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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy  

SciTech Connect

"Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3
4

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

5

Average regional end-use energy price projections to the year 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy prices shown in this report cover the period from 1991 through 2030. These prices reflect sector/fuel price projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1991 (AEO) base case, developed using the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) forecasting model. Projections through 2010 are AEO base case forecasts. Projections for the period from 2011 through 2030 were developed separately from the AEO for this report, and the basis for these projections is described in Chapter 3. Projections in this report include average energy prices for each of four Census Regions for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation end-use sectors. Energy sources include electricity, distillate fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline, residual fuel oil, natural gas, and steam coal. (VC)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Average regional end-use energy price projections to the year 2030  

SciTech Connect

The energy prices shown in this report cover the period from 1991 through 2030. These prices reflect sector/fuel price projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1991 (AEO) base case, developed using the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) forecasting model. Projections through 2010 are AEO base case forecasts. Projections for the period from 2011 through 2030 were developed separately from the AEO for this report, and the basis for these projections is described in Chapter 3. Projections in this report include average energy prices for each of four Census Regions for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation end-use sectors. Energy sources include electricity, distillate fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline, residual fuel oil, natural gas, and steam coal. (VC)

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

FOUNDATIONS OF PRICING AND INVESTMENT IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOUNDATIONS OF PRICING AND INVESTMENT IN ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION A thesis submitted, transmission and distribution areas. From 1984 to 1989 he worked for Chilquinta, an electricity distribution electricity markets. In that frame, open access to the transmission system is one of the fundamental topics

Rudnick, Hugh

8

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the tenant. If energy prices rise (from market fluctuationsenergy consumption that is “affected” by a market failure and “insulated” from pricemarket barriers, principal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment, behaviour, energy price,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating ... storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices ... 1972: 1.18: R 1.61: 7.09: 2.37.86 ...

11

Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1999. 6.50 : 7.78 [R] 23.93: 13.15 [R] 5.22 ... includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline. Notes: · Prices include taxes where ... includes fu ...

12

Strategic power plant investment planning under fuel and carbon price uncertainty.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The profitability of power plant investments depends strongly on uncertain fuel and carbon prices. In this doctoral thesis, we combine fundamental electricity market models with… (more)

Geiger, Ansgar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize energy and environmental problems by placingprincipal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment,Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use. Berkeley (CA),

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Oil futures prices in a production economy with investment constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We document a new stylized fact regarding the term structure of futures volatility. We show that the relationship between the volatility of futures prices and the slope of the term structure of prices is non-monotone and ...

Kogan, Leonid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Analysis of Incentives for Network Infrastructure Investment Under Different Pricing Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet is making a significant transition from primarily a network of desktop computers to a network variety of connected information devices such as personal digital assistants and global positioning system-based devices. On the other hand, new ... Keywords: Internet pricing, infrastructure investment, investment incentives, net neutrality, simulation

Alok Gupta; Boris Jukic; Dale O. Stahl; Andrew B. Whinston

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Input Price Risk and Optimal Timing of Energy Investment: Choice between Fossil- and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ve consider energy investment, when a choice has to be made between fossil fuel and biomass fired production technologies. A dynamic model is presented to illustrate the effect of the different degrees of input price uncer- tainty on the choice of technolog2 and the timing of the investment. It is shown that when the choice of technology is irreversible, it may be optimal to postpone the investment even if it would otherwise be optimal to invest in one or both of the plant types. Ve provide a numerical example based on cost estimates of two different power plant types.

Pauli Murto; Gjermund Nese

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Investment Efficiency in Competitive Electricity Markets With and Without Time-Varying Retail Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard economic model of efficient competitive markets relies on the ability of sellers to charge prices that vary as their costs change. Yet, there is no restructured electricity market in which most retail customers can be charged realtime prices (RTP), prices that can change as frequently as wholesale costs. We analyze the impact of having some share of customers on time-invariant pricing in competitive electricity markets. Not only does time-invariant pricing in competitive markets lead to outcomes (prices and investment) that are not first-best, it even fails to achieve the second-best optimum given the constraint of time-invariant pricing. We then study a number of policy interventions that have been proposed to address the perceived inadequacy of capacity investment. We show that attempts to correct the level of investment through taxes or subsidies on electricity or capacity are unlikely to succeed, because these interventions create new inefficiencies. We demonstrate that the most common proposal, a subsidy to capacity ownership financed by a tax on retail electricity, is particularly problematic. An alternative approach to improving efficiency, increasing the share of customers on RTP, has some surprising effects. We show that such a change lowers the equilibrium price to flat rate customers

Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holland

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Estimating the effect of future oil prices on petroleum engineering project investment yardsticks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes two methods, (1) a probabilistic method based on historical oil prices and (2) a method based on Gaussian simulation, to model future prices of oil. With these methods to model future oil prices, we can calculate the ranges of uncertainty in traditional probability indicators based on cash flow analysis, such as net present values, net present value to investment ratio and internal rate of return. We found that conventional methods used to quantify uncertainty which use high, low and base prices produce uncertainty ranges far narrower than those observed historically. These methods fail because they do not capture the "shocks" in oil prices that arise from geopolitical events or supply-demand imbalances. Quantifying uncertainty is becoming increasingly important in the petroleum industry as many current investment opportunities in reservoir development require large investments, many in harsh exploration environments, with intensive technology requirements. Insight into the range of uncertainty, particularly for downside, may influence our investment decision in these difficult areas.

Mendjoge, Ashish V

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Do Investment Banks' Relationships with Investors Impact Pricing? The Case of Convertible Bond Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the role of repeat interactions between placement agents (investment banks) and investors in the initial pricing of convertible bonds. Under the assumption that attracting repeat investors can reduce search frictions in primary issue ... Keywords: convertible bonds, corporate finance, securities issuance, underpricing

Brian J. Henderson; Heather Tookes

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Valuing modularity Choice of nuclear power investments under price uncertainty: Valuing modularity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We consider the choice problem faced by a firm in the electricity sector which holds two investment projects. The first project is an irreversible investment in a large nuclear power plant. The second project consists in building a flexible sequence of smaller, modular, nuclear power plants on the same site. In other words, we compare the benefit of the large power plant project coming from increasing returns to scale, to the benefit of the modular project due to its reduced risk (flexibility). We use the theory of real options to measure the value of the option to invest in the successive modules, under price uncertainty. From this theory, it is well-known that risk-neutral entrepreneurs will decide to invest only if the market price of electricity exceeds the cost of electricity by a positive margin which is an increasing function of the market risk. In particular, this margin is larger for the irreversible investment than for the modular project. This is because the investment process in the modular project can be interrupted at any time when the market conditions deteriorate, thereby limiting the potential loss of the investor. We consider in particular an environment where the discount rate is 8 % and volatility of the market price of electricity equals 20 % per year. The modular project consists in four units of 300 MWe each, and in which 40 % of the total overnight cost is borne by the first module. We show that the benefit of modularity is equivalent in terms of profitability to a reduction of the cost of electricity by one-thousand of a euro per kWh.- 2-Valuing modularity

Christian Gollier; David Proult; Françoise Thais; Gilles Walgenwitz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Practices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Addresses the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) current practices in treating taxes in the calculation of end use prices in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990 (SEPER), and other EIA data publications.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

> PAPER FOR THE SPECIAL SECTION ON TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT, PRICING AND CONSTRUCTION < 1 Abstract--From an economic perspective, the appropriate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impacts of an electricity transmission project on different players may vary, such side payments a multi-stage game-theoretic framework for electricity transmission investment as a new planning paradigm> PAPER FOR THE SPECIAL SECTION ON TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT, PRICING AND CONSTRUCTION

24

Oil Prices, Stock Markets and Portfolio Investment: Evidence from Sector Analysis in Europe over the Last Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Prices, Stock Markets and Portfolio Investment: Evidence from Sector Analysis in Europe over This article extends the understanding of oil­stock market relationships over the last turbulent decade. Unlike returns to oil price changes differ greatly depending on the activity sector. In the out

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Pricing and the incentive to invest in pipelines after Great Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas pipeline companies invest heavily in expansion of the United States pipeline system. System expansion projects totaled $5.7 billion in 1992. In 1993-94 there was more than $3.8 billion of construction projects completed or under construction, and an additional $5.2 billion proposed and pending, totaling over $9 billion. Over 8,000 miles of new pipelines were installed or under construction in 1993. Much of the new investment involves expanding capacity of existing pipelines by constructing parallel pipes that use existing compressors and follow the same right-of-way, a process also known as {open_quotes}looping.{close_quotes} Under traditional regulation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission or FERC), the pipelines have been able to average or {open_quotes}roll in{close_quotes} the costs of expansion, generally raising costs to existing customers. The Great Lakes Gas Transmission Ltd. Partnership (Great Lakes) decision reversed this long-standing policy by requiring new customers to bear the costs of expansion. This article will demonstrate that these alternative regulatory policies have significant consequences for pricing and the incentives to invest in new pipeline construction, and argues that the Great Lakes decision, which is currently under review, should be upheld and extended.

Spulber, D.F.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Effect of Energy Prices on Operation and Investment in OECD Countries: Evidence from the Vintage Capital Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capital stock may reduce future energy (including fossil fuel) input consumption. To illustrate the outcome of such policies we use the vintage capital model predictions to evaluate the e¤ect of a greenhouse emissions tax on energy consumption. Because... (agriculture, commerce, manufacturing, and transport) between 1990 and 2005. Compared to earlier studies, our analysis relies on more accurate energy prices in different sectors and countries based on the end-use fuel prices and sector-specific energy mix...

Steinbuks, J; Meshreky, A; Neuhoff, Karsten

27

Oil and natural gas reserve prices, 1982-2002 : implications for depletion and investment cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A time series is estimated of in-ground prices - as distinct from wellhead prices ? of US oil and natural gas reserves for the period 1982-2002, using market purchase and sale transaction information. The prices are a ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pricing and Investments in Internet Security: A Cyber-Insurance Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internet users such as individuals and organizations are subject to different types of epidemic risks such as worms, viruses, spams, and botnets. To reduce the probability of risk, an Internet user generally invests in traditional security mechanisms like anti-virus and anti-spam software, sometimes also known as self-defense mechanisms. However, such software does not completely eliminate risk. Recent works have considered the problem of residual risk elimination by proposing the idea of cyber-insurance. In this regard, an important research problem is the analysis of optimal user self-defense investments and cyber-insurance contracts under the Internet environment. In this paper, we investigate two problems and their relationship: 1) analyzing optimal self-defense investments in the Internet, under optimal cyber-insurance coverage, where optimality is an insurer objective and 2) designing optimal cyber-insurance contracts for Internet users, where a contract is a (premium, coverage) pair.

Pal, Ranjan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hedging the Long-Term Transmission Price Risks Associated with Generation Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In deregulated electricity markets with locational marginal pricing (LMP), potential investors in new generation lack adequate tools for hedging against the sometimes substantial risks created by transmission congestion. This research report will help transmission customers gain an understanding of the reasons for these risks and of the limited tools available for hedging against them.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Operational and Investment Response to Energy Prices in the OECD Manufacturing Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use the vintage capital model predictions to evaluate the e¤ect of a greenhouse emissions tax on energy consumption. Speci?cally, we simulate the e¤ect of the greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide, CO2) emissions tax implemented in 2005 in the U... input factors to production (labour, energy and materials), and the potential for more e˘ cient use of these inputs by choosing more e˘ cient technologies at the time of investment. Steinbuks, Meshreky, and Neuho¤ (2009) estimate their econometric model...

Steinbuks, J; Neuhoff, Karsten

31

Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

32

Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

33

Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

34

Ris Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end-use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end vary, so we need to find a pricing mechanism that is broadly applicable. The issue of short-term supply balance take place. DR and the security of supply problem thus take different forms depending

35

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

36

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Emerging Technologies Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC What is End-Use Efficiency (EE)? * EE is an energy resource * Broadly accepted in the U.S. as the single most effective step toward reducing pollution, power costs and price volatility * Treated as equivalent to supply-side resources * Recognized by states and regions as first priority when costs are comparable (CA, MO, NM, Pacific Northwest) The Northwest Power Act 839b(e)(1). The plan shall, as provided in this paragraph, give priority to resources which the Council determines to be cost-effective. Priority shall be given: first, to conservation; second, to renewable resources; third, to generating resources utilizing waste heat or generating resources of high fuel conversion

37

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The analysis focuses on natural gas end-use consumption trends, natural gas prices, ... during the year. Categories: Prices ... of 20 percent in the WTI leads to ...

38

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

39

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

40

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

42

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release...

43

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural...

44

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural...

45

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural...

46

,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural...

47

,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural...

48

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural...

49

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania...

50

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural...

51

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural...

52

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural...

53

,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural...

54

,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural...

55

,"Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural...

56

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural...

57

,"Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural...

58

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural...

59

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas...

60

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas...

62

,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas...

63

,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas...

64

,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas...

65

,"Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas...

66

,"Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas...

67

,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas...

68

,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas...

69

,"Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas...

70

,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas...

71

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas...

72

,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas...

73

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

74

All Price Tables.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration State Energy Data 2010: Prices and Expenditures 3 2 0 1 0 S U M M A R I E S Table E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)...

75

PRICE SPECULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The price of crude oil in the U.S. had never exceeded $40 per barrel until mid-2004. By 2006 it reached $70 per barrel, and in July 2008 it reached a peak of $145. By the end of 2008 it had plummeted to about $30 before increasing again, reaching about $110 in 2011. Are “speculators ” to blame for at least part of the volatility and sharp run-ups in price? We clarify the potential and actual effects of speculators, and investors in general, on commodity prices. We focus on crude oil, but our approach can be applied to other commodities. We first address the question of what is meant by “oil price speculation, ” and how it relates to investments in oil reserves, oil inventories, or oil price derivatives (such as futures contracts). Next we outline the ways in which one could speculate on oil prices. Finally, we turn to the data, and calculate counterfactual prices that would have occurred from 1999 to 2012 in the absence of speculation. Our framework is based on a simple and transparent model of supply and demand in the cash and storage markets for a commodity. It lets us determine whether speculation as the driver of price changes is consistent with the data on production, consumption, inventory changes, and changes in convenience yields given reasonable elasticity assumptions. We show speculation had little, if any, effect on prices and volatility.

Christopher R. Knittel; Robert S. Pindyck; Christopher R. Knittel; Robert S. Pindyck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Gasoline Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasoline Prices Gasoline Price Data Sign showing gasoline prices Local Prices: Find the cheapest gasoline prices in your area. State & Metro Area Prices: Average prices from AAA's...

77

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

78

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

79

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Allocation Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman,

80

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy End-Use Technologies for the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

The World Energy Council's recent study examined the potential of energy end-use technologies and of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) into these technologies on a global scale. Surprises are likely, but nevertheless, current research and development offer a picture of what might happen in the future as new technologies face the competition of the marketplace. Given the breadth of energy end-use technologies and the differences between regions and economic conditions, the study focused on technologies that appear most important from today's vantage point. Globally, robust research and development followed by demonstrations of new end-use technologies can potentially save at least 110 EJ/year by 2020 and over 300 EJ/year by 2050. If achieved, this translates to worldwide energy savings of as much as 25% by 2020 and over 40% by 2050, over what may be required without these technologies. It is almost certain that no single technology, or even a small set of technologies, will dominate in meeting the needs of the globe in any foreseeable timeframe. Absent a significant joint government-industry effort on end-use technology RD&D, the technologies needed will not be ready for the marketplace in the timeframes required with even the most pessimistic scenarios. Based on previous detailed analyses for the United States, an international expenditure of $4 billion per year seems more than justified. The success of new energy end-use technologies depends on new RD&D investments and policy decisions made today. Governments, in close cooperation with industry, must carefully consider RD&D incentives that can help get technologies from the laboratory or test-bed to market. Any short-term impact areas are likely to benefit from focused RD&D. These include electricity transmission and distribution, distributed electricity production, transportation, the production of paper and pulp, iron and steel, aluminum, cement and chemicals, and information and communication technologies. For long-term impact, significant areas include fuel cells, hydrogen fuel, and integrated multi-task energy systems.

Gehl, S; Haegermark, H; Larsen, H; Morishita, M; Nakicenovic, N; Schock, R N; Suntola, T

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

Essays on the household-level effects of house price growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constructing measures of house price variance . . . . 2.4.4Flip That House? House Price Dynamics and Housing InvestmentHouse Price Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sitgraves, Claudia Ayanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

f p I f 1 Ratio of Electricity Price to Marginal Cost off p f 1 I Ratio of Electricity Price to Marginal Cost of7. Wait Invest Electricity Price (US$/kWh ), P e Marginal

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Residential end-use energy planning system (REEPS). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described. REEPS forecasts a moderate rise in electricity consumption per household and significant drops in other fuels. These are caused in part by high market penetrations of electric appliances which themselves reflect major shifts in relative energy prices.

Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

86

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

87

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas,...

88

Evaluation of consumer demand for selected end-use markets for cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. cotton industry is facing a rapidly diminishing share of the domestic and foreign textile markets. To become more competitive in these markets, the textile industry should know where consumer demand is being directed. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively examine the demand for cotton in twelve selected end-uses from 1973 to 1997. Four structural models were developed to explain demand, two of which were built using the results from directed graphs. Changes in fashion and governmental policy were also assessed during this time period. Economic theory and prior literature suggested that the following factors influence demand at the end-use level: Disposable Personal Income, the Consumer Price Index for Apparel and Upkeep, cotton fiber prices lagged one year, polyester fiber prices lagged one year, and population segmented by age and gender. Regression results indicate that the Consumer Price Index, the lagged polyester prices, and the population variables most significantly contribute to the demand for cotton. A negative polyester coefficient was associated in all cases of significance, characterizing cotton and polyester fiber as complements in end-uses. Out-of-sample forecasts were generated for the years 1993 to 1997, and then evaluated using the Theil's U statistic, the Root Mean Square Error, and the Mean Absolute Percentage Error. The forecasts from the full models, those with all variables, outperformed the directed graph models in terms of predictive power. Differences in significant variables and variability in forecasting accuracy among the different end-uses suggests that there is an inherent difficulty in modeling the demand for a fiber in its end-use. A common saying in the fashion industry is that "the only constant is change." A constantly changing industry thus presents difficulty in quantifying, modeling, and forecasting.

Viator, Catherine Longman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Foreign Direct Investment in U  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 November 2000 Energy Information Administration/Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, the Team Leader for Financial Analysis (202) 586-1383. Specific technical information concerning this

90

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

91

Real Options in Small Hydropower Investments: An Empirical Study from Norway.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This empirical study examines investment behavior in small hydropower investments under uncertain electricity prices and revenues from selling so-called green certificates. We assess 73… (more)

Gravdehaug, Guro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price, 2008 “Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse GasTrends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Price

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Prices and Price Setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis studies price data and tries to unravel the underlying economic processes of why firms have chosen these prices. It focuses on three aspects… (more)

Faber, R.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Introduction to Macroeconomic Dynamics Special Issue on Oil Price Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as director of the National Economic Council, stated that "if energy prices will trend higher, you invest one, in which global real economic activity and real oil prices share a common stochastic trend, they ...nd way; if energy prices will be lower, you invest a di¤erent way. But if you don't know what prices

Garousi, Vahid

95

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

96

Decentralized capacity management and internal pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Goex, R. (2002). Capacity planning and pricing undermanufacturing on innovation, capacity and pro?tability.Mieghem, V. J. (2003). Capacity management, investment and

Dutta, Sunil; Reichelstein, Stefan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

98

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

99

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

100

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

102

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

103

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

104

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

105

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Title Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, Cecilia Fino-Chen, and Stephanie Ohshita Conference Name the ACEEE's 2012 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2012 Publisher the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. Keywords 12th five year plan, buildings, china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, low carbon indicator, policy studies

106

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings, distributed among these five types. The buildings selected have average demands of 100 to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration. plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data.

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Summary: Transmission Investment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment Assessment Under Uncertainty about Fuel Prices, Technology, Renewables Penetration and Market Responses using a Multi-Stage Stochastic Model Approach with Recourse (Year...

109

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and...

110

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

111

Monitoring of electrical end-use loads in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A California utility is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings selected have average demands of 100kW to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration, plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. PC-based software programs have been developed for reviewing and validating the end-sue load data and for generating reports.

Martinez, M. (Southern California Edison, CA (US)); Alereza, T.; Mort, D. (ADM Associates, Sacramento, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

113

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. a ZNEB low storage and low PV price run, with low storagelow storage and low PV price equipment 100 kW reciprocatingZNEB low storage and low PV price run 4a relaxed ZNEB invest

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

115

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

116

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

117

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

118

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

119

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

120

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Solid-State Lighting: Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The...

122

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0555(94)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information ...

123

Figure 60. Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration Lighting Heating, cooling, and ventilation Other 2040.00 2011.00 ... Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses, 2011 and 2040 ...

124

Table H2: Fuels and End Uses in Large Hospitals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District Chilled Water ..... Propane ..... Space-Heating ... Cooling Energy Sources Water-Heating Energy Sources Cooking Energy Sources Energy End Uses (more than

125

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

126

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

127

Refinery Investments and Future Market Incentives  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation given at the Platts 2nd Annual Refining Marktets Conference that explored three major factors affecting incentives for refiners to invest in bottoms upgrading or expansion capacity and demand, light-heavy price differentials, and margins.

Information Center

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two direct coal liquids were evaluated by linear programming analysis to determine their value as petroleum refinery feedstock. The first liquid, DL1, was produced from bitiuminous coal using the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.(HTI) two-stage hydrogenation process in Proof of Concept Run No.1, POC-1. The second liquid, DL2,was produced from sub-bituminous coal using a three-stage HTI process in Proof of Concept Run No. 2, POC-2; the third stage being a severe hydrogenation process. A linear programming (LP) model was developed which simulates a generic 150,000 barrel per day refinery in the Midwest U.S. Data from upgrading tests conducted on the coal liquids and related petroleum fractions in the pilot plant testing phase of the Refining and End Use Study was inputed into the model. The coal liquids were compared against a generic petroleum crude feedstock. under two scenarios. In the first scenario, it was assumed that the refinery capacity and product slate/volumes were fixed. The coal liquids would be used to replace a portion of the generic crude. The LP results showed that the DL1 material had essentially the same value as the generic crude. Due to its higher quality, the DL2 material had a value of approximately 0.60 $/barrel higher than the petroleum crude. In the second scenario, it was assumed that a market opportunity exists to increase production by one-third. This requires a refinery expansion. The feedstock for this scenario could be either 100% petroleum crude or a combination of petroleum crude and the direct coal liquids. Linear programming analysis showed that the capital cost of the refinery expansion was significantly less when coal liquids are utilized. In addition, the pilot plant testing showed that both of the direct coal liquids demonstrated superior catalytic cracking and naphtha reforming yields. Depending on the coal liquid flow rate, the value of the DL1 material was 2.5-4.0 $/barrel greater than the base petroleum crude, while the DL2 material was 3.0-4.0 /barrel higher than the crude. Co-processing the coal liquids with lower quality, less expensive petroleum crudes that have higher sulfur, resid and metals contents was also examined. The coal liquids have higher values under this scenario, but the values are dependent on the prices of the alternative crudes.

NONE

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Kyoto - End-Use Energy Demand (Residential & Commercial)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the convenience of natural gas heating and the decline in real oil and gas prices over the past decade have led many ... (compact fluorescent ...

130

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

131

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

132

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

133

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

134

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

135

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

136

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves...

137

Foreign investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on the effects of foreign direct investment in the United States. GAO examines foreign investment in four industries: baking, where possible control over bank lending is of concern; petroleum, where questions about increased dependence on foreign oil have arisen; chemicals, where the foreign-owned share of U.S. assets is among the highest of all industry sectors; and biotechnology, an emerging sector of potentially strategic commercial importance. In this report, GAO spells out the policy concerns in each sector, identifies the data available to analyze these concerns, and evaluates the concerns.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Marginal Cost Pricing and the New LADWP Water Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry is its capital intensity. For the water industryis 3 to 4 times the capital intensity of the telephone andits extraordinary capital intensity, investment and pricing

Hanemann, W. Michael

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

• E&P costs • E&P investments • E&P innovations Physical balancing • Inventories Markets & market behavior • Energy prices ? spot ? futures ? options

140

EIA - Natural Gas Price Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices Prices U.S. and State prices for wellhead, imports, exports, citygate, and end-use sectors. Percentages of total volume delivered by sector. (monthly, annual). Residential and Commercial Prices by Local Distributors and Marketers Average price of natural gas delivered to residential and commercial consumers by local distribution companies and marketers, and the percent sold by local distribution companies in selected states and DC (annual). Spot and Futures Prices Henry Hub natural gas spot price and New York Mercantile Exchange futures contract prices for natural gas based on delivery at the Henry Hub in Louisiana (daily, weekly, monthly, annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Investment Casting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...In investment casting, also called the "lost wax" process, a ceramic slurry is applied around a pattern, usually made of wax, and hardened to make a mold. The pattern is removed, usually by heat, and molten alloy is poured into the space formerly

142

End-Use Load-Shape Estimation: Methods and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developing effective demand-side management plans and load forecasts, utilities need information on customer hourly load patterns over a range of end-uses. Such information may be obtained using the two methods described in this report for disaggregating whole-building load data. Both methods have been validated using end-use metered data. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Using futures prices to filter short-term volatility and recover a latent, long-term price series for oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices are very volatile. But much of this volatility seems to reflect short-term,transitory factors that may have little or no influence on the price in the long run. Many major investment decisions should be guided ...

Herce, Miguel Angel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

End-use matching of solar energy systems  

SciTech Connect

The choice among available energy sources for a given task requires technical and economic tradeoffs on the part of the individual investor. From the national perspective, however, the effectiveness with which available energy sources are utilized may well become an overriding consideration. End-use matching is a procedure for introducing solar energy into the national energy infrastructure. The result of end-use matching is an identification of the most cost-effective combination of process energy needs, solar collector technology, geographic location, and economics by matching currently available solar system hardware with particular industrial processes and their locations. End-use matching is not intended to be a design tool for a specific plant, but rather a planning tool for determining where and for what general applications solar systems appear economically viable in the near- to immediate-term. This paper discusses the end-use matching methodology and illustrates first and second law thermodynamics analyses applied to a solar system producing process steam.

Kreith, F.; Kearney, D.; Bejan, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:05:49 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" "Sourcekey","N9140US2","N9160US2","NA1840NUS2","NA18...

147

,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:05:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" "Sourcekey","N9140US2","N9160US2","N9170US2","N3060US2...

148

Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Phillip Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phillip Price Phil Price Sustainable Energy Systems Group Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720...

151

Gasoline Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and diesel price estimates from the Energy Information Administration Understanding Gas Prices Photo of gasoline receipt What determines the cost of gasoline? What's the...

152

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy Efficient, Transit-oriented and Urban Regeneration Office Properties in the US from 1998-2008 Secondary menu About...

153

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping, dilution, a reaction ingredient, etc. These classifications are termed 'Btu' loads or 'Pound' loads. Some final end uses of steam are actually a combination of the two. The classification of steam loads is extremely important to the overall economics of the industrial plant steam system. These economic effects are explained in detail as they impact on both the thermal efficiency and the heat power cycle efficiency of an industrial system. The use of a powerful steam system mass and energy modeling program called MESA (Modular Energy System Analyzer, The MESA Company) in identifying and accurately evaluating these effects is described.

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Flywheel Energy Storage for End-Use Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality represents both a challenge and an opportunity for utilities to provide quality and service to their customers. Flywheel systems are becoming commercially available for solving short-term power quality problems, specifically voltage sags and momentary interruptions, and a variety of products appears particularly attractive for this market. This report provides information on the subject of flywheel energy storage systems to utility personnel responsible for end-use power quality.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Prices and Expenditures 135 A P P E N D I X A Price and Expenditure Variables ARICD Asphalt and road oil price in the industrial Dollars per million Btu ARICDZZ is independent. sector. ARICDUS = ARICVUS / ARICBUS * 1000 ARICV Asphalt and road oil expenditures in the Million dollars ARICVZZ = ARICBZZ * ARICDZZ / 1000 industrial sector. ARICVUS = SARICVZZ ARTCD Asphalt and road oil average price, all sectors. Dollars per million Btu ARTCD = ARICD ARTCV Asphalt and road oil total expenditures. Million dollars ARTCV = ARICV ARTXD Asphalt and road oil average price, all end-use Dollars per million Btu ARTXD = ARTXV / ARTXB * 1000 sectors. ARTXV Asphalt and road oil total end-use expenditures. Million dollars ARTXV = ARICV AVACD Aviation gasoline price in the transportation Dollars per million Btu AVACDZZ is independent. sector. AVACDUS = AVACVUS / AVACBUS * 1000 AVACV Aviation gasoline

158

PriceTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Prices and Expenditures 135 A P P E N D I X A Price and Expenditure Variables ARICD Asphalt and road oil price in the industrial Dollars per million Btu ARICDZZ is independent. sector. ARICDUS = ARICVUS / ARICBUS * 1000 ARICV Asphalt and road oil expenditures in the Million dollars ARICVZZ = ARICBZZ * ARICDZZ / 1000 industrial sector. ARICVUS = SARICVZZ ARTCD Asphalt and road oil average price, all sectors. Dollars per million Btu ARTCD = ARICD ARTCV Asphalt and road oil total expenditures. Million dollars ARTCV = ARICV ARTXD Asphalt and road oil average price, all end-use Dollars per million Btu ARTXD = ARTXV / ARTXB * 1000 sectors. ARTXV Asphalt and road oil total end-use expenditures. Million dollars ARTXV = ARICV AVACD Aviation gasoline price in the transportation Dollars per million Btu AVACDZZ is independent. sector. AVACDUS = AVACVUS / AVACBUS * 1000 AVACV Aviation gasoline expenditures

159

State energy-price system: 1981 update  

SciTech Connect

This report updates the State Energy Price Data System (STEPS) to include state-level energy prices by fuel and by end-use sectors for 1981. Both physical unit prices and Btu prices are presented. Basic documentation of the data base remains generally the same as in the original report: State Energy Price System; Volume 1: Overview and Technical Documentation (DOE/NBB-0029 Volume 1 of 2, November 1982). The present report documents only the changes in procedures necessitated by the update to 1981 and the corrections to the basic documentation.

Fang, J.M.; Imhoff, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Buying Beauty: On Prices and Returns in the Art Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the price determinants and investment performance of art. We apply a hedonic regression analysis to a new data set of more than one million auction transactions of paintings and works on paper. Based on the resulting price index, ... Keywords: art, auctions, hedonic regressions, investments, repeat-sales regressions, sentiment

Luc Renneboog; Christophe Spaenjers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Uncertainty Representation: Estimating Process Parameters for Forward Price Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market prices set the value of electric power assets and contracts, yet forward prices are unavailable for time horizons relevant to most valuations. Price forecasts are inherently uncertain because the drivers of prices are uncertain, but equilibrating market forces also work to reduce the growth of uncertainty over time. Consequently, quantifying the degree of future price uncertainty is difficult, but has tremendous strategic potential for power companies seeking to value real options and invest in fl...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Foreign Direct Investment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 June 2001 ii iii Contents Foreign Affiliates' Role in U.S. Energy Industry Operations ..............................................................................1 Foreign Direct Investment: The International Transactions Accounts ..............................................................8 U.S. Companies' Direct Investment Abroad in Energy ......................................................................................14 Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................19

163

Market Mechanisms for Financing Green Real Estate Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of the alternative energy paths on the property’sEVS that result from alternative energy-e?cient investments,in which alternative future paths of energy prices are

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Wallace, Nancy E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

165

Does EIA have city or county-level energy consumption and price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity sales (a proxy for end-use consumption) and prices for distribution utilities. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

166

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross...

167

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forTotal) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use for

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cheese Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cheese prices are derived from the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service Market News, the National Agricultural Statistics Service, and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. This publication explains the process of cheese pricing. It includes information on hauling rates and freight differentials

Schwart Jr., Robert B.; Anderson, David P.; Knutson, Ronald D.

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sarah Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sarah K Price Sarah Price Energy Efficiency Standards Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-4128B (510)...

170

Marisa Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marisa Dawn Price Marisa Price Communications Office Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3029B Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2056B (510) 495-2713...

171

HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DOE) defines demand response as "changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normalHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS response in electricity markets. One of the best ways to let that happen is to let customers see

172

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines a California-based microgrid?s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find a natural gas generation cost threshold that triggers DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid increases DG investment, while the option to disconnect from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generation cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit when two sources of uncertainty exist.

Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

173

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid UnderUncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines a California-based microgrid s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generating cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generating cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

175

Merchant transmission investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the performance attributes of a merchant transmission investment framework that relies on "market driven" transmission investment to provide the infrastructure to support competitive wholesale markets for ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind PowerUnder Uncertainty  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for evaluation of investments in small-scale wind power under uncertainty. It is assumed that the price of electricity is uncertain and that an owner of a property with wind resources has a deferrable opportunity to invest in one wind power turbine within a capacity range. The model evaluates investment in a set of projects with different capacity. It is assumed that the owner substitutes own electricity load with electricity from the wind mill and sells excess electricity back to the grid on an hourly basis. The problem for the owner is to find the price levels at which it is optimal to invest, and in which capacity to invest. The results suggests it is optimal to wait for significantly higher prices than the net present value break-even. Optimal scale and timing depend on the expected price growth rate and the uncertainty in the future prices.

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Lynn Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lynn Price Lynn Price China Energy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2108 (510) 486-6519 LKPrice@lbl.gov Lynn Price is a Staff Scientist and Leader of the China Energy Group of the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Ms. Price has a MS in Environmental Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has worked at LBNL since 1990. Ms. Price has been a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, since 1994 and was an author on the industrial sector chapter of IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report on Mitigation of Climate Change. Since 1999, Ms. Price has provided technical assistance to the Energy

180

Forecast Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Notes: Notes: Prices have already recovered from the spike, but are expected to remain elevated over year-ago levels because of the higher crude oil prices. There is a lot of uncertainty in the market as to where crude oil prices will be next winter, but our current forecast has them declining about $2.50 per barrel (6 cents per gallon) from today's levels by next October. U.S. average residential heating oil prices peaked at almost $1.50 as a result of the problems in the Northeast this past winter. The current forecast has them peaking at $1.08 next winter, but we will be revisiting the outlook in more detail next fall and presenting our findings at the annual Winter Fuels Conference. Similarly, diesel prices are also expected to fall. The current outlook projects retail diesel prices dropping about 14 cents per gallon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A simulation based real options approach for the investment evaluation of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investment of nuclear power has several uncertainties. This paper establishes a nuclear power investment evaluation model by employing real options theory with Monte Carlo method to evaluate the value of nuclear power plant from the perspective of ... Keywords: Least Squares Monte-Carlo, Nuclear accident, Nuclear power investment, Price mechanism, Real options

Lei Zhu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Stephanie Price  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stephanie Price is a communicator at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which assists EERE in providing technical content for many of its websites.

183

Snuller Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snuller Price Energy and Environmental Economics NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress...

184

Green Power Network: Green Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Utility Programs by State Table of Utility Programs by State List of Utilities Offering Green Power Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Green Pricing Green pricing is an optional utility service that allows customers an opportunity to support a greater level of utility company investment in renewable energy technologies. Participating customers pay a premium on their electric bills to cover the incremental cost of the additional renewable energy. To date, more than 860 utilities, including investor-owned, municipal utilities, and cooperatives, offer a green pricing option. Table of Utility Programs by State List of Utilities Offering Green Power Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs National Green Pricing Map

185

Essays on Price Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small Regular Price Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Cyclicality of Effective Prices2.3 Wholesale Price vs. Retail

Hong, Gee Hee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Essays on Three Price Judgments: Price Fairness, Price Magnitude, and Price Expectation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation addresses three important price judgments: price fairness, price magnitude, and price expectation. Developed over three chapters, the main objective of this research is… (more)

Bhowmick, Sandeep

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6a 6a Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 6a. End Uses of Fuel Consumption per Value of Production, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 1998 3 2002 3 2006 3 Total 4 32.0 30.2 18.7 Net Electricity 5 3.0 3.8 2.8 Natural Gas 8.7 8.1 5.3 Coal 0.9 0.7 0.2 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 0.2 W 0.02 Residual Fuel Oil 0.2 * 0.1 Natural Gas 1.0 0.8 0.4 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.4 1.6 1.2 Residual Fuel Oil 0.4 * 0.2 Natural Gas 7.1 6.8 4.4 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.3 1.8 1.3 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

188

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) The Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program is structured as a public-private partnership to accelerate investments in grid modernization. The $3.4 billion in federal Recovery Act funds are matched on a one-to-one basis (at a minimum) with private sector resources-bringing the total investment in SGIG projects to $7.8 billion. DOE used a merit-based, competitive process to select and fund 99 projects that are now deploying smart grid technologies and systems across the power grid, from transmission system to end-use customer, in almost every U.S. state. The SGIG Program Progress Report II, which updates the SGIG Progress

189

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (October 2013) The Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program is structured as a public-private partnership to accelerate investments in grid modernization. The $3.4 billion in federal Recovery Act funds are matched on a one-to-one basis (at a minimum) with private sector resources-bringing the total investment in SGIG projects to $7.8 billion. DOE used a merit-based, competitive process to select and fund 99 projects that are now deploying smart grid technologies and systems across the power grid, from transmission system to end-use customer, in almost every U.S. state. The SGIG Program Progress Report II, which updates the SGIG Progress

190

Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil ... storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices ... 1972: 6,223: 4,623: 13,034 ...

191

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy sourceÂ’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

193

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

194

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

195

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

196

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

197

RM Capital Investment Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plans FY 2004 (568kb pdf) FY 2005 (625kb pdf) FY 2006 (625kb pdf) FY 2007 (1.45mb pdf) Meter policy Capital Investment Plans...

198

Barner Investment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barner Investment Jump to: navigation, search Name Barner Investment Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Develops wind farm in Spain. References Barner Investment1 LinkedIn...

199

Lynn Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lynn Price China Energy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2108 (510) 486-6519 LKPrice@lbl.gov NOTICE Due...

200

Snuller Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snuller Price Energy and Environmental Economics This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PRICE GOUGING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

home heating costs? How will those be affected? With an overall increase in the price of heating oil and natural gas, we expect that there may be an increase in home heating costs...

202

Phillip Price  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90-2006 (510) 486-7875 PNPrice@lbl.gov Dr. Phillip Price has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Kentucky, and has worked in the Indoor Environment Department since 1992. In...

203

Lateral Capacity Exchange and Its Impact on Capacity Investment Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of capacity exchange between two …rms in anticipation of the mismatch between demand and capacity and its impact on …rm’s capacity investment decisions. For given capacity investment levels of the two …rms, we demonstrate how capacity price may be determined and how much capacity should be exchanged when either manufacturer acts as a Stackelberg leader in the capacity exchange game. By benchmarking against the centralized system, we show that a side payment may be used to coordinate the capacity exchange decisions. We then study the …rms’capacity investment decisions using a biform game framework in which capacity investment decisions are made individually and exchange decisions are made as in a centralized system. We demonstrate the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium capacity investment levels and study the impact of …rms’share of the capacity exchange surplus on their capacity investment levels.

Amiya K. Chakravartyz; Jun Zhangy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Residential Investment over the Real Estate Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention recently has been given to the possibility of a slowdown in the U.S. residential real estate market.While real residential investment has continued to grow and existing house prices have held up through the first quarter of 2006, analysts have pointed to other signs of slowing.Two commonly cited indicators are an apparent slowing of sales of new and existing homes and a buildup of inventories of new homes in many markets. In this Economic Letter, I characterize past episodes of residential investment downturns and evaluate how specific housing market variables, such as sales volumes and inventories, perform as predictors of downturns. Figure 1 Change in real residential fixed investment

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

State Energy Price System: 1982 update  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price System (STEPS) contains estimates of energy prices for ten major fuels (electricity, natural gas, metallurgical coal, steam coal, distillate, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene/jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas), by major end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility), and by state through 1982. Both physical unit prices and prices per million Btu are included in STEPS. Major changes in STEPS data base for 1981 and 1982 are described. The most significant changes in procedures for the updates occur in the residential sector distillate series and the residential sector kerosene series. All physical unit and Btu prices are shown with three significant digits instead of with four significant digits as shown in the original documentation. Details of these and other changes are contained in this report, along with the updated data files. 31 references, 65 tables.

Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

207

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

208

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets – leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test  

SciTech Connect

Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

Warwick, W.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

EIA - Appendix F-Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Gruping Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. F1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel Table F1. Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

211

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

212

SRM Pricing Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rates are used to calculate the price for each ... Therefore, prices for new lots and renewal issues of ... changed, all SRMs may be re-priced taking into ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Pennsylvania Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- GasBuddy.com Pennsylvania Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Pennsylvania Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com Gas Prices of the United States:...

214

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

215

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

216

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

217

The Potential to Reduce CO2 Emissions by Expanding End-Use Applications of Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the sources of electricity production, the use of electricity can be a contributing factor to net CO2 emissions. What is less obvious is that using efficient end-use electric technologies has the potential save energy and decrease overall CO2 emissions substantially. The two main mechanisms for saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions with electric end-use technologies are (1) upgrading existing electric technologies, processes, and building energy systems; and (2) expanding end-use applica...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

219

Patterns of Transmission Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in transformer capacity at the point of interconnection to the network to accommodate the reliable injection of additional power into the network at the proper voltage. The investments required will vary directly with the generator’s maximum capacity... of interconnection to the high voltage network and investments in transformer capacity at these points of interconnection. The investments required will vary directly with the distribution network’s maximum coincident demand, the number and attributes...

Joskow, Paul

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

Table 4. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use, 1999 and 2000 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 13 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 2000 Table 4. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use, 1999 and 2000 (Thousand Gallons)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table F4. Delivered energy consumption in Canada by end-use sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outloo 2013 Appendix F Table F4. Delivered energy consumption in Canada by end-use sector and fuel ...

222

Threshold Effects of Energy Price Changes ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of policies to reduce the use of energy depend on the elasticity of substitution between the various inputs and on the rate of technological progress. This paper presents a theoretical model emphasising energy investments’ characteristics of uncertainty and irreversibility that result in hypotheses concerning the relative values of substitution parameters and rates of technological change in periods of high and increasing energy prices and in periods of low prices. The theoretical model suggests that threshold level effects exist. Firms are induced to substitute away from energy only if prices of energy exceed a certain threshold level and they reverse the technology only if prices are low enough. Using panel data for the Dutch economy we do not find threshold effects in the level of energy prices.

Daan P. Van Soest A; Gerard H. Kuper B; Jan Jacobs C

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Transmission Investment: A Primer  

SciTech Connect

This primer highlights recent trends in transmission investment, summarizes the division of jurisdictional authority over transmission, and presents four alternative models for transmission ownership. (author)

McGarvey, Joe

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Investment Casting - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2007 ... PDF PRIMER: Investment Casting The basic process for producing superalloy components of a complex shape, 0, 1218, Lynette Karabin ...

225

Patterns of transmission investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines a number of issues associated with alternative analytical approaches for evaluating investments in electricity transmission infrastructure and alternative institutional arrangements to govern network ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Prices & Trends  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. Learn about EIA and Energy Department organizations that track energy prices and trends.

227

Strategic investment in power generation under uncertainty : Electric Reliability Council of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for investment in power generation technologies in the future given the uncertainties in climate policy and fuel prices. First, such studies are commonly conducted using ...

Chiyangwa, Diana Kudakwashe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

State Energy Price System: 1983 update overview and documentation  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the update of the State Energy Price System (STEPS) for the 1970-1983 period. The STEPS data base, developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract to the Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration, contains national and state-level energy price data for ten fuels and five end-use sectors. STEPS is intended to provide energy price information for Federal, state, and local government and private sector applications. The primary objective of this study is to document the update of the price series to include data for 1983. Concurrent with the 1983 update, PNL also began verifying the reproducibility of individual prices in the data base for the 1970 to 1982 period. While the reproducibility check work is completed for six of the ten fuels and is integrated in the documentation for those fuels, the findings from this task are not discussed.

Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.; McWethy, L.G.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Investment Analysis Chapter 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Investment 3. Investment Analysis Revised July 2007 3. Overview 2 3.2 Analytic Conventions 2 3.3 Cash-Flow Analysis Tools 2 Payback Period 3 Net Present Value 4 Internal Rate of Return 6 3.4 Selecting an Analysis Tool 7 3.5 The Investment Analysis Process 8 Choose the Right Time Frame 8 Consider All of the Impacts on Cash Flow 8 Account for Interactions Among Measures 9 Include Anticipated Price Changes 10 Adjust for Taxes 10 Consider Sensitivity Analysis 10 3.6 Other Considerations  Qualitative Assessments 11 Effect of Energy Performance on Shareholder Value 11 3.7 Summary  Bibliography 2 Glossary G- ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual 2 3. Investment Analysis 3. Overview All types of organizations, for-profit and not-for-profit alike, should analyze prospective invest-

231

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: July 24, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This study examines a California-based microgrid's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastc, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generation cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an

232

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

233

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

ANN-based residential water end-use demand forecasting model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom-up urban water demand forecasting based on empirical data for individual water end uses or micro-components (e.g., toilet, shower, etc.) for different households of varying characteristics is undoubtedly superior to top-down estimates originating ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Residential water demand forecasting, Water demand management, Water end use, Water micro-component

Christopher Bennett; Rodney A. Stewart; Cara D. Beal

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 2 - Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2007 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors.. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social,

236

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural gas prices are developed for the residential, commercial, indus- trial, transportation, and electric power sectors. Reported natural gas prices are retail prices for sales of natural gas to ultimate users. Natural gas prices are intended to include all federal, state, and local taxes, surcharges, and adjustments billed to consumers. Although the EIA data collection form states that taxes are to be included in the re- ported gross revenues, it is most likely that respondents would not con- sider sales taxes as part of their companies' gross revenues, and some may not be reporting them. As a result, consumer sales taxes may not be cov- ered in full. For more information see End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Prac- tices, page 23, http://www.eia.gov/FTPROOT/financial/ 0583.pdf. Estimates of the amount of natural gas consumed by the residential, com- mercial, industrial, and electric

237

Do Private Firms Invest Dierently than Public Firms? Taking Cues from the Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do Private Firms Invest Dierently than Public Firms? Taking Cues from the Natural Gas Industry Erik and public rms using a unique dataset of onshore U.S. natural gas producers. In rm-level regressions we nd that investments by private rms are 68% less responsive to changes in natural gas prices, a measure that captures

Lin, Xiaodong

238

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (July 2012) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program - Progress Report (July 2012) Program - Progress Report (July 2012) Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report (July 2012) The SGIG program is structured as a public-private partnership to accelerate investments in grid modernization. The $3.4 billion in federal Recovery Act funds are matched on a one-to-one basis (at a minimum) with private sector resources-bringing the total investment in SGIG projects to $7.8 billion. DOE used a merit-based, competitive process to select and fund 99 projects that are now deploying smart grid technologies and systems across the power grid, from transmission system to end-use customer, in almost every U.S. state. The SGIG program provides a unique opportunity to spur innovation and investment in building a smarter electric grid. This report provides a

239

EIA - Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) 6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

240

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Leveraging Limited Data Resources: Developing Commercial End-Use Information: B.C. Hydro Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an innovative strategy, EPRI has combined model-based sampling, building total load research data, audits, DOE-2 models, and borrowed end-use data to produce statistically reliable end-use information for the commercial office sector. This project demonstrates that end-use data can be developed in shorter time, at less expense, with more statistically reliable results than conventionally thought. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report a...

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

242

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

243

Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 8 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

244

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA The goal of the Research and Development Investment Criteria initiative is to measurably improve the performance of the government's...

245

Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980-2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980-2008. Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments for “internet-specific”, biotechnology, and energy / industrial sectors over the period 1980-2007. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy / industrial area accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy / industrial investments as by 2000 these investments accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested that year by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy / industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments in 2007 for the energy / industrial sector accounted for $3 billion or slightly more than 10% of all venture capital invested that year.

Dooley, James J.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation  

SciTech Connect

This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Return on Investment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since its creation in 1977, the DOE's Office of Fossil Energy has established a legacy of achievement, return-of-value, and tangible benefits for the taxpayer dollars invested.

248

Transmission Investment Incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the use of agent-based simulation as a tool for studying transmission investment incentives, and it is meant to illuminate what accounts for the difficulties in aligning incentives for enhancing the transmission system. The report suggests that a new method of calculation for bid optimization be applied to the economic analysis of long-term incentives for transmission investment. This technology can be broadly applied to help negotiators in transmission planning quantify their count...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

252

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

253

,"U.S. Total Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

254

"Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f...

255

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

256

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

257

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distribution Category UC-98 Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures by Consumption and Supply Surveys Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 General information concerning the contents of the report may be obtained from Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use Division (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of the publication may be obtained from Nancy L. Leach, Chief of the Residential and Commercial Branch (202/586-1114). The Residential Energy Consumption Survey manager and a major contributor to this report is Wendel Thompson (202/586-1119). The report was written by Gerald Peabody (202/586-6160). Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector

258

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

259

Program on Technology Innovation: Opportunities for Advancing End-Use Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Strategic Science and Technology project identified promising opportunities to develop technologies that improve end-use energy efficiency and gauged interest within the utility industry and other stakeholders in funding research and development initiatives to develop these opportunities.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

"End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use",13,"Annual",2012,"6301984"...

262

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

263

"Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze...

264
265

Rethinking Real-Time Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most US consumers are charged a near-constant retail price for electricity, despite substantial hourly variation in the wholesale market price. This paper evaluates the …rst program to expose residential consumers to hourly real-time pricing (RTP). I …nd that enrolled households are statistically signi…cantly price elastic and that consumers responded by conserving energy during peak hours, but remarkably did not increase average consumption during o¤-peak times. The program increased consumer surplus by $10 per household per year. While this is only one to two percent of electricity costs, it illustrates a potential additional bene…t from investment in retail Smart Grid applications, including the advanced electricity meters required to observe a household’s hourly consumption.

Hunt Allcott; Bill Hogan; Erich Muehlegger; Larry Katz; Erin Mansur; Sendhil Mullainathan; Paul Niehaus; Chris Nosko; Ariel Pakes; Dave Rapson; Rob Stavins; Frank Wolak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2012 End-Use Energy Efficiency and Demand Response, EPRI Program 170: Summary of Deliverables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI research program on End-Use Energy Efficiency and Demand Response (Program 170) is focused on the assessment, testing, and demonstration of energy-efficient and intelligent end-use devices, as well as analytical studies of the economic, environmental, and behavioral aspects of energy efficiency and demand response. The 2012 reports, tools and resources produced in this program are available to employees of funding companies, and can be accessed by clicking on the product number link listed after ..

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

An intelligent pattern recognition model to automate the categorisation of residential water end-use events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid dissemination of residential water end-use (e.g. shower, clothes washer, etc.) consumption data to the customer via a web-enabled portal interface is becoming feasible through the advent of high resolution smart metering technologies. However, ... Keywords: Dynamic time warping algorithm, Gradient vector filtering, Hidden Markov model, Residential water flow trace disaggregation, Water demand management, Water end-use event, Water micro-component

K. A. Nguyen, R. A. Stewart, H. Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Survey of End-Use Metering Equipment, Sensors, and Designers/Installers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

End-use data metering technology has come of age in the last several years, with many new specialized products becoming available. This report represents the first survey of end-use metering and monitoring equipment and of sensors typically used with such equipment. It also surveys organizations that provide design and/or installation services for demand-side management metering and monitoring systems.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Long-Run Evolution of Energy Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price evolution, and how it should be modeled? Can models of reversion to stochastically fluctuating trend lines help us forecast prices over horizons of 20 years or more? And what do the answers to these questions tell us about investment decisions that are dependent on prices and their stochastic evolution?

Robert S. Pindyck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Price controls and international petroleum product prices  

SciTech Connect

The effects of Federal refined-product price controls upon the price of motor gasoline in the United States through 1977 are examined. A comparison of domestic and foreign gasoline prices is made, based on the prices of products actually moving in international trade. There is also an effort to ascribe US/foreign market price differentials to identifiable cost factors. Primary emphasis is on price comparisons at the wholesale level, although some retail comparisons are presented. The study also examines the extent to which product price controls are binding, and attempts to estimate what the price of motor gasoline would have been in the absence of controls. The time period under consideration is from 1969 through 1977, with primary focus on price relationships in 1970-1971 (just before US controls) and 1976-1977. The foreign-domestic comparisons are made with respect to four major US cities, namely, Boston, New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles. 20 figures, 14 tables.

Deacon, R.T.; Mead, W.J.; Agarwal, V.B.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Federal Reserve Bank of DallasTime-Varying Oil Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the theoretical relation among output, consumption, investment, and oil price volatility in a real business cycle model. The model incorporates demand for oil by a firm, as an intermediate input, and by a household, used in conjunction with a durable good. We estimate a stochastic volatility process for the real price of oil over the period 1986-2011 and utilize the estimated process in a non-linear approximation of the model. For realistic calibrations, an increase in oil price volatility produces a temporary decrease in durable spending, while precautionary savings motives lead investment and real GDP to rise. Irreversible capital and durable investment decisions do not overturn this result.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante; Nora Traum; We Thank Ron Alquist; Sebnem Kalemli-ozcan; Junghoon Lee; James Murray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Natural Gas Wellhead Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 6.25 7.97 3.67 4.48 3.95 2.66 1922-2012 Alabama 7.44 9.65 4.32 4.46 1967-2010 Alaska 5.63 7.39 2.93 3.17 1967-2010 Arizona 5.98 7.09 3.19 4.11 1967-2010 Arkansas

274

Macroeconomic policy, investment, and urban unemployment in less-developed countries  

SciTech Connect

The two-sector Harris-Todaro model, extended to include a government sector and aggregate demand, is used to analyze the effects on output, prices, and employment of policies designed to mitigate urban unemployment. An increase in aggregate demand will be inflationary even though output will increase. Government job creation will be inflationary, will stimulate manufacturing output, but may result in a decrease in agricultural output. Investment in agriculture will increase agricultural output, decrease manufacturing output, and decrease price level. Investment in manufacturing results in an increase in manufacturing output, and agricultural output and employment will decline and prices will fall. 16 references.

Haessel, W.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

PRICE GOUGING | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRICE GOUGING PRICE GOUGING PRICE GOUGING More Documents & Publications PRICE GOUGING Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina Fact Sheet Department of Energy Response to...

276

Obtaining the optimal fuel conserving investment mix: a linear programming hedonic technique approach  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine how energy efficiency affects the resale value of homes; (2) use this information concerning the implicit price of energy efficiency to estimate the resale value of fuel saving investments; and (3) incorporate these resale values into the investment decision process and determine the efficient investment mix for a household planning to own a given home for three alternative time periods. Two models were used to accomplish these objectives. A hedonic price model was used to determine the impact of energy efficiency on housing prices. The hedonic technique is a method used to attach implicit prices to characteristics that are not themselves bought and sold in markets, but are components of market goods. The hedonic model in this study provided an estimate of the implicit price paid for an increase in energy efficiency in homes on the Des-Moines housing market. In order to determine how the length of time the home is to be owned affects the optimal investment mix, a linear programming model was used to determine the cost minimizing investment mix for a baseline house under the assumption that it would be owned for 6, 20, and 50 years, alternatively. The results of the hedonic technique revealed that a premium is paid for energy efficient homes in Des Moines. The results of the linear programming model reveal that the optimal fuel saving investment mix for a home is sensitive to the time the home is to be owned.

Dinan, T.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Effects of Economic and Environmental Factors on Investment Decisions in the Texas Grapefruit Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic and environmental factors were examined to determine their influences on grapefruit investment in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Price instability explained 17 percent of the variation in investment decision making, while 83 percent was explained by uncertainty related to severe freezes impacting the Texas grapefruit industry. Trade and environmental factors were not identified as a significant source of uncertainty affecting investment decisions. Increased investment in freeze protection technologies and improved price risk management are the most effective ways to reduce the uncertainty associated with grapefruit production and marketing. Micro-sprinkler systems could eliminate the risk of future freeze damage, conserve valuable water resources, and reduce the variable costs of production, resulting in an estimated savings of $6,250 per acre. Price risk could be reduced by producing and marketing more fancy-grade fruit and reducing the proportion of choice fruit in the marketing mix. Key words:

Edited Flynn; J. Adcock; Nicole Elmer; Amy Thurow; Jason Johnson; Parr Rosson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 WTI $/barrel Annual averages Large Gulf of Mexico Facility Costs by Segment Avg $28.31 Avg $59.13 Source: PFC Energy Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 4 Near term Spending Cuts will be Significant

279

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.05 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Diesel prices flat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices flat The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel saw no movement from last week. Prices remained flat at 3.89 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly...

282

Overshooting of agricultural prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's down a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

284

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

285

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

286

Diesel prices flat nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices flat nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel remained the same from a week ago at 3.98 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price...

287

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

288

Diesel prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

289

Georgia Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices ... History; Imports Price: 6.79: 9.71: 3.73: 4.39: 4.20: 2.78: 1999-2012: Pipeline and Distribution Use Price : 1967-2005: ...

290

Michigan Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Wellhead Price: NA: 5.63: 3.92: 3.79 : 1967-2010: Imports Price: ...

291

Effect of oil prices on returns to alternative energy investments .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper presents the role of alternative energy technologies in displacing fossil fuels as the world's primary energy source. To that end, a CAPM-GARCH multi-factor… (more)

Schmitz, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Retail Price Changes Lag Spot Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Notes: While EIA cannot claim to explain all of the factors that drive retail gasoline prices, we have had a fair amount of success in exploring the relationship between wholesale and retail prices. In particular, we have looked closely at the "pass-through" of changes in spot prices to the retail market. This graph shows a weighted national average of spot prices for regular gasoline -both conventional and reformulated (shown in red), and EIA's weekly survey price for retail regular (again both conventional and reformulated). As you can see, spot prices tend to be more volatile (and would be even more so on a daily basis), while these changes are smoother by the time they reach the retail pump. Furthermore, by looking at the peaks, you can see the retail prices seem to lag the spot price changes

293

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attraction of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplatingthe installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the natural gas price. Treatment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of the investment opportunity, which then delays the adoption decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, we take the perspective of a microgrid that can proceed in a sequential manner with DG capacity and HX investment in order to reduce its exposure to risk from natural gas price volatility. In particular, with the availability of the HX, the microgrid faces a tradeoff between reducing its exposure to the natural gas price and maximising its cost savings. By varying the volatility parameter, we find that the microgrid prefers a direct investment strategy for low levels of volatility and a sequential one for higher levels of volatility.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Maribu, Karl

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attraction of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplating the installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the natural gas price. Treatment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of the investment opportunity, which then delays the adoption decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, we take the perspective of a microgrid that can proceed in a sequential manner with DG capacity and HX investment in order to reduce its exposure to risk from natural gas price volatility. In particular, with the availability of the HX, we find that the microgrid faces a tradeoff between reducing its exposure to the natural gas price and maximising its cost savings. By varying the volatility parameter, we find ranges over which direct and sequential investment strategies dominate. Keywords:

Afzal Siddiqui; Karl Maribu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Energy End-Use Patterns in Full-Service Hotels: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a program -- Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) -- to work with private-sector companies in the design of highly-efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a project with a major hotel company to retrofit a full-service, large hotel with the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 30%. The first step of the project was an intensive metering and monitoring effort aimed at understanding energy end use patterns in the hotel. About 10% of the guest rooms (32), as well as circuits for most of the end uses in public spaces (lighting, elevators, air handlers and other HVAC system components, and various equipment), were equipped with meters. Data are being collected at 1- or 5-minute intervals and downloaded on a monthly basis for analysis. This paper presents results from the first four months of the monitoring effort, which revealed energy end-use consumption patterns, variability of guest room energy use, daily load curves, monthly variations, and other aspects of hotel energy use. Metered end-use data for hotels at this level of detail are not available from any currently-available public sources. This study presents unique information and insight into energy end-use patterns in the lodging sector of commercial buildings and can also serve as a case study of a complex sub-metering project.

Placet, Marylynn; Katipamula, Srinivas; Liu, Bing; Dirks, James A.; Xie, YuLong; Sullivan, Greg; Walent, Jim; Williamson, Rebecca

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly.

297

Natural Gas Wellhead Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

298

Primer on Gasoline Prices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This brochure answers, in laymen's terms, questions such as "What are the components of the retail price of gasoline? Why do gasoline prices fluctuate?

Information Center

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Slide 19 of 27. Price: Wellhead. Natural gas wellhead prices are projected to move up 5 percent this winter, averaging about $2.28 per Mcf during this ...

300

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Policy Drivers for Improving Electricity End-Use Efficiency in the U.S.: An Economic-Engineering Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the economically achievable potential for improving electricity end-use efficiency in the U.S. The approach involves identifying a series of energy-efficiency policies aimed at tackling market failures, and then examining their impacts and cost-effectiveness using Georgia Tech’s version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS). By estimating the policy-driven electricity savings and the associated levelized costs, a policy supply curve for electricity efficiency is produced. Each policy is evaluated individually and in an Integrated Policy scenario to examine policy dynamics. The Integrated Policy scenario demonstrates significant achievable potential: 261 TWh (6.5%) of electricity savings in 2020, and 457 TWh (10.2%) in 2035. All eleven policies examined were estimated to have lower levelized costs than average electricity retail prices. Levelized costs range from 0.5 – 8.0 cent/kWh, with the regulatory and information policies tending to be most cost-effective. Policy impacts on the power sector, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy intensity are also estimated to be significant. *Corresponding author:

Yu Wang; Marilyn A. Brown; Yu Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Price Liquefied Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Exports Price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Price Liquefied Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Exports Price to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

303

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

304

GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

306

Service Report Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enwgy Information Administration Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U;S. Department of Energy Washington, O.C. 20585 ^ ± SR-EEUD--84-I leather izat ion Program Evaluation §]*: b? .. Gerald E. Pealjody of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division August 20, 1984 This raport has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (E1A) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. |||lsS|; program in 198 l^^lRia; study is based -on a scatii;f|^ipiiii|', national samp 1* Of : - households chac aarcicipscac in the pr; 3 §S||tMi-lfc|Sis2?ia covers ;he ^tiecrr^n: of conditions under vhich the p This ,s«;;5^H:«lil-lSi|iuGcaG ac che requesic of :rva

307

Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D C 20585 SR/EEUD/86/01 Residential Conservation Measures Energy End Use Division Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy Information Administration July 1986 This report has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (EIA) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. PREFACE This study was undertaken at the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate. The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for achieving energy savings in the residential sector through conservation measures. The report is to be submitted

308

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

What Is Price Volatility  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Is Price Volatility? What Is Price Volatility? The term "price volatility" is used to describe price fluctuations of a commodity. Volatility is measured by the day-to-day percentage difference in the price of the commodity. The degree of variation, not the level of prices, defines a volatile market. Since price is a function of supply and demand, it follows that volatility is a result of the underlying supply and demand characteristics of the market. Therefore, high levels of volatility reflect extraordinary characteristics of supply and/or demand. Prices of basic energy (natural gas, electricity, heating oil) are generally more volatile than prices of other commodities. One reason that energy prices are so volatile is that many consumers are extremely limited in their ability to substitute other fuels when the price, of natural gas

310

Falling House Prices and Rising Time on the Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the current trouble in the housing market has been attributed to the fact that house price appreciation—strong for many years—is finally slowing; indeed, in many markets now, house prices are falling.The mere fact that falling house prices are considered newsworthy is interesting in its own right. In other asset markets, such as the stock and bond markets, prices routinely fluctuate up and down every day. In this Economic Letter I argue that the main reason for this difference reflects differences in the liquidity of houses and financial assets as investments. I review the ways in which residential real estate prices and liquidity vary over time and over different states of the economy, discuss the implications of this price and liquidity behavior

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Natural Gas Price Uncertainty: Establishing Price Floors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of comprehensive calculations of ceiling and floor prices for natural gas. Ceiling prices are set by the price levels at which it is more economic to switch from natural gas to residual fuel oil in steam units and to distillate in combined cycle units. Switching to distillate is very rare, whereas switching to fuel oil is quite common, varying between winter and summer and increasing when natural gas prices are high or oil prices low. Monthly fuel use was examined for 89 ...

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Static Equilibrium: Forecasting Long-Term Energy Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a static equilibrium model that can be used by power companies to analyze retirement and investment decisions. Given deterministic expectations of prices, technology alternatives, and growth rates, the model defines a long-term equilibrium for an electricity market that can be used as a practical starting point for analyzing dynamic equilibrium, the distribution of outcomes associated with investment and retirement in a probabilistic world. The report includes a spreadsheet that ca...

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Do Producer Prices Lead Consumer Prices?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased rapidly. Excluding food and energy, prices of crude materials and intermediate goods rose at annual rates of 7.2 and 16.7 percent, respectively. At the same time, however, prices of consumer goods and services excluding food and energy increased a more modest 2.9 percent. Many analysts are concerned that recent increases in the prices of crude and intermediate goods may be passed through to consumers, resulting in a higher rate of inflation in consumer prices later this year and perhaps in 1996. This article examines whether price increases at the early stages of production should be expected to move through the production chain, leading to increases in consumer prices. In the first section, a review of basic economic theory suggests there should be a pass-through effect—that is, producer prices should lead and thereby help predict consumer prices. A more sophisticated analysis, though, suggests the pass-through effect may be weak. In the second section, an examination of the empirical evidence indicates that producer prices are not always good predictors of consumer prices. The article Todd E. Clark is an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Mangal Goswami, a research associate at the bank, helped prepare the article. concludes that the recent increases in some producer prices do not necessarily signal higher inflation.

E. Clark

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a Residential Forecasting Database. Lawrenceand Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy policy initiatives (EIA 1990). Utilities rely on end-use forecasting models in order to assess market trends

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

THE SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF COMMODITY PRICE SPECULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The price of crude oil in the U.S. never exceeded $40 per barrel until mid-2004. By 2006 it reached $70, and in July 2008 it peaked at $145. By late 2008 it had plummeted to about $30 before increasing to $110 in 2011. Are speculators at least partly to blame for these sharp price changes? We clarify the effects of speculators on commodity prices. We focus on crude oil, but our approach can be applied to other commodities. We explain the meaning of “oil price speculation, ” how it can occur, and how it relates to investments in oil reserves, inventories, or derivatives (such as futures contracts). Turning to the data, we calculate counterfactual prices that would have occurred from 1999 to 2012 in the absence of speculation. Our framework is based on a simple and transparent model of supply and demand in the cash and storage markets for a commodity. It lets us determine whether speculation is consistent with data on production, consumption, inventory changes, and convenience yields given reasonable elasticity assumptions. We show speculation had little, if any, effect on prices and volatility.

Christopher R. Knittel; Robert S. Pindyck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting. DE-AC03-76SF00098 #12;i ABSTRACT This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

319

Clean Energy Investment Program (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Florida Opportunity Fund's Clean Energy Investment Program is a direct investment program created to promote the adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy (EE/RE) products and...

320

Research and Development Investment Criteria | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Investment Criteria Research and Development Investment Criteria Criteria for research and development. The goal of the Research and Development Investment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technology Investment Agreements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Investment Agreements Technology Investment Agreements Guidance Policy Flash 2006-31 - Technology Investment Agreements Financial Assistance Letter 2006-03 - Guidance...

322

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. MTBE is an oxygenate used in most of the RFG consumed in the U.S. Generally, it follows gasoline prices and its own supply/demand balance factors. But this winter, we saw it respond strongly to natural gas prices. MTBE is made from methanol and isobutylene, which in turn come from methane and butane. Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams. Until this year, the price of natural gas has been so low that it had little effect. But the surge that occurred in December and January pulled MTBE up . Keep in mind that about 11% MTBE is used in a gallon of RFG, so a 30 cent increase in MTBE is only about a 3 cent increase in the price of RFG. While we look ahead at this summer, natural gas prices should be

323

Three Essays on Retail Price Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Reference Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4.5 Reference Prices andChain-Level Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Elberg, Andres

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction................................................................................................................................. 3 Price Forecasts............................................................................................................................... 12 Oil Price Forecast Range

325

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 5.05 8.14 26.40 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.91 3.03 17.63 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.81 8.66 29.58 23.12 29.76 31.60 17.33 34.62 26.69 14.42 23.53 47.13 25.17 Arizona 2.75 11.12 27.75 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.72 11.92 23.93 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 3.25 8.63 26.39 22.45 26.66 27.35 15.63 33.22 27.03 3.33 18.97 22.02 19.63 California 3.64 8.19 27.34 22.51 31.21 30.02 20.92 23.47 27.60 6.72 21.50 38.35 24.14 Colorado 2.31 7.47 26.87 22.41 26.35 27.21 - 19.97 26.25 14.80 19.48 27.61 21.07 Connecticut - 10.42 26.69 22.95 32.04 28.99 15.83 28.58 28.10 8.15 23.26

326

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. ... Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams.

327

Maryland Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland Maryland Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Baltimore BaltimoreGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Bethesda BethesdaGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Bowie BowieGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Frederick FrederickGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Gaithersburg GaithersburgGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Other Maryland Cities MarylandGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Maryland Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Maryland Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com Gas Prices of the United States: Maryland Cities - MapQuest

328

Massachusetts Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Massachusetts Massachusetts Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Boston BostonGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Brockton BrocktonGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Cambridge CambridgeGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Fall River FallRiverGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Haverhill HaverhillGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Lawrence LawrenceGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Lowell LowellGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com New Bedford NewBedfordGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Taunton TauntonGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com

329

Ohio Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Ohio Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Akron AkronGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Cincinnati CincinnatiGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Cleveland ClevelandGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Columbus ColumbusGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Dayton DaytonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Toledo ToledoGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Other Ohio Cities OhioGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Ohio Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Ohio Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com

330

Regional Retail Gasoline Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Retail gasoline prices, like those for distillate fuels, have hit record prices nationally and in several regions this year. The national average regular gasoline price peaked at $1.68 per gallon in mid-June, but quickly declined, and now stands at $1.45, 17 cents higher than a year ago. Two regions, in particular, experienced sharp gasoline price runups this year. California, which often has some of the highest prices in the nation, saw prices peak near $1.85 in mid-September, while the Midwest had average prices over $1.87 in mid-June. Local prices at some stations in both areas hit levels well over $2.00 per gallon. The reasons for the regional price runups differed significantly. In the Midwest, the introduction of Phase 2 RFG was hampered by low stocks,

331

Virginia Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Alexandria AlexandriaGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Arlington ArlingtonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Chesapeake ChesapeakeGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Hampton HamptonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Newport News NewportNewsGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Norfolk NorfolkGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Portsmouth PortsmouthGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Richmond RichmondGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Virginia Beach VirginiaBeachGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com

332

Illinois Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Arlington Heights ArlingtonHeightsGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Aurora AuroraGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Bloomington BloomingtonGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Champaign ChampaignGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Chicago ChicagoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Decatur DecaturGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Elgin ElginGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Joliet JolietGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Naperville NapervilleGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com

333

Oklahoma Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Lawton LawtonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Norman NormanGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Oklahoma City OklahomaCityGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Tulsa TulsaGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Other Oklahoma Cities OklahomaGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Oklahoma Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Oklahoma Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com Gas Prices of the United States: Oklahoma Cities - MapQuest Oklahoma Gas Prices (organized by county, search by ZIP code) -

334

Tennessee Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Chattanooga ChattanoogaGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Clarksville ClarksvilleGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Knoxville KnoxvilleGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Memphis MemphisGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Murfreesboro MurfreesboroGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Nashville NashvilleGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Other Tennessee Cities TennesseeGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Tennessee Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Tennessee Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com

335

Wisconsin Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Appleton AppletonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Eau Claire EauClaireGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Green Bay GreenBayGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Kenosha KenoshaGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Madison MadisonGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Milwaukee MilwaukeeGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Other Wisconsin Cities WisconsinGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Wisconsin Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Wisconsin Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com

336

PRICE & AVAILABILITY UPDATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3 Price & Availability Updates File when titles transferred to new supplier..................... 5 4.4 Format of the ‘Day ’ element in Availability Dates......................................................... 5 5 Example of Price & Availability Updates transmission....................................................... 5 6 Price & Availability Updates file header............................................................................. 7 Example of a complete Price & Availability Updates file header....................................... 12 7 Price & Availability Updates “message level ” content...................................................... 13 8 Price & Availability Updates “line level ” content............................................................... 14 Example showing Order "line level " segments NOI to DNC.............................................. 21 9 Price & Availability Updates message trailer.................................................................... 21 10 Price & Availability Updates file trailer............................................................................ 22 NOTE: The TRADACOMS Price & Availability Updates message is not recommended for new implementations. The recommended formats for the communication of book product information are the ONIX for Books Product Information message and Supply Update message.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Distance Figure 6 Cumulative Unexpected Price Effectsand Paul J. Seguin, "Price Volatility, Trading Volume andGoods in Pharmaceutical Price In- dexes," American Economic

Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Suslow, Valerie Y.; Seguin, Paul J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Bertrand and Cartel Prices Vary with z 7T, CS L Figure 5Distance Cumulative Abnormal Price Changes (%) Dissimilarof New Drug Figure 6 Cumulative Unexpected Price Effects

Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Suslow, Valerie Y.; Seguin, Paul J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

340

Microsoft Word - US Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis_051812.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis Arman Shehabi, William R. Morrow, Eric Masanet This work was supported by the Advanced Manufacturing Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

342

State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID..................... 830,351 3.79 802,182 4.71 759,647 2.83 R 623,652 4.72 707,885 5.30 Calais, ME ...................... 123,521 4.50 152,486 4.47 124,991 3.49 R 115,301 R 5.85 102,292 6.44 Detroit, MI ....................... 6,171 3.82 405 9.34 1,948 3.56 2,514 5.96 1,117 6.27 Marysville, MI.................. 0 -- 0 -- 74 3.95 0 -- 303 7.80 St. Clair, MI..................... 17,198 4.45 21,747 4.54 28,441 3.19 5,202 5.84 22,853 6.50 International Falls, MN .... 3,022 2.77 617 4.85 602 3.01 0 -- 0 -- Noyes, MN...................... 469,361 3.75 448,898 4.19 402,621 3.09 R 359,801 5.04 399,298 5.77 Warroad, MN .................. 4,576 3.95 5,318 4.52

343

Evaluation of Embedded Solutions for Decreasing Sensitivity of End-Use Equipment to Power Quality Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a conceptual overview of embedded solutions for sensitivity to power quality variations, assesses its benefits, and describes its potential in four end-use equipment categories. The report focuses on the technical and market issues associated with equipment modification provided by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to improve equipment tolerance to various power quality phenomena. The report describes approaches and technologies for improving performance, discusses specific i...

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Project on restaurant energy performance: end-use monitoring and analysis. Appendixes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second volume of the report, ''The Porject on Restaurant Energy Performance - End-Use Monitoring and Analysis''. The first volume (PNL-5462) contains a summary and analysis of the metered energy performance data collected by the Project on Restaurant Energy Performance (PREP). Appendix I, presented here, contains monitoring site descriptions, measurement plans, and data summaries for the seven restaurants metered for PREP. Appendix II, also in this volume, is a description of the PREP computer system.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A new feature selection algorithm and composite neural network for electricity price forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a competitive electricity market, the forecasting of energy prices is an important activity for all the market participants either for developing bidding strategies or for making investment decisions. In this paper, a new forecast strategy is proposed ... Keywords: Composite neural network, Price forecast, Two stage feature selection technique

Farshid Keynia

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Examination Procedure for Price Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... advertised or displayed at the same price that was ... to permit 2 % of products to be inaccurately priced? ... overall quality of a store's pricing practices. ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

C. Uniform Unit Pricing Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to permit retail stores that voluntarily provide unit pricing to present prices using various ... with requirements that specify that the unit price is to be ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

All Price Tables.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8. Coal and Retail Electricity Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Retail Electricity Prices Expenditures Prices Expenditures State Dollars per Million Btu...

351

South Carolina Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Pipeline and Distribution Use Price : 1967-2005: Citygate Price: ...

352

Spot Distillate & Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Retail distillate prices follow the spot distillate markets, and crude oil prices have been the main driver behind distillate spot price increases until recently.

353

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Capital Investment Incentive (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer...

354

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act SGIG Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development...

355

Global Facility Network Design with Transshipment and Responsive Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the facility network design problem for a global firm that sells to two markets: the domestic market and a foreign market. Although the firm has to invest in capital-intensive production facilities and produce outputs in the face ... Keywords: global facility network, global operations management, newsvendor network, operations strategy, responsive pricing, supply chain management, transshipment

Lingxiu Dong; Panos Kouvelis; Ping Su

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

THE SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF COMMODITY PRICE SPECULATION Christopher  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

THE THE SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF COMMODITY PRICE SPECULATION Christopher R. Knittel and Robert S. Pindyck Massachusetts Institute of Technology July 2013 Knittel and Pindyck (MIT) PRICE SPECULATION July 2013 1 / 32 Introduction "Commodities have become an investment class: declines in their prices may simply reflect the whims of speculators." The Economist, June 23, 2012. "Federal legislation should bar pure oil speculators entirely from commodity exchanges in the United States." Joseph Kennedy II, N.Y. Times, April, 10, 2012. Sharp increases in oil prices: $40 per barrel in 2004 to $70 in 2006 to $140 in July 2008. Fell to $38 in early 2009, then increased to $110 in 2011. Are "speculators" to blame? Should futures trading be limited? Confusion over commodity price speculation and how it works. We try to clarify the potential and actual effects of speculators

357

Natural Gas Spot Prices:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 of 26 4 of 26 Notes: Spot wellhead prices last summer averaged well over $4.00 per thousand cubic feet during a normally low-price season. During the fall, these prices stayed above $5.00 per thousand cubic feet, more than double the year-ago average price. In January, the spot wellhead price averaged a record $8.98 per thousand cubic feet. Spot prices at the wellhead have never been this high for such a prolonged period. The chief reason for these sustained high gas prices was, and still is, uneasiness about the supply situation. Concern about the adequacy of winter supplies loomed throughout most of the summer and fall as storage levels remained significantly depressed. Last December, the most severe assumptions about low storage levels became real, when the spot price

358

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Diesel prices decrease slightly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease slightly The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3-tenths of a penny from a week ago,...

360

Diesel prices rise slightly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices rise slightly The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 4.16 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Diesel prices slightly decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3, 2013 Diesel prices slightly decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on...

362

Diesel prices slightly decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices slightly decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago,...

363

Diesel prices increase nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the...

364

Florida Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 4.79: 4.68: 4.54: 4.47: 4.26: 4.33: 1989-2013: ...

365

Michigan Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) Area: ... History; Citygate Price: 4.74: 4.99: 4.52: 4.48: 4.13: NA: ...

366

Maine Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 6.72: 8.18: 11.03: NA: NA: 7.19: 1989-2013: ...

367

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 6.14: 7.58: 8.34: 7.51: 7.39: 6.16: 1989-2013: ...

368

Alabama Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) Area: ... History; Citygate Price: 4.81: 5.12: 5.31: 4.92: 4.64: NA: ...

369

Career Services Pricing Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Job/Resume Posting and Prices Career Services Pricing Information Career Services Career Services chemistry jobs classifieds employment fats global help wanted job Jobs member membership network oils science jobs ...

370

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's down 0.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in...

371

Retail Propane Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Notes: Consistent with spot prices, residential propane prices have been higher all winter than during the past several years. The recent surge is mainly the result of the surge...

372

End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems ( CONAES) andCommittee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES)on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES) and FEA

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROWTH . !! 1-1 L. CAPITAL INTENSITY H ML COST EFFECTIVEGROWTH . H ML CAPITAL INTENSITY . _!!. M L ~NERGY a-----~.RATING: HIGH .CAPITAL INTENSITY 1976 Net Fixed Assets/Total

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Capital Formation Challenge Facing the Steel Industry,"National Steel Industry Economics Seminar, Chicago,69-72. Industry ( 5 ) " Steel Industry Ne e d s , " Am e r i

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Edgeworth Price Cycles, Cost-based Pricing and Sticky Pricing in Retail Gasoline Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymmetrically to Crude Oil Price Changes? ”, QuarterlyS. , A. Shepard. “Sticky Prices, Inventories, and MarketGas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctua- tions”, Review of

Noel, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Asymmetric Wholesale Pricing: Theory and Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asymmetric pricing or asymmetric price adjustment is the phenomenon where prices rise more readily than they fall. We offer and provide empirical support for a new theory of asymmetric pricing in wholesale prices. Wholesale prices may adjust asymmetrically ... Keywords: asymmetric price adjustment, asymmetric pricing, channel of distribution, channel pricing, cost of price adjustment, economic model, menu cost, retailing, scanner data, wholesale price

Sourav Ray; Haipeng (Allan) Chen; Mark E. Bergen; Daniel Levy

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Price Sound Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price Sound Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200874-0. Address and Contact Information: 638 RALEIGH STREET WINNIPEG ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA Energy Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This publication includes total energy production, consumption, and trade; energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, ...

380

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Real-time pricing -- supplanted by Price-risk derivatives?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future trends in pricing options for wholesale electrical generation are discussed. Specifically, the effect of price derivatives on electricity consumption are examined. Economic analyses are presented for customer demand in real-time pricing scenarios with and without a price derivative hedge. It is determined that consumption will be curtailed even when price caps have been purchased. Consumption behavior is also analyzed to determine the effect of different price caps; regardless of price, consumption is curtailed in response to price.

O`Sheasy, M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluating Financial Model Performance: An Empirical Analysis of Some North Sea Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifty North Sea oil & gas investment transactions were analysed using traditional spreadsheet based financial modelling methods. The purpose of the analysis was to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between the price paid for an oil & gas asset and the actual or expected financial return over the asset's economically useful life. Several interesting and statistically significant relationships were found which reveal useful information about financial modelling performance, the premia paid to acquire North Sea assets, the contribution oil and gas price uncertainty has on estimates of future financial returns and the median financial return of these North Sea Investments.

Croll, Grenville J; Lawal, Ola

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.04 8.71 6.70 6.14 5.65 4.88 1984-2012 Residential Price 12.02 12.81 10.76 10.34 9.77 9.23 1967-2012 Percentage of...

384

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy Efficient,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy Investment Returns from Responsible Property Investments: Energy Efficient, Transit-oriented and Urban Regeneration Office Properties in the US from 1998-2008 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager

385

Utility spot pricing study : Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spot pricing covers a range of electric utility pricing structures which relate the marginal costs of electric generation to the prices seen by utility customers. At the shortest time frames prices change every five ...

Caramanis, Michael C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Merchant Transmission Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

merchant transmission model of the type described above, though Australia has adopted a mixed merchant and regu- 6 lated transmission model.3 However, recent academic proposals,4 as well as FERC’s July 2002 Standard Market Design (SMD) proposals, call... that a nodal or locational marginal pricing (LMP) system is in place with attributes similar to those being proposed by the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in its SMD proposals and to what is in operation in New 3Two merchant lines...

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homes End-Use Equipment Type Equipment Market Shares Index Heating ElecFurnace Gas Furnace LPG Furnace OilHomes (millions) End-Use Equipment Type Appliance stock in millions of units Index Heating FJec Furnace Gas Furnace L P G Furnace OilHomes End-Use Equipment Type Units Efficiency for Stock Equipment Index Heating Elec Furnace Btu.out/Wh.in Gas Furnace AFUE LPG Furnace AFUE Oil

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eighth Electric Utility Forecasting Symposium in Baltimore,Development of a Residential Forecasting Database. Lawrenceand Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

notice, is given to the source. On the Efficiency of Competitive Electricity Markets With Time-Invariant Retail Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard economic model of efficient competitive markets relies on the ability of sellers to charge prices that vary as their costs change. Yet, there is no restructured electricity market in which most retail customers can be charged realtime prices (RTP), prices that can change as frequently as wholesale costs. We analyze the impact of having some share of customers on time-invariant pricing in competitive electricity markets. Not only does time-invariant pricing in competitive markets lead to outcomes (prices and investment) that are not first-best, it even fails to achieve the second-best optimum given the constraint of time-invariant pricing. We then show that attempts to correct the level of investment through taxes or subsidies on electricity or capacity are unlikely to succeed, because these interventions create new inefficiencies. In contrast, increasing the share of customers

Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holland; We Thank Jim Bushnell; Joe Farrell; Morten Hviid; Erin Mansur; Michael Riordan; Lawrence White; Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

391

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

392

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

393

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

394

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

395

Zephyr Investments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Wind energy Product Owner of Beaufort Wind Limited, created as joint venture investment vehicle by Englefield Capital, Arcapita Limited, the European arm of Arcapita Bank,...

396

Oil and natural gas reserve prices : addendum to CEEPR WP 03-016 ; including results for 2003 revisions to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction. A working paper entitled "Oil and Natural Gas Reserve Prices 1982-2002: Implications for Depletion and Investment Cost" was published in October 2003 (cited hereafter as Adelman & Watkins [2003]). Since then ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Montana Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.72 7.50 3.16 3.64 1967-2010 Imports Price 6.66 8.22 3.88 4.13 3.75 2.45 1989-2012 Exports Price 6.16 8.14 3.63 4.05 3.82 2.40 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 6.42 7.71 5.63 5.17 5.11 4.23 1984-2012 Residential Price 9.91 11.45 9.50 8.64 8.80 8.06 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 1989-2012 Commercial Price 9.76 11.32 9.41 8.54 8.66 7.98 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 78.5 79.6 49.2 54.6 53.3 52.9 1990-2012 Industrial Price 9.75 11.04 9.06 8.07 8.13 7.54 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

398

Louisiana Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 7.02 8.73 3.82 4.23 1967-2010 Imports Price 6.98 9.76 3.89 4.84 7.57 7.98 1989-2012 Exports Price -- -- -- 7.07 9.63 11.80 2007-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.22 9.58 5.96 5.43 5.67 3.48 1984-2012 Residential Price 14.20 15.49 13.15 11.73 11.37 11.54 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 11.83 13.52 10.46 9.88 9.36 8.44 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 98.0 98.4 92.0 85.9 83.6 78.0 1990-2012 Industrial Price 7.08 9.32 4.31 4.68 4.25 2.96 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

399

Nebraska Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 4.86 6.22 2.97 3.98 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.67 8.12 5.87 5.62 5.11 4.31 1984-2012 Residential Price 11.15 11.11 9.34 8.95 8.84 8.68 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 85.7 87.1 87.8 87.4 87.3 85.8 1989-2012 Commercial Price 9.16 9.62 7.44 7.08 6.69 6.19 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 63.9 57.5 61.3 60.6 60.6 55.8 1990-2012 Industrial Price 7.97 9.12 6.02 5.85 5.61 4.34 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 9.7 10.2 8.9 8.2 7.6 6.8 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 15.10 15.29 1994-2012 Electric Power Price

400

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

402

Consumer Prices During  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate City Gate City gate prices represent the total cost paid by gas distribu- tion companies for gas received at the point where the gas is physically transferred from a pipeline company or trans- mission system. This price is intended to reflect all charges for the acquisition, storage, and transportation of gas as well as other charges associated with the LDC's obtaining the gas for sale to consumers. Prices paid at the city gate by local distribution companies rose substantially between 1995 and 1996, climbing from $2.78 per thousand cubic feet to $3.27, an increase of 18 percent. Residential Residential consumers pay the highest price for natural gas. It increased to $6.34 per thousand cubic feet from the 1995 price of $6.06 per thousand cubic feet. However, the 1996 price was 1 percent lower than the 1994 price. In recent years, only modest changes in constant dollars have been

403

Connecticut Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut Connecticut Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Bridgeport BridgeportGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Hartford HartfordGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com New Haven NewHavenGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Stamford Automotive.com MapQuest.com Waterbury Automotive.com MapQuest.com West Hartford Automotive.com MapQuest.com Other Connecticut Cities ConnecticutGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Connecticut Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com Connecticut Gas Prices (organized by county) - Automotive.com Gas Prices of the United States: Connecticut Cities - MapQuest

404

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

405

Fundamentals Explain High Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: One can use a simple model to deal with price/fundamental relationships. This one predicts monthly average WTI price as a function of OECD total petroleum stock deviations from the normal levels . The graph shows the model as it begins predicting prices in 1992. It shows how well the model has predicted not only the direction, but the magnitude of prices over this 8+ year period. While the model is simple and not perfect, it does predict the overall trends and, in particular, the recent rise in prices. It also shows that prices may have over-shot the fundamental balance for a while -- at least partially due to speculative concerns over Mideast tensions, winter supply adequacy, and Iraq's export policies. Prices now seem to be correcting, and may even undershoot briefly

406

Energy prices, production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 price U K P ./kW h CHP adoption electyricity price to gas price ratio Figure 3. Energy price and CHP annual adoption (UK). Source: DTI (2002b) -5.00% 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20... .00% 199119921993199419951996199719981999200020012002 an nu al g ro w th r at e in C H P a do pt io n 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 price U K P ./kW h CHP adoption Gas price 10 Gas prices leveled off from 1996 onwards and then increased considerably growing by 33% during 1999-2002. In recent...

Bonilla, David

407

Project on Restaurant Energy Performance: end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although energy bills for restaurants throughout the United States exceed 5 billion dollars annually, very little has been documented with respect to when and how restaurants use energy, or how such use can be reduced cost-effectively. This report summarizes the results of a multiyear collaborative research effort, designed to collect information on end-use energy consumption. Objective is to reveal the quantities and profiles of energy consumption of typical food service operations by time of day and end use. This information, when examined in conjunction with building characteristics, allows detailed study of energy use cause and effect and energy conservation potential. Seven representative monitoring sites were selected, a computerized data acquisition network was designed and implemented, and detailed energy performance was compiled for a 1 year period (July 1983 through June 1984). Each of the seven facilities monitored was selected to represent the seven most common restaurant types and to provide information on a wide variety of commonly used restaurant equipment. Preliminary findings are presented.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study showed that certain influences in the global environment may have an impact on FDI’s regional or country choice of investment. The following research questions were explored. Are changes in FDI location choices due to elevated transportation costs? Has the emphasis on market changed to a stauncher stance toward efficiency factors due to current oil pricing? The data was tested by applying multiple linear regressions using archival data from Dun and Bradstreet, the World Bank, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). This study looked at data in snapshots of two years of a decade beginning with 1997 and ending with 2007. A broader dataset which has already been developed will be expanded to include the dramatic changes in oil prices pre Y2K and post Y2K. It was hypothesized that results will reflect that the cost of transportation will drive investment closer, rather than further, from the origin of investment. Due to the nature of FDI immobility, it is further hypothesized that emphasis will be placed on efficiency factors rather than market because of concern about transportation costs. The purpose will be to explore the features that affect the location of the foreign direct investment, and to address the differences in emphasis, if any, by decision-makers upon locations chosen because of the present transport costs. The findings of the tests were theoretically along the same lines as the hypothesis predicted. In 1997 market factors were dominant instead of efficiency factors. This was seen through the significance of GDP growth and the amount of roads paved. In 2007 exchange rates and distance showed significance, moving factors to a stauncher stance toward efficiency. A pooled regression showed the results of the effect of transportation cost over all. When looking at the variances at the 0.1 p level a rise in the level of FDI investment was found, concluding that the hypothesis and transportation cost results were counter intuitive.

Gressler, Kimberly

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Oil Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 his 2-3 hrs Usage levelgas Oil Dishwasher End-Use Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 hrs Usagegas Oil Dishwasher End-Use Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 hrs Usage

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

413

Missouri Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 1967-1997 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.53 8.03 7.06 6.17 5.85 5.27 1984-2012 Residential Price 13.42 13.36 12.61 11.66 12.02 12.25 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 11.82 12.02 10.81 10.28 9.99 9.54 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 76.9 77.5 76.7 76.5 73.1 69.2 1990-2012 Industrial Price 10.84 11.32 9.55 8.70 8.54 7.93 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 12.8 13.9 13.2 13.1 13.4 12.5 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 8.44 8.66 7.86 6.34 6.11 5.64 1994-2012

414

Arkansas Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 6.61 8.72 3.43 3.84 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.55 8.88 7.86 6.76 6.27 5.36 1984-2012 Residential Price 13.08 14.09 13.39 11.53 11.46 11.82 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 10.07 11.32 10.72 8.89 8.90 7.99 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 70.4 64.5 59.4 55.6 51.5 40.2 1990-2012 Industrial Price 9.51 10.56 8.44 7.28 7.44 6.38 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 4.2 3.9 3.7 2.8 2.1 1.9 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 8.39 -- -- -- -- 9.04 1994-2012

415

Iowa Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.80 8.28 5.62 5.69 5.27 4.84 1984-2012 Residential Price 11.76 11.91 9.83 9.57 9.54 9.46 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 9.97 10.25 7.88 7.81 7.55 7.13 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 77.7 75.8 72.5 72.0 72.1 72.3 1990-2012 Industrial Price 8.56 9.32 6.23 6.10 5.78 4.70 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 6.5 6.6 6.4 5.8 5.5 5.2 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 11.68 -- -- -- -- -- 1990-2012 Electric Power Price 7.73 W W W W 3.84 1997-2012

416

Maine Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Imports Price 7.57 9.77 4.48 4.94 4.40 3.45 1999-2012 Exports Price -- -- 5.62 4.53 4.46 4.30 2007-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 10.46 13.47 8.64 8.19 8.14 7.73 1984-2012 Residential Price 16.90 17.47 16.43 14.14 14.20 15.94 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 14.82 15.87 13.94 11.71 11.69 12.22 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 46.2 45.0 51.0 45.0 45.8 42.1 1990-2012 Industrial Price 13.40 14.89 9.12 11.23 10.89 10.35 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.6 0.5 0.4 1997-2012

417

Idaho Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Imports Price 6.31 7.88 3.86 4.19 3.90 2.59 1989-2012 Exports Price -- 7.43 4.49 5.85 4.74 -- 1999-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 6.68 7.48 5.63 4.82 4.65 4.07 1984-2012 Residential Price 11.47 11.07 10.54 8.95 8.80 8.26 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 10.67 10.28 9.77 8.21 8.09 7.35 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 84.8 86.0 83.7 82.0 80.8 77.0 1990-2012 Industrial Price 9.39 9.18 8.53 6.39 6.36 5.73 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 2.0 1.9 1.7 1.8 2.0 1.9 1997-2012

418

Maryland Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Imports Price 7.25 9.09 4.05 5.37 5.30 13.82 1999-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 9.24 10.23 8.02 6.49 6.26 5.67 1984-2012 Residential Price 15.17 16.07 13.73 12.44 12.10 12.17 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 79.3 77.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.30 13.12 10.87 9.87 10.29 10.00 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 27.3 24.7 1990-2012 Industrial Price 11.59 13.46 10.70 9.05 8.61 8.01 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 7.8 6.3 5.3 5.3 5.5 5.1 1997-2012

419

Alabama Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 7.44 9.65 4.32 4.46 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.78 9.84 7.61 6.46 5.80 5.18 1984-2012 Residential Price 18.14 18.30 18.12 15.79 15.08 16.20 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 15.06 15.58 14.94 13.34 12.36 12.55 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 79.8 80.2 78.8 79.3 78.9 76.2 1990-2012 Industrial Price 8.70 10.57 6.48 6.64 5.57 4.35 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 24.0 27.2 27.9 23.7 23.5 22.1 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price -- 17.32 19.17 16.24 11.45 17.99 1990-2012

420

Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Imports Price 7.32 10.34 5.90 4.86 4.77 3.69 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 9.34 10.29 8.29 7.74 7.04 6.03 1984-2012 Residential Price 16.99 17.18 14.85 14.53 13.81 13.22 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 99.9 85.0 85.6 85.4 89.3 87.8 1989-2012 Commercial Price 15.08 15.25 12.85 12.00 11.68 10.68 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 65.3 57.9 56.9 52.1 50.0 48.6 1990-2012 Industrial Price 14.83 15.23 12.07 10.41 10.14 9.82 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 29.9 20.6 21.1 19.4 20.6 17.7 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 12.84 13.80 12.99 12.48 4.28 14.81 1990-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vermont Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Imports Price 8.51 9.74 6.34 6.54 5.81 4.90 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1982-2005 Citygate Price 10.03 10.66 9.33 8.29 7.98 6.63 1984-2012 Residential Price 15.99 18.31 17.29 16.14 16.17 16.73 1980-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.79 14.31 12.96 11.82 11.90 12.09 1980-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990-2012 Industrial Price 9.08 9.60 7.93 6.57 6.09 4.89 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 78.0 79.6 77.9 77.1 80.9 100.0 1997-2012 Electric Power Price 7.72 9.14 5.66 5.73 5.26 4.14 1997-2012

422

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 9.35 10.39 7.81 7.04 6.28 5.52 1984-2012 Residential Price 14.66 16.22 14.74 12.90 12.46 11.99 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.2 88.6 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.77 14.29 11.83 10.47 10.42 10.24 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 48.5 42.1 1990-2012 Industrial Price 10.64 12.09 9.19 8.23 9.86 9.58 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 5.4 5.7 4.5 3.8 2.0 1.3 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 10.83 8.30 5.15 3.76 3.40 7.96 1990-2012

423

Indiana Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.78 7.58 4.05 4.13 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.83 8.94 5.59 5.52 4.97 4.23 1984-2012 Residential Price 11.29 12.65 10.81 8.63 9.46 8.94 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 96.2 95.0 93.6 94.1 94.6 94.5 1989-2012 Commercial Price 10.20 11.14 9.18 7.55 8.04 7.68 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 78.1 77.9 73.9 72.5 70.2 67.5 1990-2012 Industrial Price 8.45 10.48 6.91 5.65 6.53 6.19 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 7.4 6.7 7.0 5.6 3.5 1.9 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 6.09 7.94 4.08 5.19 13.24 12.29 1990-2012

424

Florida Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price NA NA NA NA 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 7.97 9.73 5.76 5.49 5.07 3.93 1984-2012 Residential Price 20.61 21.07 20.18 17.89 18.16 18.31 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 98.0 97.7 1989-2012 Commercial Price 13.07 14.45 11.09 10.60 11.14 10.41 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.5 37.0 1990-2012 Industrial Price 10.56 11.72 9.41 8.33 8.07 6.96 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.0 2.7 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 12.82 15.56 13.16 17.98 5.56 9.83 1989-2012

425

Utah Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utah Utah Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Layton LaytonGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Ogden OgdenGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Orem OremGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Provo ProvoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Salt Lake City SaltLakeCityGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Sandy SandyGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com West Jordan WestJordanGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com West Valley City WestValleyCityGasPrices.com Other Utah Cities UtahGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Utah Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com

426

Connecticut Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.67 10.24 6.81 6.58 5.92 5.12 1984-2012 Residential Price 16.39 17.85 14.81 14.93 13.83 14.17 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 98.2 97.7 97.5 97.3 96.8 96.7 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.61 13.81 9.92 9.55 8.48 8.40 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 71.5 70.7 69.0 65.4 65.4 65.1 1990-2012 Industrial Price 10.54 12.63 8.44 9.60 9.16 8.83 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 50.0 47.3 37.5 31.1 31.0 32.3 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 20.57 24.04 15.26 16.31 18.59 13.70 1992-2012 Electric Power Price 7.81 10.48 4.89 5.70 5.09 3.99 1997-2012

427

Oregon Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.27 5.33 4.00 4.92 1979-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.14 8.82 7.79 6.78 5.84 5.21 1984-2012 Residential Price 14.65 13.89 14.52 12.49 11.76 11.22 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.36 11.57 11.86 10.10 9.60 8.91 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 98.5 98.5 98.4 97.4 97.4 96.9 1990-2012 Industrial Price 9.30 9.07 9.70 7.05 6.84 5.87 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 21.8 20.1 18.9 17.1 17.1 16.7 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 6.59 8.03 7.11 5.61 4.23 4.57 1992-2012

428

Arizona Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.98 7.09 3.19 4.11 1967-2010 Exports Price 6.94 8.09 3.79 4.57 4.28 3.07 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.25 8.49 7.21 6.59 5.91 4.68 1984-2012 Residential Price 17.21 17.60 17.65 15.87 15.04 15.75 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.84 13.01 12.15 10.72 9.99 9.35 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 93.4 93.1 88.0 88.7 87.8 86.6 1990-2012 Industrial Price 10.49 10.47 8.19 7.54 6.86 5.78 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 31.3 29.6 29.1 25.5 24.2 21.4 1997-2012

429

Colorado Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 4.57 6.94 3.21 3.96 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 6.23 6.98 5.09 5.26 4.94 4.26 1984-2012 Residential Price 8.84 9.77 8.80 8.13 8.25 8.31 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 8.10 9.01 7.56 7.58 7.84 7.58 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 95.7 95.2 94.8 94.6 93.8 92.2 1990-2012 Industrial Price 7.21 8.76 6.57 5.84 6.42 5.79 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 0.5 0.6 0.5 5.2 7.5 6.8 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price 8.72 13.57 9.12 10.79 9.56 11.65 1990-2012

430

Alaska Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.63 7.39 2.93 3.17 1967-2010 Exports Price 6.21 7.69 8.59 12.19 12.88 15.71 1989-2012 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1970-2005 Citygate Price 6.75 6.74 8.22 6.67 6.53 6.14 1988-2012 Residential Price 8.68 8.72 10.23 8.89 8.77 8.47 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 7.57 8.66 9.51 8.78 8.09 8.09 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 76.0 74.9 85.3 87.7 88.6 94.9 1990-2012 Industrial Price 4.67 5.49 4.02 4.23 3.84 5.11 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 70.0 78.2 72.5 70.5 60.8 100.0 1997-2012

431

Kansas Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Wellhead Price 5.69 6.85 3.16 4.23 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 8.27 8.85 6.12 6.08 5.53 4.74 1984-2012 Residential Price 12.97 13.00 11.10 10.61 9.93 10.13 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2012 Commercial Price 12.04 12.24 10.01 9.65 8.89 8.82 1967-2012 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 64.8 64.9 65.7 66.0 62.6 59.7 1990-2012 Industrial Price 7.17 9.42 4.59 5.49 5.28 3.95 1997-2012 Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices 5.9 7.8 6.7 7.0 9.5 8.8 1997-2012 Vehicle Fuel Price -- -- -- -- 9.87 9.00 1994-2012

432

Are all your investments on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assistance in picking the new investments? Currently contributing to TIAA-CREF Currently contributingLine, Fidelity or TIAA-CREF for assistance. You must pick investments from the new core menu. Yes No If you do StraightLine, Fidelity or TIAA-CREF for assistance. You must enroll with either Fidelity or TIAA

433

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2002 > Table 6b and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

434

Project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for this effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the measurement methods, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire 15-minute interval data on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climate conditions for a one year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which has been converted into several formats for dissemination. Restaurants are found to be very intensive users of energy due largely to the frequent usage of food preparation equipment and the high ventilation requirements.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for the effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the methods of measurement, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer-based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire data at 15-minute intervals on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climatic conditions for a one-year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which have been converted into several formats for dissemination.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and This chart highlights residential heating oil prices for the current and past heating season. As you can see, prices have started the heating season, about 40 to 50 cents per gallon higher than last year at this time. The data presented are from EIA's State Heating Oil and Propane Program. We normally collect and publish this data twice a month, but given the low stocks and high prices, we started tracking the prices weekly. These data will also be used to determine the price trigger mechanism for the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve. The data are published at a State and regional level on our web site. The slide is to give you some perspective of what is happening in these markets, since you probably will get a number of calls from local residents about their heating fuels bills

437

Retail Motor Gasoline Prices*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Gasoline pump prices have backed down from the high prices experienced last summer and fall. The retail price for regular motor gasoline fell 11 cents per gallon from September to December. However, with crude oil prices rebounding somewhat from their December lows combined with lower than normal stock levels, we project that prices at the pump will rise modestly as the 2001 driving season begins this spring. For the summer of 2001, we expect only a little difference from the average price of $1.50 per gallon seen during the previous driving season, as motor gasoline stocks going into the driving season are projected to be slightly less than they were last year. The situation of relatively low inventories for gasoline could set the stage for some regional imbalances in supply that could once again

438

prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prices prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 12, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses 2009 dollars per gallon. The data is broken down into crude oil prices, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and refined petroleum product prices. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Petroleum prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Petroleum Product Prices- Reference Case (xls, 129.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

439

Using Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from the California Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from thePermit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from thehigher wholesale electricity prices, during the third and

Kolstad, Jonathan; Wolak, Frank

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Transmission Price Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the financial risks that arise from the uncertain price of transmission service in restructured or competitive electricity markets. These risks are most severe in markets with locational pricing (LMP), but they also exist in more traditionally organized electricity markets. This report has two main purposes. The first is to review the existing mathematical models of electricity price formation in spot and forward markets that may be helpful as the foundations for developing ...

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Iowa Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Ames AmesGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Cedar Rapids CedarRapidsGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Council Bluffs CouncilBluffsGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Des Moines DesMoinesGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Dubuque DubuqueGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Iowa City IowaCityGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Quad Cities QuadCitiesGasPrices.com Sioux City SiouxCityGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Waterloo WaterlooGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Other Iowa Cities

442

Louisiana Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Baton Rouge BatonRougeGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Lafayette LafayetteGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Lake Charles LakeCharlesGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Metairie MetairieGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Monroe MonroeGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com New Orleans NewOrleansGasPrices.com Automotive.com Mapquest.com Shreveport ShreveportGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Other Louisiana Cities LouisianaGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com Louisiana Gas Prices (selected cities) - GasBuddy.com

443

Utah Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

444

California Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Bakersfield BakersfieldGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Fresno FresnoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Los Angeles LosAngelesGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Modesto ModestoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Oakland OaklandGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Orange County OrangeCountyGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Riverside RiversideGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com San Bernardino SanBernardinoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com San Diego SanDiegoGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com

445

Michigan Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Selected Cities Ann Arbor AnnArborGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Battle Creek BattleCreekGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Detroit DetroitGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Flint FlintGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Grand Rapids GrandRapidsGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Kalamazoo KalamazooGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Lansing LansingGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Sterling Heights SterlingHeightsGasPrices.com Automotive.com MapQuest.com Other Michigan Cities MichiganGasPrices.com (search by city or ZIP code) - GasBuddy.com

446

Natural Gas Exports Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

447

Natural Gas Wellhead Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By:...

448

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013"...

449

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

450

Residential Price - Marketers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Marketers in Selected States (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet ...

451

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

452

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

453

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

454

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

455

Price-Anderson Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Price-Anderson Act (PAA) provides a system of indemnification for legal liability resulting from a nuclear incident in connection with contractual activity for DOE.

456

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release...

457

Idaho Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

458

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","172014"...

459

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January ...

460

Crude Price & Differential  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... , making it more competitive with other boiler fuels, and the price of residual fuel relative to crude oil increases. Thus, both the light ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Colorado Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

462

Retail Propane Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19 Notes: Residential propane prices rose fairly strongly during the 1999-2000 heating season, gaining nearly 25 cents per gallon between October and March. Unfortunately,...

463

CA Following World Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light-heavy crude differentials fell and stayed down until the later part of 1997. Crude prices continued to weaken, but the light heavy difference ...

464

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

465

,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

466

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

467

,"Vermont Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

468

,"Ohio Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

469

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

470

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

471

,"Maryland Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

472

,"Michigan Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

473

,"Illinois Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

474

,"Kansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

475

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

476

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

477

,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

478

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

479

,"Florida Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

480

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investment end-use prices" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

482

,"Virginia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

483

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

484

,"Washington Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

485

,"Maine Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

486

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

487

,"Utah Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

488

,"Oregon Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

489

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

490

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

491

,"Nevada Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

492

,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

493

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

494

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

495

,"Montana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

496

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

497

,"Missouri Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

498

,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

499

,"Indiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

500

,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...