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1

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASLAB Network GASLAB Network CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003) data Data Investigators L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021 Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson,

3

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace element Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... 5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals...

5

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Physics Discussions Trace gas measurements from... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and uncertainty of atmospheric trace gas......

7

Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS  

SciTech Connect

Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

Hashemi, M. M. [Physics Department, Doctorate Technical Center of PNU, P.O. Box 19536-33511, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir; Moosakhani, A. [Physics Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A. [Physics Department, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 34149-16818, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Majdabadi, A. [Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11155-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abachi, S. [Physics Department, University of California, Irvin, CA 92697 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

9

Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

10

Recent progress in high precision atmospheric trace gas instruments using mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report results from high precision spectroscopic instruments for atmospheric trace gases using with mid-IR quantum cascade lasers. Numerous gases can be measured with 1s absorption...

McManus, John B; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; McGovern, Ryan; Agnese, Mike

11

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

12

Trace gas contaminant control in a space station atmosphere using adsorption  

SciTech Connect

Trace contaminants enter spacecraft atmospheres through offgassing of spacecraft materials and as products of crew metabolism. The consequences of fire or accidental release of toxic vapors from onboard systems is also a crew safety concern. The purpose of this work was to determine how these contaminants could be limited to safe concentrations in the atmosphere of the proposed space station. Contaminant source models were developed from spacecraft material offgassing and human metabolic production rate measurements. Contaminants were represented with a simplified model of 30 compounds by grouping similar species together. A trace contaminant control process, which consists of chemisorption of ammonia on phosphoric acid-impregnated activated carbon, ambient temperature catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, catalytic conversion of the sulfur in hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans to elemental sulfur, and adsorption of the other contaminants in a regenerable activated carbon adsorber, was proposed. Trace contaminant adsorption rate and equilibrium equations were derived. Various adsorbents were evaluated to determine the optimum sorbents for this application. Removal system performance limits were established, and optimum design ranges for process parameters were developed. Trace gas contaminants can be limited to safe concentrations by the process proposed under normal conditions using as little as 1 Kg/man-year of ammonia chemisorbent. The most likely accidental contaminant releases can be removed in {approximately}20 hours using frequent adsorber regenerations.

Winter, J.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace metals Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 2 Chapter 1: Modelling Past Environmental Changes Using Lake Sediment Records Summary: of the anthropogenic fluxes of many potentially toxic trace metals...

15

Experimental Investigation Of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges  

SciTech Connect

Microwave atmospheric pressure discharge in neon sustained by surface waves in a dielectric tube is considered. The plasma column length was measured versus absorbed microwave power for different discharge conditions. This gives a view on the wave propagation characteristics. The predicted dependence of discharge length on the total flux of wave power based on the modified model of non-equilibrium plasma is compared with experimental values. Moreover, we present results of spectroscopic investigations of the electron density. The electron density was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{beta} spectral line. The spectroscopic results we shall use developing of a model of propagation of surface wave.

Czylkowski, D.; Jasinski, M.; Nowakowska, H.; Zakrzewski, Z. [The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace molecule Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or have currently low atmospheric mixing ratios. 2031 12... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

18

Investigation on thermal and trace element characteristics during co-combustion biomass with coal gangue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The thermochemical behaviors during co-combustion of coal gangue (CG), soybean stalk (SS), sawdust (SD) and their blends prepared at different ratios have been determined via thermogravimetric analysis. The simulate experiments in a fixed bed reactor were performed to investigate the partition behaviors of trace elements during co-combustion. The combustion profiles of biomass was more complicated than that of coal gangue. Ignition property and thermal reactivity of coal gangue could be enhanced by the addition of biomass. No interactions were observed between coal gangue and biomass during co-combustion. The volatilization ratios of trace elements decrease with the increasing proportions of biomass in the blends during co-combustion. Based on the results of heating value, activation energy, base/acid ratio and gaseous pollutant emissions, the blending ratio of 2030% biomass content is regarded as optimum composition for blending and could be applied directly at current combustion application with few modifications.

Chuncai Zhou; Guijian Liu; Ting Fang; Paul Kwan Sing Lam

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Integrated Study of MFRSR-derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facili...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facilities - Comparison with Satellite and Other Ground-Based Measurements M. D. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. A. Lacis and B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Comparison of SGP MFRSR Network Aerosol Retrievals with MODIS Aerosol Product The network of Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site consists of 21 instrument sites

20

The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photochemistry and land-system change using measurements...Coupling in the Earth System (OP3/ACES) campaign...guineensis Elaeis oleifera hybrids of the progeny...East Asian land-system change on atmospheric...and land cover: solar radiation is efficiently...based on the vertical wind. There is no consensus...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Combined Atmospheric Photochemistry and Ion Tracing code: Reproducing the Viking Lander results and initial outflow results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Combined Atmospheric Photochemistry and Ion Tracing code (CAPIT) has been developed to explore ion loss into space at Mars. The CAPIT code includes the major photochemical reactions of Mars ionosphere, ion tracing in the presence of magnetic fields, and plasma wave heating of ions. In particular, we examine whether O+ escape from the day-side ionosphere is limited by ion production (UV input) or by external energy input to the ions. To verify the code, it is demonstrated that the CAPIT solutions reproduce the Viking 1 Landers ion density and temperature profiles. Using Viking 1 Lander conditions as a baseline, ion outflow rates are examined as function of solar wind energy input via plasma waves and UV ionization rates. The O+ outflow rates predicted by the simulation are comparable to the outflow rates estimated by observation. The results indicate that plasma waves are a viable source of energy to O+ ions and suggest that present-day O+ outflow rates at Mars are source limited by photochemical production (UV input) during periods of strong energy input (plasma wave activity), but otherwise regulated by both UV input and energy input. These results imply that ion heating by plasma waves can influence the present-day loss of O+.

L. Andersson; R.E. Ergun; A.I.F. Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Influence of oxygen traces on an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive argon plasma discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharge source driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz has been developed experimentally that is capable of producing a homogeneous and cold glow discharge in O2/Ar. With respect to the influence of oxygen component when diluted into argon plasmadischarge on the dischargecharacteristics the measurements of the electrical parameters (impedance phase angle resistance and reactance) are made systematically and the densities of the metastable and resonant state of argon are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy(OES). It is shown that the admixture of oxygen into argon plasma not only changes the electric characteristics but also alters the optical emission spectra greatly due to strong interaction between the oxygen content and the argon in the plasma environment.

Shou-Zhe Li; Qi Wu; Wen Yan; Dezhen Wang; Han S. Uhm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver Investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Dissertation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver Investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Dissertation Atmospheric corrosion is a costly problem. Accelerated laboratory tests, such as the salt fog chamber, have been created to predict corrosion of materials without the need to expose them over long periods

24

A General Investigation of Optimized Atmospheric Sample Duration  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of up to 80 aerosol and xenon monitoring systems spaced around the world that have collection systems sensitive enough to detect nuclear releases from underground nuclear tests at great distances (CTBT 1996; CTBTO 2011). Although a few of the IMS radionuclide stations are closer together than 1,000 km (such as the stations in Kuwait and Iran), many of them are 2,000 km or more apart. In the absence of a scientific basis for optimizing the duration of atmospheric sampling, historically scientists used a integration times from 24 hours to 14 days for radionuclides (Thomas et al. 1977). This was entirely adequate in the past because the sources of signals were far away and large, meaning that they were smeared over many days by the time they had travelled 10,000 km. The Fukushima event pointed out the unacceptable delay time (72 hours) between the start of sample acquisition and final data being shipped. A scientific basis for selecting a sample duration time is needed. This report considers plume migration of a nondecaying tracer using archived atmospheric data for 2011 in the HYSPLIT (Draxler and Hess 1998; HYSPLIT 2011) transport model. We present two related results: the temporal duration of the majority of the plume as a function of distance and the behavior of the maximum plume concentration as a function of sample collection duration and distance. The modeled plume behavior can then be combined with external information about sampler design to optimize sample durations in a sampling network.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Investigation of condensed products of graphite evaporation in an electric arc in argon and helium atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition of products formed in the discharge chamber at the synthesis of nanostructures by arc discharge was investigated. The fullerene soot obtained in an argon atmosphere was shown to contain at leas...

V. I. Podgornyi; S. D. Kushch; A. N. Yakovlev

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra  

SciTech Connect

A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); [Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); [Liege Univ., Liege (Belgium); [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction The availability of a rapid highly accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model is essential to meet the objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model must be capable of computing radiance at spectral intervals consistent with the monochromatic spectral variation of the atmospheric molecular absorption. The resolution of the spectrometers to be deployed at the ARM sites, 0.1 cm-1 and less, will provide an important assessment of our capability to perform radiative transfer calculations in the multiply scattered environment. A second important application forthe high-accuracy high-resolution model is to provide parameterizations and validations for

28

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric cospectral similarity for temperature and water vapor isotope fluxes. mixing ratio generator Routine field use in water vapor isotope research. The unit generates a stable water vapor mixing ratio by measuring

Minnesota, University of

29

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling  

SciTech Connect

One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effects of land use on surfaceatmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...27 November 2011 research-article Articles...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...boundary layer using a research aircraft in Sabah...exchange fluxes of energy and trace gases...Geophys. Res. Abstracts 12, EGU2010-15408...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Investigation of Atmospheric Transmission in the Crimea (Ukraine) in the Twentieth Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic monitoring of spectral atmospheric transmission (SAT) has been conducted in the Crimea (a peninsula in Ukraine) since 1996. A sun-tracking solar photometer that records signals in five spectral regions selected by interference filters ...

E. I. Terez; G. A. Terez

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleation and growth of atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and a theoretical study of atmospheric molecular complexes and clusters. The nucleation rate was considerably enhanced in the presence of cis-pinonic acid and ammonia. The composition of the critical cluster was estimated from the dependence...

Zhao, Jun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of HCCI Combustion of Diethyl Ether and Ethanol Mixtures Using Carbon 14 Tracing and Numerical Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Despite the rapid combustion typically experienced in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), components in fuel mixtures do not ignite in unison or burn equally. In our experiments and modeling of blends of diethyl ether (DEE) and ethanol (EtOH), the DEE led combustion and proceeded further toward completion, as indicated by {sup 14}C isotope tracing. A numerical model of HCCI combustion of DEE and EtOH mixtures supports the isotopic findings. Although both approaches lacked information on incompletely combusted intermediates plentiful in HCCI emissions, the numerical model and {sup 14}C tracing data agreed within the limitations of the single zone model. Despite the fact that DEE is more reactive than EtOH in HCCI engines, they are sufficiently similar that we did not observe a large elongation of energy release or significant reduction in inlet temperature required for light-off, both desired effects for the combustion event. This finding suggests that, in general, HCCI combustion of fuel blends may have preferential combustion of some of the blend components.

Mack, J H; Dibble, R W; Buchholz, B A; Flowers, D L

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pb deposition Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Pollution... 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... ANTHROPOGENICNATURAL 12;Chapter 2: Sources and...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric bulk deposition Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Pollution... 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... ANTHROPOGENICNATURAL 12;Chapter 2: Sources and...

37

Experimental Investigations of the Lean Blowout Limit of Different Syngas Mixtures in an Atmospheric, Premixed, Variable-Swirl Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Investigations of the Lean Blowout Limit of Different Syngas Mixtures in an Atmospheric, Premixed, Variable-Swirl Burner ... The observed higher LBO limit of the diluted generic syngas could be due to the effect of N2 addition on the adiabatic flame temperature (Figure 18) and burning velocity of the generic syngas. ... The LSI does not need to undergo significant alteration to operate with the hydrocarbon fuels but needs further studies for adaptation to burn dild. ...

Parisa Sayad; Alessandro Schnborn; Jens Klingmann

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

ARM - Evolution of the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides clues as to the composition of the early atmosphere. Volcanic emissions include nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and trace gases such as argon. Although oxygen,...

39

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

40

Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data  

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Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Methane, Cape Meares Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data Base for the Period 1979-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1007 data Data (DB1007) Investigators M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data base presents continuous automated atmospheric methane (CH4) measurements taken at the atmospheric monitoring facility in Cape Meares, Oregon, by the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology. The Cape Meares data represent some 119,000 individual atmospheric methane measurements carried out during 1979-1992. Analysis of ambient air (collected 12 to 72 times daily) was carried out by means of an automated sampling and measurement system, using the method of gas chromatography and

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust exhaust experiment It has previously been difficult to identify the emissions of diesel exhaust until reactive with organic compounds such as alkanes which are present in diesel exhaust emissions. The reaction

Collins, Gary S.

42

Numerical investigation of pulse-modulated atmospheric radio frequency discharges in helium under different duty cycles  

SciTech Connect

Experiments observed that the pulse duty cycle has effects on the plasma homogeneity in pulse-modulated radio frequency (rf) discharges. In this paper, pulse-modulated rf (13.56 MHz) helium discharges are theoretically investigated using a two dimensional fluid model. With the pulse period being fixed to 15 {mu}s, it is found that when the pulse-on duration is over 4 {mu}s, i.e., the duty cycle is larger than approximately 27%, the discharge transits from an inhomogeneous to a homogeneous mode in every specific part of each pulse cycle under currently-used simulation parameters. More quantitative analysis shows that the discharge becomes more homogeneous as the duty cycle is increased but does not reach complete homogeneity. Possible reasons for the homogeneity improvement are discussed.

Sun Jizhong; Ding Zhengfen; Li Xuechun; Wang Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang Qi [Dalian Institute of Semiconductor Technology, School of Electronics Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Numerical investigation on operation mode influenced by external frequency in atmospheric pressure barrier discharge  

SciTech Connect

The influence of external driving frequency on the discharge mode in the dielectric barrier discharge was investigated with a two-dimensional, self-consistent fluid model. The simulation results show that the helium discharge exhibits three operation modes: Townsend, homogeneous glow, and local glow discharges from the lower frequency (1 kHz) to the higher frequency (100 kHz) under discharge parameters specified in this work. The discharge operates in a Townsend mode when the driving frequency varies from 1 to about 7 kHz; while it exhibits homogenous glow characteristics in an approximate range from 7 to 65 kHz; when the external frequency exceeds 65 kHz, it turns into a local glow discharge. The effects of external driving frequency on the discharge mode were revealed and the physical reasons were discussed.

Wang Qi [Dalian Institute of Semiconductor Technology, School of Electronics Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun Jizhong; Wang Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Magnetic resonance investigation of Zn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O properties influenced by annealing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

ZnO is an attractive system for a wide variety of practical applications, being a chemically stable oxide semiconductor. It has been shown that Fe doping produces ferromagnetic semiconductor at room temperature. This material, therefore, has the potential for use in spintronic devices such as spin transistors, spin light emitting diodes, very high density nonvolatile semiconductor memory and optical emitters. It is believed that oxygen vacancies and substitutional incorporation are important to produce ferromagnetism in semiconductor oxide doped with transition metal ions. The present paper reports detailed electron paramagnetic resonance investigations (EPR) of the samples in order to investigate how annealing atmosphere (Air and Argon) influenced the magnetic behavior of the samples. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Fe{sup 3+} ions in Zn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O powders with x = 1%, 3% is reported. These samples are interesting to investigate as Fe doping produce ferromagnetism in ZnO, making a promising ferromagnetic semiconductor at room temperature.

Raita, O.; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Stan, M.; Giurgiu, L. M. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Donath 65-103, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Donath 65-103, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University  

SciTech Connect

Coal is the United States most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coals availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

Trembly, J.P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Simultaneous determination of nine trace mono- and di-chlorophenols in water by ion chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel analytical method was proposed for the rapidly simultaneous determination of nine mono-chlorophenols (MCPs) and di-chlorophenols (DCPs) in water samples using eluent generator ion chromatography (IC) coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) in the negative mode. The IC separation was carried out on an IonPac AS11 analytical column (250mmנ4.0mm) using gradient KOH containing 15% acetonitrile as organic modifier at a constant flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The molecular ions m/z [M?H]? 127 and 161 were selected for the quantification in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode for \\{MCPs\\} and DCPs, respectively. The average recoveries were between 80.6% and 92.6%. Within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations were less than 12.1% and 13.3%, respectively. The method allowed the nine objective compounds in water samples to be determined at ?g/L levels. It was confirmed that this method could be used in routine analysis.

Micong Jin; Yiwen Yang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

O'Brien, Timothy E.

49

Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect

Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Multiscale and Multidisciplinary Investigation Of EcosystemAtmosphere CO2 Exchange Over the Rocky Mountains of Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant fraction of Earth consists of mountainous terrain. However, the question of how to monitor the surfaceatmosphere carbon exchange over complex terrain has not been fully explored. This article reports on studies by a team of ...

Jielun Sun; Steven P. Oncley; Sean P. Burns; Britton B. Stephens; Donald H. Lenschow; Teresa Campos; Andrew S. Watt; Russell K. Monson; David J. P. Moore; Jia Hu; Mark Tschudi; David S. Schimel; Steven Aulenbach; William J. Sacks; Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Chun-Ta Lai; Brian Lamb; Eugene Allwine; Teresa Coons; Dennis Ojima; Patrick Z. Ellsworth; Leonel S. L. Sternberg; Sharon Zhong; Craig Clements; Dean E. Anderson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Field Campaign (an AMF2 Deployment)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From October 2012 through September 2013, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the container ship Spirit, operated by Horizon Lines, for the Marine ARM GPCI* Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. During approximately 20 round trips between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, AMF2 obtained continuous on-board measurements of cloud and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; surface meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched every six hours. During two two-week intensive observational periods in January and July 2013, additional instruments were deployed and balloon soundings were be increased to every three hours. These additional data provided a more detailed characterization of the state of the atmosphere and its daily cycle during two distinctly different seasons. The primary objective of MAGIC was to improve the representation of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition in climate models. AMF2 data documented the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in a variety of marine cloud types.

54

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Atmospheric Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

56

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Pat Matthews

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981 Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO Monitoring Program DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp007 data Data (NDP-007) PDF PDF Investigators D. J. Beardsmore and G. I. Pearman Methods From 1972 through 1981, air samples were collected in glass flasks from aircraft at a variety of latitudes and altitudes over Australia, New Zealand, and Antarctica. The samples were analyzed for CO2 concentrations with nondispersive infrared gas analysis. The resulting data contain the sampling dates, type of aircraft, flight number, flask identification number, sampling time, geographic sector, distance in kilometers from the listed distance measuring equipment (DME) station, station number of the

58

Detailed investigation of a pulverized fuel swirl flame in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

A novel approach to oxycoal flame stabilization has been developed at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University [D. Toporov, M. Foerster, R. Kneer, in: Third Int. Conf. on Clean Coal Technologies for Our Future, Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy, 15-17 May 2007]. The swirl burner design and its operating conditions have been adjusted in order to enforce CO formation thus stabilizing the flame and obtaining a full burnout at levels of O{sub 2} content in the O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture similar to those in air. The paper presents results of detailed numerical and experimental investigations of a stable oxy-fired pulverized coal swirl flame (type-2) obtained with a 21 vol% O{sub 2} concentration. The combustion tests were performed in a vertical pilot-scale furnace (100 kW{sub th}) in the framework of the OXYCOAL-AC research project aiming to develop a membrane-based oxyfuel process. The experimental results concerning gas velocities, gas and particle temperatures, and gas compositions are presented and discussed, focusing on the underlying mechanisms as well as on the aerodynamics of the oxycoal flame. A comparison between measurements and simulations has shown the validity of the numerical method used. The reported data set can be used for validation of numerical models developed for prediction of oxyfuel combustion. (author)

Toporov, D.; Bocian, P.; Heil, P.; Kellermann, A.; Stadler, H.; Tschunko, S.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R. [Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, Eilfschornsteinstrasse 18, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Export of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Asian outflow by fragmenting the pollution plume. INDEX TERMS: 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Atmospheric Dynamics: Mesoscale meteorology; KEYWORDS: warm conveyor belt, TRACE-P, pollution Citation: MariExport of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment C. Mari

Palmer, Paul

60

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU)106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS05-23-05), equation of state experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. AppendixA provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to eachCAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal doserates and the presence of contaminants of concern. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of thecontamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EMSL - trace metals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trace-metals en Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

63

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Investigation of Trace Uranium in Biological Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

added to the program at LANL and should result in much lower minimum detection limits. The flow sheet for the LANL process is shown in Figure 2.[14] The LANL bioassay program is predominately focused on plutonium bioassay as the overall mission... robust procedure for eliminating difficult matrices (also known as harsh environment mass spectrometry), and therefore apt for the problem of urinalysis. One recent publication details the ability of similar systems to preconcentrate plutonium...

Miller, James Christopher

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric deposition Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...7 Summary: 5 Chapter 2: Sources and...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis atmospheric deposition Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...7 Summary: and dry deposition analysis...

68

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE, PROFESSOR MAC 503, Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professors F. Millero and E. Atlas COURSE GOALS: Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry. The course/Circulation/Transport 16. Trace Gas Exchanges and Biogeochemical Cycles;Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchanges 17. Biogeochem (cont

Miami, University of

70

Deriving emissions time series from sparse atmospheric mole fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growth-based Bayesian inverse method is presented for deriving emissions of atmospheric trace species from temporally sparse measurements of their mole fractions. This work is motivated by many recent studies that have ...

Rigby, Matthew

71

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE?¢????s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) following the termination of injection. Based on the loss of urea and the appearance of ammonium, a first order rate constant for urea hydrolysis of 0.18 day-1 rate with an associate Rf for ammonium of 11 were estimated. This rate constant is approximately 6 times higher than estimated for previous field experiments conducted in eastern Idaho. Additionally, DIC carbon isotope ratios were measured for the groundwater. Injected urea had a ???´13C of 40.7???±0.4 ?¢???° compared to background groundwater DIC of ???´13C of -16.6???±0.2?¢???°. Observed decreases in groundwater DIC ???´13C of up to -19.8?¢???° followed temporal trends similar to those observed for ammonium and suggest that both the increase in ammonium and the sift in ???´13C are the result of urea hydrolysis. Although direct observation of calcite precipitation was not possible because of the high pre-existing calcite content in the site sediments, an observed ???´13C decrease for solid carbonates from sediment samples collect following urea injection (compared to pre-injection values) is likely the result of the incorporation of inorganic carbon derived from urea hydrolysis into newly formed solid carbonates.

Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Correlation of mineralogy and trace element leaching behavior in modified in situ spent shales from Logan Wash, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale retorting induces mineral and chemical reactions to occur on the macroscopic and microscopic levels in the kerogen-bearing marlstone. The nature and extent of the reactions is dependent upon process variables such as maximum temperature, time at temperature, atmosphere, and raw shale composition. This report describes the investigation of the mineral, chemical, and trace element release properties of spent shales retrieved from an experimental in situ retort at Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site in Garfield County, Colorado. Correlation between mineralogy of the spent materials and the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements are indicated, and relationships with important process parameters are discussed. The progress of carbonate decomposition reactions and silication reactions is indicative of the processing conditions experienced by the shale materials and influences the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements when the solids are contacted by water. Shale minerals that are exposed to the extreme conditions reached in underground retorting form high temperature product phases including akermanite-gehlenite and diopside-augite solid solutions, kalsilite, monticellite, and forsterie. The persistence of relatively thermally stable phases, such as quartz, orthoclase, and albite provide insight into the extremes of processing conditions experienced by the spent shales. Leachate compositions suggest that several trace elements, including vanadium, boron, fluoride, and arsenic are not rendered immobile by the formation of the high-temperature silicate product phase akermanite-gehlenite.

Peterson, E.J.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

75

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.4.1 Rotated Take-Off Angle Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.4.2 Rotated Cubed Sphere Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.4.3 Ray Tube Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.5 Theoretical Model..., the ray parameters are defined as ?1 = ?(declination), ?2 = ?(azimuth), and ?3 = ?(travel-time). (b) Suppose we have a unit cube centered at the source point, then a ray can be traced from the source point through an evenly discretized point on the face...

Jain, Tarun K

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric Chemistry of the Tropical Brazilian Partner Organizations National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA)1 The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere by the atmospheric oxidation of trace gases to low volatility compounds (Chen et al. 2009). These products can

82

The Fidelity and Trace Norm Distances for Quantifying Coherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the coherence measures induced by fidelity and trace norm, based on the recent proposed coherence quantification in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401, 2014]. We show that the fidelity of coherence does not in general satisfy the monotonicity requirement as a measure of coherence under the subselection of measurements condition. We find that the trace norm of coherence can act as a measure of coherence for qubit case and some special class of qutrits.

Lian-He Shao; Zhengjun Xi; Heng Fan; Yongming Li

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either team or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat trace are dealt with: water freeze protection, chemical freeze protection, viscosity maintenance...

Schilling, R. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

Chappell, W R

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Trace 700 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace 700 Trace 700 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 References: http://www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 Detailed HVAC design tool. Can provide heating and cooling load calculation, system sizing, and energy use. A fairly thorough understanding of HVAC is necessary to use this tool. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

87

A sun glint heliostat for atmospheric spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple arrangement based upon sun glint the brilliant image of the sun behind a convex reflecting surface is used to produce a nearly stationary image of the sun. Using a telescopemirror this image is directed into a spectrometer and is spectrally analyzed for the purpose of remote sensing of trace species in our atmosphere. Typical data using a reflecting sphere are reported and discussed qualitatively in relation to the atmospheric absorbers between the sun and detector. The over?all uses of the system are described and some cautions concerning its limitations are discussed. Alternate geometries and possible variations of the system are described.

A. E. S. Green; R. A. Sutherland; G. Ganguli

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

of SOHO `Waves, Oscillations SmallScale Transient in Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of SOHO `Waves, Oscillations Small­Scale Transient in Solar Atmosphere: A Joint from SOHO TRACE identified from SUMER Atlas Curdt (2001). studied shifts widths 703.87 ? 8 ? 4 coronal ## 706.02 ?(# 6

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gas annual Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactive trace gas with a current lifetime in the atmosphere of w... gas'. The greenhouse effect of one molecule of CH4 ... Source: USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine...

90

CIRRICULUM VITAE: TOM BREIDER Atmospheric Chemistry Post-Doctoral Research Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to changing anthropogenic and dynamic biogenic emissions of trace gases and aerosols. These chemistry and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles. Discuss., 3, 1185-1221, 2010 4) Hossani, R., M. P. Chipperfield, W. Feng, T. J. Breider, E. Atlas, S. A

Jacob, Daniel J.

91

A Static Dilution System to Produce Trace Level Gas Standards for Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......trace chromatographic analysis of extraneous gases...standards for quantitative analysis of O2, N 2 , and other...its versatility and reliability. Introduction High-purity...atmosphere), and in analysis (as a carrier gas for...dried in a silica gel reactor before being admitted......

N.P. Neves; Jr.; C.A. Gasparoto; C.H. Collins

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

93

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

95

Specifying API Trace Birthmark by Abstract Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API trace birthmark is a major class of software birthmarks, where API sequences are defined as software birthmarks to ... , an abstract interpretation-based method for specifying API trace birthmark is proposed ...

Ying Zeng; Fenlin Liu; Jian Chen; Bin Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Response of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled oceanatmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Distributed trace using central performance counter memory  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Title Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Brostoff, Lynn B., Jhanis J. Gonzalez, Paul Jett, and Richard E. Russo Journal Journal of Archeological Science Volume 36 Start Page 461 Issue 2 Pagination 461-466 Date Published 02/2009 Keywords Ancient gold, femtosecond, la-icp-ms, Trace element Abstract In this collaborative investigation, femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the study of a remarkable group of ancient Chinese gold objects in the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Taking advantage of the superior ablation characteristics and high precision of a femtosecond 266 nm Ti:sapphire laser at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, major, minor and trace element concentrations in the gold fragments were quantified. Results validate use of femtosecond LA-ICP-MS for revealing ''fingerprints'' in minute gold samples. These fingerprints allow us to establish patterns based on the association of silver, palladium and platinum that support historical, technical and stylistic relationships, and shed new light on these ancient objects.

99

Privacy vulnerability of published anonymous mobility traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobility traces of people and vehicles have been collected and published to assist the design and evaluation of mobile networks, such as large-scale urban sensing networks. Although the published traces are often made anonymous in that the true identities ... Keywords: mobility traces, privacy, security and protection

Chris Y. T. Ma; David K. Y. Yau; Nung Kwan Yip; Nageswara S. V. Rao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ray Tracing JELLO Brand Paul S. Heckbert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ray Tracing JELL­O ® Brand Gelatin Paul S. Heckbert Dessert Foods Division Pixar San Rafael, CA ABSTRACT Ray tracing has established itself in recent years as the most general image synthesis algorithm for ray tracing Jell­O ® brand gelatin. We believe the method may have application to other brands

Treuille, Adrien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Point-to-curve ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Point-to-curve Ray Tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Oxygen » Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen Atmospheric Trace Gases » Oxygen » Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric oxygen (O2) concentrations at nine currently active stations. Records since 1989 are available from Scripps Pier and Alert, Alaska, although these are not continuous. Continuous records from seven stations extend back to 1993, and data for the other two stations (Cold Bay, Alaska and Palmer Station, Antarctica) are available back to the mid 1990s. These data are from remote locations or other locations situated so that they represent averages over large portions of the globe rather than local background sources.

104

Estimation of atmospheric deposition in coastal Jalisco, western Mexico, using an epiphytic plant (Tillandsia recurvata L. Bromeliaceae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ttllandsia recurvata was used as a biomonitor to ographics. estimate the trace element atmospheric deposition in a tropical dry forest of the Pacific coast of Jalisco, in western Mexico. The plant samples were initially collected gem a population...

Sahagun Godinez, Eduardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

108

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Novel Applications of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Textile Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on (more)

Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

112

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

114

Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

115

Accelerated Ray Traced Animations Exploiting Temporal Coherence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ray tracing is a well-know technique for producing realistic graphics. However, the time necessary to generate images is unacceptably long. When producing the many frames (more)

Baines, Darwin Tarry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

13C and 18O from Carbon Mono-and Dioxide, two proxies for tracing combustion sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Biomass burning Hydrocarbon oxydation Different isotope signals 18O-signal of CO in the atmosphere13C and 18O from Carbon Mono- and Dioxide, two proxies for tracing combustion sources Rolf Siegwolf #12;· Consequences of a traffic accident: Different sources of combustion products, a case study · Air

117

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 3, 14951508, 2003 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/3/1495/ Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Physics Trace gas measurements from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux1 that impact on the chemical composi- tion of the atmosphere and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from the analysis of IMG/ADEOS measurements

118

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after@kom.aau.dk Abstract-- Currently available video traces for scalable en- coded video with more than one layer are a convenient repre- sentation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video

Reisslein, Martin

119

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after video traces for scalable encoded video with more than one layer are a convenient representation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video distortion (RMSE) or quality (PSNR

Reisslein, Martin

120

Representing El Nio in Coupled OceanAtmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Nio characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Site Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and Retrieval Validation Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Moy, Leslie University of Wisconsin-Madison Lesht, Barry Argonne National Laboratory Cress, Ted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Strow, Larrabee Hannon, Scott Fetzer, Eric Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua platform is the first of a new generation of advanced hyperspectral atmospheric sounders with the capability of retrieving temperature and trace gas profiles with high vertical resolution and absolute accuracy. In the past few years ARM has played a major role in the validation of AIRS, including the launch of

122

Oxidation of trace amounts of transplutonium elements to the tetravalent state in solutions of mineral acids and their stabilities  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of trace amounts of americium(IV) in sulfuric and nitric acid solutions as a function of the mineral acid, potassium phosphotungstate, and ammonium persulfate concentrations was investigated. The stability of americium(IV) was studied. The optimal conditions and time of oxidation of trace amounts of americium to the tetravalent state were found on the basis of the experimental data obtained.

Milyukova, M.S.; Varezhkina, N.S.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Malikov, D.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Seven Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics teams and three data sets from the Trace Gas and Aerosol Fluxes science teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-02 C and N Isotopes in Leaves and Atmospheric CO2, Amazonas, Brazil . Data set prepared by A.C. de Araujo, J.P.H.B. Ometto, A.J. Dolman, B. Kruijt, M.J. Waterloo and J.R. Ehleringer. This data set reports delta 13C/12C results for leaf tissues and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), delta 15N/14N ratios for leaf tissue, and leaf carbon and nitrogen concentrations along a topographical gradient in old-growth forests near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Also included are coincident

124

Trace gases, CO2, climate, and the greenhouse effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weather is driven by the suns energy input and the difference between insolation per unit area of the poles and the equator. The energy flux of the Earth is in long?term balanceas much is radiated away by the Earth as is absorbed or the mean temperature would have to increase or decrease steadily (and of course this is not observed). CO2 and other trace gases can cause the Earths mean temperature to rise through the Greenhouse Effect. The mean temperature in the Little Ice Age was only 1?C cooler but large effects were felt especially toward the poles. The CO2 which stays in the atmosphere will raise Earths mean temperature with effects which are relatively certain: a lot of warming at the poles and a very small amount of warming at the equator.

Gordon J. Aubrecht II

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

126

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

128

The effect of atmospheric corona treatment on AA1050 aluminium M. Jariyaboon a,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an alternative for chrome conversion coatings. An atmospheric corona discharge (atmospheric plasma) pro- cess and corrosion resistance. However, they focused only on the prop- erty of thin films after atmospheric plasma deposition and the ex- act effect of the atmospheric corona plasma on aluminium has not yet been investigated

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

129

Transient Responses of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Gradual Changes of Atmospheric CO2. Part I. Annual Mean Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the response of a climate model to a gradual increase or decrease of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The model is a general circulation model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land surface system with global geography and ...

S. Manabe; R. J. Stouffer; M. J. Spelman; K. Bryan

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

131

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

132

Atmospheric chemistry of HFC-227ca: Spectrokinetic investigation of the CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O{sub 2} radical, its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, and the atmospheric fate of the CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O radical  

SciTech Connect

A pulse radiolysis technique was used to study the UV absorption spectrum of CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O{sub 2} radicals, at 230 nm {sigma} = (3.2{+-}0.4) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup -1}. Rate constants for reactions of CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O{sub 2} radicals with NO and NO{sub 2} were determined. The rate constant for reaction of F atoms with CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}H was determined by using an absolute rate technique. The atmospheric fate of CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O radicals is decomposition via C-C bond scission to give CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2} radicals and CF{sub 2}O. In one bar of SF{sub 6} at 296 K, CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O radicals decompose with a rate > 1.5 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. In their turn CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2} radicals are converted into CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}O radicals which also decompose via C-C bond scission. The results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of HFC-227ca. 30 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Geissing, A.M.B.; Feilberg, A.; Mogelberg, T.E.; Sehested, J.; Bilde, M. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)] [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Nielsen, O.J. [Ford Motor Co., Aachen (Germany)] [Ford Motor Co., Aachen (Germany)

1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

136

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CP-violating CFT and trace anomaly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is logically possible that the trace anomaly in four dimension includes the Hirzebruch-Pontryagin density in CP violating theories. Although the term vanishes at free conformal fixed points, we realize such a possibility in the holographic renormalization group and show that it is indeed possible. The Hirzebruch-Pontryagin term in the trace anomaly may serve as a barometer to understand how much CP is violated in conformal field theories.

Yu Nakayama

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERS

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Extreme Precipitation in an Atmosphere General Circulation Model: Impact of Horizontal and Vertical Model Resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To investigate the influence of atmospheric model resolution on the representation of daily precipitation extremes, ensemble simulations with the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 at different horizontal (T213 to T31) and vertical (L31 ...

Claudia Volosciuk; Douglas Maraun; Vladimir A. Semenov; Wonsun Park

145

Improvements of surface functionality of cotton fibers by atmospheric plasma treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to investigate the viability of atmospheric plasma treatment over raw cotton fabric surfaces as ... , the fabric samples were treated with air plasma and argon atmospheric plasma. Thereafter, the ...

H. A. Karahan; E. zdo?an

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Hidden Markov Model Perspective on Regimes and Metastability in Atmospheric Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, data from three atmospheric models are analyzed to investigate the existence of atmospheric flow regimes despite nearly Gaussian statistics of the planetary waves in these models. A hierarchy of models is used, which describes the ...

Christian Franzke; Daan Crommelin; Alexander Fischer; Andrew J. Majda

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Uncertainty in Contaminant Concentration Fields Resulting from Atmospheric Boundary Layer Depth Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depth uncertainty and uncertainty in atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) simulations is investigated by examining profiles of predicted concentrations of a contaminant. Because ...

Brian P. Reen; Kerrie J. Schmehl; George S. Young; Jared A. Lee; Sue Ellen Haupt; David R. Stauffer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Document metadata, tracking and tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metadata is a valuable resource that, among other things, helps manage multiple changes to documents being produced by multiple authors collaborating together. These hidden properties are also of particular importance to forensic investigators who may well seek evidence linking individuals with knowledge of events or particular facts. But are we indiscreet in the level of metadata that we continue to publish? If so, what risks do we run in so doing?

Andrew J Clark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

150

Ray tracing of Jovian kilometric radiation  

SciTech Connect

Results of computer ray tracing of Jovian kilometric from 56.2 kHz to 1 MHz in a model Jovian magnetosphere with an Io torus are presented. Ray tracing calculations indicate that the Io torus presents a propagation barrier to the radiation and that the Jovian kilometric radiation must be generated in the L-O mode from a source near Jupiter on field lines passing through the Io torus. One effect of the Io torus is to refract the rays away from the magnetic equator forming a shadow zone at radial distances beyond the torus. In general, at radial distances greater than 10 Jovian radii, as the wave frequency increases (>200 kHz) so does the magnetic latitude of the shadow zone. These and other features of the ray tracing calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the observations from the plasma wave receiver and planetary radio astronomy experiment on board both Voyager 1 and 2.

Green, J.L.; Gurnett, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Predicting mesh density for adaptive modelling of the global atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...under investigation for atmospheric modelling for some time...atmosphere, using the shallow water equations-a necessary...to solve the shallow water equations on fixed meshes...discussed in 3. The mesh generator and the predictive adaptive...Solving the shallow water equations on polygons...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tracing Paleoclimate over the Past 25,000 Years Using Evidence from Radiogenic Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this dissertation is to apply radiogenic isotopes extracted from marine sediments to investigate aspects of global climate change over the past 25 kyr, especially ocean and atmospheric circulation, continental aridity, and hydrology...

Xie, Ruifang

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE 700  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

700 700 TRACE 700 logo. Trane's TRACE 700 software - the latest version of Trane Air Conditioning Economics - brings the algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) to the familiar Windows operating environment. Use it to assess the energy and economic impacts of building-related selections such as architectural features, comfort-system design, HVAC equipment selections, operating schedules, and financial options. Flexible data entry, coupled with multiple views and "drag-and-drop" load assignments, simplify the modeling process and help you identify optimal zoning and plant configurations. Compare up to four alternatives for a single project by modeling various air distribution and mechanical

154

Trace fossil assemblages in selected shelf sandstones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10... with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10...

Locke, Kathleen Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

156

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

157

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

158

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

159

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

160

Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A compositional trace semantics for Orc Dimitrios Vardoulakis and Mitchell Wand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compositional trace semantics for Orc Dimitrios Vardoulakis and Mitchell Wand Northeastern University dimvar@ccs.neu.edu wand@ccs.neu.edu Abstract. Orc [9] is a language for task orchestration. It has binding, and proving an adequacy theorem to relate them. Also, we investigate strong bisimulation in Orc

Strickland, Stevie

162

Tracing compressed curves in triangulated surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple path or cycle in a triangulated surface is normal if it intersects any triangle in a finite set of arcs, each crossing from one edge of the triangle to another. We describe an algorithm to "trace" a normal curve in O(min set{X, n2log ... Keywords: computational topology, geodesics, normal coordinates

Jeff Erickson; Amir Nayyeri

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods T. Ueda * M. Nakahara...H. Suzuki ** * Division of Marine Radioecology, National Institute...Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Cooperation, Tokyo...Co and Cs in 5 species of marine cephalopods were determined......

T. Ueda; M. Nakahara; T. Ishii; Y. Suzuki; H. Suzuki

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solar Semidiurnal Tide in the Dusty Atmosphere of Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical coupling due to the solar semidiurnal tide in Mars's atmosphere, and effects on zonal mean temperature and wind structures, are investigated using a numerical model. The model provides self-consistent solutions to the coupled zonal mean ...

Jeffrey M. Forbes; Saburo Miyahara

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was...2 con...

F. Ouni; A. Khacef; J. M. Cormier

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

167

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

168

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

169

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

171

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 49414956 Ground-based and aircraft measurements of trace gases in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 815E, Rutherford St., Upton, NY 11973, USA b Chemistry/Physics, downtown Phoenix Super Site, and downwind Usery Pass surface stations. Air masses entering the metropolitan in the region. Calculated ozone production rate and efficiency varied from 1 to 7 ppbv h?1 , and 1­3 molecules

172

The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is hilly, having peaks above 500 m a.s...The ground-based oil palm plantation measurements...ToF-MS). The m/z 82 peak is greater over regions of oil palm, which is consistent...nearby Sabahmas oil palm plantation. Peaks are assigned, as...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud hydrometeors (water drops, ice particles, and, particularlyATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259 Simulations of drop fall turbulence. The model permits us to generate different realizations of the random velocity field component

Mark, Pinsky

174

The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the effects of atmospheric plasma on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) forests. Tall and high CNTs forests have been successfully grown on a large scale using a newly developed system called atmospheric pressure ... Keywords: Atmospheric pressure, Carbon nanotubes, Mass production, Plasma effects, Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Seok Seung Shin; Bum Ho Choi; Young Mi Kim; Jong Ho Lee; Dong Chan Shin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

176

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 2851}2863 Resolution of pollutant concentrations in the boundary 1999 Abstract This paper investigates the solution of a 3D atmospheric dispersion problem using a time to solve the atmospheric di!usion equation. Preliminary studies of dispersion from a single source

Utah, University of

177

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

178

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning: Supplies LDPE 60ml bottles (nalgene) ACS grade Hydrochloric acid Trace metal grade nitric acid Day 1 1. Submerge 60ml bottles for up to three uses) 2. Rinse 3x in milli-q (DI) water 3. Fill bottles with 2% trace metal grade nitric

Paytan, Adina

179

Cell treatment and surface functionalization using the atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma torch (APGD-t).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma torch (APGD-t ) was used to treat cell cultures to investigate potential reactions with biological tissue. The plasma jet (more)

Yonson, Sara.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air : plasma characterisation for skin therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A pulsed atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device operating in air is investigated for medical applications such as for skin disinfection and promotion of wound (more)

Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheres final project Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 10 A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric Summary: ) into equation (2.26)...

182

Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

185

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

Zevenhoven, Ron

189

The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA (Amazon) LBA (Amazon) The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Overview [LBA Logo] The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international research initiative conducted from 1995-2005 and led by Brazil. The LBA Project encompasses several scientific disciplines, or components. The LBA-ECO component focuses on the question: "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amazonia?" The Amazon rain forest or Amazonia, is the largest remaining expanse of tropical rain forest on Earth, harboring approximately one-third of all Earth's species. Although the rain forest's area is so large that it

190

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FL Kansas City, MO Lake Charles, LA Los Angeles, CAFL Kansas City, MO Lake Charles, LA Los Angeles, CA

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Products from Principal Investigators  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

192

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. R. Holmes (1977): Nitrogen Dioxide Photolysis in the LosO3 Ozone NO Nitric Oxide NO2 Nitrogen Dioxide NO3 NitrateNitrogen Pentoxide HONO Nitrous Acid HNO3 Nitric Acid HNO4 Peroxynitric Acid HO2H Hydrogen Peroxide CO Carbon Monoxide SO2 Sulfur Dioxide

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

known amounts of ethylene, propane, propylene, n-butane, n-3 ppm -1 min -1 . (Primarily propane) ALK3 Alkanes and other

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Numerical Investigation of Light Scattering by Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relatively small particles) is combined with the im- proved geometric-optics method (IGOM) that is only applicable for large particles. The Koch-fractal geometry is introduced to model the light scattering properties of aerosol, and performs an excellent job...

Liu, Chao

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigating jets in the lower-to-mid solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´ay-Siebenb¨urgen Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre Department of Applied Mathematics The University

196

Trace elements in co-combustion of solid recovered fuel and coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element partitioning in co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was studied in an entrained flow reactor. The experiments were carried out at conditions similar to pulverized coal combustion, with SRF shares of 7.9wt.% (wet basis), 14.8wt.% and 25.0wt.%. In addition, the effect of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on trace element partitioning was investigated. The trace elements studied were As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn, since these elements were significantly enriched in SRF as compared to coal. During the experiments, bottom ash was collected in a chamber, large fly ash particles were collected by a cyclone with a cut-off diameter of ~2.5?m, and the remaining fly ash particles were gathered in a filter. It was found that when coal was co-fired with SRF, the As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn content in filter ash/cyclone ash increased almost linearly with their content in fuel ash. This linear tendency was affected when the fuels were mixed with additives. The volatility of trace elements during combustion was assessed by applying a relative enrichment (RE) factor, and TEMEDS analysis was conducted to provide qualitative interpretations. The results indicated that As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were highly volatile when co-firing coal and SRF, whereas the volatility of Cr was relatively low. Compared with coal combustion, co-firing of coal and SRF slightly enhanced the volatility of Cd, Pb and Zn, but reduced the volatility of Cr and Sb. The Cl-based additives increased the volatility of Cd, Pb and As, whereas addition of ammonium sulphate generally decreased the volatility of trace elements. Addition of kaolinite reduced the volatility of Pb, while the influence on other trace elements was insignificant. The results from the present work imply that trace element emission would be significantly increased when coal is co-fired with SRF, which may greatly enhance the toxicity of the dusts from coal-fired power plant. In order to minimize trace element emission in co-combustion, in addition to lowering the trace element content in SRF, utilizing SRF with low Cl content and coal with high S and aluminosilicates content would be desirable.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

199

Atmospheric Flow Development and Associated Changes in Turbulent Sensible Heat Flux over a Patchy Mountain Snow Cover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we numerically investigated the small-scale boundary layer dynamics and the energy balance over a fractional snow-cover. The atmospheric boundary layer flows over a patchy snow-cover were calculated with an atmospheric model (...

Rebecca Mott; Michael Lehning; Megan Daniels; Michael Lehning

200

Trace and ultratrace metals in bottled waters: Survey of sources worldwide and comparison with refillable metal bottles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bottled waters from diverse natural and industrial sources are becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Several potentially harmful trace metals (Ag, Be, Li, Ge, Sb, Sc, Te, Th, U) are not monitored regularly in such waters. As a consequence, there is extremely limited data on the abundance and potential health impacts of many potentially toxic trace elements. Containers used for the storage of bottled waters might also increase trace metal levels above threshold limits established for human consumption by the EPA or WHO. Applying strict clean room techniques and sector field ICPMS, 23 elements were determined in 132 brands of bottled water from 28 countries. In addition, leaching experiments with high purity water and various popular metal bottles investigated the release of trace metals from these containers. The threshold limits for elements such as Al, Be, Mn and U in drinking water were clearly exceeded in some waters. Several bottled waters had Li concentrations in the low mg/L range, a level which is comparable to blood plasma levels of patients treated against manic depression with Li-containing drugs. The rate of release of trace metals from metal bottles assessed after 13days was generally low, with one exception: Substantial amounts of both Sb and Tl were released from a commercially available pewter pocket flask, exceeding international guidelines 5- and 11-fold, respectively. Trace metal levels of most bottled waters are below guideline levels currently considered harmful for human health. The few exceptions that exist, however, clearly reveal that health concerns are likely to manifest through prolonged use of such waters. The investigated coated aluminium and stainless steel bottles are harmless with respect to leaching of trace metals into drinking water. Pocket flasks, in turn, should be selected with great care to avoid contamination of beverages with harmful amounts of potentially toxic trace metals such as Sb and Tl.

Michael Krachler; William Shotyk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

202

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos ... In the positive ion mode, protonated water hydrates (H3O+(H2O)n) generated by the corona discharge in the chamber diluent air were responsible for the protonation of analytes, and the ions that were mass analyzed were mainly protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and their protonated homo- and heterodimers. ... Methyl nitrite, 2-propyl nitrite and N2O5 were prepared and stored as described previously,(8, 10) and O3 in O2 diluent was generated using a Welsbach T-408 ozone generator. ...

Sara M. Aschmann; Ernesto C. Tuazon; William D. Long; Roger Atkinson

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

Gerlich, Gerhard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

3, 20272058, 2003 Trace gas IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux 1 , J. Hadji-Lazaro 1 , S. Turquety 1 gas abundances in the troposphere were obtained from10 sparsely distributed measurement sites

205

Atmospheric chemistry of gaseous diethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of diethyl sulfate (DES) has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants (in cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DES with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by FTIR spectroscopy and are <3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and {le}2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}23}, respectively. The reactivity of DES toward OH radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from {ge}1 day with respect to reaction with water to >12 years with respect to ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DES within an urban air parcel is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmospheric species studied. No evidence has been found for the formation of DES or related compounds during the ozonolysis of olefins in the presence of SO{sub 2} and ethanol.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

207

Clogging and Lump Formation During Atmospheric Plasma Spraying with Powder Injection Downstream the Plasma Gun  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed to numerically and experimentally investigate lump formation during atmospheric plasma spraying with powder injection downstream the plasma gun exit. A first set of investigations...2-7wt.%Y2O3.....

Isabelle Choquet; Stefan Bjrklund; Jimmy Johansson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Synopsis of Mackenzie GEWEX Studies on the Atmospheric-Hydrologic System of a Cold Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric-hydrologic system of the Mackenzie River Basin (MRB) shares many traits special to the world cold regions. MAGS investigators used a variety of research methods (field investigations, remote se...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Accident Investigations  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and activities.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Trace element content of magnetohydrodynamic coal combustion effluents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element contents from effluents of a simulated coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) combustion process have been determined using thermal neutron activation analysis techniques. The quality control consi...

M. S. Akanni; V. O. Ogugbuaja; W. D. James

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks . Abstract: Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to...

212

Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces Alan Dix does not attempt to address the whole question, but focuses on a phenomenological semantics

Dix, Alan

213

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

215

Tracing The Largest Seasonal Migration on Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is estimated that over 3.6 billion passengers are travelling during the Chinese Spring Festival travel season. They leave their working cities and return their hometowns to enjoy annual family time, and back to cities after the holiday. In this study, with the massive location-based data collected from millions of smartphone users, we propose a novel method to trace the migration flow and explore the migration patterns of Chinese people. From the temporal perspective, we explore the migration trend over time during a 34-days period, about half a month before and after the Spring Festival. From the spatial perspective, the migration directions and routes are estimated and quantified, and the migration flow is visualized. The spatial range of influence of developed regions could be reflected with the destinations of migration, the migration destinations and originations have obvious characteristic of geographical proximity.

Wang, Xianwen; Mao, Wenli; Hu, Zhigang; Gu, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Southeast Pacific atmospheric composition and variability sampled along 20?S during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Climate-Atmosphere-Land Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was conducted from 15 October to 15 November 2008 in the South East Pacific region to investigate interactions between land, sea and atmosphere in this unique tropical eastern ocean environment and to improve the skill of global and regional models in representing the region. This study synthesises selected aircraft, ship and surface site observations from VOCALS-REx to statistically summarise and characterise the atmospheric composition and variability of the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) and Free Troposphere (FT) along the 20{sup o} S parallel between 70{sup o} W and 85{sup o} W. Significant zonal gradients in mean MBL sub-micron aerosol particle size and composition, carbon monoxide, ozone and sulphur dioxide were seen over the campaign, with a generally more variable and polluted coastal environment and a less variable, more pristine remote maritime regime. Gradients are observed to be associated with strong gradients in cloud droplet number. The FT is often more polluted in terms of trace gases than the MBL in the mean; however increased variability in the FT composition suggests an episodic nature to elevated concentrations. This is consistent with a complex vertical interleaving of airmasses with diverse sources and hence pollutant concentrations as seen by generalised back trajectory analysis, which suggests contributions from both local and long-range sources. Furthermore, back trajectory analysis demonstrates that the observed zonal gradients both in the boundary layer and the free troposphere are characteristic of marked changes in airmass history with distance offshore - coastal boundary layer airmasses having been in recent contact with the local land surface and remote maritime airmasses having resided over ocean for in excess of ten days. Boundary layer composition to the east of 75{sup o} W was observed to be dominated by coastal emissions from sources to the west of the Andes, with evidence for diurnal pumping of the Andean boundary layer above the height of the marine capping inversion. The climatology presented here aims to provide a valuable dataset to inform model simulation and future process studies, particularly in the context of aerosol-cloud interaction and further evaluation of dynamical processes in the SEP region for conditions analogous to those during VOCALS-REx.

Allen, G.; Kleinman, L.; Coe, H.; Clarke, A.; Bretherton, C.; Wood, R.; Abel, S. J.; Barrett, P.; Brown, P.; George, R.; Freitag, S.; McNaughton, C.; Howell, S.; Shank, L.; Kapustin, V.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Lee, Y.-N.; Springston, S.; Toniazzo, T.; Krejci, R.; Fochesatto, J.; Shaw, G.; Krecl, P.; Brooks, B.; McKeeking, G.; Bower, K. N.; Williams, P. I.; Crosier, J.; Crawford, I.; Connolly, P.; Covert, D.; Bandy, A. R.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

218

Insect Trace Fossil Associations in Paleosols: The Coprinisphaera Ichnofacies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Namibia Sossus Sand (Khommabes Car-bonates) Late Pleistocene...from the Pleistocene Khommabes Car-bonates of Namibia are not...1993, Trace fossils from a Car-boniferous turbiditic lake...1985, Trace fossils from the Panther Member, Star Point Formation...

JORGE F. GENISE; M. GABRIELA MNGANO; LUIS A. BUATOIS; JOS H. LAZA; MARIANO VERDE

219

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1. Wang,6 D. R. Blake,7 E. Atlas,8 A. Fried,8 B. Potter,9 M. A. Avery,10 G. W. Sachse,10 S. T. Sandholm,11 the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment are used in conjunction

Clarke, Antony

220

Reasoning by Assumption: Formalisation and Analysis of Human Reasoning Traces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the traces acquired in experiments undertaken. 1 Introduction Practical reasoning processes are often not limited to single reasoning steps, but extend to traces or trajectories of a number of interrelated by assumption'. This (non-deductive) practical reasoning pattern in- volves a number of interrelated reasoning

Treur, Jan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water By Daniel D. Snow, Ph.D. Director traces of drugs in the public drinking water supplies of 24 major U.S. metropolitan areas. This has in drinking water supplies is not new, but the classes of contaminants being tested for are. Pharmaceuticals

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

222

The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to map artificial night sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on the computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere which allows a fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. We present here up-to-date Extended Garstang Models (EGM) which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution DMSP-OLS satellite measurements of artificial light emissions and to GTOPO30 digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the World at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atm...

Cinzano, Pierantonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrodynamics of Embedded Planets' First Atmospheres. II. A Rapid Recycling of Atmospheric Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following Paper I we investigate the properties of atmospheres that form around small protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by conducting hydrodynamical simulations. These are now extended to three dimensions, employing a spherical grid centred on the planet. Compression of gas is shown to reduce rotational motions. Contrasting the 2D case, no clear boundary demarcates bound atmospheric gas from disc material; instead, we find an open system where gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or, vice versa, when the disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. The simulations do not converge to a time-independent solution; instead, the atmosphere is characterized by a time-varying velocity field. Of particular interest is the timescale to replenish the atmosphere by nebular gas, $t_\\mathrm{replenish}$. It is shown that the replenishment rate, $M_\\mathrm{atm}/t_\\mathrm{replenish}$, can be understood in terms of a modified Bondi accretion rate, $\\sim$$R_\\mathrm{Bondi}^2\\rho...

Ormel, Chris W; Kuiper, Rolf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

226

Separation of climatological imprints of the Kuroshio Extension and Oyashio fronts on the wintertime atmospheric boundary layer: Their sensitivity to SST resolution prescribed for atmospheric reanalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoscale structures of the wintertime marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as climatological imprints of oceanic fronts within the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension (KOE) region east of Japan are investigated, by taking advantage of high horizontal ...

Ryusuke Masunaga; Hisashi Nakamura; Takafumi Miyasaka; Kazuaki Nishii; Youichi Tanimoto

227

Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... preliminary work. The absence of levels of a higher order suggests that the contribution of radon from this source does not represent a significant addition to the total atmospheric level. ... Domestic 0.70

W. ANDERSON; R. C. TURNER

1956-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Larval Behavior and Natural Trace Element Signatures as Indicators of Crustacean Population Connectivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variability in an atlas of trace element signatures forin creating a trace element atlas, our results show thatstage to create a trace element atlas in 2009 (Table 4.2),

Miller, Seth Haylen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part III: Analysis of Global-Mean Response Using Simple Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

International Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (IUAPPA) Symposium and Korean Society for Atmospheric Environment (KOSAE) Symposium, 12th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Earth Observation data for the knowledge of the atmospheric pollutants concentration fields over on pollutant distribution are presently investigated in urban atmospheric pollution researches. This multiInternational Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (IUAPPA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

Distribution of size-fractionated particulate trace metals collected by bottles and in-situ pumps in the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of size-fractionated particulate trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, V, and Co) was investigated in the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea by collection of particulate matter using water bottles (Go-flo) and large volume in-situ pumps (Challenger Oceanic Systems and Services). Trace metal procedural filter blanks for Poretics membrane filters (0.4- and 10 ?m pore size) and Nitex screens (53 ?m mesh size) were sufficiently low that metal concentrations could be measured reliably. These results validate the use of Challenger Oceanics Systems and Services in-situ pumps for collection of particulate trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, V, and Co) in shelf, slope, and open ocean Atlantic waters. In the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea, trace metal concentrations per volume filtered generally decrease with increasing particle size for all metals. In the upper 250 m of slope waters of the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and in the Labrador Sea, trace metal concentrations in all particle sizes are lower than in shelf waters. Higher particulate metal concentrations in shelf waters are consistent with an increase in the supply of these trace metals with proximity to continental sources. In addition, an increase in particulate trace metal concentrations in shelf waters with depth is attributed to an input from resuspended sediment.

Sarah E. Weinstein; S.Bradley Moran

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen and helium traces in type Ib-c supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectroscopic properties of a selected optical photospheric spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are investigated.Special attention is devoted to traces of hydrogen at early phases. The generated spectra are found to match the observed ones reasonably well, including a list of only 23 candidate ions. Guided by SN Ib 1990I, the observed trough near 6300\\AA is attributed to H$\\alpha$ in almost all Type Ib events, although in some objects it becomes too weak to be discernible, especially at later phases. Alternative line identifications are discussed. Differences in the way hydrogen manifests its presence within CCSNe are highlighted. In Type Ib SNe, the H$\\alpha$ contrast velocity (i.e. line velocity minus the photospheric velocity) seems to increase with time at early epochs, reaching values as high as 8000 km s$^{-1}$ around 15-20 days after maximum and then remains almost constant. The derived photospheric velocities, indicate a lower velocity for Type II SNe 1987A and 1999em as compared to SN Ic 1994I and SN IIb 1993J, while Type Ib events display a somewhat larger variation. The scatter, around day 20, is measured to be $\\sim$5000 km s$^{-1}$. Following two simple approaches, rough estimates of ejecta and hydrogen masses are given. A mass of hydrogen of approximately 0.02 $M_\\odot$ is obtained for SN 1990I, while SNe 1983N and 2000H ejected $\\sim$0.008 $M_\\odot$ and $\\sim$0.08 $M_\\odot$ of hydrogen, respectively. SN 1993J has a higher hydrogen mass, $\\sim 0.7$ $M_\\odot$ with a large uncertainty. A low mass and thin hydrogen layer with very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is thus the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe. Some interesting and curious issues relating to oxygen lines suggest future investigations.

A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut; E. Baron; R. P. Kirshner

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Search for Non-Standard Interactions by atmospheric neutrino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of neutral current Non-Standard Interactions in propagation on atmospheric neutrino experiments such as Super-Kamiokande and Hyper-Kamiokande. With the ansatz where the parameters which have strong constraints from other experiments are neglected, we show how these experiments put constraints on the remaining parameters of the Non-Standard Interactions.

Shinya Fukasawa

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modeling of atmospheric corrosion behavior of weathering steel in sulfur dioxide-polluted atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric corrosion resistance of carbon steel (CS) and high-phosphorus weathering steel (WS, Acr-Ten A) was compared after exposure for up to 6 years in Taiwan. In an industrial atmosphere, corrosion kinetics of WS after 3 years of exposure deviated from behavior predicted by the well-known bilogarithmic law. This deviation was simulated using a laboratory accelerated test under cyclic wet/dry conditions with addition of 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). In-situ electrochemical impedance measurements also were carried out in a modified three-electrode cell covered by a thin electrolyte layer to investigate corrosion behavior of WS in SO{sub 2}-polluted environments. Three impedance models were proposed to explain the characteristic corrosion behavior of WS in various stages of exposure.

Wang, J.H.; Shih, H.C. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wei, F.I. [China Steel Corp., Kaoshiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on Almonds with a Fluidized Bed Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigated the use of a fluidized bed atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) as a possible pasteurization methodInactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on Almonds with a Fluidized Bed Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Kalyani Narayanan1, Nathan M. Anderson2, Gregory J. Fleischman2 and Susanne Keller2 1Institute

Heller, Barbara

240

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DECADAL CHANGES IN THE HADLEY CIRCULATION * Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Peking University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DECADAL CHANGES IN THE HADLEY CIRCULATION * YONGYUN HU CHEN ZHOU Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Peking University Beijing, 100871, China The Hadley circulation is one of the most important atmospheric circulations. The main goal of this paper is to investigate whether the Hadley circulation has

Hu, Yongyun

242

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine

243

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. [Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Time Series of Trace Element Concentrations Calculated from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a). A total of 120 samples were collected at sites within the Bay, outside the Golden Gate receives many waste water discharges, especially in areas south of the Dumbarton Bridge, that contain trace

245

A graphics architecture for ray tracing and photon mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, methods were developed to render various global illumination e?ects with rasterization GPUs. Among those were hardware based ray tracing and photon mapping. However, due to current GPU??s inherent architectural limitations, the e...

Ling, Junyi

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A study on some trace elements in Chilean seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Levels of essential and toxic trace elements in six marine species greatly in demand in the international market (canned pink clams, razor clams, clams, king crab, sardines, and frozen albacore tuna fish) were...

N. Gras; L. Munoz; M. Thieck

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Complex ray tracing study of electron cyclotron resonance heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the up-to-date ray tracing study of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of fusion plasmas, energy absorption ... side of the tokamak plasmas approach the electron cyclotron resonance surface step by st...

Liu Hongxiu; Zhao Changlin

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explored. The power and utility of the phase and component streamlines have been demonstrated using synthetic examples and two field cases. The new formulation of streamline tracing provides additional information about the reservoir drive mechanisms...

Kumar, Sarwesh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

250

HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGING OF THE 2004 TRANSIT OF VENUS AND ASYMMETRIES IN THE CYTHEREAN ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the only space-borne optical-imaging observations of the 2004 June 8 transit of Venus, the first such transit visible from Earth since AD 1882. The high-resolution, high-cadence satellite images we arranged from NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) reveal the onset of visibility of Venus's atmosphere and give further information about the black-drop effect, whose causes we previously demonstrated from TRACE observations of a transit of Mercury. The atmosphere is gradually revealed before second contact and after third contact, resulting from the changing depth of atmospheric layers refracting the photospheric surface into the observer's direction. We use Venus Express observations to relate the atmospheric arcs seen during the transit to the atmospheric structure of Venus. Finally, we relate the transit images to current and future exoplanet observations, providing a sort of ground truth showing an analog in our solar system to effects observable only with light curves in other solar systems with the Kepler and CoRoT missions and ground-based exoplanet-transit observations.

Pasachoff, Jay M. [Williams College-Hopkins Observatory, 33 Lab Campus Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Widemann, Thomas [Observatoire de Paris-LESIA, 92190 Meudon (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

Anderson, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rothganger, Fredrick (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Detailed Atmosphere Modeling for the Neutron Star 1E1207.45209: Evidence of Oxygen/Neon Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive investigation of the two broad absorption features observed in the X-ray spectrum of the neutron star 1E1207.4-5209 based on a recent analysis of the 260 ks XMM-Newton data by Mori et al. Expanding on earlier work by Hailey & Mori, we have examined all previously proposed atmospheric models for 1E1207.4-5209. Using our atomic code, which rapidly solves Schrdinger's equation for arbitrary ions in strong magnetic field, we have systematically constructed atmospheric models by calculating polarization-dependent LTE opacities and addressed all the physics relevant to strongly magnetized plasmas. We have been able to rule out virtually all atmospheric models because they either do not sustain an ionization balance consistent with the claimed atmosphere composition or because they predict line strengths and line widths that are inconsistent with the data. Only oxygen or neon atmospheres at B ~ 1012 G provide self-consistent atmospheric solutions of the appropriate ionization balance that also have line widths, strengths, and energies consistent with the observations. The observed features are likely composed of several bound-bound transition lines from highly ionized oxygen/neon, and they are broadened primarily by motional Stark effects and magnetic field variation over the line-emitting region. Further considerations of plausible mechanisms for the formation of a mid-Z atmosphere likely rule out neon atmospheres and have important implications for the fallback mechanism in supernova ejecta. Future high-resolution spectroscopy missions such as Constellation-X will be able to resolve predicted substructure in the absorption features and will measure magnetic field strength and gravitational redshift independently to better than 10% accuracy.

Kaya Mori; Charles J. Hailey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Investigations into the Utility of an Inorganic Salt Eutectic Column for Trace Hydrocarbon Determinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......components of both the alkane and PAH mixtures to active sites. While Snowdon and Peake (1) worked with crude oil and oil shale extracts, and the workers of Reference 5 appear to have injected hydrocarbons onto similar columns at 500 ng/compo......

A.C. Butler; R.R. Sibbald

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the upstream oil and gas industry has dealt with some of the most challenging metering applications. One of these is the measurement of water percentage at the point of allocation. It is an essential requirement when test separators...

Liu, Jin

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using {mu}-XRF  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system ({mu}-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 {mu}m output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 {mu}m in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Patologia, HCFM/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Laser Based Techniques for Ultra Trace Isotope Production, Spectroscopy and Detection  

SciTech Connect

A variety of research activities in the field of fundamental and applied nuclear physics has evolved in the last years using resonantly tuned radiation from powerful lasers. The technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy has delivered outstanding results and found broad acceptance in the last years as a particularly efficient and highly selective method for rare and exotic radioisotope studies. It is used for production, spectroscopy and detection of these species and provides complete isobaric, high isotopic and even some isomeric selection, which altogether is needed for on-line investigation of short lived species far off stability as well as for ultra trace determination. Good overall efficiency pushes the experimental limits of detection in elemental trace analysis down to below 106 atoms per sample, and additionally isotopic selectivity as high as 3 ? 1012 has been demonstrated. The widespread potential of resonance ionization techniques is discussed, focusing on the experimental arrangements for applications in selective on-line isotope production, spectroscopy of rare radioisotopes and ultra trace determination of radiotoxic isotopes like 238Pu to 244Pu, 135,137Cs, 89,90Sr or 41Ca in environmental, technical and biomedical samples.

Wendt, K.; Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Muller, P; Nortershauser, W.; Schmitt, Annette; Schumann, P; Trautmann, Norbert; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solar Coronal Structures and Stray Light in TRACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the 2004 Venus transit of the Sun to constrain a semi-empirical point-spread function for the TRACE EUV solar telescope, we have measured the effect of stray light in that telescope. We find that 43% of 171A EUV light that enters TRACE is scattered, either through diffraction off the entrance filter grid or through other nonspecular effects. We carry this result forward, via known-PSF deconvolution of TRACE images, to identify its effect on analysis of TRACE data. Known-PSF deconvolution by this derived PSF greatly reduces the effect of visible haze in the TRACE 171A images, enhances bright features, and reveals that the smooth background component of the corona is considerably less bright (and hence much more rarefied) than commonly supposed. Deconvolution reveals that some prior conlclusions about the Sun appear to have been based on stray light in the images. In particular, the diffuse background "quiet corona" becomes consistent with hydrostatic support of the coronal plasma; feature contrast is greatly increased, possibly affecting derived parameters such as the form of the coronal heating function; and essentially all existing differential emission measure studies of small features appear to be affected by contamination from nearby features. We speculate on further implications of stray light for interpretation of EUV images from TRACE and similar instruments, and advocate deconvolution as a standard tool for image analysis with future instruments such as SDO/AIA.

C. E. DeForest; P. C. H. Martens; M. J. Wills-Davey

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

259

Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

Venot, Olivia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

MeTAGeM-Trace: Improving trace generation in model transformation by leveraging the role of transformation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the context of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE), generation of traces can be automated using the implicit traceability relationships contained in any model transformation. Besides, if transformations are developed adopting a Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) approach, i.e. promoting the role of models and the level of automation, model transformation will benefit from the promised advantages of MDE in terms of less costly software development while reducing the inherent complexity of coding model transformations. To put these ideas into practice, this work introduces MeTAGeM-Trace, the first prototype of an EMF-based toolkit for the MDD of model-to-model transformations which supports trace generation, i.e. it allows developing model transformations that produce not only the corresponding target models, but also a trace model between the elements of the source and target models involved in the transformation.

lvaro Jimnez; Juan M. Vara; Vernica A. Bollati; Esperanza Marcos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates  

SciTech Connect

The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

Tarasenko, Victor F. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634021, pr. Akademicheskii 2/3 (Russian Federation)

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

264

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

265

A Numerical Study of Methods for Moist Atmospheric Flows: Compressible Equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two common numerical techniques for integrating reversible moist processes in atmospheric flows are investigated in the context of solving the fully compressible Euler equations. The first is a one-step, coupled technique based on using ...

Max Duarte; Ann S. Almgren; Kaushik Balakrishnan; John B. Bell; David M. Romps

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The response of moist convection and the atmospheric general circulation to climate warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, the response of atmospheric circulations to changes in surface temperature is investigated. Both cloud-scale and planetary-scale circulations are considered, and a number of different theoretical and numerical ...

Singh, Martin Simran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Surface modification and aging effect of polysulfonamide yarns treated by atmospheric pressure plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on wettability and dyeability of polysulfonamide ... were investigated. The helium and helium/oxygen plasma-treated PSA yarns were stored for different...K/S......

C. X. Wang; J. C. Lv; D. W. Gao; G. L. Liu; L. M. Jin; J. H. Liu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Decontamination of VX Surrogate Malathion by Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decontamination of the VX surrogate (malathion) by the atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet (APPJ) was investigated. Optical emission ... the neutral gas temperature. The effects of RF input power and ...

Wen-Chao Zhu; Bai-Rong Wang; Hai-Ling Xi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Inactivation of microbes and macromolecules by atmospheric-pressure plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma is ionized gas, which is found in ... be generated artificially. A variety of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently being investigated for their clinical ... reporting on the treatment of patient...

Jan-Wilm Lackmann; Julia Elisabeth Bandow

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Functionalization of Cotton by In-Situ Reaction of Styrene in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cotton fabric was treated using styrene/helium glow plasma at the atmospheric pressure. After the treatment, the substrate ... and frequency, on fragmentation of styrene inside plasma zone was investigated using ...

Dambarudhar Parida; Manjeet Jassal

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Influence of Discharge Atmosphere on the Ageing Behaviour of Plasma-Treated Polylactic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of a plasma treatment on polymers is not permanent, since ... . This paper investigates the influence of discharge atmosphere on the ageing behaviour of plasma-treated PLA foils: these foils are plasma

R. Morent; N. De Geyter; M. Trentesaux

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Excitation of plasma waves in the ionosphere caused by atmospheric acoustic waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transformation of atmospheric acoustic waves into plasma waves in the ionosphere is investigated. The transformation mechanism is based on plasma wave exitation by growing acoustic waves, when ... is reached....

N. Ya. Kotsarenko; R. Prez Enrquez; S. V. Koshevaya

273

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region of the Southern Ocean using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled OceanAtmosphere Mesoscale ...

Natalie Perlin; Simon P. de Szoeke; Dudley B. Chelton; Roger M. Samelson; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Larry W. ONeill

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Large-Eddy Simulation of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layers above a Spectrum of Moving Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Momentum and scalar transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) is driven by a turbulent mix of winds, buoyancy, and surface gravity waves. To investigate the interaction between these processes, a large-eddy simulation (LES) model ...

Peter P. Sullivan; James C. McWilliams; Edward G. Patton

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sea-level response to atmospheric forcing along the north coast of Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data from tide gauges (19901999) at Bandar Abbas and Bushehr combined with atmospheric data at both stations are utilized to investigate the mean sea-level (MSL) response to meteorological forcing functions alon...

S. Hassanzadeh; A. Kiasatpour; F. Hosseinibalam

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Nio ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Impact of Atmosphere and Land Surface Initial Conditions on Seasonal Forecasts of Global Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of land surface and atmosphere initialization on the forecast skill of a seasonal prediction system is investigated, and an effort to disentangle the role played by the individual components to the global predictability is done, via a ...

Stefano Materia; Andrea Borrelli; Alessio Bellucci; Andrea Alessandri; Pierluigi Di Pietro; Panagiotis Athanasiadis; Antonio Navarra; Silvio Gualdi

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model  

SciTech Connect

This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the O{sub x}, HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

Moraes, F.P. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Regional atmospheric pollution; Urban area micrometeorology are large sources of atmospheric pollutants. Their spatial distribution and their temporal evolution can

Ribes, Aurélien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loadings  

SciTech Connect

Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5-MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorofluorocarbons » Chlorofluorocarbons » Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations Globally Averaged Atmospheric CFC-11 Concentrations: Monthly and Annual Data for the Period 1975-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1010 data Data (DB1010) Investigator M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data set presents globally averaged atmospheric concentrations of chlorofluorocarbon 11, known also as CFC-11 or F-11 (chemical name: trichlorofluoromethane; formula: CCl3F). The monthly global average data are derived from flask air samples collected at eight sites in six locations over the period August 1980-July 1992. The sites are Barrow (Alaska), Cape Meares (Oregon), Cape Kumukahi and Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Cape Matatula (American Samoa), Cape Grim (Tasmania), Palmer Station, and the

283

Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Small Interannual Variability of Global Atmospheric Hydroxyl  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nicosia 1645, Cyprus. The oxidizing capacity...air pollution and natural influences. We show...methane and other trace gases oxidized primarily...observations of additional gases oxidized primarily...from a variety of natural and anthropogenic...changes in trace-gas emissions with smoothed...

S. A. Montzka; M. Krol; E. Dlugokencky; B. Hall; P. Jckel; J. Lelieveld

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Meteorology and Atmospheric ISSN 0177-7971  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of precipitation scav- enging are calculated for wet removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ammonia (NH3) using of soluble trace gas in gaseous and liquid phases, mole l-1 c(G) Concentration of soluble trace gas Raindrop diameter, m DG Coefficient of diffusion in a gaseous phase, cm2 s-1 HA Henry's law constant, mole

Elperin, Tov

286

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook followed a Code of Honor, which is stated in this very simple verse: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal that knowledge for the benefit of society. Our most fundamental mission is to help students at all levels, from

288

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

291

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

292

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

293

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

294

Lifetimes and time scales in atmospheric chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as for years with extensive forest fires. Moving beyond atmospheric chemistry, extension of this approach to Earth system models could yield surprises. The coupling across different components of the chemistry-climate system, such as atmospheric...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE Load 700  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Load 700 Load 700 TRACE Load 700 logo. Use TRACE Load 700 software - the building and load design modules of TRACE 700, Trane Air Conditioning Economics - to evaluate the effect of building orientation, size, shape, and mass based on hourly weather data and the resulting heat-transfer characteristics of air and moisture. To assure calculation integrity, the program uses algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). Choose from eight different ASHRAE cooling and heating methodologies, including the Exact Transfer Function. The program encourages "what if" analyses, allowing the user to enter construction details in any order and then easily change the resulting building model as the design progresses. Multiple project views and "drag-and-drop"

296

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 13227 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service (1001 kW-5000kW) Industrial General Service (50 kW and Under) Commercial General Service (51 kW-1000 kW) Commercial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole & Transformer Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Transformer Lighting

297

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composites using atmospheric plasma treatment. J. Appl.of polymer surfaces: atmospheric plasma versus vacuum plasmaA. Morgan, The effect of atmospheric plasma treatment on the

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

Paul H. Wine

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

Model Atmospheres for Low Field Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute model atmospheres and emergent spectra for low field (Bsolar abundance and iron atmospheres. We compare our results to high field magnetic atmospheres, available only for hydrogen. An application to apparently thermal flux from the low field millisecond pulsar PSR J0437--4715 shows that H atmospheres fit substantially better than Fe models. We comment on extension to high fields and the implication of these results for neutron star luminosities and radii.

Mohan Rajagopal; Roger Romani

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

On the energy content of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of the content of sensible heat, potential energy, and latent heat in the atmosphere between...

Stefan L. Hastenrath

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Heat Trace and Functional Determinant in One Dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the spectral properties of the Laplace type operator on the circle. We discuss various approximations for the heat trace, the zeta function and the zeta-regularized determinant. We obtain a differential equation for the heat kernel diagonal and a recursive system for the diagonal heat kernel coefficients, which enables us to find closed approximate formulas for the heat trace and the functional determinant which become exact in the limit of infinite radius. The relation to the generalized KdV hierarchy is discussed as well.

Ivan G Avramidi

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

Instrumental Requirements for Global Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC CH2O, O3, AND NO2...AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC OH, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL...HYDROGEN-CHLORIDE AND WATER AT ANTARCTIC STRATOSPHERIC...TOON, O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND HCL IN...requirements for global atmospheric chemistry. | The field...

D. L. Albritton; F. C. Fehsenfeld; A. F. Tuck

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Space plasma influences on the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 129 0.2 0.6 1.0...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 131 the size and the...satellites probing the space-plasma and atmospheric environments, they provide...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...1978012175 air atmosphere biosphere carbon...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth, which...synchronization rate of 16 khz and the picture...the interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

310

Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

Pan, Feifei

311

Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

Smith, Arthur P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

313

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

314

Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmospheric chemistry/air quality, boundary layer and air pollution meteorology, regional/global climatology MODELING OF MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS AT URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES Our atmosphere is a complex systemAtmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) (http

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

317

Concentrations and origins of atmospheric lead and other trace species at a rural site in northern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors in the aerosol composition data: a biomass burning source, an industrial and coal combustion smallscale coal burning such as in home and institutional heating, was identified as the main source leaded fuels), combustion (e.g., utility boilers), and waste management (e.g., incinerators) [U.S. EPA

Li, Zhanqing

318

Development and Application of a Versatile Balloon-Borne DOAS Spectrometer for Skylight Radiance and Atmospheric Trace Gas Profile Measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the framework of this thesis, a novel balloon-borne DOAS instrument was developed, characterized in the laboratory and employed during 5 stratospheric balloon flights. Its (more)

Weidner, Frank

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...............................................7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and storage in long-term repositories, and (iv) long-term post-depositional migration within the repositories and processing of metals, waste incineration, and industrial processes such as the production of iron and steel FIRES FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION MINING AND SMELTING IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTION WASTE INCINERATION

Short, Daniel

320

Concentrations and Origins of Atmospheric Lead and Other Trace Species at a Rural Site in Northern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition data: a biomass burning source, an industrial and coal combustion source, a secondary aerosol to combustion of leaded gasoline, despite a correlation between lead and CO. Potential source contribution), transportation (e.g., wear of on-road vehicles, aircraft and off-road vehicles using leaded fuels), combustion (e

Dickerson, Russell R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Trace formula for dielectric cavities III: TE modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction of the semiclassical trace formula for the resonances with the transverse electric (TE) polarization for two-dimensional dielectric cavities is discussed. Special attention is given to the derivation of the two first terms of Weyl's series for the average number of such resonances. The obtained formulas agree well with numerical calculations for dielectric cavities of different shapes.

E. Bogomolny; R. Dubertrand

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

323

Generating and Analyzing Symbolic Traces of Simulink/Stateflow Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the model and the simulation traces. We propose a new represen­ tation, called the bounded vertex that enables the development, testing, and rapid prototyping of control software, supported by automated code, the semantics of these models is loosely defined in terms of a simulation engine. The lack of clearly specified

Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

324

Realistic Performance Analysis of WSN Protocols Through Trace Based Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Generic network simulators are often used, but they tend to rely on synthetic models. Because WSN enable trace based WSN simulation by first enhancing an existing WSN profiler that automates. These include simulation area, node density, radio model, noise model, etc. These parameters are used

Han, Qi "Chee"

325

Inferring human mobility patterns from taxicab location traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Taxicabs equipped with real-time location sensing devices are increasingly becoming popular. Such location traces are a rich source of information and can be used for congestion pricing, taxicab placement, and improved city planning. An important problem ... Keywords: hidden markov models, human mobility patterns, taxi cab occupancy, trajectory analysis

Raghu Ganti; Mudhakar Srivatsa; Anand Ranganathan; Jiawei Han

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Learning web-service task descriptions from traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of learning task specific web-service descriptions from traces of users successfully completing a task. Unlike prior approaches, we take a traditional machine-learning perspective to the construction of web-service models ... Keywords: Apprenticeship Learning, Machine Learning, Sample Complexity, Web Services

Thomas J. Walsh; Michael L. Littman; Alexander Borgida

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GROUP TESTING MEETS TRAITOR TRACING Peter Meerwald and Teddy Furon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the restriction of M to K. Many papers have proposed bounds on the minimal num- ber of tests or practical designs noise (q is the false positive test probability) [2]. Sejdinovic and Johnson recently considered bothGROUP TESTING MEETS TRAITOR TRACING Peter Meerwald and Teddy Furon INRIA Rennes Bretagne Atlantique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Trace Environmental Quantitative Analysis: Principles, Techniques and Applications, 2nd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, California State UniVersity, Los Angeles JA0599418 10.1021/ja0599418 CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics and field- based techniques. Loconto's book does a superlative job of introducing the concept of trace edition of this famous handbook continues to provide up-to-date, critically evaluated chemical

Zubarev, Eugene

329

A Feasibility Study: Mining Daily Traces for Home Heating Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

savings as well as 14.9%­59.2% reduction in miss time. Keywords Energy, home heating, daily traces, prediction 1. INTRODUCTION Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) contributes most to a home's energy bills, accounting for 48% of residential energy consumption in the U.S. and 61% in the U.K., 64% in Canada where

Whitehouse, Kamin

330

Age of Neoproterozoic Bilatarian Body and Trace Fossils, White  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Age of Neoproterozoic Bilatarian Body and Trace Fossils, White Sea, Russia: Implications-bearing, shallow marine siliciclastic rocks in the Zimnie Gory section of the White Sea region indicates Ranges, South Australia (18); in the Poleta Formation in the White-Inyo Mountains and Upper Wood Canyon

331

A Parallelisation of Ray Tracing with Diffuse Interreflection Erik Reinhard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include a.i. architectural design, theatre and greenhouse lighting simulations and traffic lighting images of 3D scenes. However, the rendering of complex scenes under advanced lighting circumstances may scenes. It calculates the reflection of light in a scene by tracing the path of light backwards from

Reinhard, Erik

332

CACHING CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERNET AND INTRANET WEB PROXY TRACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CACHING CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERNET AND INTRANET WEB PROXY TRACES Arthur Goldberg, Ilya Pevzner} This paper studies the caching characteristics of HTTP requests and responses that pass through production a large Internet Service Provider (ISP) and 2.0 million entries from an Intranet firewall are studied. We

Goldberg, Arthur P.

333

From transformation traces to transformation rules: Assisting Model Driven Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From transformation traces to transformation rules: Assisting Model Driven Engineering approach. In this paper we are interested in semi-automatically gen- erating labelled graph (model) transformations conform to a particu- lar syntax (meta-model). Those transformations are basic operations in model driven

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

Container throughput estimation leveraging ship GPS traces and open data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, the port container throughput, a crucial measurement of regional economic development, was manually collected by port authorities. This requires a large amount of human effort and often delays publication of this important figure. In this ... Keywords: AIS trace, container throughput estimation, open data

Longbiao Chen, Daqing Zhang, Gang Pan, Leye Wang, Xiaojuan Ma, Chao Chen, Shijian Li

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

336

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

337

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

338

ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY ESTIMATION USING SATELLITE PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current atmospheric density models are not capable enough to accurately model the atmospheric density, which varies continuously in the upper atmosphere mainly due to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity. Inaccurate atmospheric modeling...

Arudra, Anoop Kumar

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Influence of Chemi-ionization and Recombination Processes on Spectral Line Shapes in Stellar Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the chemi-ionization processes in atom- Rydberg atom collisions, as well as the corresponding chemi-recombination processes are considered as factors of influence on the atom exited-state populations in weakly ionized layers of stellar atmospheres. The presented results are related to the photospheres of the Sun and some M red dwarfs as well as weakly ionized layers of DB white dwarfs atmospheres. It has been found that the mentioned chemi ionization/recombination processes dominate over the relevant concurrent electron-atom and electron-ion ionization and recombination process in all parts of considered stellar atmospheres. The obtained results demonstrate the fact that the considered chemi ionization/recombination processes must have a very significant influence on the optical properties of the stellar atmospheres. Thus, it is shown that these processes and their importance for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) modeling of the solar atmospheres should be investigated further.

Mihajlov, Anatolij A; Sreckovic, Vladimir A; Dimitrijevic, Milan S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Atmospheric chemistry of HFC-143a: Spectrokinetic investigation of the CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2][center dot] radical, its reactions with NO and NO[sub 2], and the fate of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O  

SciTech Connect

The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2] radicals, the kinetics of their self-reaction, and their reactions with NO and NO[sub 2] have been studied in the gas phase at 296 K using a pulse radiolysis technique. A long path-length Fourier transform infrared technique was used to study the fate of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O radicals. Absorption cross sections were quantified over the wavelength range 220-300 nm. At 250 nm, [sigma](CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2]) = (2.73 [+-] 0.31) [times] 10[sup [minus]18] molecule[sup [minus]1]. By monitoring the rate of NO[sub 2] formation, k[sub 4] = (1.2 [+-] 0.3) [times] 10[sup [minus]11] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1] was found for the reaction of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2] radical with NO. The reaction of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2] radicals with NO gives CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O radicals. In the atmosphere, >99.33% of the CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O radicals react with O[sub 2] to give CF[sub 3]CHO. By monitoring the rate of NO[sub 2] decay, k[sub 5] = (5.8 [+-] 1.1) [times] 10[sup [minus]12] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1] was found for the reaction of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 2]O[sub 2] radical with NO[sub 2]. The results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of CF[sub 3]CH[sub 3] (HFC-143a). 34 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Nielsen, O.J.; Gamborg, E.; Sehested, J. (Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)); Wallington, T.J.; Hurley, M.D. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States))

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Atmospheric chemistry of CF{sub 3}CFHCF{sub 3} (HFC-227ea): Spectrokinetic investigation of the CF{sub 3}CFO{sub 2}{sup .}CF{sub 3} radical, its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, and fate of the CF{sub 3}CFO{sup .}CF{sub 3} radical  

SciTech Connect

The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the CF{sub 3}CFO{sub 2}{sup .}CF{sub 3} radical, the kinetics of its self-reaction and reactions with NO and NO{sub 2} have been studied in the gas phase at 296 K using a pulse radiolysis technique. A long-path-length Fourier transform infrared technique was used to study the fate of the CF{sub 3}CFO{sup .}CF{sub 3} radical. Absorption cross sections for the CF{sub 3}CFO{sub 2}{sup .}CF{sub 3} radical were quantified over the wavelength range 220-270 nm. The rate constant for the CF{sub 3}CFO{sub 2}{sup .}CF{sub 3} self-reaction was determined, as well as those of the reaction of CF{sub 3}CFO{sub 2}{sup .}CF{sub 3} radicals with NO and NO{sub 2}. The atmospheric fate of CF{sub 3}CFO{sup .}CF{sub 3} radicals is decomposition via C-C bond scission to give CF{sub 3} radicals and CF{sub 3}C(O)F. In 1000 mbar of SF{sub 6} at 296 K decomposition of CF{sub 3}CFO{sup .}CF{sub 3} radicals proceeds at a rate greater than 1 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. The results are discussed in the context of the atmospheric chemistry of HFC-227ea. 31 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Mogelberg, T.E.; Sehested, J.; Bilde, M. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)] [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Nielsen, O.J. [Ford Forschungscenter Aachen (Germany)] [Ford Forschungscenter Aachen (Germany)

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

ASU EFRC - Principal investigators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal investigators Ana Moore Principal Investigator Subtask 4 Leader Anne Jones Principal Investigator Devens Gust Director of the Center Principal Investigator Don Seo...

343

Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -  

SciTech Connect

This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section, pages A and sqs.

Meot F.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Glenn& #44; J.; Huang& #44; H.; Luccio& #44; A.; MacKay& #44; W.W.; Roser& #44; T.; Tsoupas& #44; N.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion ... In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. ... The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles:? fine particles approximately 0.1?1 ?m in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 ?m in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels (4). ...

Terttaliisa Lind; Jouni Hokkinen; Jorma K. Jokiniemi; Sanna Saarikoski; Risto Hillamo

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Trace element partitioning between type B CAI melts and melilite and spinel: Implications for trace element distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Partition coefficients between intermediate composition melilites and CAI melt are the following: Li, 0.5 size energetics analysis is used to assess isovalent partitioning into the different cation sites, interpreta- tion of the trace element and isotope compositions of CAIs, particularly the light elements Li

Mcdonough, William F.

346

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollutants), "known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects" (see also, in part stemming from anthropogenic sources, i.e. pollution. In wastes and waste-derived fuels the "trace to fouling of turbine blades (mainly Ca)or pollute or poison catalysts (mainly As) or sorbents downstream

Zevenhoven, Ron

347

National Center for Atmospheric Research annual report, fiscal year 1991. Report for 1 October 1990-30 September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) annual report for fiscal year 1991 is presented. NCAR's projects for the period included investigations of air pollution from the oil well fires in Kuwait, a solar eclipse, thunderstorms in central Florida, the El Nino current, greenhouse processes, and upper atmosphere phenomena.

Warner, L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

P8.13 CONTRAIL STUDIES AND FORECASTS IN THE SUBARCTIC ATMOSPHERE ABOVE FAIRBANKS, Martin Stuefer* and Gerd Wendler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the radiative characteristics of contrails are similar to those of thin layers of naturally occurring cirrus are of interest for scientists investigating atmospheric radiation transfer processes, the chemical state of temperatures in the lower atmosphere by reducing the net radiation to the surface during the day and reducing

Stuefer, Martin

349

Trace metal uptake and accumulation pathways in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known of trace metal concentrations and their possible role in the mortality of critically endangered Kemp??s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii). Research described herein characterized concentrations of seven trace metals ?? Ag, Cd...

Wang, Hui-Chen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Trace Reduction for Virtual Memory Simulations Scott F. Kaplan, Yannis Smaragdakis, and Paul R. Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace Reduction for Virtual Memory Simulations Scott F. Kaplan, Yannis Smaragdakis, and Paul R reduction. Neither requires that the simulator be modi ed to accept the reduced trace. This research

Smaragdakis, Yannis

351

Determination of trace impurities in zircaloy-2 and tellurium by spark source mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of trace impurities in zircaloy-2 and tellurium by Spark Source Mass Spectrometry (SSMS) is reported. The advantage of SSMS lies in the fact that along with metallic trace constituents even the n...

K. L. Ramakumar; V. A. Raman; V. L. Sant

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Biomonitoring of trace metal bioavailabilities to the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite along the Iranian coast of the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fouling barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite is a cosmopolitan biomonitor of trace metal bioavailabilities, with an international comparative data set of body metal concentrations. Bioavailabilities of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, V and Zn to A.amphitrite were investigated at 19 sites along the Iranian coast of the understudied Persian Gulf. Commercial and fishing ports showed extremely high Cu bioavailabilities, associated with high Zn bioavailabilities, possibly from antifouling paints and procedures. V availability was raised at one port, perhaps associated with fuel leakage. Cd bioavailabilities were raised at sites near the Strait of Hormuz, perhaps affected by adjacent upwelling off Oman. The As data allow a reinterpretation of the typical range of accumulated As concentrations in A.amphitrite. The Persian Gulf data add a new region to the A.amphitrite database, confirming its importance in assessing the ecotoxicologically significant trace metal contamination of coastal waters across the world.

A. Nasrolahi; B.D. Smith; M. Ehsanpour; M. Afkhami; P.S. Rainbow

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Semi-Volatile Compounds on Atmospheric Particulate Matters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermal desorption (TD) device was developed and coupled to gas chromatograph (GC) or gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds on atmospheric particulate matters (PM). The TD was operated by direct heating and placed on the top of GC injector, leading to high heating rate and easy transfer of analytes to GC without re-focusing of analytes by cold trap. The materials used for supporting PM samples, desorption temperature and time, and types of sample injection were investigated for the detection of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nine n-alkanes. The limits of detection of the proposed TD-GC method were in the range of 0.0140.094 ng for PAHs, and 0.0160.026 ng for n-alkanes, with coefficients of correlation above 0.9975. The TD-GC method was applied to the determination of trace \\{PAHs\\} and n-alkanes on PM10 samples from three cities. The recoveries were in the range of 95%135% (PAHs) and 95%115% (n-alkanes). Finally, the TD was coupled to GC-MS for comparison of the contents of \\{PAHs\\} and n-alkanes on \\{PMx\\} with different particulate size (x = 10, 5, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.1).

Hu MENG; Jing-Hong ZHAO; Chun-Feng DUAN; Liang HAO; Ya-Feng GUAN

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Attack on a TraceZero Cryptosystem Claus Diem and Jasper Scholten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Attack on a Trace­Zero Cryptosystem Claus Diem and Jasper Scholten Institut f?ur Experimentelle

Diem, Claus

356

Reactive Uptake of Trace Metals in the Hyporheic Zone of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Mn oxides in the hyporheic zone enhance trace metal uptake. Reach-scale mass-balance calculations

357

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Gregory Hackett, Kirk Gerdes, Randall Gemmen Phone: (304)285-5279, Gregory.Hackett@NETL.DOE.GOV Utilization of coal as a fuel source for highly efficient integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power generation facilities is technologically and environmentally attractive. IGFC plants are expected to offer the highest efficiency coal gasification processes, even when carbon capture and storage systems are included in the design. One element of IGFC research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is the investigation of syngas cleanup processes for these integrated systems. Of particular interest are the effects of trace elements naturally contained in

358

Measurement of particulate matter and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant with electrostatic precipitators equipped the low temperature economizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The particulate matter and trace elements from a 660MW coal-fired power plant boiler which equipped with a novel electrostatic precipitator were sampled and analyzed. To promote the thermal efficiency of power plants, a low temperature economizer was installed at the inlet of electrostatic precipitator to collect the heat generated from flue gas. The low temperature economizer can reduce flue gas temperature, and then affect the operation of electrostatic precipitator. Therefore, this experiment was carried out to investigate the collection characteristics of this novel electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter. In addition, the distribution of trace elements in solid combustion residues was also studied. The results indicate that the low temperature economizer can markedly decrease the amount of particulate matter at the outlet of electrostatic precipitator. The collection efficiency of electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter is significantly improved by the low temperature economizer, whereby the collection efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM1.0 can reach 99.7% and 99.2%, respectively. Most of the trace elements remain in the fly ash collected by the electrostatic precipitator, and less than 10% remain in the bottom ash, but very rare emit from the electrostatic precipitator. The low temperature economizer not only reduces the emission of particulate matter, but also diminishes the emissions of trace elements in flue gas. The enrichment characteristics of trace elements in submicron particles were also studied.

Chao Wang; Xiaowei Liu; Dong Li; Junping Si; Bo Zhao; Minghou Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences  

SciTech Connect

The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

Elderkin, C.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power There is a large literature on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest

Fulman, Jason

362

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest results is due to Diaconis

Fulman, Jason

363

LES BIG DATA ET LA RELATION CLIENT Quand les traces numriques organisent l'change marchand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LES BIG DATA ET LA RELATION CLIENT Quand les traces numériques organisent l'échange marchand Auteur traces numériques organisent l'échange marchand Résumé : Avec le mouvement de digitalisation du commerce marchands font des comportements des consommateurs. Ces traces numériques doivent donc permettre aux

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

Walter, M.Todd

365

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE? By: Emily courtesy LTSN Bioscience. http://bio.ltsn.ac.uk/imagebank/ Just as trace metals are important to humans to the structural stability of molecules and membranes. For these reasons, incorrect trace metal levels can

Nottingham, University of

366

Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Trace Analysis of Agrochemicals in Food  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Trace Analysis of Agrochemicals in Food ... Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is applied to the rapid, in situ, direct qualitative and quantitative (ultra)trace analysis of agrochemicals in foodstuffs. ... The results proved that DESI allows the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased samples. ...

Juan F. Garca-Reyes; Ayanna U. Jackson; Antonio Molina-Daz; R. Graham Cooks

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

What we can learn from atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics potential of future measurements of atmospheric neutrinos is explored. Observation of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ driven sub-dominant effects and $\\theta_{13}$ driven large matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos can be used to study the deviation of $\\theta_{23}$ from maximality and its octant. Neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined extremely well due to the large matter effects. New physics can be constrained both in standard atmospheric neutrino experiments as well as in future neutrino telescopes.

Sandhya Choubey

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major campaign to quantify the magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters around Mammoth Mountain volcano in eastern California was carried out from 1996 to 1999. The total water flow from all sampled cold springs was >=1.8_107 m3/yr draining an area that receives an estimated

370

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

371

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

372

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

373

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation provides an introduction to the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) initiative, including objectives, program areas, and a general timeline of activities.

376

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fault simulation of combinational circuits based on critical path tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FAULT SIMULATION Ol' COMBINATIONAI, CIRCUITS BASED ON CRITICAL PATH TRACING A Thesis by CHARLES JAMES BURNETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering FAULT SIIUIULATION OF COMBINATlONAL CIRCUITS BASED ON CRITICAL PATH TRACINC A Thesis CHARLES JAMES BURNETT Approved as to style and content by: Don E. Ross (Chair of Committee...

Burnett, Charles James

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Trace determination of lead by helium-4 activation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass samples doped with 61 different trace elements at nominal 500 to 1 ppm level concentrations. We evaluated the measurement sensitivities of two methods for alpha counting, i. e. , surface barrier detector and nuclear track detectors. Detection.... An automated system synchronized irradiation, solenoid operation, and data acquisition. Prior to irradiation, the solenoid was energized to position the aluminum sheet in front of the detector. The cyclotron's beam pulser system then began irradiation...

Vargas Bernal, Maria E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

Zhuang, Qianlai

380

Generation of non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in hetero-phase media of air with water aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations on non-thermal plasma generation using of high-voltage discharge in hetero-phase media of airflow at atmospheric pressure with liquid aerosol are presented in...B. subti...

Yu. S. Akishev; G. I. Aponin; M. E. Grushin

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Biological and Atmospheric Relevant Interfaces: Lipids, Organosulfur Species and Interfacial Water Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Biological and Atmospheric Relevant Interfaces frequency generation is employed to investigate the ordering of water at phospholipid/water interfaces: Lipids, Organosulfur Species and Interfacial Water Structure DISSERTATION Presented in Partial

382

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

383

Impacts of OceanAtmosphere Coupling on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change and Ocean Prediction in the Australian Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of atmosphereocean coupling on predicted tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change and the ocean response in the Australian region. The coupled model comprises the Australian Bureau of Meteorologys Tropical ...

P. A. Sandery; G. B. Brassington; A. Craig; T. Pugh

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Influence of energy contributions to a high-voltage atmospheric-pressure discharge on the efficiency of conversion of ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations of the conversion of ethanol in a high-voltage atmospheric-pressure discharge have been presented. The influence of the energy parameters of the discharge on the yield a...

S. A. Zhdanok; A. V. Krauklis; P. P. Samtsov

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Surface Products over the Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Boundary Forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the uncertainties related to atmospheric fields from reanalysis products used in forcing ocean models. Four reanalysis products, namely from 1) the interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) version ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

386

Climatology of extratropical atmospheric wave packets in the northern hemisphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planetary and synoptic scale wave-packets represents one important component of the atmospheric large-scale circulation. These dissipative structures are able to rapidly transport eddy kinetic energy, generated locally (e.g. by baroclinic conversion), downstream along the upper tropospheric flow. The transported energy, moving faster than individual weather systems, will affect the development of the next meteorological system on the leading edge of the wave packet, creating a chain of connections between systems that can be far apart in time and space, with important implications on predictability. In this work we present a different and novel approach to investigate atmospheric variability, based on the objective recognition of planetary and synoptic wave packets. We have developed an objective tracking algorithm which allows to extract relevant statistical properties of the wave trains as a function of their dominant wavelength. We have applied the algorithm to the daily analysis (every 12h) from 1958-2009...

Grazzini, Federico

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Impact of Atmospheric Chromatic Effects on Weak Lensing Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (i) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction (DCR) and (ii) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shape of a galaxy that has a different spectral energy distribution (SED) than the stars. For (i), we extend a study by Plazas & Bernstein based on analytic calculations that show that DCR leads to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for future surveys, if not corrected. For (ii), we find that the wavelength dependence of seeing leads to significant bia...

Meyers, Joshua E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate June 2013. [1] Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21

389

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

390

Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radio Frequency Signals in Jupiter's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMAGE OF A LARGE UPWARD ELECTRICAL-DISCHARGE...RINNERT K , HDB ATMOSPHERIC ELEC 27 ( 1995...MEASUREMENTS OF THE RF CHARACTERISTICS...JUPITER PLASMA-WAVE OBSERVATIONS...OBSERVATIONS OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL FLASHES...Solar and thermal radiation...relatively large at the beginning...and about non-radiative...sensitive area of 6...

L. J. Lanzerotti; K. Rinnert; G. Dehmel; F. O. Gliem; E. P. Krider; M. A. Uman; J. Bach

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth...interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies of 500 Mhz, this amounts...chang-ing the atmospheric carbon dioxide...in the polar areas. Although...The shaded area indicates the...per-missible atmospheric CO2 level might...emission rates are largest between 2000...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

395

Atmospheric muon background in the ANTARES detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the background due to atmospheric muons in the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope is presented. Two different codes for atmospheric shower simulation have been used. Results from comparisons between these codes at sea level and detector level are presented. The first results on the capability of ANTARES to reject this class of background are given.

S. Cecchini; E. Korolkova; A. Margiotta; L. Thompson

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... MEASUREMENTS of the radon content of the atmosphere were made so long ago as 1905 by Eve1-2 in ... whole seemed to support the original suggestion of Elster and Geitel6 in 1903 that the radon in the atmosphere arises mainly from the soil. These workers noted that the highest ...

W. ANDERSON; W. V. MAYNEORD; R. C. TURNER

1954-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

398

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

Gilleland, Eric

399

Atmospheric Circulation of Eccentric Hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hot-Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse even...

Lewis, Nikole K; Fortney, Jonathan J; Knutson, Heather A; Marley, Mark S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system  

SciTech Connect

There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V. [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand). Faculty of Science

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Atmospheric Environment 37 (2003) 21932205 Atmospheric lifetime as a probe of radical chemistry in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carried out to study OH photochemistry in the troposphere (Eisele et al., 1994; Atlas and Ridley, 1996 study of a very broad range of trace species and included measurements of [OH] (Mount and Williams, 1997

402

Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres V. A. Sreckovic 1 Lj...applicable for the helium plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres described in Koester...study of DB white dwarf atmosphere plasma properties, helium plasmas......

V. A. Sreckovic; Lj. M. Ignjatovic; A. A. Mihajlov; M. S. Dimitrijevic

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

Shapira, Yoram

404

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

Menut, Laurent

405

Study of a dual frequency atmospheric pressure corona plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radio frequency mixing of 2 and 13.56 MHz was investigated by performing experimental measurements on the atmospheric pressurecoronaplasma. As a result of the dual frequency length current density and electron excitation temperature of the plasma were increased while the gas temperature was maintained at roughly the same level when compared to the respective single frequency plasmas. Moreover observation of time-resolvedimages revealed that the dual frequency plasma has a discharge mode of 2 MHz positive streamer 2 MHz negative glow and 13.56 MHz continuous glow.

Dan Bee Kim; S. Y. Moon; H. Jung; B. Gweon; Wonho Choe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gap-dependent transitions of atmospheric microplasma in open air  

SciTech Connect

We report on the gap dependence of the planar atmospheric microplasma in air. We investigate the transitions of the dielectric barrier discharge in open air, including the random walk filaments (plasma columns), localized filaments, stochastic filaments, and diffuse discharge. A star-shaped filamentary discharge pattern is observed after the formation of the localized filaments. The liquid drops found on the dielectric surface further become a confining pattern for star-shaped discharge. We also demonstrate the applications of the insulating pattern for the use of the plasma display in open air by the handwritten characters with UV adhesive.

Chu, Hong-Yu; Huang, Bo-Shiun [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, ChiaYi 62102, Taiwan (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Study of a dual frequency atmospheric pressure corona plasma  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency mixing of 2 and 13.56 MHz was investigated by performing experimental measurements on the atmospheric pressure corona plasma. As a result of the dual frequency, length, current density, and electron excitation temperature of the plasma were increased, while the gas temperature was maintained at roughly the same level when compared to the respective single frequency plasmas. Moreover, observation of time-resolved images revealed that the dual frequency plasma has a discharge mode of 2 MHz positive streamer, 2 MHz negative glow, and 13.56 MHz continuous glow.

Kim, Dan Bee; Moon, S. Y.; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

On the effects of atmospheric refraction on radar ground patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of superrefraction. A radial pattern of AP echoes occurred in a number of cases when there was a strong gradient of N in an elevated refractive layer, but this pattern was not nearly as common as others. Investigations [10, 13, 14, 15, 16] of the atmosphere... when the antenna elevation angle is less than 2 deg and when there is an elevated refracting layer between 1500 ft and 3000 ft above the radar in which the gradient of refractivity is greater than 48N/1000 ft. ACKNONLEDGMENT The author wishes...

Cobb, Lalovee Glendale

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

410

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

411

Intense and Highly Energetic Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis documents the efforts taken to produce highly ionized and concentrated atmospheric pressure plasma using an arrayed atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The (more)

Furmanski, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

413

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

414

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national economies; Recognizing that significant interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial global, terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystem studies should focus on the structure and processes of the environment

415

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of...

416

Variance in trace constituents following the final stratospheric warming  

SciTech Connect

Temporal variances in the concentration of trace species are examined within the northern hemisphere stratosphere following the final warming. Variances are computed utilizing an annual cycle run of a tracer transport model and stratospheric balloon observations. The model uses winds generated with a general circulation model to transport N{sub 2}O. Regions of significant N{sub 2}O variance are produced immediately following the modeled final warming as zonally inhomogeneous N{sub 2}O anomalies are created during the warming, then advected passively about the pole by easterly winds. Diffusion rapidly dissipates these anomalies and decreases the associated stratospheric tracer variance to very low levels by June. On monthly timescales the 10 day normal mode explains up to 50% of the modeled variance of N{sub 2}O during summer. On these timescales potential temperature exhibits less variability than N{sub 2}O, as horizontal parcel displacements are relatively ineffective at inducing potential temperature variability. An examination of balloon observations of N{sub 2}O and other long lived trace species, between 40{degree} and 50{degree}N, indicates that the primary component of the tracer variance during June is on an interannual time scale. The authors attribute this interannual variability to stratospheric variability during the winter and early spring months imprinted onto the distributions of long lived tracers. Potential temperatures does not exhibit much interannual variability because it does not retain a memory of the previous winters circulation.

Hess, P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1990-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Ray-tracing for complex astrophysical high-opacity structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a ray-tracing technique for radiative transfer modeling of complex three-dimensional (3D) structures which include dense regions of high optical depth like in dense molecular clouds, circumstellar disks, envelopes of evolved stars, and dust tori around active galactic nuclei. The corresponding continuum radiative transfer problem is described and the numerical requirements for inverse 3D density and temperature modeling are defined. We introduce a relative intensity and transform the radiative transfer equation along the rays to solve machine precision problems and to relax strong gradients in the source term. For the optically thick regions where common ray-tracers are forced to perform small trace steps, we give two criteria for making use of a simple approximative solver crossing the optically thick region quickly. Using an example of a density structure with optical depth changes of 6 orders of magnitude and sharp temperature variations, we demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed scheme using a common 5th-order Runge-Kutta ray-tracer with adaptive step size control. In our test case, the gain in computational speed is about a factor of 870. The method is applied to calculate the temperature distribution within a massive molecular cloud core for different boundary conditions for the radiation field.

J. Steinacker; A. Bacmann; Th. Henning

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Project title: Principal Investigator(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. 0123 Project title: Principal Investigator(s): Funding Agency: Submission deadline: Instruments, redeployment costs) OBS engineering and technical support cost: (on shore and at sea) Shipping: Travel and technical support for OBS operations at sea. The cost of providing this support (e.g., instrument charges

Menke, William

419

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems January 3, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Event-tracing tools have proved vital for understanding how parallel applications behave. But new challenges make the use of event tracing on extreme-scale machines problematic. Tracing tools generate large amounts of data, which can overload the parallel file system and skew the application being studied. To remedy this problem, researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised a new technique that enables event tracing on exascale systems. Scientists who have been using existing performance analysis tools find that these frequently do not scale to large systems. And even if they do

420

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Airborne Particles in Outdoor Air: Atmospheric Dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For industrial products, in addition to the harmful effect like usual particles, the particular harmful effect of atmospheric dust especially metal particles is very large. For example, the light metal element...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) represents an innovative approach...2, and dust cycles together with the energy and momentum budgets. The mission concept is based on a constellation of satel...

E. R. Kursinski; W. Folkner; C. Zuffada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Uraninite and Fullerene in Atmospheric Particulates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incineration, uranium mining, and atmospheric testing of nuclearweapons-burning power plants typically contain very small amounts of uranium ( concentrations, the form of the uranium has been unknown. Using a variety of advanced electron microscopy

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

424

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens ... (22) Plasma II is more effective than Plasma I with the ability to develop homogeneous plasmas and eliminate boundary-layer air effects. ...

Sudheer Jinka; Uday Turaga; Vinitkumar Singh; Rachel L. Behrens; Cenk Gumeci; Carol Korzeniewski; Todd Anderson; Rory Wolf; Seshadri Ramkumar

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

425

Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Balanced Atmospheric Response to Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a Squall line propagates through the atmosphere, it not only excite transient gravityinertia wave motion but also produces more permanent modifications to the large-scale balanced flow. Here we calculate this balanced response using the is ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott R. Fulton; Rolf F. A. Herttenstein

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Synopsis of Atmospheric Research under MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold regions present a challenge to atmospheric and hydrologic research. Their low temperatures test the endurance of field workers and their instruments; their distance from large urban centers raises the cos...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

431

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen, and Ingo Wald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Email: {knolla1 Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen, and Ingo Wald

Wald, Ingo

433

Computer analysis of holographic systems by means of vector ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a computer program based on Welford's vector analysis approach capable of ray tracing through hybrid optical systems containing both conventional and diffractive...

Holloway, H W; Ferrante, R A

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

435

Sediment water exchange of trace metals and nutrients in Galveston Bay, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The benthic fluxes of several trace metals and nutrients were determined for three stations along the salinity gradient in the Trinity Bay region of Galveston (more)

Warnken, Kent Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Speciation of trace metals in seawater by anodic stripping voltammetry: Critical analytical steps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The speciation of trace metals in seawater based on the voltammetric (DPASV) titration ... to sample contaminations during sampling, filtration and storage, displacement of complexing equilibria in freeze storage

G. Capodaglio; G. Scarponi; G. Toscano

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne trace element Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: airborne trace element Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: pollution in Lake...

438

Experimental investigations of the interaction between the ELF Earth electromagnetic fields and astrophysical processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations of the moon and solar tides and their interaction with the electric field of the atmospheric boundary layer are possible both by means of using big data files and by using a method of spaced reception.

L. V. Grunskaya; V. A. Efimov; V. V. Isakevich; A. A. Zakirov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Investigating the Accumulation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in a Mixed Conifer Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains, Tucson, AZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigating the Accumulation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in a Mixed Conifer Forest, Santa forested locations, where the compounds presumably derive from atmospheric deposition [Moeckel et al, 2009]. Forest biomass and organic soil horizons present lipophilic interfaces for partitioning of PCBs from

Fay, Noah

440

Investigations | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations Investigations Investigations Investigations The Office of Investigations performs investigations into allegations of fraud, waste, and abuse in programs and operations of the Department, NNSA and FERC. Priority is given to investigations of suspected violations of criminal and civil statutes, as well as serious administrative misconduct. Particular focus is placed on the prevention and detection of contract and grant fraud; environmental, health and safety violations; computer crimes; and issues that reflect on the integrity and credibility of Department officials. Suspected criminal and civil violations are reported promptly to the Department of Justice for prosecutive consideration. Potential outcomes from such referrals include declination or acceptance for further action,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Contribution of Atmospheric Circulation to Inception of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at 116 kyr BP*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution of Atmospheric Circulation to Inception of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at 116 kyr BP of the Laurentide Ice Sheet is investigated using the Community Land Model, version 3 (CLM3) with bias-corrected 40 cold and persistent summer air temperatures in the contemporary climate do not produce perennial snow

Howat, Ian M.

442

Development of a trace explosives detection portal for personnel screening  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the development, design, and operation of a walk-through trace detection portal designed to screen personnel for explosives. Developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with primary funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and additional support from the Department of Energy office of Safeguards and Security, this portal is intended primarily for use in airport terminals and in other localities where a very high throughput of pedestrian traffic is combined with stringent security requirements. The portal is capable of detecting both vapor and particulate contamination, with the collection of explosive material being based upon the entrainment of that material in air flows over the body of the person being screened. This portal is capable of detecting most types of common high explosives of interest to the FAA. The authors discuss the results of field testing of the portal in the Albuquerque International Airport in September, 1997 and more recent steps towards commercialization of the portal.

Parmeter, J.E.; Linker, K.L.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.; Bouchier, F.A.; Hannum, D.W.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study  

SciTech Connect

Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tracing of Error in a Time Series Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A physical (e.g. astrophysical, geophysical, meteorological etc.) data may appear as an output of an experiment or it may contain some sociological, economic or biological information. Whatever be the source of a time series data some amount of noise is always expected to be embedded in it. Analysis of such data in presence of noise may often fail to give accurate information. Although text book data filtering theory is primarily concerned with the presences of random, zero mean errors; but in reality, errors in data are often systematic rather than random. In the present paper we produce different models of systematic error in the time series data. This will certainly help to trace the systematic error present in the data and consequently that can be removed as possible to make the data compatible for further study.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Trace gas measurements in the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume  

SciTech Connect

The authors report trace gas measurements made both inside and outside the Kuwait oil-fire smoke plume during a flight of an instrumented research aircraft on May 30, 1991. Concentrations of SO{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub x} averaged vertically and horizontally throughout the plume 80 km downwind of Kuwait City were 106, 127, and 9.1 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), respectively, above background concentrations. With the exception of SO{sub 2}, trace gas concentrations were far below typical US urban levels and primary national ambient air quality standards. Ambient ozone was titrated by NO in the dark, dense core of the smoke plume close to the fires, and photochemical ozone production was limited to the diffuse edge of the plume. Photochemical O{sub 3} production was noted throughout the plume at a distance of 160 km downwind of Kuwait City, and averaged 2.3 ppbv per hour during the first 3 hours of transport. Little additional photochemical production was noted at a downwind range of 340 km. The fluxes of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and reactive nitrogen from the roughly 520 fires still burning on May 30, 1991 are estimated at 1.4 x 10{sup 7} kg SO{sub 2}/d, 6.9 x 10{sup 6} kg CO/d, and 2.7 x 10{sup 5} kg N/d, respectively. Generally low concentrations of CO and NO{sub x} indicate that the combustion was efficient and occurred at low temperatures. Low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentrations suggest that the volatile components of the petroleum were burned efficiently. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Luke, W.T.; Kok, G.L.; Schillawski, R.D.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Greenberg, J.P.; Kadavanich, M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Atmospheric chemistry impacts and feedbacks on the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prediction. Issues to be addressed include the quantification of the impact of the atmospheric oxidation and the oxidative state of the atmosphere. The end goal is to create a model that can quantitatively predict is required to: Predict 3-D atmospheric CO2 production as a function of the CCSM3 atmospheric chemistry module

447

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

448

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

449

Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen and Ingo Wald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2007-001 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA1 Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen and Ingo Wald UUSCI. Technical Report No UUSCI-2007-001 Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll Charles

Utah, University of

450

THE BEST SOBOLEV TRACE CONSTANT IN DOMAINS WITH HOLES FOR CRITICAL OR SUBCRITICAL EXPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BEST SOBOLEV TRACE CONSTANT IN DOMAINS WITH HOLES FOR CRITICAL OR SUBCRITICAL EXPONENTS JULI in the Sobolev trace embedding H1() Lq() in a bounded smooth domain for critical or subcritical q, that is 1 embedding H1 () Lq () for critical or subcritical exponents, 1

Rossi, Julio D.

451

The Measurement of Trace Emissions and Combustion Characteristics for a Mass Fire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32 The Measurement of Trace Emissions and Combustion Characteristics for a Mass Fire Ronald A of emissions from biomass burning on global climate. While the burning of biomass constitutes a large fraction of world emis- sions, there are insufficient data on the combustion efficiency, emission factors, and trace

452

Trace metal behaviour in riverine sediments: role of organic matter and sulphides Adeline Charriaua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Trace metal behaviour in riverine sediments: role of organic matter and sulphides Authors Adeline : 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2010.11.005 #12;2 Abstract Three sediment cores were collected in the Scheldt. The speciation and the distribution of trace metals in pore waters and sediment particles were assessed through

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

Solar Energy 74 (2003) 157173 Comparison between ray-tracing simulations and bi-directional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy 74 (2003) 157­173 Comparison between ray-tracing simulations and bi-Louis Scartezzini a Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory LESO-PB, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology EPFL-tracing software. For the first time, an attempt is made to validate detailed bi-directional properties

454

Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing Andrew G. Miklas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing Andrew G. Miklas , Stefan Saroiu , Alec processing and anony- mization must be performed at line speed. This paper presents Bunker, a network tracing benefits of online anonymization. Bunker uses virtualization, encryption, and restricted I/O interfaces

Hunt, Galen

455

RATS: restoration-aware trace signal selection for post-silicon validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-silicon validation is one of the most important and expensive tasks in modern integrated circuit design methodology. The primary problem governing post-silicon validation is the limited observability due to storage of a small number of signals in ... Keywords: post-silicon validation, restoration, trace buffer, trace signals

Kanad Basu; Prabhat Mishra

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

White-light flares: A TRACE/RHESSI overview H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White-light flares: A TRACE/RHESSI overview H. S. Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory, University includes a "white light" imaging capability with novel characteristics. Many flares with such white. The spectral response of the TRACE white-light passband extends into the UV, so these data capture

Hudson, Hugh

457

Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy Achim Lilienthal, Denis,reiman,zell}@informatik.uni-tuebingen.de Abstract. As a sub-task of the general gas source localisation problem, gas source tracing is supposed to guide a gas-sensitive mobile system towards a source by using the cues determined from the gas

Zell, Andreas

458

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor N. Petra1, J. Zweck1, S. E, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA E-mail: zweck@umbc.edu Abstract: A model for a resonant. At low concentrations, the molecular dynamics of the trace gas do not influence the signal. © 2010

Minkoff, Susan E.

459

LaserSPECks:: laser SPECtroscopic trace-gas sensor networks - sensor integration and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a novel laser spectroscopic trace-gas sensor platform, LaserSPECks that integrates recently developed miniature quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QE-PAS) gas sensing technology. This universal platform uses infrared laser spectroscopy ... Keywords: lasers, sensors, spectroscopy, trace gas sensing

Stephen So; Farinaz Koushanfar; Anatoliy Kosterev; Frank Tittel

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nancy G. Leveson and Clark S. Turner, "An Investigation of the Therac-25 Accidents".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scanning magnets vs. X-ray target Software replaces some earlier hardware monitors and safety measures was a computerized radiation therapy machine 11 machines were installed (US and Canada) In 1985-1987 there were 6) These were traced to race conditions in reading operator input Unique early investigation of safety

Feitelson, Dror

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "investigators atmospheric trace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FBP Notice to Investigate  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to support the investigation will be sent separately via email. Under the Major Fraud Act (MFA), as amended, 41 U.S.C. 4310, this investigation may be a proceeding...

462

Submarine Seismic Investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...March 1941 research-article Submarine Seismic Investigations E. C. Bullard T. F. Gaskell The refraction seismic method has been used to investigate the...techniques, and results of a refraction seismic survey of the rock surface underlying...

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits 0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September 19, 2011 - 8:45am Addthis PROBLEM Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks. PLATFORM: All versions of Director prior to 5.5.2.3 are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. reference LINKS: Blue Coat Advisories ID: SA62 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026061 Blue Coat Director 510 Blue Coat SGME 5 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: An attacker can use the HTTP TRACE method to echo malicious script back to the client as part of a Cross Site Scripting (XSS) attack. No

464

V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support 1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information October 26, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Software version: 6.2.3, 6.2.3.1 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Tivoli Monitoring. REFERENCE LINKS: IBM Support Document: 1614003 IBM Support Portal SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027692 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user may be able to conduct HTTP TRACE and HTTP TRACK attacks to access sensitive information from the HTTP headers.

465

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: esmap.org/esmap/TRACE Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/tool-rapid-assessment-city-energy-tra Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: TRACE[1] This tool offers cities a quick and easy way to assess their energy

466

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

467

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

468

A Comprehensive Bench-and Pilot-Scale Investigation of Trace Or-ganic Compound Rejection by Forward Osmosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sea- water desalination, multi-barrier protection of drinking water, reduction in reverse osmosis seawater on the way to a seawater reverse osmosis pro- cess. The rejection of wastewater constituents by Forward Osmosis SUPPORTING INFORMATION Nathan T. Hancock1 , Pei Xu1 , Dean M. Heil1 , Christopher Bellona2

469

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

470

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

471

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

472

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

473

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

474

Detection of an Extrasolar Planet Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high precision spectrophotometric observations of four planetary transits of HD 209458, in the region of the sodium resonance doublet at 589.3 nm. We find that the photometric dimming during transit in a bandpass centered on the sodium feature is deeper by (2.32 +/- 0.57) x 10^{-4} relative to simultaneous observations of the transit in adjacent bands. We interpret this additional dimming as absorption from sodium in the planetary atmosphere, as recently predicted from several theoretical modeling efforts. Our model for a cloudless planetary atmosphere with a solar abundance of sodium in atomic form predicts more sodium absorption than we observe. There are several possibilities that may account for this reduced amplitude, including reaction of atomic sodium into molecular gases and/or condensates, photoionization of sodium by the stellar flux, a low primordial abundance of sodium, or the presence of clouds high in the atmosphere.

David Charbonneau; Timothy M. Brown; Robert W. Noyes; Ronald L. Gilliland

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage  

SciTech Connect

The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New Albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. The results of the results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage.

Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L. (Univ. of Wyoming Research Corp., Laramie (United States))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

478

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

479

Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radioactive contamination of atmospheric dust over southeastern New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosol particle samples were collected at three sites located near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a deep underground nuclear waste-storage facility, and they were analyzed to investigate the spatial and temporal variations in the concentrations of selected radionuclides and inorganic substances. The activities of 238Pu, 239,240Pu,241Pu and 241Am were determined by alpha spectrometry following a series of chemical separations, and the concentrations of Al, U and Th were determined in a separate set of samples by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. There was no evidence for impacts of the WIPP on radionuclide activity concentrations. Rather, the activities of both naturally-occurring (U and Th) and man-made (241Am and 239,240Pu) radionuclides in the aerosols peaked in spring and tracked the loadings of Al, an indicator of mineral dust. More than half of the variability in the 239,240Pu at the sampling site closest to the WIPP could be explained by the seasonal cycles of atmospheric dust. For U and Th, the predictive value of Al was even higher: 66% to over 90% of the variance in these nuclides could be explained by their relationship to dust. Extrapolation of the data to a global scale suggests that ?0.02% of the total 239,240Pu from nuclear weapons fallout currently recirculates between the earth and atmosphere each year. In terms of monitoring releases from nuclear facilities, the results presented here demonstrate that elemental data provide information directly relevant to understanding causes for variability in the activities of atmospheric radionuclides.

Richard Arimoto; Joel L. Webb; Marsha Conley

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Room-Temperature Silicon Nitrides Prepared with Very High Rates (>50nm/s) in Atmospheric-Pressure Very High-Frequency Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the structure and stability of SiN x ...films deposited with very high rates (>50nm/s) in atmospheric-pressure (AP) He-based plasma excited by a 150MHz ver...

Hiroaki Kakiuchi; Hiromasa Ohmi; Kei Nakamura

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Effect of Plasma Deposition Using Low-Power/Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Promoting Adhesion of Composite Resin to Enamel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This study investigated the effect of monomer deposition through a low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) on adhesion of resin ... stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. The

Geum-Jun Han; Jae-Hoon Kim; Sung-No Chung

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Analysis of spectra of acoustic signals generated by high-power pulsed laser radiation propagating in the atmosphere. I. Spectra of local plasma formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the spectra of acoustic signals generated by high-power pulsed laser radiation propagating in the atmosphere in the breakdown mode are given in ... of a...

S. V. Shamanaev; L. G. Shamanaeva

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Variations of the Isotopic Ratios of Uranium in Environmental Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental...for the detection of traces of depleted uranium (DU) in environmental samples...percentage composition is about 20% depleted uranium and 80% natural uranium, for......

M. Magnoni; S. Bertino; B. Bellotto; M. Campi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES  

SciTech Connect

Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Atmospheric CO2> Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Puszta, Hungary K-Puszta, Hungary Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary graphics Graphics data Data Investigator László Haszpra Hungarian Meteorological Service, Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Department for Analysis of Atmospheric Environment, H-1675, P.O. Box 39, Budapest, Hungary Period of Record 1981-1997 Location The K-puszta regional background air pollution monitoring station was established in a clearing in a mixed forest on the Hungarian Great Plain in the middle of the Carpathian Basin. K-puszta is as free from direct pollution as possible in the highly industrialized, densely populated central Europe. Because of the growing vegetation, the station was moved in September 1993 to a larger clearing, also at the same elevation,

487

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

488

In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Isotopes and Ratios » 13C and 18O Oxygen Isotopes and Ratios » 13C and 18O Ratios, Atmospheric CO2, Cape Grim In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1014 data Data Investigators Francey R. J. and C. E. Allison Description Since 1982, a continuous program of sampling atmospheric CO2 to determine stable isotope ratios has been maintained at the Australian Baseline Air Pollution Station, Cape Grim, Tasmania (40°, 40'56"S, 144°, 41'18"E). The process of in situ extraction of CO2 from air, the preponderance of samples collected in conditions of strong wind from the marine boundary layer of the Southern Ocean, and the determination of all isotope ratios relative to a common high purity CO2 reference gas with isotopic δ13C close to

489

Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

Leitgab, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

An investigation of the air flow structure over a rooftop in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind speed, the mean vertical wind speed, and the verticalA variation in the mean vertical wind speed was observed forpredominantly positive vertical wind speed, whereas the

Hayes, William Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

An investigation of the atmospheric physical conditions associated with microwave propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Dopartasat) Jsauary 1958 I 4 8 I t/0 C 5 I I 1 I'I u I' t ! I I I II III I The ?riter ?ishes to ackno?ledge the kind assistaace of all the nonhero of tbe gadar Meteorology Seccion of chs Depart?ant of Oceanography and Meteorology in tha... bees foesos4 saisly es ?bat e4ght bs tarss4 wsisgla ysth yroysgacios. " This ayyrosob ~- ylatsly fails is oossi4srstioa sf eoa4itioss else?hers Aas ia ths Lsse4iaco ares or is chs yath ower ?hiah the obserwscioss sro ?a4e. sloe siecle ro4iosos4s...

Riggs, Lowell Pogue

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric radiation entropy flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solar constant Q 0, TOA SW albedo alpha TOA, Sun's temperature T Sun, the empirical constant a 0 and the overall...the relationship between radiative entropy and temperature distributions. J. Atmos. Sci. 47, 795-803. ( doi...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

A numerical investigation of long waves in the atmosphere produced by flow over various mountain profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vector in the y direction unit vector in the vertical direction wavelength periodic length of model residual error distance from center of paraboloid mountain horizontal distance t ime U, u average zonal wind V west wind component of V..., However, Rossby did not at that time associate mountains with these waves. Constructing 5-day, mean, pressure charts for the 3-km level, he noted the existence of the major semi-permanent features of the low- level circulation which he termed "centers...

Collins, Ralph Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation/Meteorology (ASI/MET) Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which is driven by solar heating during the day...lower albedo and greater thermal inertia of the surface...the plane of the lander solar panels. Temperatures...lower albedo and greater thermal inertia of the surface...the plane of the lander solar panels. Temperatures...

J. T. Schofield; J. R. Barnes; D. Crisp; R. M. Haberle; S. Larsen; J. A. Magalhes; J. R. Murphy; A. Seiff; G. Wilson

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

496

Investigating the Role of OceanAtmosphere Coupling in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Airsea interaction over the North Pacific is diagnosed using a simple, local coupled autoregressive model constructed from observed 7-day running-mean sea surface temperature (SST) and 2-m air temperature TA anomalies during the extended winter ...

Dimitry Smirnov; Matthew Newman; Michael A. Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS  

SciTech Connect

Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain Groff, David ARM SGP Duchon, Claude University Of Oklahoma Category: Atmospheric State and Surface We investigate the cause of unusually high albedos at an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) extended facility near Morris, OK. In a previous study, daily albedos were calculated at several SGP extended facilities for 1998 and 1999 using broadband (.28 to 3 microns) pyranometers. The average daily albedo during this period was calculated to be at least about 5% higher at Morris than at any of the other SGP extended facilities. Surface based measurements of daily albedos at Morris and two nearby SGP extended facilities during 2004 and 2005 suggest the unusually high albedo measurements at Morris are real.

499

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

500

Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z