Future Transportation Fuel,” Energy,of hydrogen for future transportation. The P.I. is co-of hydrogen for future transportation. The P.I. is co-

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schock, “Hydrogen as a Future Transportation Fuel,” Energy,of hydrogen for future transportation. The P.I. is co-of hydrogen for future transportation. The P.I. is co-

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFL) offers a considerable increase in energy efficiencyCFL/(I-T&D loss) * Lamp hrs/day * 365 day sly ear d.Based on power plant efficiency

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Review: Solar Revolution: The Economic Transformation of the Global Energy Industry by Travis Bradford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entered an era where fossil fuels are becoming increasinglytoo much reliance on fossil fuels during the last one and atalks about the present fossil-fuel based energy system,

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy and Depletable Resources: Economics and Policy, 1973-98 (Revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shock. 20 In the mid-1970's coal price rose dramatically andcoal mining productivity dropped so much (worldwide) after the oil priceto energy price increases. If consumers the decline in coal

Kolstad, Charles D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Technical and Economic Assessment of Transition Strategies Toward Widespread Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

we plan to add biomass as a potential supply, and considerII, we will add biomass as a potential supply. In addition,biomass, wastes, wind, solar, hydropower and nuclear, encouraging use of a more diverse primary energy supply.

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TRANSITION STRATEGIES TOWARD WIDESPREAD USE OF HYDROGEN AS AN ENERGY CARRIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

we plan to add biomass as a potential supply, and considerII, we will add biomass as a potential supply. In addition,biomass, wastes, wind, solar, hydropower and nuclear, encouraging use of a more diverse primary energy supply.

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher; Johnson, Nils; Ni, Jason; Lin, Zhenhong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), evaluated a number of control strategies for packaged cooling equipment that can be implemented in an advanced controller, which can be retrofit into existing packaged heat pump units to improve their operational efficiency. This report documents the results of that analysis.

Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Katipamula, Srinivas

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

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461

An economic prefeasibility study of geothermal energy development at Platonares, Honduras  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected economic benefits from development of a geothermal power plant at Plantanares in the Department of Copan, Honduras are evaluated in this report. The economic benefits of geothermal plants ranging in size from a 10-MW plant in the shallow reservoir to a 20-, 30-, 55-, or 110-MW plant in the assumed deeper reservoir were measured by computing optimal expansion plans for each size of geothermal computing optimal expansion plans for each size of geothermal plant. Savings are computed as the difference in present value cost between a plan that contains no geothermal plant and one that does. Present value savings in millions of 1987 dollars range from $25 million for the 10-MW plant to $110 million for the 110-MW plant -- savings of 6% to 25% over the time period 1988 through 2008. The existence of the shallow reservoir is relatively well-characterized, and much indirect scientific evidence indicate the existence of the deeper reservoir. Based on probability distributions estimated by geologists of temperature, areal extent, depth, and porosity, the expected size of power plant that the deep reservoir can support was estimated with the following results: O-MW -- 16% (i.e., there is a 16% chance that the deep reservoir will not support a power plant); 20-MW -- 38%; 30-MW -- 25%; 55-MW -- 19%; and 110-MW -- 2%. When the cost savings from each size of plant are weighted by the probability that the reservoir will support a plant of that size, the expected monetary value of the deep reservoir can be computed. It is $42 million in present value 1987 dollars -- a cost savings of 10%. The expected savings from the 10-MW plant in the shallow reservoir are expected to be close to the computed value of $25 million, i.e., the probability that the shallow reservoir can support the plant is high. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Trocki, L.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

US energy for the rest of the century. [From 1980 Mineral Economics Symposium  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the basic quantitative results of recent US Commerce Department forecasting efforts in the energy area. This work has been published in three volumes by National Technical Information Service. It covers the entire spectrum of US energy requirements and focuses on the use of energy for operational purposes. The tables provide data on fuel consumption by types and Btu content both for 1979 and as projected for the year 2000. Three main points are highlighted in the tables: 1. The US energy problem, at least from now to the end of the century, is basically a petroleum problem. Liquid-fuel usage in the transprtation sector will suffer the greatest strain in the years ahead. 2. The automobile will have to become more fuel-efficient to meet the limits that will exist on petroleum supply. To meet expected constraints, a doubling of current mileage standards is necessary and 10% of automobiles may have to run on electricity and 10% on gasohol. 3. The continuing shift to electricity projected in the forecast will necessitate large conversion losses in electricity production from fossil fuels. When such losses are excluded, however, the forecast indicates that US net usable energy on a per capita basis by the year 2000 will actually be less than today and will continue to decline. Two other points deserve to be noted: (1) US end users of energy currently spend $316 billion annually; this includes direct taxes; and (2) almost 50% of our energy is used to produce steam. 3 references, 8 tables.

Gustaferro, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Performance and Economics of a Wind-Diesel Hybrid Energy System: Naval Air Landing Field, San Clemente Island, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the wind resource, economics and operation of the recently installed wind turbines in conjunction with diesel power for the Naval Air Landing Field (NALF), San Clemente Island (SCI), California Project. The primary goal of the SCI wind power system is to operate with the existing diesel power plant and provide equivalent or better power quality and system reliability than the existing diesel system. The wind system is also intended to reduce, as far as possible, the use of diesel fuel and the inherent generation of nitrogen-oxide emissions and other pollutants. The first two NM 225/30 225kW wind turbines were installed and started shake-down operations on February 5, 1998. This report describes the initial operational data gathered from February 1998 through January 1999, as well as the SCI wind resource and initial cost of energy provided by the wind turbines on SCI. In support of this objective, several years of data on the wind resources of San Clemente Island were collected and compared to historical data. The wind resource data were used as input to economic and feasibility studies for a wind-diesel hybrid installation for SCI.

McKenna, E. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Olsen, T. (Timothy Olsen Consulting)

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)