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  1. Center for Inverse Design: Inverse Design Approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverse Design Approach This page describes the inverse materials design methodology used by the Center for Inverse Design, which integrates and combines the following: (1) theory,...

  2. Center for Inverse Design: Organization of the Center for Inverse Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization of the Center for Inverse Design This page shows the organizational management structure of the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center. It also describes the roles and responsibilities of the key staff within the Center for Inverse Design. Large blue equilateral triangle pointing up with a smaller purple equilateral triangle pointing down enclosed within the larger triangle that divides the larger triangle into three smaller blue triangles. The upper small

  3. Center for Inverse Design: EFRC Researchers in Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chief Scientist for Theory in the Center for Inverse Design, explains the background in modern physics that has led to inverse design. Zunger is a professor at the University of...

  4. Inverse Design: Playing "Jeopardy" in Materials Science (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Zunger; Tumas, Bill; CID Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Inverse Design: Playing 'Jeopardy' in Materials Science' was submitted by the Center for Inverse Design (CID) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CID, an EFRC directed by Bill Tumas at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: NREL (lead), Northwestern University, University of Colorado, Stanford University, and Oregon State University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Inverse Design is 'to replace trial-and-error methods used in the development of materials for solar energy conversion with an inverse design approach powered by theory and computation.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, defects, spin dynamics, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  5. Inverse Design: Playing "Jeopardy" in Materials Science (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex Zunger (former Director, Center for Inverse Design); Tumas, Bill (Director, Center for Inverse Design); CID Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Inverse Design: Playing 'Jeopardy' in Materials Science' was submitted by the Center for Inverse Design (CID) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CID, an EFRC directed by Bill Tumas at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: NREL (lead), Northwestern University, University of Colorado, Stanford University, and Oregon State University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Inverse Design is 'to replace trial-and-error methods used in the development of materials for solar energy conversion with an inverse design approach powered by theory and computation.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, defects, spin dynamics, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  6. Center for Inverse Design: Need Help?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Need Help? Use this form to send us your comments and questions, to report problems with the Center for Inverse Design site, or to ask for help in finding information on our site. Enter your name and e-mail address in the boxes provided, then type your message. When you are finished, click "Send Message." If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Content Last Updated: October 09,

  7. CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  8. Center for Inverse Design: Research Thrusts and Subtasks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Thrusts and Subtasks The Center for Inverse Design creates an unprecedented coupling of theory and experiment to realize the thesis that inverse design can revolutionize the way materials science will be done in the future. Inverse design entails the theory-driven search of materials with given functionality, and discovery of hitherto unreported materials with relevant functionality. We have three thrusts, with six subtasks, that map directly into the overall Center objectives.

  9. Center for Inverse Design: Partner Institutions in the Center for Inverse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Partner Institutions in the Center for Inverse Design This page provides information about the six institutions that are partners in the Center of Inverse Design: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Oregon State University (OSU), Northwestern University (NU), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), and University of Colorado at Boulder (CU). You can also find information about the groups and departments within these institutions, where

  10. Center for Inverse Design: Collaboration Tool for the Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    directly to the Center for Inverse Design SharePoint Collaboration Tool. If you have forgotten your password, contact the Webmaster. If you would like to request access to the...

  11. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Iron Chalcogenide PV Absorbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers The Center for Inverse Design has identified the iron-based ternary chalcogenide materials Fe 2 SiS 4 and Fe 2 GeS 4 as promising new photovoltaic materials, which circumvent the problems historically encountered with iron sulfide FeS 2 (iron pyrite). There is intense interest in earth-abundant materials, including iron-bearing systems, for the widespread development of photovoltaic (PV) technologies to sustainably meet growing energy needs. The inverse

  12. Center for Inverse Design: Modality 2 - Design of Materials with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    configuration or a couple of nearby metastable states are relevant. The appropriate strategy to identify potential materials then consists of three main steps: Develop design...

  13. Inverse Design of High-Absorption Thin-Film Photovoltaic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Inverse Design scientists identified some potential Cu-V-VI thin-film photovoltaic (PV) absorber materials that have stronger solar absorption than CuInSe 2 -one of the ...

  14. Center for Inverse Design: Modality 3 - Discovery of Missing Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Discovery of Missing Materials Modality 3 applies to yet discovered, currently undocumented materials. This approach is designed for a different class of problems: when the materials we would like to consider are simply undocumented standard compilations, i.e., they have not yet been made. Like the other two modalities, this one also involves a search space. But unlike Modalities 1 and 2, the steps involved in Modality 3 are: Calculate the stable crystal structure of a given hypothetical

  15. The Promiscuity of [beta]-Strand Pairing Allows for Rational Design of [beta]-Sheet Face Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2009-06-17

    Recent studies suggest the dominant role of main-chain H-bond formation in specifying {beta}-sheet topology. Its essentially sequence-independent nature implies a large degree of freedom in designing {beta}-sheet-based nanomaterials. Here we show rational design of {beta}-sheet face inversions by incremental deletions of {beta}-strands from the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. We show that a {beta}-sheet structure can be maintained when a large number of native contacts are removed and that one can design large-scale conformational transitions of a {beta}-sheet such as face inversion by exploiting the promiscuity of strand-strand interactions. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures confirmed the success of the design and supported the importance of main-chain H-bonds in determining {beta}-sheet topology. This work suggests a simple but effective strategy for designing and controlling nanomaterials based on {beta}-rich peptide self-assemblies.

  16. Inverse Design of Mn-based ternary p-type wide-gap oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used theory to predict band structure and transport properties for the d 5 transition metal (TM) oxides MnO and Fe 2 O 3 . Significance and Impact This work identified design principles for improving d 5 oxides as a new class of semiconductors with potential applications in energy conversion. Design Principles Demonstrated for Semiconducting d 5 Transition-Metal Oxides with Photovoltaic Applications Potential H. Peng and S. Lany, Phys. Rev. B (Rapid Comm.) 85, 201202(R) (2012). Figure 1:

  17. CHANDRA HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF CID-42, A CANDIDATE RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Aldcroft, T.; Trichas, M.; Fruscione, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Blecha, L.; Loeb, A.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Salvato, M.; Komossa, S.; Koekemoer, A.; Mainieri, V.; Piconcelli, E.; Vignali, C.

    2012-06-10

    We present Chandra High Resolution Camera observations of CID-42, a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) at z = 0.359 in the COSMOS survey. CID-42 shows two optical compact sources resolved in the HST/ACS image embedded in the same galaxy structure and a velocity offset of {approx}1300 km s{sup -1} between the H{beta} broad and narrow emission line, as presented by Civano et al. Two scenarios have been proposed to explain the properties of CID-42: a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling SMBH and a double Type 1/Type 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, where one of the two is recoiling because of slingshot effect. In both scenarios, one of the optical nuclei hosts an unobscured AGN, while the other one, either an obscured AGN or a star-forming compact region. The X-ray Chandra data allow us to unambiguously resolve the X-ray emission and unveil the nature of the two optical sources in CID-42. We find that only one of the optical nuclei is responsible for the whole X-ray unobscured emission observed and a 3{sigma} upper limit on the flux of the second optical nucleus is measured. The upper limit on the X-ray luminosity plus the analysis of the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution indicate the presence of a star-forming region in the second source rather than an obscured SMBH, thus favoring the GW recoil scenario. However, the presence of a very obscured SMBH cannot be fully ruled out. A new X-ray feature, in a SW direction with respect to the main source, is discovered and discussed.

  18. Inverse Design of Mn-based ternary p-type wide-gap oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnO is an important prototypical wide-gap oxide semiconductor. The discrepancy between band- structure theory and ARPES is removed by a correction for the Zn-d band energy in GW calculations. Significance and Impact The present approach improves the capability for property prediction and design of energy materials. Benchmarking Band-Structure Calculations Against Angular-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) for ZnO L.Y. Lim, S. Lany, Y.J. Chang, E. Rotenberg, A. Zunger, M.F. Toney,

  19. Center for Inverse Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    found outside the chemical neighborhood of the "usual suspects" materials, and (ii) the development of accidentally-discovered materials may take a long time (because it takes a...

  20. Appearance, temperature, and NO{sub x} emission of two inverse diffusion flames with different port design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, L.K.; Cheung, C.S.; Leung, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the appearance, temperature distribution, and NO{sub x} emission index of two inverse diffusion flames, one with circumferentially arranged ports (CAPs) and the other with co-axial (CoA) jets, both burning LPG with 70% butane and 30% propane. Flame appearances were investigated first with a fixed fueling rate at different airflow rates equivalent to air jet Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1000 to 4500; and then at a fixed airflow rate with different fueling rates equivalent to overall equivalence ratios (F) of 1.0 to 2.0. The CAP flame is found to consist of two zones: a lower entrainment zone and an upper mixing and combustion zone. The CoA flame in most cases is similar to a diffusion flame. The two-zone structure can be observed only at Re larger than 2500. The temperature distributions of the flames are similar at overall equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.2 for Re=2500, except that the corresponding CoA flame is longer. The flame temperature is higher in the CAP flame than the CoA flame at higher overall equivalence ratios. A measurement of centerline oxygen concentrations shows that the oxygen concentration reaches a minimum value at a flame height of 50 mm in the CAP flame but decreases more gradually in the CoA flame. It can be concluded that there is more intense air-fuel mixing in a CAP flame than the CoA flame. Investigation of the emission index of NO{sub x} (EINO{sub x}) for both flames at Re=2500 and overall equivalence ratios of 1.0 to 6.0 reveals that the EINO{sub x} curve of each flame is bell-shaped, with a maximum value of 3.2 g/kg at F=1.2 for the CAP flame and 3 g/kg at F=2.2 for the CoA flame.

  1. Center for Inverse Design: About the Center for Inverse Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chart of efficiencies determined by certified agencieslabs of best research solar cells worldwide from 1976 to present for various PV technologies; check explanatory notes...

  2. Center for Inverse Design: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Density of States on vertical axis and E - EVBM on horizontal axis. Each plot shows red and blue curves, with vertical dashed lines that show the separation between portions...

  3. Center for Inverse Design: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prepared CsNiX3 (XCl, Br, I) A.D. Raw, J.A. Ibers, and K.R. Poeppelmeier, Journal of Solid State Chemistry 192, 34-37 (2012). DOI: 10.1016j.jssc.2012.03.037 Foundational:...

  4. More About Inversions Background

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Inversions Background Inversions occur in fluids when a more dense fluid lies beneath a less dense fluid. In the atmosphere, the density is linked to temperature variations with warmer air lying atop colder air. Sounding Analysis - Inversions (Activity) Objective To evaluate radiosonde soundings for inversions. Materials  Soundings for the same date and synoptic time (provided or obtained online) Important Points to Understand The soundings here appear on a Stuve diagram. Because the

  5. Center for Inverse Design: Modality 1 - Inverse Band Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (such as Simulated Annealing or Genetic Algorithms) in conjunction with the relevant quantum mechanics. Thus, we calculate a few thousand configurations and seek to find the...

  6. Inverse Energy Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverse Energy Transfer by Near-Resonant Interactions with a Damped-Wave Spectrum P.W. Terry Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 USA (Received 12 January 2004; published 1 December 2004) The interaction of long-wavelength anisotropic drift waves with the plasma turbulence of electron density advection is shown to produce the inverse energy transfer that condenses onto

  7. UNDERSTANDING INVERSIONS Background

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNDERSTANDING INVERSIONS Background When placing any two fluids (either two liquids or two gases) in proximity, the fluids will want to stratify or layer according to their densities (mass per volume). The variation in density can be linked to either what is dissolved in each liquid or the temperature of the two liquids or gases. The denser fluid will settle to the bottom; the warmer fluid will rise to the top, creating an inversion because it is opposite or inverted from what a typical

  8. Center for Inverse Design: Staff Biographies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Project Leader, Dupont Central Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, ... Initiative leader for Chemical and Catalytic Technologies on DuPont Corporate ...

  9. Center for Inverse Design Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The model is of the perovskite structure of CaTiO3. The atoms are color-coded as follows: red oxygen, yellow calcium, and green titanium. About the Center Approach ...

  10. Inverse Design Summer School brochure, Sept 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiment: Synthesis (25 min) A. Zakutayev Characterization (25 min) J. Perkins 3:00 - 3:50 Verification by specialized theory S. Lany 4:00 - 5:30 Time for informal...

  11. Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration ...

  12. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  13. INVERSIONS H. Michael Mogil, Certified Consulting Meteorologist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEPTEMBER 2008 INVERSIONS H. Michael Mogil, Certified Consulting Meteorologist In the ... The cloud top marks the approximate inversion layer. Photo by H. Michael Mogil You don't ...

  14. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often ...

  15. Requirements and Designs for Mars Rover RTGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Shirbacheh, M; Sankarankandath, V

    2012-01-19

    The current-generation RTGs (both GPHS and MOD) are designed for operation in a vacuum environment. The multifoil thermal insulation used in those RTGs only functions well in a good vacuum. Current RTGs are designed to operate with an inert cover gas before launch, and to be vented to space vacuum after launch. Both RTGs are sealed with a large number of metallic C-rings. Those seals are adequate for retaining the inert-gas overpressure during short-term launch operations, but would not be adequate to prevent intrusion of the Martian atmospheric gases during long-term operations there. Therefore, for the Mars Rover application, those RTGs just be modified to prevent the buildup of significant pressures of Mars atmosphere or of helium (from alpha decay of the fuel). In addition, a Mars Rover RTG needs to withstand a long-term dynamic environment that is much more severe than that seen by an RTG on an orbiting spacecraft or on a stationary planetary lander. This paper describes a typical Rover mission, its requirements, the environment it imposes on the RTG, and a design approach for making the RTG operable in such an environment. Specific RTG designs for various thermoelectric element alternatives are presented.; Reference CID #9268 and CID #9276.

  16. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks

  17. Design and tritium permeation analysis of China HCCB TBM port cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiangfeng, S.; Guoqiang, H.; Zhiyong, H.; Chang'an, C.; Deli, L.

    2015-03-15

    China is planning to develop a helium-cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) on ITER to test key blanket technologies. In this paper, the design and tritium permeation analysis of China HCCB TBM port cell are introduced. A theoretical model has been developed to estimate tritium permeation rates and leak rates from the components and pipes which China has scheduled to house in the port cell. It is shown that on normal working conditions, the permeation and leak rate of the systems in the port cell will be no higher than 1.58 Ci/d without the use of tritium permeation barriers, and 0.10 Ci/d with the use of tritium permeation barriers. It also appears that tritium permeation barriers are necessary for high temperature components such as the reduction bed and the heater.

  18. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS ...

  19. From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Planning a Long Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long Journey in ...

  20. MODEL SELECTION FOR SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC INVERSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Viticchie, B.

    2012-04-01

    Inferring magnetic and thermodynamic information from spectropolarimetric observations relies on the assumption of a parameterized model atmosphere whose parameters are tuned by comparison with observations. Often, the choice of the underlying atmospheric model is based on subjective reasons. In other cases, complex models are chosen based on objective reasons (for instance, the necessity to explain asymmetries in the Stokes profiles) but it is not clear what degree of complexity is needed. The lack of an objective way of comparing models has, sometimes, led to opposing views of the solar magnetism because the inferred physical scenarios are essentially different. We present the first quantitative model comparison based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence ratios for spectropolarimetric observations. Our results show that there is not a single model appropriate for all profiles simultaneously. Data with moderate signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) favor models without gradients along the line of sight. If the observations show clear circular and linear polarization signals above the noise level, models with gradients along the line are preferred. As a general rule, observations with large S/Ns favor more complex models. We demonstrate that the evidence ratios correlate well with simple proxies. Therefore, we propose to calculate these proxies when carrying out standard least-squares inversions to allow for model comparison in the future.

  1. Inversion of normal moveout for monoclinic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Contreras, P.; Tsvankin, I.

    2000-05-01

    Multiple vertical fracture sets, possibly combined with horizontal fine layering, produce an equivalent medium of monoclinic symmetry with a horizontal symmetry plane. Although monoclinic models may be rather common for fractured formations, they have hardly been used in seismic methods of fracture detection due to the large number of independent elements in the stiffness tensor. Here, the authors show that multicomponent wide-azimuth walkaway VSP surveys provide enough information to invert for all but one anisotropic parameters of monoclinic media. In order to facilitate the inversion procedure, the authors introduce a Thomsen-style parametrization for monoclinic media that includes the vertical velocities of the P-wave and one of the split S-waves and a set of dimensionless anisotropic coefficients. The parameter-estimation algorithm, based on NMO equations valid for any strength of the anisotropy, is designed to obtain anisotropic parameters of monoclinic media by inverting the vertical velocities and NMO ellipses of the P-, S{sub 1}- and S{sub 2}-waves. A Dix-type representation of the NMO velocity of mode-converted waves makes it possible to replace the pure shear modes in reflection surveys with the PS{sub 1}- and PS{sub 2}-waves. Numerical tests show that this method yields stable estimates of all relevant parameters for both a single layer and a horizontally stratified monoclinic medium.

  2. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Anomalous Surface Conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 3 ) films grown by pulsed laser deposition. This desirable, but unexpected, effect produces conductivities at the surface comparable to intentionally doped commercial materials. ...

  3. Center for Inverse Design: EFRC Researchers in Focus (Text Version...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid-state theory as we know it today was basically constructed by the earlier days of quantum mechanics by people such as in the 1940s and 50s, Enrico Fermi in the 1930s, 40s,...

  4. Center for Inverse Design: Lost SharePoint Password?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lost SharePoint Password? Enter your name and e-mail address in the boxes provided. When you are finished, click "Request Password." If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Request Password Printable Version Content Last Updated: August 19, 2013 Skip footer navigation to end of page

  5. Center for Inverse Design poster for EFRC Summit, May 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. Center for Inverse Design: Principal Investigators in the Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and materials science in applied and basic R&D focused on renewable energy including solar energy conversion for electricity and fuels, hydrogen storage and fuel cells, ...

  7. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Enabling Practical p-Type...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and hence enable unopposed p-type doping in easily grown materials. Reference: J.D. Perkins, T.R. Paudel, A. Zakutayev, P.F. Ndione, P.A. Parilla, D.L. Young, S. Lany, D.S....

  8. Inverse Pm3(-)n cubic micellar lyotropic phases from zwitterionic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inverse Pm3(-)n cubic micellar lyotropic phases from zwitterionic triazolium gemini surfactants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inverse Pm3(-)n cubic micellar lyotropic...

  9. Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear superimposed as opposite trends. Such inversions are common and they should be taken into account, along with the...

  10. Femtosecond Population Inversion and Stimulated Emission of Dense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Femtosecond Population Inversion and Stimulated Emission of Dense Dirac Fermions in Graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Femtosecond Population Inversion and...

  11. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  12. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Robert D.; Kychakoff, George

    1989-01-01

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R+.DELTA.R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as ##EQU1##

  13. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

    1989-09-12

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

  14. Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion (PEXSI)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion method (PEXSI) is a fast method for evaluating certain selected elements of a matrix function. PEXSI is highly scalable on distributed memory parallel machines. For sparse matrices, the PEXSI method can be more efficient than the widely used diagonalization method for evaluating matrix functions, especially when a relatively large number of eigenpairs are needed to be computed in the diagonalization methond

  15. The inverse problems of wing panel manufacture processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleinikov, A. I.; Bormotin, K. S.

    2013-12-16

    It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and springback are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software. Currently, forming of light metals poses tremendous challenges due to their low ductility at room temperature and their unusual deformation characteristics at hot-cold work: strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive behavior, and a very pronounced anisotropy. We used the constitutive models of steady-state creep of initially transverse isotropy structural materials the kind of the stress state has influence. The paper gives basics of the developed computer-aided system of design, modeling, and electronic simulation targeting the processes of manufacture of wing integral panels. The modeling results can be used to calculate the die tooling, determine the panel processibility, and control panel rejection in the course of forming.

  16. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (520 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  17. Full waveform inversion of solar interior flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2014-12-10

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here, we apply techniques of full waveform inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L {sub 2} norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance filtered f and p {sub 1} and large-distance unfiltered p modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, due to density stratification, leads to wrong ratios of horizontal and vertical flow velocities ({sup c}ross talk{sup )}. In the present formulation, the lack of sufficient temporal frequency and spatial resolution makes it difficult to accurately localize flow profiles at depth. We therefore suggest that the most efficient way to discover the global minimum is to perform a probabilistic forward search, involving calculating the misfit associated with a broad range of models (generated, for instance, by a Monte Carlo algorithm) and locating the deepest minimum. Such techniques possess the added advantage of being able to quantify model uncertainty as well as realization noise (data uncertainty).

  18. Stochastic inverse problems: Models and metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbagh, Elias H.; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Aldrin, John C.; Annis, Charles; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2015-03-31

    In past work, we introduced model-based inverse methods, and applied them to problems in which the anomaly could be reasonably modeled by simple canonical shapes, such as rectangular solids. In these cases the parameters to be inverted would be length, width and height, as well as the occasional probe lift-off or rotation. We are now developing a formulation that allows more flexibility in modeling complex flaws. The idea consists of expanding the flaw in a sequence of basis functions, and then solving for the expansion coefficients of this sequence, which are modeled as independent random variables, uniformly distributed over their range of values. There are a number of applications of such modeling: 1. Connected cracks and multiple half-moons, which we have noted in a POD set. Ideally we would like to distinguish connected cracks from one long shallow crack. 2. Cracks of irregular profile and shape which have appeared in cold work holes during bolt-hole eddy-current inspection. One side of such cracks is much deeper than other. 3. L or C shaped crack profiles at the surface, examples of which have been seen in bolt-hole cracks. By formulating problems in a stochastic sense, we are able to leverage the stochastic global optimization algorithms in NLSE, which is resident in VIC-3D, to answer questions of global minimization and to compute confidence bounds using the sensitivity coefficient that we get from NLSE. We will also address the issue of surrogate functions which are used during the inversion process, and how they contribute to the quality of the estimation of the bounds.

  19. Viscoacoustic wave form inversion of transmission data for velocity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and attenuation. An efficient frequency domain implementation is applied that consists of performing a series of single frequency inversions sweeping from low to high frequency. ...

  20. Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  1. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies. less Authors: ...

  2. Inverse Opals, a New Nanomaterial | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion Inverse Opals, a New Nanomaterial Seminar Wednesday Apr 6, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-150 S3TEC welcomes Prof. Gerald Mahan

  3. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  4. A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For Characterizin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Target-Oriented Magnetotelluric Inversion Approach For...

  5. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain...

  6. The Mystery of the Missing Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Mystery of the Missing Materials Stay alert, Sherlock Holmes. The Center for Inverse Design is "afoot"! The Center (CID)-an Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center-is in hot pursuit of new materials with extraordinary properties. And under CID's magnifying glass is the vast materials space containing the promising A 2 BX 4 spinel metal-chalcogenide and ABX half-Heusler tetrahedral compounds, which have great potential for solar-cell and other electronic and optical

  7. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of

  8. Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Pospichal, Bernhard; Eisenbach, Stefan; Weihs, P.; Clements, Craig B.; Steinacker, Reinhold; Mursch-Radlgruber, Erich; Dorninger, Manfred

    2004-08-01

    Comparisons are made between the post-sunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in quite different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes have both experienced extreme temperature minima below -50C. On undisturbed clear nights, temperature inversions reach to 120 m heights in both sinkholes, but are much stronger in the drier Rocky Mountain basin (24K versus 13K). Inversion destruction takes place 2.6 to 3 hours after sunrise and is accomplished primarily by subsidence warming associated with the removal of air from the base of the inversion by the upslope flows that develop over the sidewalls. Differences in inversion strengths and post-sunrise heating rates are caused by differences in the surface energy budget, with drier soil and a higher sensible heat flux in the Rocky Mountain sinkhole.

  9. Structural inversion: Occurrence, mechanics, and implications for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    Structural inversion, defined as the uplift of previously extended, subsiding regions by later contraction, has been recognized on every continent that has been explored for petroleum. The process can occur at the large scale of deformation in orogenic belts, but this presentation focused on inversion affecting sedimentary basins and their associated structures. The mid-continent rift and the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah are good examples of basin inversion. Typically, rift and sag basins can be later inverted. Mainly by reactivation of older normal faults, inversion selects rift basins where, in pure shear, weakening because of necking or thinning of lithosphere has occurred, and where, in simple shear, mechanical detachment surfaces are available for subsequent movement. Sag basins can apparently be inverted in the absence of reactivated normal faults, as in the southern altiplano of Bolivia and offshore Sabah, Borneo. Basins can be inverted by dominant strike slip with some convergent component, e.g., offshore northeast Brazil, and by almost direct compression, e.g., Atlas Mountains, Morocco. Structural inversion has important implications for petroleum exploration. Areas of inversion frequently have tighter porosity for a potential reservoir and faster seismic velocity for a particular stratigraphic interval than would be expected for their present depth of burial. Burial history curves characteristically have an upward inflection at the time of inversion, which can affect the hydrocarbon maturation process. Some source rocks may be overmature for present burial depths. In some presently shallow basins, however, maturation would not have occurred had not source rocks once been buried more deeply. Inversion can cause remigration of hydrocarbons. Finally, inversion can create the trapping structures.

  10. Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging ...

  11. Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology and Applications to the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  12. From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling. (Conference) | SciTech Connect From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling. Abstract not provided. Authors: Eldred, Michael S. ; Heimbach, Patrick [1] ; Jackson, Charles [2] ; Jakeman, John Davis ; Perego, Mauro ; Price, Stephen, [3] ; Salinger, Andrew

  13. Joint inversion in coupled quasi-static poroelasticity (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Joint inversion in coupled quasi-static poroelasticity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Joint inversion in coupled quasi-static poroelasticity Authors: Hesse, Marc A. ; Stadler, Georg Publication Date: 2014-02-24 OSTI Identifier: 1161864 DOE Contract Number: SC0001114 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: journal of geophysical research; Journal Volume: 119; Related Information: CFSES partners with University of Texas at Austin (lead);

  14. Adjoint-based Deterministic Inversion for Ice Sheets. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Adjoint-based Deterministic Inversion for Ice Sheets. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adjoint-based Deterministic Inversion for Ice Sheets. Abstract not provided. Authors: Perego, Mauro ; Salinger, Andrew G. ; Phipps, Eric Todd ; Ridzal, Denis ; Kouri, Drew Philip ; Kalashnikova, Irina ; S. Price ; G. Stadler Publication Date: 2014-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1242148 Report Number(s): SAND2014-19449PE 540987 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference

  15. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties using tracer data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data Authors: Kowalsky, M. B. ; Finsterle, S. ; Commer, M. ; Williams, K. H. ; Murray, C. ; Newcomer, D. ; Englert, A. ; Steefel, C. I. ; Hubbard, S. S. Publication Date: 2012-01-01 OSTI Identifier:

  16. Passive Vector Geoacoustic Inversion in Coastal Areas Using a sequential

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unscented Kalman Filter (Conference) | SciTech Connect Passive Vector Geoacoustic Inversion in Coastal Areas Using a sequential Unscented Kalman Filter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Passive Vector Geoacoustic Inversion in Coastal Areas Using a sequential Unscented Kalman Filter Authors: Candy, J V ; Ren, Q Y ; Hermand, J P Publication Date: 2013-09-09 OSTI Identifier: 1104521 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-643793 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  17. Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and

  18. Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through a crystal-chemical lens. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal to inverse transition in martian spinel: Understanding the interplay between chromium, vanadium, and iron valence state partitioning through

  19. Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets with ... February 1, 2017 Title: Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric ...

  20. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal ...

  1. Solutions of the Schrdinger equation with inversely quadratic Hellmann plus inversely quadratic potential using Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, B. I.

    2014-11-12

    By using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method, the Schrdinger equation has been solved for the interaction of inversely quadratic Hellmann (IQHP) and inversely quadratic potential (IQP) for any angular momentum quantum number, l. The energy eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenfunctions have been obtained in terms of Laguerre polynomials. Special cases of the sum of these potentials have been considered and their energy eigenvalues also obtained.

  2. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  3. Our On-Its-Head-and-In-Your-Dreams Approach Leads to Clean Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence; Gwinner, Don; Hicks, Al

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Inverse Design (CID), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CID is to revolutionize the discovery of new materials by design with tailored properties through the development and application of a novel inverse design approach powered by theory guiding experiment with an initial focus on solar energy conversion.

  4. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  5. Inverse Marx modulators for self-biasing klystron depressed collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Mark A.

    2014-07-31

    A novel pulsed depressed collector biasing scheme is proposed. This topology feeds forward energy recovered during one RF pulse for use on the following RF pulse. The presented ''inverse'' Marx charges biasing capacitors in series, and discharges them in parallel. Simulations are shown along with experimental demonstration on a 62kW klystron.

  6. 3D electromagnetic inversion for environmental site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D non-linear electromagnetic inversion scheme has been developed to produce images of subsurface conductivity structure from electromagnetic geophysical data. The solution is obtained by successive linearized model updates where full forward modeling is employed at each iteration to compute model sensitivities and predicted data. Regularization is applied to the problem to provide stability. Because the inverse part of the problem requires the solution of 10`s to 100`s of thousands of unknowns, and because each inverse iteration requires many forward models to be computed, the code has been implemented on massively parallel computer platforms. The use of the inversion code to image environmental sites is demonstrated on a data set collected with the Apex Parametrics {open_quote}MaxMin I-8S{close_quote} over a section of stacked barrels and metal filled boxes at the Idaho National Laboratory`s {open_quote}Cold Test Pit{close_quote}. The MaxMin is a loop-loop frequency domain system which operates from 440 Hz up to 56 kHz using various coil separations; for this survey coil separations of 15, 30 and 60 feet were employed. The out-of phase data are shown to be of very good quality while the in-phase are rather noisy due to slight mispositioning errors, which cause improper cancellation of the primary free space field in the receiver. Weighting the data appropriately by the estimated noise and applying the inversion scheme is demonstrated to better define the structure of the pit. In addition, comparisons are given for single coil separations and multiple separations to show the benefits of using multiple offset data.

  7. NN inversion potentials intermediate energy proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Love, W.G.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1995-10-01

    Recently developed nucleon-nucleon interactions using the quantum inverse scattering method shed new fight on the off-shell properties of the internucleon effective force for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Calculations of proton elastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the 500 MeV region show that variations in off-shell contributions are determined to a great extent by the accuracy with which the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts are reproduced. The study is based on the full-folding approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical potential which allows a deep understanding of the interplay between on- and off-shell effects in nucleon scattering. Results and the promising extension offered by the inversion potentials beyond the range of validity of the low-energy internucleon forces will be discussed.

  8. TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION USING PALLADIUM AND INVERSE COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L.; Sessions, H.; Xiao, S.

    2010-08-31

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) was further studied with a new configuration. Previous configuration used a palladium packed column and a plug flow reverser (PFR). This new configuration uses an inverse column to replace the PFR. The goal was to further improve performance. Both configurations were experimentally tested. The results showed that the new configuration increased the throughput by a factor of more than 2.

  9. Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben A. Abagyan

    2000-06-01

    The main scientific contribution of the project ''Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem'' submitted in 1996 and funded by the Department of Energy in 1997 is the formulation and development of the idea of the multilink recognition method for identification of functional and structural homologues of newly discovered genes. This idea became very popular after they first announced it and used it in prediction of the threading targets for the CASP2 competition (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction).

  10. CID | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    powered by theory guiding experiment with an initial focus on solar energy conversion. Research Topics: solar (photovoltaic), solar (fuels), photosynthesis (natural and ...

  11. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn; Kang, Zhenhui E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Junling

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  12. Final Technical Report for "Applied Mathematics Research: Simulation Based Optimization and Application to Electromagnetic Inverse Problems"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-17

    The focus of research was: Developing adaptive mesh for the solution of Maxwell's equations; Developing a parallel framework for time dependent inverse Maxwell's equations; Developing multilevel methods for optimization problems with inequal- ity constraints; A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in the 0th frequency (DC resistivity); A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in low frequency regime. Although the research concentrated on electromagnetic forward and in- verse problems the results of the research was applied to the problem of image registration.

  13. Adjoint-based Deterministic Inversion for Ice Sheets

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adjoint-based deterministic Inversion for Ice Sheets SAND2014-19449PE ___ _---------------- M. Perego2- joint work with: A. Salinger2, E. Phipps2, D. Ridzal2, D. Kouri2, I. Kalashnikova2, S. Price2, G. Stadler3 2Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA 2Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA 3University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA (now at Courant institute, New York) October 29, TUG 2014, Albuquerque Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and

  14. Seismic Attenuation Inversion with t* Using tstarTomog.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Leiph

    2014-09-01

    Seismic attenuation is defined as the loss of the seismic wave amplitude as the wave propagates excluding losses strictly due to geometric spreading. Information gleaned from seismic waves can be utilized to solve for the attenuation properties of the earth. One method of solving for earth attenuation properties is called t*. This report will start by introducing the basic theory behind t* and delve into inverse theory as it pertains to how the algorithm called tstarTomog inverts for attenuation properties using t* observations. This report also describes how to use the tstarTomog package to go from observed data to a 3-D model of attenuation structure in the earth.

  15. Inflation in the generalized inverse power law scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zhun

    2013-11-01

    We propose a single field inflationary model by generalizing the inverse power law potential from the intermediate model. We study the implication of our model on the primordial anisotropy of cosmological microwave background radiation. Specifically, we apply the slow-roll approximation to calculate the scalar spectral tilt n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. The results are compared with the recent data measured by the Planck satellite. We find that by choosing proper values for the parameters, our model can well describe the Planck data.

  16. Sneutrino inflation in supersymmetric B - L with inverse seesaw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban; Sil, Arunansu

    2012-07-27

    We have shown that inflation in the supersymmetric B - L extension of the Standard Model can be realized where one of the associated right-handed sneutrinos can provide a non-trivial inflationary trajectory at tree level (hence breaking B - L during inflation). As soon as the inflation ends, the right-handed sneutrino falls into the supersymmetric vacuum, with a vanishing vacuum expectation value, so that B - L symmetry is restored. The B - L gauge symmetry will be radiatively broken at a TeV scale and light neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism.

  17. Estimating Field-Scale Hydraulic Parameters of Heterogeneous Soils Using A Combination of Parameter Scaling and Inverse Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Andy L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2002-12-10

    As the Hanford Site transitions into remediation of contaminated soil waste sites and tank farm closure, more information is needed about the transport of contaminants as they move through the vadose zone to the underlying water table. The hydraulic properties must be characterized for accurate simulation of flow and transport. This characterization includes the determination of soil texture types, their three-dimensional distribution, and the parameterization of each soil texture. This document describes a method to estimate the soil hydraulic parameter using the parameter scaling concept (Zhang et al. 2002) and inverse techniques. To this end, the Groundwater Protection Program Science and Technology Project funded vadose zone transport field studies, including analysis of the results to estimate field-scale hydraulic parameters for modeling. Parameter scaling is a new method to scale hydraulic parameters. The method relates the hydraulic-parameter values measured at different spatial scales for different soil textures. Parameter scaling factors relevant to a reference texture are determined using these local-scale parameter values, e.g., those measured in the lab using small soil cores. After parameter scaling is applied, the total number of unknown variables in hydraulic parameters is reduced by a factor equal to the number of soil textures. The field-scale values of the unknown variables can then be estimated using inverse techniques and a well-designed field experiment. Finally, parameters for individual textures are obtained through inverse scaling of the reference values using an a priori relationship between reference parameter values and the specific values for each texture. Inverse methods have the benefits of 1) calculating parameter values that produce the best-fit between observed and simulated values, 2) quantifying the confidence limits in parameter estimates and the predictions, 3) providing diagnostic statistics that quantify the quality of calibration and data shortcomings and needs, and 4) not restricting the initial and boundary-flow conditions, the constitutive relationships, or the treatment of heterogeneity. On this project, inverse modeling was performed using the combination of two computer models, one for forward flow modeling and the other for nonlinear regression. The forward model used to simulate water flow was the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator (White and Oostrom 2000). STOMP was designed to solve a variety of nonlinear, multiple-phase, flow and transport problems for unsaturated porous media. The Universal CODE (UCODE) model (Poeter and Hill 1998) was used to perform inverse modeling posed as a parameter-estimation problem using nonlinear regression. Inverse techniques were applied to two cases of one-dimensional flow in layered soils and one case of three-dimensional flow in a heterogeneous soil. The results show that the simulation errors were significantly reduced after applying parameter scaling and inverse modeling. When compared to the use of local-scale parameters, parameter scaling reduced the sum of squared weighted residue by 93 to 96% for the relatively smaller scale (~2 m [~6.6 ft]) one-dimensional flow and 59% for the more complex Sisson and Lu site, which has the spatial scale of about 18 m (60 ft). This parameter estimation method will be applied to analyze the first two years of field experiments completed at the Sisson and Lu site.

  18. On the computational complexity of sequence design problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, W.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Inverse protein folding concerns the identification of an amino acid sequence that folds to a given structure. Sequence design problems attempt to avoid the apparant difficulty of inverse protein folding by defining an energy that can be minimized to find protein-like sequences. We evaluate the practical relevance of two sequence design problems by analyzing their computational complexity. We show that the canonical method of sequence design is intractable and describe approximation algorithms for this problem. We also describe an efficient algorithm that exactly solves the grand canonical method. Our analysis shows how sequence design problems can fail to reduce the difficulty of the inverse protein folding problem and highlights the need to analyze these problems to evaluate their practical relevance. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  19. On the computational complexity of sequence design problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, W.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Algorithms and Discrete Mathematics Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Inverse protein folding concerns the identification of an amino acid sequence that folds to a given structure. Sequence design problems attempt to avoid the apparent difficulty of inverse protein folding by defining an energy that can be minimized to find protein-like sequences. The authors evaluate the practical relevance of two sequence design problems by analyzing their computation complexity. They show that the canonical method of sequence design is intractable, and describe approximation algorithms for this problem. The authors also describe an efficient algorithm that exactly solves the grand canonical method. The analysis shows how sequence design problems can fail to reduce the difficulty of the inverse protein folding problem, and highlights the need to analyze these problems to evaluate their practical relevance.

  20. Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-06-30

    Inverse models use observations of a system (observation vector) to quantify the variables driving that system (state vector) by statistical optimization. When the observation vector is large, such as with satellite data, selecting a suitable dimension for the state vector is a challenge. A state vector that is too large cannot be effectively constrained by the observations, leading to smoothing error. However, reducing the dimension of the state vector leads to aggregation error as prior relationships between state vector elements are imposed rather than optimized. Here we present a method for quantifying aggregation and smoothing errors as a function ofmore » state vector dimension, so that a suitable dimension can be selected by minimizing the combined error. Reducing the state vector within the aggregation error constraints can have the added advantage of enabling analytical solution to the inverse problem with full error characterization. We compare three methods for reducing the dimension of the state vector from its native resolution: (1) merging adjacent elements (grid coarsening), (2) clustering with principal component analysis (PCA), and (3) applying a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with Gaussian pdfs as state vector elements on which the native-resolution state vector elements are projected using radial basis functions (RBFs). The GMM method leads to somewhat lower aggregation error than the other methods, but more importantly it retains resolution of major local features in the state vector while smoothing weak and broad features.« less

  1. Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-01-13

    Inverse models use observations of a system (observation vector) to quantify the variables driving that system (state vector) by statistical optimization. When the observation vector is large, such as with satellite data, selecting a suitable dimension for the state vector is a challenge. A state vector that is too large cannot be effectively constrained by the observations, leading to smoothing error. However, reducing the dimension of the state vector leads to aggregation error as prior relationships between state vector elements are imposed rather than optimized. Here we present a method for quantifying aggregation and smoothing errors as a function ofmore » state vector dimension, so that a suitable dimension can be selected by minimizing the combined error. Reducing the state vector within the aggregation error constraints can have the added advantage of enabling analytical solution to the inverse problem with full error characterization. We compare three methods for reducing the dimension of the state vector from its native resolution: (1) merging adjacent elements (grid coarsening), (2) clustering with principal component analysis (PCA), and (3) applying a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with Gaussian pdfs as state vector elements on which the native-resolution state vector elements are projected using radial basis functions (RBFs). The GMM method leads to somewhat lower aggregation error than the other methods, but more importantly it retains resolution of major local features in the state vector while smoothing weak and broad features.« less

  2. Inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using peridynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Daniel Z.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-10

    The following work presents an adjoint-based methodology for solving inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using state-based peridynamics. We show that the inner product involving the peridynamic operators is self-adjoint. The proposed method is illustrated for several numerical examples with constant and spatially varying material parameters as well as in the context of fractures. We also present a framework for obtaining material parameters by integrating digital image correlation (DIC) with inverse analysis. This framework is demonstrated by evaluating the bulk and shear moduli for a sample of nuclear graphite using digital photographs taken during the experiment. The resulting measuredmore » values correspond well with other results reported in the literature. Lastly, we show that this framework can be used to determine the load state given observed measurements of a crack opening. Furthermore, this type of analysis has many applications in characterizing subsurface stress-state conditions given fracture patterns in cores of geologic material.« less

  3. Inversion of seismic reflection traveltimes using a nonlinear optimization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pullammanappallil, S.K.; Louie, J.N. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present the use of a nonlinear optimization scheme called generalized simulated annealing to invert seismic reflection times for velocities, reflector depths, and lengths. A finite-difference solution of the eikonal equation computes reflection traveltimes through the velocity model and avoids ray tracing. They test the optimization scheme on synthetic models and compare it with results from a linearized inversion. The synthetic tests illustrate that, unlike linear inversion schemes, the results obtained by the optimization scheme are independent of the initial model. The annealing method has the ability to produce a suite of models that satisfy the data equally well. They make use of this property to determine the uncertainties associated with the model parameters obtained. Synthetic examples demonstrate that allowing the reflector length to vary, along with its position, helps the optimization process obtain a better solution. The authors put this to use in imaging the Garlock fault, whose geometry at depth is poorly known. They use reflection times picked from shot gathers recorded along COCORP Mojave Line 5 to invert for the Garlock fault and velocities within the Cantil Basin below Fremont Valley, California. The velocities within the basin obtained by their optimization scheme are consistent with earlier studies, though their results suggest that the basin might extend 1--2 km further south. The reconstructed reflector seems to suggest shallowing of the dip of the Garlock fault at depth.

  4. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  5. n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-12

    nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) is a comprehensive well test analysis software package. It provides a user-interface, a well test analysis model and many tools to analyze both field and simulated data. The well test analysis model simulates a single-phase, one-dimensional, radial/non-radial flow regime, with a borehole at the center of the modeled flow system. nSIGHTS solves the radially symmetric n-dimensional forward flow problem using a solver based on a graph-theoretic approach.more » The results of the forward simulation are pressure, and flow rate, given all the input parameters. The parameter estimation portion of nSIGHTS uses a perturbation-based approach to interpret the best-fit well and reservoir parameters, given an observed dataset of pressure and flow rate.« less

  6. Rapid Evaluation of Particle Properties using Inverse SEM Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the final deliverable of a 3 year project whose purpose was to investigate the possibility of using simulations of X-ray spectra generated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a means to perform quantitative analysis of the sample imaged in the SEM via an inverse analysis methodology. Using the nine point Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) typically used by the US Department of Defense (DOD) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this concept is now at a TRL of 3. In other words, this work has proven the feasibility of this concept and is ready to be further investigated to address some of the issues highlighted by this initial proof of concept.

  7. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillaumn-Espaa, Elisa; Nez-Ypez, H. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.

    2014-10-15

    The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrdinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete fall-to-the-center with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

  8. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I. E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il

    2013-05-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future.

  9. Source-independent full waveform inversion of seismic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2006-02-14

    A set of seismic trace data is collected in an input data set that is first Fourier transformed in its entirety into the frequency domain. A normalized wavefield is obtained for each trace of the input data set in the frequency domain. Normalization is done with respect to the frequency response of a reference trace selected from the set of seismic trace data. The normalized wavefield is source independent, complex, and dimensionless. The normalized wavefield is shown to be uniquely defined as the normalized impulse response, provided that a certain condition is met for the source. This property allows construction of the inversion algorithm disclosed herein, without any source or source coupling information. The algorithm minimizes the error between data normalized wavefield and the model normalized wavefield. The methodology is applicable to any 3-D seismic problem, and damping may be easily included in the process.

  10. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  11. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Synthesis by Inverse Suspension Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Robert J.; Scrivens, Walter A.; Nash, Charles

    2005-10-21

    Base catalyzed sol-gel polycondensation of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) with formaldehyde by inverse suspension polymerization leads to the formation of uniform, highly cross-linked, translucent, spherical gels, which have increased selectivity and capacity for cesium ion removal from high alkaline solutions. Because of its high selectivity for cesium ion, resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resins are being considered for process scale column radioactive cesium removal by ion-exchange at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), which is now under construction at the Hanford site. Other specialty resins such as Superlig{reg_sign} 644 have been ground and sieved and column tested for process scale radioactive cesium removal but show high pressure drops across the resin bed during transition from column regeneration to loading and elution. Furthermore, van Deemter considerations indicate better displacement column chromatography by the use of spherical particle beads rather than irregularly shaped ground or granular particles. In our studies batch contact equilibrium experiments using a high alkaline simulant show a definite increase in cesium loading onto spherical R-F resin. Distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 777 to 429 mL/g in the presence of 0.1M and 0.7M potassium ions, respectively. Though other techniques for making R-F resins have been employed, to our knowledge no one has made spherical R-F resins by inverse suspension polymerization. Moreover, in this study we discuss the data comparisons to known algebraic isotherms used to evaluate ion-exchange resins for WTP plant scale cesium removal operations.

  12. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  13. Absolutely and uniformly convergent iterative approach to inverse scattering with an infinite radius of convergence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kouri, Donald J.; Vijay, Amrendra; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jingfeng; Hoffman, David K.

    2007-05-01

    A method and system for solving the inverse acoustic scattering problem using an iterative approach with consideration of half-off-shell transition matrix elements (near-field) information, where the Volterra inverse series correctly predicts the first two moments of the interaction, while the Fredholm inverse series is correct only for the first moment and that the Volterra approach provides a method for exactly obtaining interactions which can be written as a sum of delta functions.

  14. Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-09-01

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

  15. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  16. NuSTAR Observations of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse Compton Emission Wik, Daniel R.; NASA, Goddard Johns Hopkins U.; Hornstrup, A.; Denmark, Tech. U.; Molendi, S.; IASF,...

  17. NuSTAR Observations of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse Compton Emission Authors: Wik, Daniel R. ; NASA, Goddard Johns Hopkins U. ; Hornstrup, A. ; Denmark, Tech. U. ; Molendi, S. ; IASF,...

  18. FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse ice-sheet problems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse ice-sheet problems. Abstract not provided. Authors: Salinger, Andrew G. ; Perego, Mauro ; Hoffman, Mattew ; Leng, Wei ; ...

  19. Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integration of Noise and Coda Correlation Data into Kinematic and Waveform Inversions presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  20. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-...

  1. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-08-08

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICSmore » can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  2. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  3. Solving Inverse Detection Problems Using Passive Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Vaquer, Pablo A.

    2012-08-15

    The ability to reconstruct an unknown radioactive object based on its passive gamma-ray and neutron signatures is very important in homeland security applications. Often in the analysis of unknown radioactive objects, for simplicity or speed or because there is no other information, they are modeled as spherically symmetric regardless of their actual geometry. In these presentation we discuss the accuracy and implications of this approximation for decay gamma rays and for neutron-induced gamma rays. We discuss an extension of spherical raytracing (for uncollided fluxes) that allows it to be used when the exterior shielding is flat or cylindrical. We revisit some early results in boundary perturbation theory, showing that the Roussopolos estimate is the correct one to use when the quantity of interest is the flux or leakage on the boundary. We apply boundary perturbation theory to problems in which spherically symmetric systems are perturbed in asymmetric nonspherical ways. We apply mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithms to object reconstructions. We present a benchmark test set that may be used to quantitatively evaluate inverse detection methods.

  4. Negative terahertz conductivity in disordered graphene bilayers with population inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svintsov, D.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, V.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-03-16

    The gapless energy band spectra make the structures based on graphene and graphene bilayer with the population inversion to be promising media for the interband terahertz (THz) lasing. However, a strong intraband absorption at THz frequencies still poses a challenge for efficient THz lasing. In this paper, we show that in the pumped graphene bilayer, the indirect interband radiative transitions accompanied by scattering of carriers by disorder can provide a substantial negative contribution to the THz conductivity (together with the direct interband transitions). In the graphene bilayer on high-? substrates with point charged defects, these transitions substantially compensate the losses due to the intraband (Drude) absorption. We also demonstrate that the indirect interband contribution to the THz conductivity in a graphene bilayer with the extended defects (such as the charged impurity clusters) can surpass by several times the fundamental limit associated with the direct interband transitions, and the Drude conductivity as well. These predictions can affect the strategy of the graphene-based THz laser implementation.

  5. Self-annihilation of inversion domains by high energy defects in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koukoula, T.; Kioseoglou, J. Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2014-04-07

    Low-defect density InN films were grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy over an ?1??m thick GaN/AlN buffer/nucleation layer. Electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of inverse polarity domains propagating across the GaN layer and terminating at the sharp GaN/InN (0001{sup }) interface, whereas no inversion domains were detected in InN. The systematic annihilation of GaN inversion domains at the GaN/InN interface is explained in terms of indium incorporation on the Ga-terminated inversion domains forming a metal bonded In-Ga bilayer, a structural instability known as the basal inversion domain boundary, during the initial stages of InN growth on GaN.

  6. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  7. Implement Method for Automated Testing of Markov Chain Convergence into INVERSE for ORNL12-RS-108J: Advanced Multi-Dimensional Forward and Inverse Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, Keith C.

    2015-04-01

    The DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) method is a powerful optimization/uncertainty quantification tool used to solve inverse transport problems in Los Alamos National Laboratorys INVERSE code system. The DREAM method has been shown to be adept at accurate uncertainty quantification, but it can be very computationally demanding. Previously, the DREAM method in INVERSE performed a user-defined number of particle transport calculations. This placed a burden on the user to guess the number of calculations that would be required to accurately solve any given problem. This report discusses a new approach that has been implemented into INVERSE, the Gelman-Rubin convergence metric. This metric automatically detects when an appropriate number of transport calculations have been completed and the uncertainty in the inverse problem has been accurately calculated. In a test problem with a spherical geometry, this method was found to decrease the number of transport calculations (and thus time required) to solve a problem by an average of over 90%. In a cylindrical test geometry, a 75% decrease was obtained.

  8. Design Rational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... designed for maximal cryptographic strength and high speed ... for Pair-Wise Key Establishment Schemes Using ... two benefits: careful management admits some ...

  9. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta βe = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in themore » inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.« less

  10. Application Of 3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3D Inversion To Magnetotelluric Data In The Ogiri Geothermal Area, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Application Of 3D...

  11. 3-D Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inversion Of Borehole-To-Surface Electrical Data Using A Back-Propagation Neural Network Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 3-D...

  12. Sapphire decomposition and inversion domains in N-polar aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussey, Lindsay White, Ryan M.; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Guo, Wei; Osterman, Katherine; Haidet, Brian; Bryan, Zachary; Bobea, Milena; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko; Mita, Seiji

    2014-01-20

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques and potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching confirmed that inversion domains in the N-polar AlN grown on c-plane sapphire were due to the decomposition of sapphire in the presence of hydrogen. The inversion domains were found to correspond to voids at the AlN and sapphire interface, and transmission electron microscopy results showed a V-shaped, columnar inversion domain with staggered domain boundary sidewalls. Voids were also observed in the simultaneously grown Al-polar AlN, however no inversion domains were present. The polarity of AlN grown above the decomposed regions of the sapphire substrate was confirmed to be Al-polar by KOH etching and TEM.

  13. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta ?e = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  14. Methods to control phase inversions and enhance mass transfer in liquid-liquid dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsouris, Constantinos; Dong, Junhang

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effects of applied electric fields on liquid-liquid dispersions. In general, the present invention is directed to the control of phase inversions in liquid-liquid dispersions. Because of polarization and deformation effects, coalescence of aqueous drops is facilitated by the application of electric fields. As a result, with an increase in the applied voltage, the ambivalence region is narrowed and shifted toward higher volume fractions of the dispersed phase. This permits the invention to be used to ensure that the aqueous phase remains continuous, even at a high volume fraction of the organic phase. Additionally, the volume fraction of the organic phase may be increased without causing phase inversion, and may be used to correct a phase inversion which has already occurred. Finally, the invention may be used to enhance mass transfer rates from one phase to another through the use of phase inversions.

  15. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations In this study, we evaluate the possibility

  16. Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    competing interactions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets with competing interactions Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 1, 2017 Title: Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets with competing interactions Magnetic skyrmions have attracted considerable attention recently for their huge potential in spintronic applications.

  17. NuSTAR Observations of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse Compton

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Emission (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: NuSTAR Observations of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse Compton Emission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NuSTAR Observations of the Bullet Cluster: Constraints on Inverse Compton Emission Authors: Wik, Daniel R. ; /NASA, Goddard /Johns Hopkins U. ; Hornstrup, A. ; /Denmark, Tech. U. ; Molendi, S. ; /IASF, Milan ; Madejski, G. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC ; Harrison, F. A. ;

  18. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using

  19. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  20. Efficient Inversion of Mult-frequency and Multi-Source Electromagnetic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Egbert

    2007-03-22

    The project covered by this report focused on development of efficient but robust non-linear inversion algorithms for electromagnetic induction data, in particular for data collected with multiple receivers, and multiple transmitters, a situation extremely common in eophysical EM subsurface imaging methods. A key observation is that for such multi-transmitter problems each step in commonly used linearized iterative limited memory search schemes such as conjugate gradients (CG) requires solution of forward and adjoint EM problems for each of the N frequencies or sources, essentially generating data sensitivities for an N dimensional data-subspace. These multiple sensitivities allow a good approximation to the full Jacobian of the data mapping to be built up in many fewer search steps than would be required by application of textbook optimization methods, which take no account of the multiplicity of forward problems that must be solved for each search step. We have applied this idea to a develop a hybrid inversion scheme that combines features of the iterative limited memory type methods with a Newton-type approach using a partial calculation of the Jacobian. Initial tests on 2D problems show that the new approach produces results essentially identical to a Newton type Occam minimum structure inversion, while running more rapidly than an iterative (fixed regularization parameter) CG style inversion. Memory requirements, while greater than for something like CG, are modest enough that even in 3D the scheme should allow 3D inverse problems to be solved on a common desktop PC, at least for modest (~ 100 sites, 15-20 frequencies) data sets. A secondary focus of the research has been development of a modular system for EM inversion, using an object oriented approach. This system has proven useful for more rapid prototyping of inversion algorithms, in particular allowing initial development and testing to be conducted with two-dimensional example problems, before approaching more computationally cumbersome three-dimensional problems.

  1. Elastic-Waveform Inversion with Compressive Sensing for Sparse Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2015-01-26

    Accurate velocity models of compressional- and shear-waves are essential for geothermal reservoir characterization and microseismic imaging. Elastic-waveform inversion of multi-component seismic data can provide high-resolution inversion results of subsurface geophysical properties. However, the method requires seismic data acquired using dense source and receiver arrays. In practice, seismic sources and/or geophones are often sparsely distributed on the surface and/or in a borehole, such as 3D vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys. We develop a novel elastic-waveform inversion method with compressive sensing for inversion of sparse seismic data. We employ an alternating-minimization algorithm to solve the optimization problem of our new waveform inversion method. We validate our new method using synthetic VSP data for a geophysical model built using geologic features found at the Raft River enhanced-geothermal-system (EGS) field. We apply our method to synthetic VSP data with a sparse source array and compare the results with those obtained with a dense source array. Our numerical results demonstrate that the velocity mode ls produced with our new method using a sparse source array are almost as accurate as those obtained using a dense source array.

  2. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Fossil Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.sciencedirect.comscience?obMiamiImageURL&cid277910&user10& Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org...

  3. The influence of air temperature inversions on snowmelt and glacier mass-balance simulations, Ammassalik island, SE Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, a realistic description of air temperature inversions is essential for accurate snow and glacier ice melt, and glacier mass-balance simulations. A physically based snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) was used to simulate eight years (1998/99 to 2005/06) of snow accumulation and snow and glacier ice ablation from numerous small coastal marginal glaciers on the SW-part of Ammassalik Island in SE Greenland. These glaciers are regularly influenced by inversions and sea breezes associated with the adjacent relatively low temperature and frequently ice-choked fjords and ocean. To account for the influence of these inversions on the spatiotemporal variation of air temperature and snow and glacier melt rates, temperature inversion routines were added to MircoMet, the meteorological distribution sub-model used in SnowModel. The inversions were observed and modeled to occur during 84% of the simulation period. Modeled inversions were defined not to occur during days with strong winds and high precipitation rates due to the potential of inversion break-up. Field observations showed inversions to extend from sea level to approximately 300 m a.s.l., and this inversion level was prescribed in the model simulations. Simulations with and without the inversion routines were compared. The inversion model produced air temperature distributions with warmer lower elevation areas and cooler higher elevation areas than without inversion routines due to the use of cold sea-breeze base temperature data from underneath the inversion. This yielded an up to 2 weeks earlier snowmelt in the lower areas and up to 1 to 3 weeks later snowmelt in the higher elevation areas of the simulation domain. Averaged mean annual modeled surface mass-balance for all glaciers (mainly located above the inversion layer) was -720 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} for inversion simulations, and -880 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} without the inversion routines, a difference of 160 mm w.eq. y{sup -1}. The annual glacier loss for the two simulations was 50.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} and 64.4 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} for all glaciers - a difference of {approx}21%. The average equilibrium line altitude (ELA) for all glaciers in the simulation domain was located at 875 m a.s.l. and at 900 m a.s.l. for simulations with or without inversion routines, respectively.

  4. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  5. Inverse Cascade of Non-helical Magnetic Turbulence in a Relativistic Fluid

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Inverse Cascade of Non-helical Magnetic Turbulence in a Relativistic Fluid Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inverse Cascade of Non-helical Magnetic Turbulence in a Relativistic Fluid Authors: Zrake, Jonathan ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park Publication Date: 2014-10-23 OSTI Identifier: 1160305 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16129 Journal ID: ISSN 2041--8213; arXiv:1407.5626 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  6. Inverse scattering transform for the focusing nonlinear Schrdinger equation with nonzero boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biondini, Gino; Kova?i?, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    The inverse scattering transform for the focusing nonlinear Schrdinger equation with non-zero boundary conditions at infinity is presented, including the determination of the analyticity of the scattering eigenfunctions, the introduction of the appropriate Riemann surface and uniformization variable, the symmetries, discrete spectrum, asymptotics, trace formulae and the so-called theta condition, and the formulation of the inverse problem in terms of a Riemann-Hilbert problem. In addition, the general behavior of the soliton solutions is discussed, as well as the reductions to all special cases previously discussed in the literature.

  7. Use of traveltime skips in refraction analysis to delineate velocity inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, H.C.; Dixit, M.M.; Murty, P.R.K.

    1995-08-01

    First arrival refraction data does not normally provide any indication of the velocity inversion problem. However, under certain favorable circumstances, when the low-velocity layer (LVL) is considerably thicker than the overlying higher-velocity layer (HVL), the velocity inversion can be seen in the form of a traveltime skip. Model studies show that in such cases the length of the HVL traveltime branch can be used to determine the thickness of the HVL and the magnitude of the traveltime skip in order to determine the thickness of the LVL. This is also applicable in the case of field data.

  8. Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films « Prev Next » Title: Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films Authors: Yacoby, Yizhak ; Zhou, Hua ; Pindak, Ron ; Božović, Ivan Publication Date: 2013-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1101917 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B

  9. Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomic-layer synthesis and imaging uncover broken inversion symmetry in La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 films Authors: Yacoby, Yizhak ; Zhou, Hua ; Pindak, Ron ; Božović, Ivan Publication Date: 2013-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1101917 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B

  10. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabitz, H.

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  11. Water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level over the tropical western Pacific. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP), several periods of water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level were observed. Satellite and radiosonde data from TOGA COARE are used to document the large-scale conditions and thermodynamic and kinematic structures present during three extended periods in which moisture and temperature inversions near the freezing level were very pronounced. Observations from each case are synthesized into schematics which represent typical structures of the inversion phenomena. Frequency distributions of the inversion phenomena along with climatological humidity and temperature profiles are calculated for the four-month IOP.

  12. Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets with competing interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic skyrmions have attracted considerable attention recently for their huge potential in spintronic applications. Generally skyrmions are big compared to the atomic lattice constant, which allows for the Ginzburg-Landau type description in the continuum limit. This description successfully captures the main experimental observations on skyrmions in B20 compound without inversion symmetry. Skyrmions can also exist in inversion-symmetric magnets with competing interactions. Here, we derive a general Ginzburg-Landau theory for skyrmions in these magnets valid in the long-wavelength limit. We study the unusual static and dynamical properties of skyrmions based on the derived Ginzburg-Landau theory. We show that an easy axismore » spin anisotropy is sufficient to stabilize a skyrmion lattice. Interestingly, the skyrmion in inversion-symmetric magnets has a new internal degree of freedom associated with the rotation of helicity, i.e., the “spin” of the skyrmion as a particle, in addition to the usual translational motion of skyrmions (orbital motion). The orbital and spin degree of freedoms of an individual skyrmion can couple to each other, and give rise to unusual behavior that is absent for the skyrmions stabilized by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Finally, the derived Ginzburg-Landau theory provides a convenient and general framework to discuss skyrmion physics and will facilitate the search for skyrmions in inversion-symmetric magnets.« less

  13. Thermoelectric properties of highly doped n-type polysilicon inverse opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, J; Sinha, S

    2012-10-01

    Nanostructured single-crystal silicon exhibits a remarkable increase in the figure of merit for thermoelectric energy conversion. Here we theoretically investigate a similar enhancement for polycrystalline silicon inverse opals. An inverse opal provides nanoscale grains and a thin-film like geometry to scatter phonons preferentially over electrons. Using solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons and phonons, we show that the figure of merit at 300 K is fifteen times that of bulk single-crystal silicon. Our models predict that grain boundaries are more effective than surfaces in enhancing the figure of merit. We provide insight into this effect and show that preserving a grain size smaller than the shell thickness of the inverse opal increases the figure of merit by as much as 50% when the ratio between the two features is a third. At 600 K, the figure of merit is as high as 0.6 for a shell thickness of 10 nm. This work advances the fundamental understanding of charge and heat transport in nanostructured inverse opals. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4758382

  14. Balanced-activity improved inverse emulsion to inhibit brittle lutite hydration in oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmedo, E. P.; de J. Hernandez Alvarez, R.; Barrera, C. D.; Ramos, J. D. G.

    1984-10-02

    An improved inverse emulsion for use as a drilling fluid that inhibits brittle lutite hydration. The emulsion includes a heavy oil; brine; a viscosity agent with thermostabilizing properties; an emulsifying agent; a thickening agent; a gelatinizing additive; and an alkaline earth metal hydroxide. The emulsion avoids hole collapsing and improves well gage stability.

  15. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of 2. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  16. Design Modifications for Increasing the BOM and EOM Power Output and Reducing the Size and Mass of RTG for the Pluto Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Kumar, Vasanth

    1994-06-01

    A companion paper analyzed the effect on source modules for three specific fuel options, and compared the predicted power output with JPL's latest goals for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission. The results showed that a 5-module RTG cannot fully meet JPL's goals with any of the available fuels; and that a 6-module RTG more than meets those goals with Russian fuel, almost meets them with U.S. (Cassini-type) fuel, but still falls far short of meeting them with the depleted fuel from the aged (1982) Galileo spare RTG. The inadequacy of the aged fuel was disappointing,because heat source modules made from it already exist, and their use in PFF could result in substantial cost savings. The present paper describes additional analyses which showed that a six-module RTG with the aged fuel can meet JPL's stipulated power margin with a relatively simple design modification, that a second design modification makes it possible to recover all of the mass and size penalty for going from five to six heat source modules, and that a third modification could raise the EOM power margin to 16%. There are four copies in the file. Cross Reference ESD Files FSC-ESD-217-94-531 (CID #8572)

  17. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

  18. Inverse Kinetics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  19. SOUND-SPEED INVERSION OF THE SUN USING A NONLOCAL STATISTICAL CONVECTION THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Chunguang; Deng Licai; Xiong Darun; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen

    2012-11-01

    Helioseismic inversions reveal a major discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and the standard solar model just below the base of the solar convection zone. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is caused by the inherent shortcomings of the local mixing-length theory adopted in the standard solar model. Using a self-consistent nonlocal convection theory, we construct an envelope model of the Sun for sound-speed inversion. Our solar model has a very smooth transition from the convective envelope to the radiative interior, and the convective energy flux changes sign crossing the boundaries of the convection zone. It shows evident improvement over the standard solar model, with a significant reduction in the discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and local convection models.

  20. Encapsulation of nanoclusters in dried gel materials via an inverse micelle/sol gel synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martino, A.; Yamanaka, S.A.; Kawola, J.S.; Showalter, S.K.; Loy, D.A.

    1998-09-29

    A dried gel material sterically entrapping nanoclusters of a catalytically active material and a process to make the material via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis are disclosed. A surfactant is mixed with an apolar solvent to form an inverse micelle solution. A salt of a catalytically active material, such as gold chloride, is added along with a silica gel precursor to the solution to form a mixture. To the mixture are then added a reducing agent for the purpose of reducing the gold in the gold chloride to atomic gold to form the nanoclusters and a condensing agent to form the gel which sterically entraps the nanoclusters. The nanoclusters are normally in the average size range of from 5--10 nm in diameter with a monodisperse size distribution. 1 fig.

  1. Encapsulation of nanoclusters in dried gel materials via an inverse micelle/sol gel synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martino, Anthony; Yamanaka, Stacey A.; Kawola, Jeffrey S.; Showalter, Steven K.; Loy, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    A dried gel material sterically entrapping nanoclusters of a catalytically active material and a process to make the material via an inverse micelle/sol-gel synthesis. A surfactant is mixed with an apolar solvent to form an inverse micelle solution. A salt of a catalytically active material, such as gold chloride, is added along with a silica gel precursor to the solution to form a mixture. To the mixture are then added a reducing agent for the purpose of reducing the gold in the gold chloride to atomic gold to form the nanoclusters and a condensing agent to form the gel which sterically entraps the nanoclusters. The nanoclusters are normally in the average size range of from 5-10 nm in diameter with a monodisperse size distribution.

  2. Non-linear Conjugate Gradient Time-Domain Controlled Inversion Source

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-16

    Software that simulates and inverts time-domain electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a step-wise source signal from either galvanic (grounded wires) or inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried inductive (magnetic loops) sources. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code TEM3D ver. 2.0. The upgrade includes the following components: (1) Improved (faster)memory access during gradient computation. (2) Data parellelization scheme: Multiple transmitters (sources) can be distributed accross several banks of processors (daa-planes). Similarly, the receivers of each source are also distributed accross the corresponding data-plane. (3) Improved data-IO.« less

  3. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling Methods for 1D Seismic and EM Data Inversion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-09-22

    This software provides several Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods for the Bayesian model developed for inverting 1D marine seismic and controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The current software can be used for individual inversion of seismic AVO and CSEM data and for joint inversion of both seismic and EM data sets. The structure of the software is very general and flexible, and it allows users to incorporate their own forward simulation codes and rockmore » physics model codes easily into this software. Although the softwae was developed using C and C++ computer languages, the user-supplied codes can be written in C, C++, or various versions of Fortran languages. The software provides clear interfaces for users to plug in their own codes. The output of this software is in the format that the R free software CODA can directly read to build MCMC objects.« less

  4. From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    94C From Deterministic Inversion to Uncertainty Quantification: Planning a Long Journey in Ice Sheet Modeling M. Eledred, J. Jakeman, M. Perego, A. Salinger, I. K. Tezaur [SNL], P. Heimbach, C. Jackson [UT Austin], M. Hoffman, S. Price [LANL], G. Stadler [Courant] THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN «Los Alamos NATIONAL LABORATORY QOEST Workshop, Los Angeles, April 2, 2015 Sandia National (Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  5. Inversion for Eigenvalues and Modes Using Sierra-SD and ROL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Timothy; Aquino, Wilkins; Ridzal, Denis; Kouri, Drew Philip

    2015-12-01

    In this report we formulate eigenvalue-based methods for model calibration using a PDE-constrained optimization framework. We derive the abstract optimization operators from first principles and implement these methods using Sierra-SD and the Rapid Optimization Library (ROL). To demon- strate this approach, we use experimental measurements and an inverse solution to compute the joint and elastic foam properties of a low-fidelity unit (LFU) model.

  6. An iterative particle filter approach for coupled hydro-geophysical inversion of a controlled infiltration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Rossi, Matteo; Pasetto, Damiano; Deiana, Rita; Ferraris, Stefano; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2015-02-15

    The modeling of unsaturated groundwater flow is affected by a high degree of uncertainty related to both measurement and model errors. Geophysical methods such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) can provide useful indirect information on the hydrological processes occurring in the vadose zone. In this paper, we propose and test an iterated particle filter method to solve the coupled hydrogeophysical inverse problem. We focus on an infiltration test monitored by time-lapse ERT and modeled using Richards equation. The goal is to identify hydrological model parameters from ERT electrical potential measurements. Traditional uncoupled inversion relies on the solution of two sequential inverse problems, the first one applied to the ERT measurements, the second one to Richards equation. This approach does not ensure an accurate quantitative description of the physical state, typically violating mass balance. To avoid one of these two inversions and incorporate in the process more physical simulation constraints, we cast the problem within the framework of a SIR (Sequential Importance Resampling) data assimilation approach that uses a Richards equation solver to model the hydrological dynamics and a forward ERT simulator combined with Archie's law to serve as measurement model. ERT observations are then used to update the state of the system as well as to estimate the model parameters and their posterior distribution. The limitations of the traditional sequential Bayesian approach are investigated and an innovative iterative approach is proposed to estimate the model parameters with high accuracy. The numerical properties of the developed algorithm are verified on both homogeneous and heterogeneous synthetic test cases based on a real-world field experiment.

  7. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  8. COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adjoint Methods | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 6, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods Professor Jeroen Tromp Princeton University Presentation: Office presentation icon WC06FEB2013_JTromp.ppt Harnessing high-performance computers and accurate numerical methods to better constrain physical properties of Earth's interior is rapidly becoming one of the most important research topics in

  9. Determination of transit time distribution and Rabi frequency by applying regularized inverse on Ramsey spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Soo Heyong; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Ho Seong; Kwon, Taeg Yong [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-23

    The authors report on a method to determine the Rabi frequency and transit time distribution of atoms that are essential for proper operation of atomic beam frequency standards. Their method, which employs alternative regularized inverse on two Ramsey spectra measured at different microwave powers, can be used for the frequency standards with short Ramsey cavity as well as long ones. The authors demonstrate that uncertainty in Rabi frequency obtained from their method is 0.02%.

  10. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  11. Top-gate organic depletion and inversion transistors with doped channel and injection contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xuhai; Kasemann, Daniel Leo, Karl

    2015-03-09

    Organic field-effect transistors constitute a vibrant research field and open application perspectives in flexible electronics. For a commercial breakthrough, however, significant performance improvements are still needed, e.g., stable and high charge carrier mobility and on-off ratio, tunable threshold voltage, as well as integrability criteria such as n- and p-channel operation and top-gate architecture. Here, we show pentacene-based top-gate organic transistors operated in depletion and inversion regimes, realized by doping source and drain contacts as well as a thin layer of the transistor channel. By varying the doping concentration and the thickness of the doped channel, we control the position of the threshold voltage without degrading on-off ratio or mobility. Capacitance-voltage measurements show that an inversion channel can indeed be formed, e.g., an n-doped channel can be inverted to a p-type inversion channel with highly p-doped contacts. The Cytop polymer dielectric minimizes hysteresis, and the transistors can be biased for prolonged cycles without a shift of threshold voltage, indicating excellent operation stability.

  12. New analysis indicates no thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob L.; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-20

    An important focus of exoplanet research is the determination of the atmospheric temperature structure of strongly irradiated gas giant planets, or hot Jupiters. HD 209458b is the prototypical exoplanet for atmospheric thermal inversions, but this assertion does not take into account recently obtained data or newer data reduction techniques. We reexamine this claim by investigating all publicly available Spitzer Space Telescope secondary-eclipse photometric data of HD 209458b and performing a self-consistent analysis. We employ data reduction techniques that minimize stellar centroid variations, apply sophisticated models to known Spitzer systematics, and account for time-correlated noise in the data. We derive new secondary-eclipse depths of 0.119% 0.007%, 0.123% 0.006%, 0.134% 0.035%, and 0.215% 0.008% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m bandpasses, respectively. We feed these results into a Bayesian atmospheric retrieval analysis and determine that it is unnecessary to invoke a thermal inversion to explain our secondary-eclipse depths. The data are well fitted by a temperature model that decreases monotonically between pressure levels of 1 and 0.01 bars. We conclude that there is no evidence for a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b.

  13. Quantum states for quantum processes: A toy model for ammonia inversion spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteca, Gustavo A. [Departement de Chimie et Biochimie and Biomolecular Sciences Programme, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, A ring ngstroemlaboratoriet, Box 259, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Tapia, O. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, A ring ngstroemlaboratoriet, Box 259, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Chemical transformations are viewed here as quantum processes modulated by external fields, that is, as shifts in reactant to product amplitudes within a quantum state represented by a linear (coherent) superposition of electronuclear basis functions; their electronic quantum numbers identify the ''chemical species.'' This basis set can be mapped from attractors built from a unique electronic configurational space that is invariant with respect to the nuclear geometry. In turn, the quantum numbers that label these basis functions and the semiclassical potentials for the electronic attractors may be used to derive reaction coordinates to monitor progress as a function of the applied field. A generalization of Feynman's three-state model for the ammonia inversion process illustrates the scheme; to enforce symmetry for the entire inversion process model and ensure invariance with respect to nuclear configurations, the three attractors and their basis functions are computed with a grid of fixed floating Gaussian functions. The external-field modulation of the effective inversion barrier is discussed within this conceptual approach. This analysis brings the descriptions of chemical processes near modern technologies that employ molecules to encode information by means of confinement and external fields.

  14. Method for the preparation of metal colloids in inverse micelles and product preferred by the method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for preparing catalytic elemental metal colloidal particles (e.g. gold, palladium, silver, rhodium, iridium, nickel, iron, platinum, molybdenum) or colloidal alloy particles (silver/iridium or platinum/gold). A homogeneous inverse micelle solution of a metal salt is first formed in a metal-salt solvent comprised of a surfactant (e.g. a nonionic or cationic surfactant) and an organic solvent. The size and number of inverse micelles is controlled by the proportions of the surfactant and the solvent. Then, the metal salt is reduced (by chemical reduction or by a pulsed or continuous wave UV laser) to colloidal particles of elemental metal. After their formation, the colloidal metal particles can be stabilized by reaction with materials that permanently add surface stabilizing groups to the surface of the colloidal metal particles. The sizes of the colloidal elemental metal particles and their size distribution is determined by the size and number of the inverse micelles. A second salt can be added with further reduction to form the colloidal alloy particles. After the colloidal elemental metal particles are formed, the homogeneous solution distributes to two phases, one phase rich in colloidal elemental metal particles and the other phase rich in surfactant. The colloidal elemental metal particles from one phase can be dried to form a powder useful as a catalyst. Surfactant can be recovered and recycled from the phase rich in surfactant.

  15. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx over China: Reconciling the difference of inverse modeling results using GOME-2 and OMI measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Dasa; Wang, Yuhang; Smeltzer, Charles; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2014-06-27

    Inverse modeling using satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns has been extensively used to estimate nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in China. Recently, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provide independent global NO2 column measurements on a nearly daily basis at around 9:30 and 13:30 local time across the equator, respectively. Anthropogenic NOx emission estimates by applying previously developed monthly inversion (MI) or daily inversion (DI) methods to these two sets of measurements show substantial differences. We improve the DI method by conducting model simulation, satellite retrieval, and inverse modeling sequentially on a daily basis. After each inversion, we update anthropogenic NOx emissions in the model simulation with the newly obtained a posteriori results. Consequently, the inversion-optimized emissions are used to compute the a priori NO2 profiles for satellite retrievals. As such, the a priori profiles used in satellite retrievals are now coupled to inverse modeling results. The improved procedure was applied to GOME-2 and OMI NO2 measurements in 2011. The new daily retrieval-inversion (DRI) method estimates an average NOx emission of 6.9 Tg N/yr over China, and the difference between using GOME-2 and OMI measurements is 0.4 Tg N/yr, which is significantly smaller than the difference of 1.3 Tg N/yr using the previous DI method. Using the more consistent DRI inversion results, we find that anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to be higher in winter and summer than spring (and possibly fall) and the weekday-to-weekend emission ratio tends to increase with NOx emission in China.

  16. THERMAL EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell * * * * * * * * * * * report of investigations 5847 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Stewart L. Udall, Secretary BUREAU OF MINES Marling J. Ankeny, Director DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED This publication has been cataloged as follows: Stecura, Stephan Thermal expansion and phase inversion of rare-earth oxides, by Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell. [Washington] U. S. Dept. of

  17. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore » impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  18. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy laboratories.

  19. Control of the spin to charge conversion using the inverse Rashba-Edelstein effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangiao, S.; De Teresa, J. M.; Morellon, L.; Martinez-Velarte, M. C.; Lucas, I.; Viret, M.

    2015-04-27

    We show here that using spin orbit coupling interactions at a metallic interface it is possible to control the sign of the spin to charge conversion in a spin pumping experiment. Using the intrinsic symmetry of the “Inverse Rashba Edelstein Effect” (IREE) in a Bi/Ag interface, the charge current changes sign when reversing the order of the Ag and Bi stacking. This confirms the IREE nature of the conversion of spin into charge in these interfaces and opens the way to tailoring the spin sensing voltage by an appropriate trilayer sequence.

  20. Dirac or inverse seesaw neutrino masses with B L gauge symmetry and S? flavor symmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-02-01

    Many studies have been made on extensions of the standard model with B L gauge symmetry. The addition of three singlet (right-handed) neutrinos renders it anomaly-free. It has always been assumed that the spontaneous breaking of B L is accomplished by a singlet scalar field carrying two units of B L charge. This results in a very natural implementation of the Majorana seesaw mechanism for neutrinos. However, there exists in fact another simple anomaly-free solution which allows Dirac or inverse seesaw neutrino masses. We show for the first time these new possibilities and discuss an application tomoreneutrino mixing with S? flavor symmetry.less

  1. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  2. Takes Electric or Magnetic field data through Inversion process a 2D Distributon

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-05-01

    Program images 2D distributions in electrical conductivity for geophysical applications. The program can treat surface based and cross well measurement geometries, including inductive and grounded source antennas in the quasi-static limit. The algorithm using Krylov iterative methods to solve for the predicted data and model sensitivities. The model update is achieved using a Gauss-newton optimization process for stability. A new line search capability is now included in the algorithm to insure global convergence of themore » inversion iteration.« less

  3. TeV-scale gauged B-L symmetry with inverse seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2010-10-01

    We propose a modified version of the TeV-scale B-L extension of the standard model, where neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism. We show that heavy neutrinos in this model can be accessible via clean signals at the LHC. The search for the extra gauge boson Z{sub B-L}{sup '} through the decay into dileptons or two dileptons plus missing energy is studied. We also show that the B-L extra Higgs boson can be directly probed at the LHC via a clean dilepton and missing energy signal.

  4. Application of principal component analysis (PCA) and improved joint probability distributions to the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) for predicting extreme sea states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey C.; Sallaberry, Cédric J.; Dallman, Ann R.; Neary, Vincent S.

    2016-01-06

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulations as a part of the standard current practice for designing marine structures to survive extreme sea states. These environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height (Hs) and either energy period (Te) or peak period (Tp) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first-order reliability method (I-FORM) is a standard design practice for generating environmental contours. This papermore » develops enhanced methodologies for data analysis prior to the application of the I-FORM, including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the variables under consideration as well as new distribution and parameter fitting techniques. As a result, these modifications better represent the measured data and, therefore, should contribute to the development of more realistic representations of environmental contours of extreme sea states for determining design loads for marine structures.« less

  5. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle thesemore » challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.« less

  6. Evaluation of wetland methane emissions across North America using atmospheric data and inverse modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, Scot M.; Commane, Roisin; Melton, Joe R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Benmergui, Joshua; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Michalak, Anna M.; Sweeney, Colm; Worthy, Doug E. J.

    2016-03-02

    Existing estimates of methane (CH4) fluxes from North American wetlands vary widely in both magnitude and distribution. In light of these differences, this study uses atmospheric CH4 observations from the US and Canada to analyze seven different bottom-up, wetland CH4 estimates reported in a recent model comparison project. We first use synthetic data to explore whether wetland CH4 fluxes are detectable at atmospheric observation sites. We find that the observation network can detect aggregate wetland fluxes from both eastern and western Canada but generally not from the US. Based upon these results, we then use real data and inverse modelingmore » results to analyze the magnitude, seasonality, and spatial distribution of each model estimate. The magnitude of Canadian fluxes in many models is larger than indicated by atmospheric observations. Many models predict a seasonality that is narrower than implied by inverse modeling results, possibly indicating an oversensitivity to air or soil temperatures. The LPJ-Bern and SDGVM models have a geographic distribution that is most consistent with atmospheric observations, depending upon the region and season. Lastly, these models utilize land cover maps or dynamic modeling to estimate wetland coverage while most other models rely primarily on remote sensing inundation data.« less

  7. Advancing Inverse Sensitivity/Uncertainty Methods for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbanas, Goran; Williams, Mark L; Leal, Luiz C; Dunn, Michael E; Khuwaileh, Bassam A.; Wang, C; Abdel-Khalik, Hany

    2015-01-01

    The inverse sensitivity/uncertainty quantification (IS/UQ) method has recently been implemented in the Inverse Sensitivity/UnceRtainty Estimiator (INSURE) module of the AMPX system [1]. The IS/UQ method aims to quantify and prioritize the cross section measurements along with uncer- tainties needed to yield a given nuclear application(s) target response uncertainty, and doing this at a minimum cost. Since in some cases the extant uncertainties of the differential cross section data are already near the limits of the present-day state-of-the-art measurements, requiring significantly smaller uncertainties may be unrealistic. Therefore we have incorporated integral benchmark exper- iments (IBEs) data into the IS/UQ method using the generalized linear least-squares method, and have implemented it in the INSURE module. We show how the IS/UQ method could be applied to systematic and statistical uncertainties in a self-consistent way. We show how the IS/UQ method could be used to optimize uncertainties of IBE s and differential cross section data simultaneously.

  8. Inverse neutrinoless double beta decay revisited: Neutrinos, Higgs triplets, and a muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    We revisit the process of inverse neutrinoless double beta decay (e{sup -}e{sup -{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}) at future linear colliders. The cases of Majorana neutrino and Higgs triplet exchange are considered. We also discuss the processes e{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} and {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}, which are motivated by the possibility of muon colliders. For heavy neutrino exchange, we show that masses up to 10{sup 6} (10{sup 5}) GeV could be probed for ee and e{mu} machines, respectively. The stringent limits for mixing of heavy neutrinos with muons render {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} less promising, even though this process is not constrained by limits from neutrinoless double beta decay. If Higgs triplets are responsible for inverse neutrinoless double beta decay, observable signals are only possible if a very narrow resonance is met. We also consider unitarity aspects of the process in case both Higgs triplets and neutrinos are exchanged. An exact seesaw relation connecting low energy data with heavy neutrino and triplet parameters is found.

  9. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes’ rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  10. Inverse transport problem solvers based on regularized and compressive sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Y.; Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zhang, H.

    2012-07-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, regularized-based method and compressive sensing (CS)-based method for inverse transport equation are presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. With a large number of measurements, least-square method is utilized to complete the reconstruction. Owing to the ill-posedness of the inverse problems, regularized algorithm is employed. Tikhonov method is applied with an appropriate posterior regularization parameter to get a meaningful solution. However, it's always very costly to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, CS sparse reconstruction technique Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. This paper constructs and takes the forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix as measurement matrix. In the CS-based algorithm, Fourier expansion and wavelet expansion are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system. Simulations and numerical results of regularized method with appropriate regularization parameter and that of CS-based agree well with the reference value, furthermore, both methods avoid amplifying the noise. (authors)

  11. An adaptive importance sampling algorithm for Bayesian inversion with multimodal distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-21

    Parametric uncertainties are encountered in the simulations of many physical systems, and may be reduced by an inverse modeling procedure that calibrates the simulation results to observations on the real system being simulated. Following Bayes rule, a general approach for inverse modeling problems is to sample from the posterior distribution of the uncertain model parameters given the observations. However, the large number of repetitive forward simulations required in the sampling process could pose a prohibitive computational burden. This difficulty is particularly challenging when the posterior is multimodal. We present in this paper an adaptive importance sampling algorithm to tackle these challenges. Two essential ingredients of the algorithm are: 1) a Gaussian mixture (GM) model adaptively constructed as the proposal distribution to approximate the possibly multimodal target posterior, and 2) a mixture of polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, built according to the GM proposal, as a surrogate model to alleviate the computational burden caused by computational-demanding forward model evaluations. In three illustrative examples, the proposed adaptive importance sampling algorithm demonstrates its capabilities of automatically finding a GM proposal with an appropriate number of modes for the specific problem under study, and obtaining a sample accurately and efficiently representing the posterior with limited number of forward simulations.

  12. Full-waveform inversion in the time domain with an energy-weighted gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Huang, Lianjie; Lin, Youzuo

    2011-01-01

    When applying full-waveform inversion to surface seismic reflection data, one difficulty is that the deep region of the model is usually not reconstructed as well as the shallow region. We develop an energy-weighted gradient method for the time-domain full-waveform inversion to accelerate the convergence rate and improve reconstruction of the entire model without increasing the computational cost. Three different methods can alleviate the problem of poor reconstruction in the deep region of the model: the layer stripping, depth-weighting and pseudo-Hessian schemes. The first two approaches need to subjectively choose stripping depths and weighting functions. The third one scales the gradient with only the forward propagation wavefields from sources. However, the Hessian depends on wavefields from both sources and receivers. Our new energy-weighted method makes use of the energies of both forward and backward propagated wavefields from sources and receivers as weights to compute the gradient. We compare the reconstruction of our new method with those of the conjugate gradient and pseudo-Hessian methods, and demonstrate that our new method significantly improves the reconstruction of both the shallow and deep regions of the model.

  13. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  14. Rotatable spin-polarized electron source for inverse-photoemission experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolwijk, S. D. Wortelen, H.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2014-01-15

    We present a ROtatable Spin-polarized Electron source (ROSE) for the use in spin- and angle-resolved inverse-photoemission (SR-IPE) experiments. A key feature of the ROSE is a variable direction of the transversal electron beam polarization. As a result, the inverse-photoemission experiment becomes sensitive to two orthogonal in-plane polarization directions, and, for nonnormal electron incidence, to the out-of-plane polarization component. We characterize the ROSE and test its performance on the basis of SR-IPE experiments. Measurements on magnetized Ni films on W(110) serve as a reference to demonstrate the variable spin sensitivity. Moreover, investigations of the unoccupied spin-dependent surface electronic structure of Tl/Si(111) highlight the capability to analyze complex phenomena like spin rotations in momentum space. Essentially, the ROSE opens the way to further studies on complex spin-dependent effects in the field of surface magnetism and spin-orbit interaction at surfaces.

  15. SU-E-J-161: Inverse Problems for Optical Parameters in Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahrenholtz, SJ; Stafford, RJ; Fuentes, DT

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is investigated as a neurosurgical intervention for oncological applications throughout the body by active post market studies. Real-time MR temperature imaging is used to monitor ablative thermal delivery in the clinic. Additionally, brain MRgLITT could improve through effective planning for laser fiber's placement. Mathematical bioheat models have been extensively investigated but require reliable patient specific physical parameter data, e.g. optical parameters. This abstract applies an inverse problem algorithm to characterize optical parameter data obtained from previous MRgLITT interventions. Methods: The implemented inverse problem has three primary components: a parameter-space search algorithm, a physics model, and training data. First, the parameter-space search algorithm uses a gradient-based quasi-Newton method to optimize the effective optical attenuation coefficient, ?-eff. A parameter reduction reduces the amount of optical parameter-space the algorithm must search. Second, the physics model is a simplified bioheat model for homogeneous tissue where closed-form Green's functions represent the exact solution. Third, the training data was temperature imaging data from 23 MRgLITT oncological brain ablations (980 nm wavelength) from seven different patients. Results: To three significant figures, the descriptive statistics for ?-eff were 1470 m{sup ?1} mean, 1360 m{sup ?1} median, 369 m{sup ?1} standard deviation, 933 m{sup ?1} minimum and 2260 m{sup ?1} maximum. The standard deviation normalized by the mean was 25.0%. The inverse problem took <30 minutes to optimize all 23 datasets. Conclusion: As expected, the inferred average is biased by underlying physics model. However, the standard deviation normalized by the mean is smaller than literature values and indicates an increased precision in the characterization of the optical parameters needed to plan MRgLITT procedures. This investigation demonstrates the potential for the optimization and validation of more sophisticated bioheat models that incorporate the uncertainty of the data into the predictions, e.g. stochastic finite element methods.

  16. Disorder dependent half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mukhtiyar; Saini, Hardev S.; Thakur, Jyoti; Reshak, Ali H.; Kashyap, Manish K.

    2013-12-15

    Heusler alloys based thin-films often exhibit a degree of atomic disorder which leads to the lowering of spin polarization in spintronic devices. We present ab-initio calculations of atomic disorder effects on spin polarization and half-metallicity of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The five types of disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi have been proposed and investigated in detail. The A2{sub a}-type and B2-type disorders destroy the half-metallicity whereas it sustains for all disorders concentrations in DO{sub 3a}- and A2{sub b}-type disorder and for smallest disorder concentration studied in DO{sub 3b}-type disorder. Lower formation energy/atom for A2{sub b}-type disorder than other four disorders in Mn{sub 2}CoSi advocates the stability of this disorder. The total magnetic moment shows a strong dependence on the disorder and the change in chemical environment. The 100% spin polarization even in the presence of disorders explicitly supports that these disorders shall not hinder the use of Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy in device applications. - Graphical abstract: Minority-spin gap (E{sub g↓}) and HM gap (E{sub sf}) as a function of concentrations of various possible disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi inverse Heusler alloy. The squares with solid line (black color)/dotted line (blue color)/dashed line (red color) reperesents E{sub g↓} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi and the spheres with solid line (black color)/dottedline (blue color)/dashed line (red color) represents E{sub sf} for DO{sub 3a}-/DO{sub 3b}-/A2{sub b}-type disorder in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. - Highlights: • The DO{sub 3}- and A2-type disorders do not affect the half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The B2-type disorder solely destroys half-metallicity in Mn{sub 2}CoSi. • The A2-type disorder most probable to occur out of all three types. • The total spin magnetic moment strongly depends on the disorder concentrations.

  17. A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Glass, R.J.; Yeh, T.C.; LaBrecque, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from electric resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity of the vadose zone (from the ERT measurements) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related. As of the 21st month of a 36-month project, a three-dimensional stochastic hydrologic inverse model for heterogeneous vadose zones has been developed. This model employs pressure and moisture content measurements under both transient and steady flow conditions to estimate unsaturated hydraulic parameters. In this model, an innovative approach to sequentially condition the estimate using temporal measurements has been incorporated. This allows us to use vast amounts of pressure and moisture content information measured at different times while keeping the computational effort manageable. Using this model the authors have found that the relative importance of the pressure and moisture content measurements in defining the different vadose zone parameters depends on whether the soil is wet or dry. They have also learned that pressure and moisture content measurements collected during steady state flow provide the best characterization of heterogeneity compared to other types of hydrologic data. These findings provide important guidance to the design of sampling scheme of the field experiment described below.'

  18. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  19. Anti-site disorder and improved functionality of Mn?NiX (X = Al, Ga, In, Sn) inverse Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Souvik; Kundu, Ashis; Ghosh, Subhradip; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-10-07

    Recent first-principles calculations have predicted Mn?NiX (X = Al, Ga, In, Sn) alloys to be magnetic shape memory alloys. Moreover, experiments on Mn?NiGa and Mn?NiSn suggest that the alloys deviate from the perfect inverse Heusler arrangement and that there is chemical disorder at the sublattices with tetrahedral symmetry. In this work, we investigate the effects of such chemical disorder on phase stabilities and magnetic properties using first-principles electronic structure methods. We find that except Mn?NiAl, all other alloys show signatures of martensitic transformations in presence of anti-site disorder at the sublattices with tetrahedral symmetry. This improves the possibilities of realizing martensitic transformations at relatively low fields and the possibilities of obtaining significantly large inverse magneto-caloric effects, in comparison to perfect inverse Heusler arrangement of atoms. We analyze the origin of such improvements in functional properties by investigating electronic structures and magnetic exchange interactions.

  20. Temperature dependence of inverse Rashba-Edelstein effect at metallic interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Akiyo; Tashiro, Takaharu; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-05-25

    We report temperature evolution of spin-charge conversion through the inverse Rashba-Edelstein effect (IREE) in a metallic heterostructure. The IREE was induced in a Ag/Bi junction by spin pumping, dynamical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal; nonequilibrium spin accumulation created in the Ag/Bi junction is converted into a charge current at the interface. By measuring the charge current arising from the IREE at different temperatures, we found that the spin-charge conversion efficiency is almost independent of temperature. This method offers a versatile route for probing the spin-orbit coupling at metallic interfaces under various conditions, promising further development of spin-orbit physics and spin-based technologies.

  1. Re-Inversion of Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography Data from the Hanford Site B-Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-05-01

    This report documents the three-dimensional (3D) inversion results of surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data collected over the Hanford Site B-Complex. The data were collected in order to image the subsurface distribution of electrically conductive vadose zone contamination resulting from both planned releases of contamination into subsurface infiltration galleries (cribs, trenches, and tile fields), as well as unplanned releases from the B, BX, and BY tank farms and/or associated facilities. Electrically conductive contaminants are those which increase the ionic strength of pore fluids compared to native conditions, which comprise most types of solutes released into the subsurface B-Complex. The ERT data were collected and originally inverted as described in detail in report RPP-34690 Rev 0., 2007, which readers should refer to for a detailed description of data collection and waste disposal history. Although the ERT imaging results presented in that report successfully delineated the footprint of vadose zone contamination in areas outside of the tank farms, imaging resolution was not optimized due to the inability of available inversion codes to optimally process the massive ERT data set collected at the site. Recognizing these limitations and the potential for enhanced ERT characterization and time-lapse imaging at contaminated sites, a joint effort was initiated in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of Science (DOE-SC), with later support by the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), to develop a high-performance distributed memory parallel 3D ERT inversion code capable of optimally processing large ERT data sets. The culmination of this effort was the development of E4D (Johnson et al., 2010,2012) In 2012, under the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI), the U.S. Department of Energy – Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) commissioned an effort for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to re-invert the ERT data collected over the B-Complex using E4D, with the objective to improve imaging resolution and better understand the distribution of vadose zone contamination at the B-Complex. The details and results of that effort as documented in this report display a significant improvement in ERT image resolution, revealing the nature and orientation of contaminant plumes originating in former infiltration galleries and extending toward the water table. In particular, large plumes originating in the BY-Cribs area appear to have intercepted, or are close to intercepting the water table after being diverted eastward, possibly by the same low permeability unit causing perched water north of the B-Tank Farm boundary. Contaminant plumes are also evident beneath the BX-Trenches, but do not appear to have intercepted the water table. Imaging results within the tank farms themselves are highly biased by the dense network of electrically conductive tanks and dry wells, and are therefore inconclusive concerning contaminant distributions beneath tanks. However, beneath the diversion boxes, the results do reveal highly conductive anomalies that are not associated with metallic infrastructure, and may be diagnostic of extensive contamination. Overall, the parallel ERT inversion provides additional detail concerning contaminated zones in terms of conductive anomalies. These anomalies are consistent with waste disposal histories, and in several cases reveal lateral contaminant transport caused by heterogeneity within the vadose zone.

  2. Exploring parameter constraints on quintessential dark energy: The inverse power law model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashar, Mark; Bozek, Brandon; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Barnard, Michael

    2009-05-15

    We report on the results of a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of an inverse power law (IPL) quintessence model using the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) simulated data sets as a representation of future dark energy experiments. We generate simulated data sets for a {lambda}CDM background cosmology as well as a case where the dark energy is provided by a specific IPL fiducial model, and present our results in the form of likelihood contours generated by these two background cosmologies. We find that the relative constraining power of the various DETF data sets on the IPL model parameters is broadly equivalent to the DETF results for the w{sub 0}-w{sub a} parametrization of dark energy. Finally, we gauge the power of DETF 'stage 4' data by demonstrating a specific IPL model which, if realized in the universe, would allow stage 4 data to exclude a cosmological constant at better than the 3{sigma} level.

  3. 3D Seismic Experimentation and Advanced Processing/Inversion Development for Investigations of the Shallow Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levander, Alan Richard; Zelt, Colin A.

    2015-03-17

    The work plan for this project was to develop and apply advanced seismic reflection and wide-angle processing and inversion techniques to high resolution seismic data for the shallow subsurface to seismically characterize the shallow subsurface at hazardous waste sites as an aid to containment and cleanup activities. We proposed to continue work on seismic data that we had already acquired under a previous DoE grant, as well as to acquire additional new datasets for analysis. The project successfully developed and/or implemented the use of 3D reflection seismology algorithms, waveform tomography and finite-frequency tomography using compressional and shear waves for high resolution characterization of the shallow subsurface at two waste sites. These two sites have markedly different near-surface structures, groundwater flow patterns, and hazardous waste problems. This is documented in the list of refereed documents, conference proceedings, and Rice graduate theses, listed below.

  4. Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Design Earth-sheltered homes, like the one pictured, are a unique option for efficiently designed homes. No matter the type of home you choose, energy efficient design strategies will save you money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Pamm McFadden/NREL. Earth-sheltered homes, like the one pictured, are a unique option for efficiently designed homes. No matter the type of home you choose, energy efficient design strategies will save you money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Pamm

  5. NEW DEVELOPMENTS ON INVERSE POLYGON MAPPING TO CALCULATE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS: OPTIMIZED COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mediavilla, E.; Lopez, P.; Gonzalez-Morcillo, C.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.

    2011-11-01

    We derive an exact solution (in the form of a series expansion) to compute gravitational lensing magnification maps. It is based on the backward gravitational lens mapping of a partition of the image plane in polygonal cells (inverse polygon mapping, IPM), not including critical points (except perhaps at the cell boundaries). The zeroth-order term of the series expansion leads to the method described by Mediavilla et al. The first-order term is used to study the error induced by the truncation of the series at zeroth order, explaining the high accuracy of the IPM even at this low order of approximation. Interpreting the Inverse Ray Shooting (IRS) method in terms of IPM, we explain the previously reported N {sup -3/4} dependence of the IRS error with the number of collected rays per pixel. Cells intersected by critical curves (critical cells) transform to non-simply connected regions with topological pathologies like auto-overlapping or non-preservation of the boundary under the transformation. To define a non-critical partition, we use a linear approximation of the critical curve to divide each critical cell into two non-critical subcells. The optimal choice of the cell size depends basically on the curvature of the critical curves. For typical applications in which the pixel of the magnification map is a small fraction of the Einstein radius, a one-to-one relationship between the cell and pixel sizes in the absence of lensing guarantees both the consistence of the method and a very high accuracy. This prescription is simple but very conservative. We show that substantially larger cells can be used to obtain magnification maps with huge savings in computation time.

  6. Solar Design Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  7. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  8. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  9. Solutions of the Schrdinger equation with inversely quadratic effective plus Mie-type potential using Nikiforov-Uvarov method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, B. I.; Anake, T. A.

    2014-11-12

    The Schrdinger equation with the interaction of inversely quadratic effective and Mie-type potential has been solved for any angular momentum quantum number l using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The bound state energy eigenvalues and the corresponding un-normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in terms of the Laguerre polynomials. Several cases of the potential are also considered and their eigen values obtained.

  10. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agree well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.

  11. Dosimetric aspects of inverse-planned modulated-arc total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Held, Mareike; Kirby, Neil; Morin, Olivier; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To develop optimal beam parameters and to verify the dosimetric aspects of the recently developed modulated-arc total-body irradiation (MATBI) technique, which delivers an inverse-planned dose to the entire body using gantry rotation. Methods: The patient is positioned prone and supine underneath the gantry at about 2 m source-to-surface distance (SSD). Then, up to 28 beams irradiate the patient from different gantry angles. Based on full-body computed-tomography (CT) images of the patient, the weight of each beam is optimized, using inverse planning, to create a uniform body dose. This study investigates how to best simulate patients and the ideal beam setup parameters, such as field size, number of beams, and beam geometry, for treatment time and dose homogeneity. In addition, three anthropomorphic water phantoms were constructed and utilized to verify the accuracy of dose delivery, with both diode array and ion chamber measurements. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy of the new technique, a beam model is created specifically for the extended-SSD positioning for MATBI. Results: Low dose CT scans can be utilized for dose calculations without affecting the accuracy. The largest field size of 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2} was found to deliver the most uniform dose in the least amount of time. Moreover, a higher number of beams improves dose homogeneity. The average dose discrepancy between ion chamber measurements and extended-SSD beam model calculations was 1.2%, with the largest discrepancy being 3.2%. This average dose discrepancy was 1.4% with the standard beam model for delivery at isocenter. Conclusions: The optimum beam setup parameters, regarding dose uniformity and treatment duration, are laid out for modulated-arc TBI. In addition, the presented dose measurements show that these treatments can be delivered accurately. These measurements also indicated that a new beam model did not significantly improve the accuracy of dose calculations. The optimum beam setup parameters along with the measurements performed to ensure accurate dose delivery serve as a useful guide for the clinical implementation of MATBI.

  12. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81% to 870% for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies.

  13. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  14. IMAGING STARSPOT EVOLUTION ON KEPLER TARGET KIC 5110407 USING LIGHT-CURVE INVERSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Monnier, John D.; Harmon, Robert O.; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin

    2013-04-10

    The Kepler target KIC 5110407, a K-type star, shows strong quasi-periodic light curve fluctuations likely arising from the formation and decay of spots on the stellar surface rotating with a period of 3.4693 days. Using an established light-curve inversion algorithm, we study the evolution of the surface features based on Kepler space telescope light curves over a period of two years (with a gap of .25 years). At virtually all epochs, we detect at least one large spot group on the surface causing a 1%-10% flux modulation in the Kepler passband. By identifying and tracking spot groups over a range of inferred latitudes, we measured the surface differential rotation to be much smaller than that found for the Sun. We also searched for a correlation between the 17 stellar flares that occurred during our observations and the orientation of the dominant surface spot at the time of each flare. No statistically significant correlation was found except perhaps for the very brightest flares, suggesting that most flares are associated with regions devoid of spots or spots too small to be clearly discerned using our reconstruction technique. While we may see hints of long-term changes in the spot characteristics and flare statistics within our current data set, a longer baseline of observation will be needed to detect the existence of a magnetic cycle in KIC 5110407.

  15. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  17. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter annihilation and the Pamela positron excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  18. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb?.??Sn?.??Se: Optical and Hall-effect studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Naween; Gu, Genda; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb?.??Sn?.??Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10300 K) reflectance was measured over 407000 cm? (5870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm? (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy optical spectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.

  19. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb?.??Sn?.??Se: Optical and Hall-effect studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Naween; Gu, Genda; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb?.??Sn?.??Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10300 K) reflectance was measured over 407000 cm? (5870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm? (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy opticalmorespectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.less

  20. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  1. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  2. System Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Design System Design This template is used to define the system design PDF icon System Design More Documents & Publications Transition Plan Training Plan Feasibility Study ...

  3. Designated Team Leader

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designated Team Leader Each user project is coordinated by a Designated Team Leader (DTL) who may also be the Principal Investigator (PI). The DTL must provide details of all...

  4. Final Design RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Do adequate calculations exist to support the selected design? (ED-2.3) Are vessels and piping systems designed, sized, and qualified to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ...

  5. Conceptual Safety Design RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Conceptual Safety Design (CSD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the Conceptual Safety Design work, processes and...

  6. Energy design for architects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, A.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains techniques for energy efficiency in architectural design. Many aspects are covered including: cost; comfort and health; energy use; the design process; and analytical techniques. 202 figs. (JF)

  7. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  8. System Design Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter addresses translating the user-oriented functional design specifications into a set of technical, computer-oriented system design specifications; and designing the data structure and processes to the level of detail necessary to plan and execute the Programming and Installation Stages.

  9. Foundation Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, John; Mosiman, Garrett; Handeen, Daniel; Huelman, Patrick; Christian, Jeffery

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information that will enable designers, builders, and homeowners to understand foundation design problems and solutions. The foundation of a house is a somewhat invisible and sometimes ignored component of the building. It is increasingly evident, however, that attention to good foundation design and construction has significant benefits to the homeowner and the builder, and can avoid some serious future problems. Good foundation design and construction practice means not only insulating to save energy, but also providing effective structural design as well as moisture, termite, and radon control techniques where appropriate.

  10. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  11. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  12. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in GRB afterglows (analytical treatment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T. [Space and Remote Sensing, MS B244, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows from high-energy photons (above 100 MeV), assuming a power-law photon spectrum C {sub ?}??{sup 2} and considering only the pairs generated from primary high-energy photons. The essential properties of these pairs (number, minimal energy, cooling energy, distribution with energy) and of their emission (peak flux, spectral breaks, spectral slope) are set by the observables GeV fluence ?(t) = Ft and spectrum, and by the Lorentz factor, ?, and magnetic field, B, of the source of high-energy photons, at observer time, t. Optical and X-ray pseudo light curves, F {sub ?}(?), are calculated for the given B; proper synchrotron self-Compton light curves are calculated by setting the dynamics ?(t) of the high-energy photon source to be that of a decelerating, relativistic shock. It is found that the emission from pairs can accommodate the flux and decays of the optical flashes measured during the prompt (GRB) phase, but it decays faster than the X-ray plateaus observed during the delayed (afterglow) phase. The brightest pair optical emission is obtained for 100 < ? < 500, and depends mostly on the GeV fluence, being independent of the source redshift. Emission from pairs formed during the GRB phase offers an alternate explanation to reverse-shock optical flashes. These two models may be distinguished based on their corresponding flux decay index-spectral slope relations, different correlations with the Large Area Telescope fluence, or through modeling of the afterglow multiwavelength data.

  13. New insights into the enigma of boron carbide inverse molecular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dera, Przemyslaw; Manghnani, Murli H.; Hushur, Anwar; Hu, Yi; Tkachev, Sergey

    2014-07-01

    Equation of state and compression mechanism of nearly stoichiometric boron carbide B{sub 4}C were investigated using diamond anvil cell single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique up to a maximum quasi-hydrostatic pressure of 74.0(1) GPa in neon pressure transmitting medium at ambient temperature. No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. Crystal structure refinements indicate that the icosahedral units are less compressible (13% volume reduction at 60 GPa) than the unit cell volume (18% volume reduction at 60 GPa), contrary to expectations based on the inverse molecular behavior hypothesis, but consistent with spectroscopic evidence and first principles calculations. The high-pressure crystallographic refinements reveal that the nature of the chemical bonds (two, versus three centered character) has marginal effect on the bond compressibility and the compression of the crystal is mainly governed by the force transfer between the rigid icosahedral structural units. - Graphical abstract: Single crystal measurements of equation of state and compression mechanism of B{sub 4}C show that the icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume, despite the threei-ceneterd nature of some icosahedral bonds. - Highlights: Equation of state and compression mechanism of B{sub 4}C were measured to 75 GPa. No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. Icosahedral units are less compressibe than the unit cell volume. The nature of the chemical bonds has mariginal effect on the bond compressibility. The compression is governed by force transfer between the rigid icosahedra.

  14. Use of inverse time, adjustable instantaneous pickup circuit breakers for short circuit and ground fault protection of energy efficient motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, D.W.; Bradfield, H.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many energy efficient low voltage motors exhibit first half cycle instantaneous inrush current values greater than the National Electrical Code`s 13 times motor full load amperes maximum permissible setting for instantaneous trip circuit breakers. The alternate use of an inverse time circuit breaker could lead to inadequate protection if the breaker does not have adjustable instantaneous settings. Recent innovations in digital solid state trip unit technology have made available an inverse time, adjustable instantaneous trip circuit breaker in 15A to 150A ratings. This allows the instantaneous pickup to be adjusted to a value slightly above motor inrush so that low level faults will be cleared instantaneously while avoiding nuisance tripping at startup. Applications, settings and comparisons are discussed.

  15. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kimura, Wayne D.; Romea, Richard D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  16. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore » a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.« less

  17. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-19

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO₂ observations at 210 stations to infer CO₂ fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr⁻¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr⁻¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr⁻¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  18. Atmospheric inversion of the surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distributions of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, Tristram O.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous USA, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with consideration of the spatial information of crop production and consumption. Spatially distributed 5 county-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous USA are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon 10 fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 20022007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 0.03 Pg C yr? to 0.42 0.13 Pg C yr?, whereas the large sink in the US Southeast forest region is weakened from 0.410.12 Pg C yr? 15 to 0.29 0.12 Pg C yr?. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the West region from 0.066 0.04 Pg C yr? to 0.040 0.02 Pg C yr?1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increase in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop 20 products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides an atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance of a region.

  19. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  20. Preparation of LiFePO{sub 4} with inverse opal structure and its satisfactory electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Junbiao . E-mail: ljb01@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Tang Zilong; Zhang Zhongtai; Shen Wanci

    2005-12-08

    Phase pure, well-crystallized and homogeneous LiFePO{sub 4} powder with inverse opal structure was obtained by calcining the precursors of Li{sup +}, Fe{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} in the presence of organic template of poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) latex micro-spheres under nitrogen atmosphere. The resultant products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), chemical titration, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Land 2001A electrochemical measurement system. Results indicated that after the decomposition of organic template, inverse opal structure and conductive carbon were left in the resultant products. With the large specific surface area resulting from inverse opal structure and with the conductive carbon, the products delivered satisfactory capacity and superior rate capability at room temperature, i.e., over 100 mAh/g at the high current density of 5.9C.

  1. Explosiv3Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosiv3Design 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:March 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Explosiv3Design 3D-printing technology is booming and could revolutionize the design of high explosives. March 8, 2016 3D printer makes cones of explosive materials A 3D printer is the ideal tool to make these cones of explosive material with finely controlled internal microstructure. Scientists are revolutionizing both the manufacturing process and the explosive materials

  2. Structural design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, P.; Chang, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper is one of seven presented at a special OTC session on international standards for the design of offshore platforms for earthquakes. Companion papers describe an overview of proposed ISO provisions, seismic exposure, foundation design, performance characteristics, a site-specific example, and probability-based LRFD. The focus of this paper is upon results of interest to structural designers, such as: simplified load and resistance factors; lifetime reliability estimates; ductility analysis using API jolts; and example North Sea application.

  3. Inherently Risky Design?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inherently Risky Design? The History of Soviet Nuclear Reactors and the Notion of Safety Sonja Schmid, ... Program * Kurchatov turns to power reactors before first Soviet ...

  4. The LCLS Design Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R-593 April 2002 UC-414 Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report Published April 2002 Prepared for the Department of Energy under contract number...

  5. Effective Design Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As described in the Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG), all Federal agencies are required to follow the Guiding Principles for New Construction and Major Renovations, which include considerations...

  6. ERHIC INTERACTION REGION DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.PARKER,B.PTITSYN,V.TEPIKIAN,S.WANG,D.WANG,F.

    2003-10-13

    This paper presents the current interaction region design status of the ring-ring version of the electron-ion collider eRHIC (release 2.0).

  7. INVERSE-COMPTON CONTRIBUTION TO THE STAR-FORMING EXTRAGALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian D.

    2013-08-20

    Fermi has resolved several star-forming galaxies, but the vast majority of the star-forming universe is unresolved, and thus contributes to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Here, we calculate the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB in the Fermi range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV due to inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of the interstellar photon field by cosmic-ray electrons. We first construct one-zone models for individual star-forming galaxies assuming that supernovae power the acceleration of cosmic rays. We develop templates for both normal and starburst galaxies, accounting for differences in the cosmic-ray electron propagation and in the interstellar radiation fields. For both types of star-forming galaxies, the same IC interactions leading to gamma rays also substantially contribute to the energy loss of the high-energy cosmic-ray electrons. Consequently, a galaxy's IC emission is determined by the relative importance of IC losses in the cosmic-ray electron energy budget ({sup p}artial calorimetry{sup )}. We calculate the cosmological contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB using our templates and the cosmic star formation rate distribution. For all of our models, we find that the IC EGB contribution is almost an order of magnitude less than the peak of the emission due to cosmic-ray ion interactions (mostly pionic p{sub cr} p{sub ism} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}); even at the highest Fermi energies, IC is subdominant. The flatter IC spectrum increases the high-energy signal of the pionic+IC sum, bringing it closer to the EGB spectral index observed by Fermi. Partial calorimetry ensures that the overall IC signal is relatively well constrained, with only uncertainties in the amplitude and spectral shape for plausible model choices. We conclude with a brief discussion on how the pionic spectral feature and other methods can be used to measure the star-forming component of the EGB.

  8. Core Design Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  9. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  10. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ...

  11. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of your whole-house design -- an approach for building an energy-efficient home. Indoor Lighting Design When designing indoor lighting for energy efficiency,...

  12. Race to Zero Design Competition Webinar: Housing Design Best...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Race to Zero Design Competition Webinar: Housing Design Best Practices Race to Zero Design Competition Webinar: Housing Design Best Practices November 18, 2014 1:00PM to 2:30PM EST ...

  13. Inversion by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from N- to Ga-polar gallium nitride and its application to multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosalli, A. M.; Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth approach for inverting N-polar to Ga-polar GaN by using a thin inversion layer grown with high Mg flux. The introduction of this inversion layer allowed us to grow p-GaN films on N-polar GaN thin film. We have studied the dependence of hole concentration, surface morphology, and degree of polarity inversion for the inverted Ga-polar surface on the thickness of the inversion layer. We then use this approach to grow a light emitting diode structure which has the MQW active region grown on the advantageous N-polar surface and the p-layer grown on the inverted Ga-polar surface.

  14. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  15. Proposals and Design Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposals and Design Reports Proposals and Design Reports Proposal (1/2/04) Proposal Addendum (29/3/04) Physics Case and Detector Technology Report (12/04) Technical Design Report (7/06) Reviews DOE CD-4 DOE 2008 DOE CD-3b CD-3b Readiness DOE CD-1/2/3a CD-2/3a Readiness CD-1 Readiness PAC Report (4/05) Approvals FNAL PAC Approval: April 15, 2004 DOE Critical Decision 1,2,3a (Performance Baseline, Construction Start) Approval: March 30, 2007 DOE Critical Decision 4 (Project Completion) Approval:

  16. Policies for green design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullerton, D.; Wu, W.

    1998-09-01

    A simple general equilibrium model is used to analyze disposal-content fees, subsidies for recyclable designs, unit-pricing of household disposal, deposit-refund systems, and manufacturer take-back requirements. Firms use primary and recycled inputs to produce output that has two attributes: packaging per unit output, and recyclability. If households pay the social cost of disposal, then they send the right signals to producers to reduce packaging and to design products that can more easily be recycled. If garbage is collected for free, then socially optimum attributes can still be achieved by a tax on producers` use of packaging and subsidy to recyclable designs.

  17. Rampressor Turbine Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramgen Power Systems

    2003-09-30

    The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

  18. Novel rocket design flight tested

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel rocket design flight tested Novel rocket design flight tested Scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that...

  19. Generalized chloride mass balance: Forward and inverse solutions for one-dimensional tracer convection under transient flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, T.R.; Murphy, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Forward and inverse solutions are provided for analysis of inert tracer profiles resulting from one-dimensional convective transport under fluxes which vary with time and space separately. The developments are displayed as an extension of conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) techniques to account for transient as well as space-dependent water fluxes. The conventional chloride mass balance has been used over two decades to estimate recharge over large time scales in arid environments. In this mass balance approach, the chloride concentration in the pore water, originating from atmospheric fallout, is inversely proportional to the flux of water through the sediments. The CMB method is especially applicable to arid and semi-arid regions where evapotranspirative enrichment of the pore water produces a distinct chloride profile in the unsaturated zone. The solutions presented allow incorporation of transient fluxes and boundary conditions in CMB analysis, and allow analysis of tracer profile data which is not constant with depth below extraction zone in terms of a rational water transport model. A closed-form inverse solution is derived which shows uniqueness of model parameter and boundary condition (including paleoprecipitation) estimation, for the specified flow model. Recent expressions of the conventional chloride mass balance technique are derived from the general model presented here; the conventional CMB is shown to be fully compatible with this transient flow model and it requires the steady-state assumption on chloride mass deposition only (and not on water fluxes or boundary conditions). The solutions and results are demonstrated on chloride profile data from west central New Mexico.

  20. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; et al

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research andmore » Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  1. Inversed relationship between CD44 variant and c-Myc due to oxidative stress-induced canonical Wnt activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Go J. Saya, Hideyuki

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: CD44 variant810 and c-Myc are inversely expressed in gastric cancer cells. Redox-stress enhances c-Myc expression via canonical Wnt signal. CD44v, but not CD44 standard, suppresses redox stress-induced Wnt activation. CD44v expression promotes both transcription and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Inversed expression pattern between CD44v and c-Myc is often recognized in vivo. -- Abstract: Cancer stem-like cells express high amount of CD44 variant8-10 which protects cancer cells from redox stress. We have demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, that CD44 variant8-10 and c-Myc tend to show the inversed expression manner in gastric cancer cells. That is attributable to the oxidative stress-induced canonical Wnt activation, and furthermore, the up-regulation of the downstream molecules, one of which is oncogenic c-Myc, is not easily to occur in CD44 variant-positive cancer cells. We have also found out that CD44v8-10 expression is associated with the turn-over of the c-Myc with the experiments using gastric cancer cell lines. This cannot be simply explained by the model of oxidative stress-induced Wnt activation. CD44v8-10-positive cancer cells are enriched at the invasive front. Tumor tissue at the invasive area is considered to be composed of heterogeneous cellular population; dormant cancer stem-like cells with CD44v8-10 {sup high}/ Fbw7 {sup high}/ c-Myc {sup low} and proliferative cancer stem-like cells with CD44v8-10 {sup high}/ Fbw7 {sup low}/ c-Myc {sup high}.

  2. Subsea HIPPS design procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaroe, R.; Lund, B.F.; Onshus, T.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is based on a feasibility study investigating the possibilities of using a HIPPS (High Integrity Pressure Protection System) to protect a subsea pipeline that is not rated for full wellhead shut-in pressure. The study was called the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study, and was performed by SINTEF, Norway. Here, OPPS is an acronym for Overpressure Pipeline Protection System. A design procedure for a subsea HIPPS is described, based on the experience and knowledge gained through the ``Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study``. Before a subsea HIPPS can be applied, its technical feasibility, reliability and profitability must be demonstrated. The subsea HIPPS design procedure will help to organize and plan the design activities both with respect to development and verification of a subsea HIPPS. The paper also gives examples of how some of the discussed design steps were performed in the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study. Finally, further work required to apply a subsea HIPPS is discussed.

  3. Conceptual Design RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Review Module is a tool that assists Department of Energy (DOE) federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the conceptual design package prior to CD-1 approval. It focuses on...

  4. DesignForward

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Design-Build Contract Awarded for Electrical Substation at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 27, 2016 LOS ALAMOS, NM - Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has awarded a design-build contract at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to Gardner Zemke Mechanical and Electrical Contractors of Albuquerque. Under

  5. Wind Turbine Blade Design

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Blade engineering and design is one of the most complicated and important aspects of modern wind turbine technology. Engineers strive to design blades that extract as much energy from the wind as possible throughout a range of wind speeds and gusts, yet are still durable, quiet and cheap. A variety of ideas for building turbines and teacher handouts are included in this document and at the Web site.

  6. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  7. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  8. Temperature dependence of the photo-induced inverse spin Hall effect in Au/InP hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamari, Shailesh K. Porwal, S.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.

    2014-01-27

    Photo-induced Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) measurements on Au/InP hybrid structures are performed over a temperature range of 45 to 300?K. Dependence of the spin current density on the degree of circular polarization and also on the angle of incidence of laser beam confirms the ISHE origin of measured signal. The magnitude of ISHE increases with sample cooling. A numerical model based on the spin relaxation of non-equilibrium spin-polarized electrons is proposed for predicting the temperature dependence of ISHE. Our results indicate that the proposed device can be used as a spin photodetector over a wide temperature range.

  9. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knecht, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Advanced solar panel designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph, E.L.; Linder, E.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new high efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  11. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  12. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2014-12-23

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototypemore » network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.« less

  13. Designing optimal greenhouse gas observing networks that consider performance and cost

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lucas, D. D.; Yver Kwok, C.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Graven, H.; Bergmann, D.; Guilderson, T. P.; Weiss, R.; Keeling, R.

    2015-06-16

    Emission rates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) entering into the atmosphere can be inferred using mathematical inverse approaches that combine observations from a network of stations with forward atmospheric transport models. Some locations for collecting observations are better than others for constraining GHG emissions through the inversion, but the best locations for the inversion may be inaccessible or limited by economic and other non-scientific factors. We present a method to design an optimal GHG observing network in the presence of multiple objectives that may be in conflict with each other. As a demonstration, we use our method to design a prototypemore » network of six stations to monitor summertime emissions in California of the potent GHG 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (CH2FCF3, HFC-134a). We use a multiobjective genetic algorithm to evolve network configurations that seek to jointly maximize the scientific accuracy of the inferred HFC-134a emissions and minimize the associated costs of making the measurements. The genetic algorithm effectively determines a set of "optimal" observing networks for HFC-134a that satisfy both objectives (i.e., the Pareto frontier). The Pareto frontier is convex, and clearly shows the tradeoffs between performance and cost, and the diminishing returns in trading one for the other. Without difficulty, our method can be extended to design optimal networks to monitor two or more GHGs with different emissions patterns, or to incorporate other objectives and constraints that are important in the practical design of atmospheric monitoring networks.« less

  14. Designing tomorrow's warheads -- today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.P.

    1988-03-15

    Until recently, new weapons' warheads were most often an incremental improvement on a previous warhead design. The tools available to the munition designer today, however, allow for a more comprehensive methodology to be employed. The focus of this paper will be a portion of the process of design of an explosively formed projectile (EFP) which uses tantalum as its liner material. Several questions surrounding tantalum's behavior under high strains require answers before such an EFP can be properly designed. The base-technology issues of different material properties will be explored using a three-dimensional finite element code (DYNA3D) and then compared to experiments. State-of-the-art diagnostics are an integral part of this methodology. Predetermined ''flasher block'' contours will provide specific position/time data which will assist in improving and understanding the high explosive equation of state as well as determining the energy imparted to the liner. In turn, this will lead to improved modeling of the liner as it translates along the line of flight. Flash X-ray Radiograph (FXR) will provide clues to axial symmetry, density, and overall time/distance information. This data will also provide answers to the strain rate depencence of the tantalum. Integration of the data from the experiment with the material response models allows post-experiment normalization of the code. This ''normalized'' tool is, finally used in the point design of the warhead.

  15. Highly Dispersed Pseudo-Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts Synthesized via Inverse Micelle Solutions for the Liquefaction of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampden-Smith, M.; Kawola, J.S.; Martino, A.; Sault, A.G.; Yamanaka, S.A.

    1999-01-05

    The mission of this project was to use inverse micelle solutions to synthesize nanometer sized metal particles and test the particles as catalysts in the liquefaction of coal and other related reactions. The initial focus of the project was the synthesis of iron based materials in pseudo-homogeneous form. The frost three chapters discuss the synthesis, characterization, and catalyst testing in coal liquefaction and model coal liquefaction reactions of iron based pseudo-homogeneous materials. Later, we became interested in highly dispersed catalysts for coprocessing of coal and plastic waste. Bifunctional catalysts . to hydrogenate the coal and depolymerize the plastic waste are ideal. We began studying, based on our previously devised synthesis strategies, the synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with a bifunctional nature. In chapter 4, we discuss the fundamental principles in heterogeneous catalysis synthesis with inverse micelle solutions. In chapter 5, we extend the synthesis of chapter 4 to practical systems and use the materials in catalyst testing. Finally in chapter 6, we return to iron and coal liquefaction now studied with the heterogeneous catalysts.

  16. SU-E-T-555: A Protontherapy Inverse Treatment Planning System Prototype with Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop and benchmark an inverse treatment planning system (TPS) for proton radiotherapy integrating fast analytical dose and LET calculations in patient geometries and a dual objective function with both dose and LET components, enabling us to apply optimization techniques to improve the predicted outcome of treatments based on radiobiological models. Methods: The software package was developed in MATLAB and implements a fluence-dose calculation technique based on a pencil beam model for dose calculations and a 3D LET model based on the extension of the LET in the radial direction as a function of the predicted radiological pathway. Both models were benchmarked against commissioning data from our institution, dose calculations performed with a commercial treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. The optimization is based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach . Results: The dose and LET calculations were tested in a water phantom and several real patient treatments. The pass rate for the gamma index analysis (3%/3mm) test was above 90% for all test cases analyzed, and the calculation time was of the order of seconds. The inverse planning module produced plans with a significantly higher mean LET in the target compared to traditional plans, without any loss of target coverage. The clinical relevance of this improvement is under consideration . Conclusion: The developed treatment planning system is a valuable clinical and research tool that enables us to incorporate LET effects into proton radiotherapy planning in a streamlined fashion.

  17. Population inversion in a magnetized hydrogen plasma expansion as a consequence of the molecular mutual neutralization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harskamp, W. E. N. van; Brouwer, C. M.; Schram, D. C.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Engeln, R.

    2011-03-15

    A weakly magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma, created by a cascaded arc, was investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. The emission of the expanding plasma is dominated by H{sub {alpha}} emission in the first part of the plasma expansion, after which a sharp transition to a blue afterglow is observed. The position of this sharp transition along the expansion axis depends on the magnetic field strength. The blue afterglow emission is associated with population inversion of the electronically excited atomic hydrogen states n=4-6 with respect to n=3. By comparing the measured densities with the densities using an atomic collisional radiative model, we conclude that atomic recombination processes cannot account for the large population densities observed. Therefore, molecular processes must be important for the formation of excited states and for the occurrence of population inversion. This is further corroborated at the transition from red to blue, where a hollow profile of the excited states n=4-6 in the radial direction is observed. This hollow profile is explained by the molecular mutual neutralization process of H{sub 2}{sup +} with H{sup -}, which has a maximum production for excited atomic hydrogen 1-2 cm outside the plasma center.

  18. Estimation of field-scale soil hydraulic and dielectric parametersthrough joint inversion of GPR and hydrological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Finsterle, Stefan; Peterson, John; Hubbard,Susan; Rubin, Yoram; Majer, Ernest; Ward, Andy; Gee, Glendon

    2005-05-05

    A method is described for jointly using time-lapse multiple-offset cross-borehole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel time measurements and hydrological measurements to estimate field-scale soil hydraulic parameters and parameters of the petrophysical function, which relates soil porosity and water saturation to the effective dielectric constant. We build upon previous work to take advantage of a wide range of GPR data acquisition configurations and to accommodate uncertainty in the petrophysical function. Within the context of water injection experiments in the vadose zone, we test our inversion methodology with synthetic examples and apply it to field data. The synthetic examples show that while realistic errors in the petrophysical function cause substantial errors in the soil hydraulic parameter estimates,simultaneously estimating petrophysical parameters allows for these errors to be minimized. Additionally, we observe in some cases that inaccuracy in the GPR simulator causes systematic error in simulated travel times, making necessary the simultaneous estimation of a correction parameter. We also apply the method to a three-dimensional field setting using time-lapse GPR and neutron probe (NP) data sets collected during an infiltration experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site in Washington. We find that inclusion of GPR data in the inversion procedure allows for improved predictions of water content, compared to predictions made using NP data alone.

  19. The inversion layer of electric fields and electron phase-space-hole structure during two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Lijen; Lefebvre, Bertrand; Torbert, Roy B.; Daughton, William S.

    2011-01-15

    Based on two-dimensional fully kinetic simulations that resolve the electron diffusion layer in undriven collisionless magnetic reconnection with zero guide field, this paper reports the existence and evolution of an inversion layer of bipolar electric fields, its corresponding phase-space structure (an electron-hole layer), and the implication to collisionless dissipation. The inversion electric field layer is embedded in the layer of bipolar Hall electric field and extends throughout the entire length of the electron diffusion layer. The electron phase-space hole structure spontaneously arises during the explosive growth phase when there exist significant inflows into the reconnection layer, and electrons perform meandering orbits across the layer while being cyclotron-turned toward the outflow directions. The cyclotron turning of meandering electrons by the magnetic field normal to the reconnection layer is shown to be a primary factor limiting the current density in the region where the reconnection electric field is balanced by the gradient (along the current sheet normal) of the off-diagonal electron pressure-tensor.

  20. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  1. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  2. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  3. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNLs experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNLs work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  4. Good, Better, Best: Designing a Designation Program for Solar | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Good, Better, Best: Designing a Designation Program for Solar Good, Better, Best: Designing a Designation Program for Solar December 4, 2012 - 4:00pm Addthis The Energy Department is gathering input on solar designation programs that could one day help consumers recognize the best products and services that the solar industry has to offer. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. The Energy Department is gathering input on solar designation programs that could one day help consumers

  5. Stochastic Inversion of InSAR Data to Assess the Probability of Pressure Penetration into the Lower Caprock at In Salah

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramirez, Abelardo; Foxall, William

    2014-05-28

    Stochastic inversions of InSAR data were carried out to assess the probability that pressure perturbations resulting from CO2 injection into well KB-502 at In Salah penetrated into the lower caprock seal above the reservoir. Inversions of synthetic data were employed to evaluate the factors that affect the vertical resolution of overpressure distributions, and to assess the impact of various sources of uncertainty in prior constraints on inverse solutions. These include alternative pressure-driven deformation modes within reservoir and caprock, the geometry of a sub-vertical fracture zone in the caprock identified in previous studies, and imperfect estimates of the rock mechanical properties.more » Inversions of field data indicate that there is a high probability that a pressure perturbation during the first phase of injection extended upwards along the fracture zone ~ 150 m above the reservoir, and less than 50% probability that it reached the Hot Shale unit at 1500 m depth. Within the uncertainty bounds considered, it was concluded that it is very unlikely that the pressure perturbation approached within 150 m of the top of the lower caprock at the Hercynian Unconformity. The results are consistent with previous deterministic inversion and forward modeling studies.« less

  6. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  7. Stochastic Inversion of InSAR Data to Assess the Probability of Pressure Penetration into the Lower Caprock at In Salah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, Abelardo; Foxall, William

    2014-05-28

    Stochastic inversions of InSAR data were carried out to assess the probability that pressure perturbations resulting from CO2 injection into well KB-502 at In Salah penetrated into the lower caprock seal above the reservoir. Inversions of synthetic data were employed to evaluate the factors that affect the vertical resolution of overpressure distributions, and to assess the impact of various sources of uncertainty in prior constraints on inverse solutions. These include alternative pressure-driven deformation modes within reservoir and caprock, the geometry of a sub-vertical fracture zone in the caprock identified in previous studies, and imperfect estimates of the rock mechanical properties. Inversions of field data indicate that there is a high probability that a pressure perturbation during the first phase of injection extended upwards along the fracture zone ~ 150 m above the reservoir, and less than 50% probability that it reached the Hot Shale unit at 1500 m depth. Within the uncertainty bounds considered, it was concluded that it is very unlikely that the pressure perturbation approached within 150 m of the top of the lower caprock at the Hercynian Unconformity. The results are consistent with previous deterministic inversion and forward modeling studies.

  8. Designing a Benchmarking Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) Solution Center document about how state and local governments, Indian tribes, and overseas U.S. territories can design a plan to benchmark the energy consumption in public buildings.

  9. Microresonator electrode design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Branch, Darren W.

    2016-05-10

    A microresonator with an input electrode and an output electrode patterned thereon is described. The input electrode includes a series of stubs that are configured to isolate acoustic waves, such that the waves are not reflected into the microresonator. Such design results in reduction of spurious modes corresponding to the microresonator.

  10. Tool and Fixture Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Mark W.

    2015-07-28

    In a manufacturing process, a need is identified and a product is created to fill this need. While design and engineering of the final product is important, the tools and fixtures that aid in the creation of the final product are just as important, if not more so. Power supplies assembled at the TA-55 PF-5 have been designed by an excellent engineering team. The task in PF-5 now is to ensure that all steps of the assembly and manufacturing process can be completed safely, reliably, and in a quality repeatable manner. One of these process steps involves soldering fine wires to an electrical connector. During the process development phase, the method of soldering included placing the power supply in a vice in order to manipulate it into a position conducive to soldering. This method is unacceptable from a reliability, repeatability, and ergonomic standpoint. To combat these issues, a fixture was designed to replace the current method. To do so, a twelve step engineering design process was used to create the fixture that would provide a solution to a multitude of problems, and increase the safety and efficiency of production.

  11. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, George F; Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC) - based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  12. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Holcomb, D.E.; Cetiner, S.M.

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC)–based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  13. Wood energy system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This handbook, Wood Energy System Design, was prepared with the support of the Council of Great Lakes Governors and the US Department of Energy. It contains: wood fuel properties; procurement; receiving, handling, and storage; combustion; gasification; emission control; electric power generation and cogeneration; and case studies. (JF)

  14. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  15. Ventuno Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ventuno Design Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ventuno Design Place: Lower Saxony, Germany Zip: 49767 Sector: Wind energy Product: German-based wind farm developer with...

  16. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  17. Spectral shape deformation in inverse spin Hall voltage in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}|Pt bilayers at high microwave power levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lustikova, J. Shiomi, Y.; Handa, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-02-21

    We report on the deformation of microwave absorption spectra and of the inverse spin Hall voltage signals in thin film bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum at high microwave power levels in a 9.45-GHz TE{sub 011} cavity. As the microwave power increases from 0.15 to 200 mW, the resonance field shifts to higher values, and the initially Lorentzian spectra of the microwave absorption intensity as well as the inverse spin Hall voltage signals become asymmetric. The contributions from opening of the magnetization precession cone and heating of YIG cannot well reproduce the data. Control measurements of inverse spin Hall voltages on thin-film YIG|Pt systems with a range of line widths underscore the role of spin-wave excitations in spectral deformation.

  18. Transparency and damage tolerance of patternable omniphobic lubricated surfaces based on inverse colloidal monolayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, Nicolas; Belisle, Rebecca A.; Hatton, Benjamin; Wong, Tak-Sing; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-07-31

    A transparent coating that repels a wide variety of liquids, prevents staining, is capable of self-repair and is robust towards mechanical damage can have a broad technological impact, from solar cell coatings to self-cleaning optical devices. Here we employ colloidal templating to design transparent, nanoporous surface structures. A lubricant can be firmly locked into the structures and, owing to its fluidic nature, forms a defect-free, self-healing interface that eliminates the pinning of a second liquid applied to its surface, leading to efficient liquid repellency, prevention of adsorption of liquid-borne contaminants, and reduction of ice adhesion strength. We further show howmore » this method can be applied to locally pattern the repellent character of the substrate, thus opening opportunities to spatially confine any simple or complex fluids. The coating is highly defect-tolerant due to its interconnected, honeycomb wall structure, and repellency prevails after the application of strong shear forces and mechanical damage. The regularity of the coating allows us to understand and predict the stability or failure of repellency as a function of lubricant layer thickness and defect distribution based on a simple geometric model.« less

  19. Transparency and damage tolerance of patternable omniphobic lubricated surfaces based on inverse colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, N; Belisle, RA; Hatton, B; Wong, TS; Aizenberg, J

    2013-07-31

    A transparent coating that repels a wide variety of liquids, prevents staining, is capable of self-repair and is robust towards mechanical damage can have a broad technological impact, from solar cell coatings to self-cleaning optical devices. Here we employ colloidal templating to design transparent, nanoporous surface structures. A lubricant can be firmly locked into the structures and, owing to its fluidic nature, forms a defect-free, self-healing interface that eliminates the pinning of a second liquid applied to its surface, leading to efficient liquid repellency, prevention of adsorption of liquid-borne contaminants, and reduction of ice adhesion strength. We further show how this method can be applied to locally pattern the repellent character of the substrate, thus opening opportunities to spatially confine any simple or complex fluids. The coating is highly defect-tolerant due to its interconnected, honeycomb wall structure, and repellency prevails after the application of strong shear forces and mechanical damage. The regularity of the coating allows us to understand and predict the stability or failure of repellency as a function of lubricant layer thickness and defect distribution based on a simple geometric model.

  20. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  1. Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped field-effect transistor on GaAs (100) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Si, Mengwei; Wu, Heng; Ye, Peide D.; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G.; Shao, Jiayi; Manfra, Michael J.

    2015-02-16

    Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (WaveFETs) are demonstrated using atomic-layer epitaxy of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectric on (111)A nano-facets formed on a GaAs (100) substrate. The wave-shaped nano-facets, which are desirable for the device on-state and off-state performance, are realized by lithographic patterning and anisotropic wet etching with optimized geometry. A well-behaved 1 μm gate length GaAs WaveFET shows a maximum drain current of 64 mA/mm, a subthreshold swing of 135 mV/dec, and an I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio of greater than 10{sup 7}.

  2. A Bayesian inversion framework for yield and height-of-burst/depth-of-burial for near-surface explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, Gardar; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Ramirez, Abe; Ford, Sean; Rodgers, Artie

    2015-09-07

    A Bayesian inversion framework is presented to estimate the yield of an explosion and height-of-burst/depth-of-burial (HOB/DOB) using seismic and air pressure data. This is accomplished by first calibrating the parameters in the forward models that relate the observations to the yield and HOB/DOB and then using the calibrated model to estimate yield and HOB/DOB associated with a new set of seismic and air pressure observations. The MCMC algorithms required to perform these steps are outlined, and the results with real data are shown. Finally, an extension is proposed for a case when clustering in the seismic displacement occurs as a function of different types of rock and other factors.

  3. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P; Le Flanchec, V.; Negre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-19

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications and Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 {mu}m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  4. Extracting grain-orientation-dependent data from in situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction. I. Inverse pole figures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoica, Grigoreta M.; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke; Ma, Dong; Vogel, S. C.; Carpenter, J. S.; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-11-28

    The problem of calculating the inverse pole figure (IPF) is analyzed from the perspective of the application of time-of flight neutron diffraction toin situmonitoring of the thermomechanical behavior of engineering materials. On the basis of a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) method, a consistent set of grain orientations is generated and used to compute the weighting factors for IPF normalization. The weighting factors are instrument dependent and were calculated for the engineering materials diffractometer VULCAN (Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The QMC method is applied to face-centered cubic structures and can be easily extended to other crystallographic symmetries. Examples includemore » 316LN stainless steelin situloaded in tension at room temperature and an Al–2%Mg alloy, substantially deformed by cold rolling and in situannealed up to 653 K.« less

  5. Conditions for spin-gapless semiconducting behavior in Mn{sub 2}CoAl inverse Heusler compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galanakis, I.; zdo?an, K.; ?a??o?lu, E.; Blgel, S.

    2014-03-07

    Employing ab initio electronic structure calculations, we investigate the conditions for spin-gapless semiconducting (SGS) behavior in the inverse Mn{sub 2}CoAl Heusler compound. We show that tetragonalization of the lattice, which can occur during films growth, keeps the SGS character of the perfect cubic compound. On the contrary, atomic swaps even between sites with different local symmetry destroy the SGS character giving rise to a half-metallic state. Furthermore, the occurrence of Co-surplus leads also to half-metallicity. Thus, we propose that in order to achieve SGS behavior during the growth of Mn{sub 2}CoAl (and similar SGS Heusler compounds) thin films, one should minimize the occurrence of defects, while small deformations of the lattice, due to the lattice mismatch with the substrate, do not play a crucial role.

  6. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

  7. Achromatic Interaction Point Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimei Wang,, Yaroslav Derbenev, S.Alex Bogacz, P. Chevtsov, Andre Afanaciev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland P. Johnson

    2009-05-01

    Designers of high-luminosity energy-frontier muon colliders must provide strong beam focusing in the interaction regions. However, the construction of a strong, aberration-free beam focus is difficult and space consuming, and long straight sections generate an off-site radiation problem due to muon decay neutrinos that interact as they leave the surface of the earth. Without some way to mitigate the neutrino radiation problem, the maximum c.m. energy of a muon collider will be limited to about 3.5 TeV. A new concept for achromatic low beta design is being developed, in which the interaction region telescope and optical correction elements, are installed in the bending arcs. The concept, formulated analytically, combines space economy, a preventative approach to compensation for aberrations, and a reduction of neutrino flux concentration. An analytical theory for the aberration-free, low beta, spatially compact insertion is being developed.

  8. ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.F. fitch

    1995-03-13

    The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

  9. NRT preliminary design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preliminary design - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  10. Rotor Aerodynamic Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamic Design - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. Rotor Design Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Tools - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  12. QA in Design Guidance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Guidance Document for Integrating Quality Assurance During the Design and Construction Life Cycle September 2011 Page 2 of 29 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) guidance document is approved for use by all DOE EM organizational units and contractors performing work for EM. A project's Quality Assurance Program assigns responsibilities and authorities, defines policies and requirements, and provides

  13. GEM Technical Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-31

    The GEM collaboration was formed in June 1991 to develop a major detector for the SSC. The primary physics objectives of GEM are those central to the motivation for the SSC, to study high p{sub T} physics - exemplified by the search for Higgs bosons - and to search for new physics beyond the standard model. The authors present in this Technical Design Report (TDR) a detector with broad capabilities for the discovery and subsequent study of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass and flavor, and other physics requiring precise measurements of gammas, electrons, and muons - hence the name, GEM. In addition, as a design goal, they have taken care to provide the robustness needed to do the physics that requires high luminosity. Finally, good coverage and hermeticity allow the detection of missing transverse energy, E{sub T}. The GEM design emphasizes clean identification and high resolution measurement of the primary physics signatures for high p{sub T} physics. The approach is to make precise energy measurements that maximize the sensitivity to rare narrow resonances, to detect the elementary interaction products (quarks, leptons, and photons), and to build in the features required to reduce backgrounds.

  14. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  15. Photovoltaic Incentive Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Investments in customer-owned grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) energy systems are growing at a steady pace. This is due, in part, to the availability of attractive economic incentives offered by public state agencies and utilities. In the United States, these incentives have largely been upfront lump payments tied to the system capacity rating. While capacity-based ''buydowns'' have stimulated the domestic PV market, they have been criticized for subsidizing systems with potentially poor energy performance. As a result, the industry has been forced to consider alternative incentive structures, particularly ones that pay based on long-term measured performance. The industry, however, lacks consensus in the debate over the tradeoffs between upfront incentive payments versus longer-term payments for energy delivery. This handbook is designed for agencies and utilities that offer or intend to offer incentive programs for customer-owned PV systems. Its purpose is to help select, design, and implement incentive programs that best meet programmatic goals. The handbook begins with a discussion of the various available incentive structures and then provides qualitative and quantitative tools necessary to design the most appropriate incentive structure. It concludes with program administration considerations.

  16. FEMP Designated Product: Lavatory Faucets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP suspended its product designation and purchasing specification for commercial faucets until further notice.

  17. Two-dimensional inverse planning and delivery with a preclinical image guided microirradiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.; Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; The Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in preclinical radiotherapy systems have provided the foundation for scaling many of the elements of clinical radiation therapy practice to the dimensions and energy demanded in small animal studies. Such systems support the technical capabilities to accurately deliver highly complex dose distributions, but methods to optimize and deliver such distributions remain in their infancy. This study developed an optimization method based on empirically measured two-dimensional dose kernel measurements to deliver arbitrary planar dose distributions on a recently developed small animal radiotherapy platform.Methods: A two-dimensional dose kernel was measured with repeated radiochromic film measurements for the circular 1 mm diameter fixed collimator of the small animal radiotherapy system at 1 cm depth in a solid water phantom. This kernel was utilized in a sequential quadratic programming optimization framework to determine optimal beam positions and weights to deliver an arbitrary desired dose distribution. The positions and weights were then translated to a set of stage motions to automatically deliver the optimized dose distribution. End-to-end efficacy of the framework was quantified through five repeated deliveries of two dosimetric challenges: (1) a 5 mm radius bullseye distribution, and (2) a sock distribution contained within a 9 13 mm bounding box incorporating rectangular, semicircular, and exponentially decaying geometric constructs and a rectangular linear dose gradient region. These two challenges were designed to gauge targeting, geometric, and dosimetric fidelity.Results: Optimization of the bullseye and sock distributions required 2.1 and 5.9 min and utilized 50 and 77 individual beams for delivery, respectively. Automated delivery of the resulting optimized distributions, validated using radiochromic film measurements, revealed an average targeting accuracy of 0.32 mm, and a dosimetric delivery error along four line profiles taken through the sock distribution of 3.9%. Mean absolute delivery error across the 01 Gy linear dose gradient over 7.5 mm was 0.01 Gy.Conclusions: The work presented here demonstrates the potential for complex dose distributions to be planned and automatically delivered with millimeter scale heterogeneity at submillimeter accuracy. This capability establishes the technical foundation for preclinical validation of biologically guided radiotherapy investigations and development of unique radiobiological experiments.

  18. Conceptual Design RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conceptual Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Concep Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ptual De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) sign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of

  19. Ecological Communities by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2015-06-25

    In synthetic ecology, a nascent offshoot of synthetic biology, scientists aim to design and construct microbial communities with desirable properties. Such mixed populations of microorganisms can simultaneously perform otherwise incompatible functions. Compared with individual organisms, they can also better resist losses in function as a result of environmental perturbation or invasion by other species. Synthetic ecology may thus be a promising approach for developing robust, stable biotechnological processes, such as the conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. However, achieving this will require detailed knowledge of the principles that guide the structure and function of microbial communities.

  20. Control system design method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  1. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  2. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of

  3. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e[mu] coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study [pi][sup 0] and [eta] production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the [phi] meson (via K[sup +]K[sup [minus

  4. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBINSON,K.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has prepared a conceptual design for a world class user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the ''National Synchrotron Light Source II'' (NSLS-II), will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. The overall objective of the NSLS-II project is to deliver a research facility to advance fundamental science and have the capability to characterize and understand physical properties at the nanoscale, the processes by which nanomaterials can be manipulated and assembled into more complex hierarchical structures, and the new phenomena resulting from such assemblages. It will also be a user facility made available to researchers engaged in a broad spectrum of disciplines from universities, industries, and other laboratories.

  5. Bicriteria network design problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marathe, M.V.; Ravi, R.; Sundaram, R.; Ravi, S.S.; Rosenkrantz, D.J.; Hunt, H.B. III

    1997-11-20

    The authors study a general class of bicriteria network design problems. A generic problem in this class is as follows: Given an undirected graph and two minimization objectives (under different cost functions), with a budget specified on the first, find a subgraph from a given subgraph class that minimizes the second objective subject to the budget on the first. They consider three different criteria -- the total edge cost, the diameter and the maximum degree of the network. Here, they present the first polynomial-time approximation algorithms for a large class of bicriteria network design problems for the above mentioned criteria. The following general types of results are presented. First, they develop a framework for bicriteria problems and their approximations. Second, when the two criteria are the same they present a black box parametric search technique. This black box takes in as input an (approximation) algorithm for the criterion situation and generates an approximation algorithm for the bicriteria case with only a constant factor loss in the performance guarantee. Third, when the two criteria are the diameter and the total edge costs they use a cluster based approach to devise approximation algorithms. The solutions violate both the criteria by a logarithmic factor. Finally, for the class of treewidth-bounded graphs, they provide pseudopolynomial-time algorithms for a number of bicriteria problems using dynamic programming. The authors show how these pseudopolynomial-time algorithms can be converted to fully polynomial-time approximation schemes using a scaling technique.

  6. SU-E-T-567: A Three-Field Mono-Isocentric Inverse Treatment Planning Method for the Patients with Larger Breasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, T; Marina, O; Chen, P; Teahan, M; Liu, Q; Benedetti, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a three-field monoisocentric inverse breast treatment planning technique without the use of half-beam block. Methods: Conventional three-field breast treatment with supraclavicular half-beam blocked requires two isocenters when the breast is too large to be contained within half-beam. The inferior border of the supraclavicular field and superior borders of the breast fields are matched on patient's skin with the light field. This method causes a large dose variation in the matching region due to daily setup uncertainties and requires a longer treatment setup time. We developed a three-field mono-isocentric planning method for the treatment of larger breasts. The three fields share the same isocenter located in the breast. Beam matching is achieved by rotating collimator, couch and gantry. Furthermore, we employed a mixed open-IMRT inverse optimization method to improve dose uniformity and coverage. Results: Perfect geometric beam matching was achieved by rotating couch, collimator and gantry together. Treatment setup time was significantly reduced without light-field matching during treatment deliveries. Inverse mixed open-IMRT optimization method achieved better dose uniformity and PTV coverage while keeping sufficient air flash to compensate setup and breast shape changes in daily treatments. Conclusion: By eliminating light field matching, the three-field mono-isocentric treatment method can significantly reduce setup time and uncertainty for large breast patients. Plan quality is further improved by inverse IMRT planning.

  7. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full-core-height diodes. Moreover, placing the fuel on the outside of the diode makes possible reactors with much higher fuel volume fractions, which enable power-flattened fast reactors scalable to very low power levels without the need for life-limiting hydride moderators or the use of efficiency-limiting driver fuel. In addition, with the fuel on the outside its swelling does not increase the emitter diameter or reduce the interelectrode gap. This should permit long lifetimes even with closer spacings, which can significantly improve the system efficiences. This was confirmed by coupled neutronic, thermal, thermionic, and electrical system analyses - some of which are presented in this paper - and by subsequent experiments. A companion paper presented next describes the fabrication and testing of full-scale converter elements, both fueled and unfueled, and summarizes the test results obtained. There is a duplicate copy in the file.

  8. Production Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  9. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  10. Optimized design for PIGMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansborough, L.; Hamm, R.; Stovall, J.; Swenson, D.

    1980-01-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is a compact linear proton accelerator design, optimized for pion production and cancer treatment use in a hospital environment. Technology developed during a four-year PIGMI Prototype experimental program allows the design of smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linacs. A new type of low-energy accelerating structure, the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) has been tested; it produces an exceptionally good-quality beam and allows the use of a simple 30-kV injector. Average axial electric-field gradients of over 9 MV/m have been demonstrated in a drift-tube linac (DTL) structure. Experimental work is underway to test the disk-and-washer (DAW) structure, another new type of accelerating structure for use in the high-energy coupled-cavity linac (CCL). Sufficient experimental and developmental progress has been made to closely define an actual PIGMI. It will consist of a 30-kV injector, and RFQ linac to a proton energy of 2.5 MeV, a DTL linac to 125 MeV, and a CCL linac to the final energy of 650 MeV. The total length of the accelerator is 133 meters. The RFQ and DTL will be driven by a single 440-MHz klystron; the CCL will be driven by six 1320-MHz klystrons. The peak beam current is 28 mA. The beam pulse length is 60 ..mu..s at a 60-Hz repetition rate, resulting in a 100-..mu..A average beam current. The total cost of the accelerator is estimated to be approx. $10 million.

  11. MCFC product design improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-05-01

    This contract is supported by DOE and DOD/DARPA funds. The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOE's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (A) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed; and (B) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to the year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications. A dual fuel fixed base design for military fuels operation, as well as support system logistics will be the key deliverables for the DARPA part of the program.

  12. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-18

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr?1, with wetlandmoremethane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr?1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004June 2005 were in the range of 14.630.4 Tg yr?1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr?1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr?1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.less

  13. DOE Designated User Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designated User Facilities DOE Designated User Facilities DOE Designated User Facilities Sept 30 2015 More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - DesignatedUserFacilitiesApri...

  14. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Computational co-design may facilitate revolutionary designs ...

  15. We Want It All - Designers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    We Want It All - Designers Chip Israel MIES, FIALD, LEED AP, LC cisrael@lightingdesignalliance.com We Don't Want It - Glare LED's Are a Tool It's Still bout the Design. Education...

  16. ARIA Cell Solenoid Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-05-20

    Detailed schematics of the structure of the preliminary ARIA solenoid cell design including overhead and cross section views and dimensions.

  17. Challenge Home Student Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Challenge Home Student Design Competition took place April 26 and 27 at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  18. ORISE: Instructional Design and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructional Design and Development The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works with government agencies and organizations to create customized training and instructional design programs, from traditional classroom teaching to online education. ORISE uses a multi-step process to define the instructional design and development needs. Our process includes: Defining the target audience and objectives Designing and developing the program and materials Piloting, delivering and

  19. Prototype simplified daylighting design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treado, S.J.; Goodin, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    The report describes a prototype simplified design tool which has been developed to provide information for developing effective building fenestration systems. A computer software system was developed to search through and select the best available fenestration designs from a large database of previously simulated buildings. Fenestration designs can be selected based on energy usage, energy cost or peak loads. The determination of fenestration energy costs is discussed. The design tool is primarily intended for commercial, industrial or institutional buildings of any type.

  20. Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered the Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide and its elements, including assess, plan, implement, and evaluate.

  1. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb0.77Sn0.23Se: Optical and Hall effect studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Naween; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Gu, Genda; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb₀.₇₇Sn₀.₂₃Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10–300 K) reflectance was measured over 40–7000 cm⁻¹ (5–870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm⁻¹ (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy opticalmore » spectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Thus, density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.« less

  2. Low-energy inverse photoemission spectroscopy using a high-resolution grating spectrometer in the near ultraviolet range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-15

    An inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES) apparatus using a Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer is demonstrated. Previous IPES instruments based on grating spectrometers used a concave grating and operated in the vacuum ultraviolet range. The reflectance of such gratings is lower than 20% and the aberration cannot be finely corrected leading to an energy resolution of up to 0.1 eV. In the present study, employing the low energy IPES regime [H. Yoshida, Chem. Phys. Lett. 539–540, 180 (2012)], incident electrons with a kinetic energy below 5 eV are used, while photon emission in the range of between 250 and 370 nm is analyzed with a 10-cm Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer. The signal intensity is at least 30 times higher than the previous apparatus. The resolution of photon detection is set at 0.07 eV though the ultimate resolution is one order of magnitude higher. The experiment is performed both by sweeping the electron energy (isochromat mode) and by simultaneously analyzing the photon of whole wavelength range (tunable photon energy mode)

  3. Revisiting Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectra of Nickel Oxide from First Principles: Implications for Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-07-17

    We use two different ab initio quantum mechanics methods, complete active space self-consistent field theory applied to electrostatically embedded clusters and periodic many-body G?W? calculations, to reanalyze the states formed in nickel(II) oxide upon electron addition and ionization. In agreement with interpretations of earlier measurements, we find that the valence and conduction band edges consist of oxygen and nickel states, respectively. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that the oxygen states of the valence band edge are localized whereas the nickel states at the conduction band edge are delocalized. We argue that these characteristics may lead to low electron-hole recombination and relatively efficient electron transport, which, coupled with band gap engineering, could produce higher solar energy conversion efficiency compared to that of other transition-metal oxides. Both methods find a photoemission/inverse-photoemission gap of 3.6-3.9 eV, in good agreement with the experimental range, lending credence to our analysis of the electronic structure of NiO.

  4. Tunable inverse topological heterostructure utilizing (Bi1−xInx)2Se3 and multichannel weak-antilocalization effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brahlek, Matthew J.; Koirala, Nikesh; Liu, Jianpeng; Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Salehi, Maryam; Han, Myung-Geun; Zhu, Yimei; Vanderbilt, David; Oh, Seongshik

    2016-03-10

    In typical topological insulator (TI) systems the TI is bordered by a non-TI insulator, and the surrounding conventional insulators, including vacuum, are not generally treated as part of the TI system. Here, we implement a material system where the roles are reversed, and the topological surface states form around the non-TI (instead of the TI) layers. This is realized by growing a layer of the tunable non-TI (Bi1-xInx)2Se3 in between two layers of the TI Bi2Se3 using the atomically precise molecular beam epitaxy technique. On this tunable inverse topological platform, we systematically vary the thickness and the composition of themore » (Bi1-xInx)2Se3 layer and show that this tunes the coupling between the TI layers from strongly coupled metallic to weakly coupled, and finally to a fully decoupled insulating regime. This system can be used to probe the fundamental nature of coupling in TI materials and provides a tunable insulating layer for TI devices.« less

  5. Spectral inversion of the H? line for a plasma feature in the upper chromosphere of the quiet sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chae, Jongchul

    2014-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Becker's cloud model (BCM): an embedded cloud model (ECM)for the inversion of the core of the H? line spectrum of a plasma feature either lying high above the forest of chromospheric features or partly embedded in the outermost part of this forest. The fundamental assumption of the ECM is that the background light incident on the bottom of the feature from below is equal to the ensemble-average light at the same height. This light is related to the observed ensemble-average light via the radiative transfer that is described by the four parameters newly introduced in addition to the original four parameters of the BCM. Three of these new parameters are independently determined from the observed rms contrast profile of the ensemble. We use the constrained ?{sup 2} fitting technique to determine the five free parameters. We find that the ECM leads to the fairly good fitting of the observed line profiles and the reasonable inference of physical parameters in quiet regions where the BCM cannot. Our first application of this model to a quiet region of the Sun indicates that the model can produce the complete velocity map and Doppler width map of the region.

  6. Accurate modeling and inversion of electrical resistivity data in the presence of metallic infrastructure with known location and dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2015-06-26

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been widely used in environmental applications to study processes associated with subsurface contaminants and contaminant remediation. Anthropogenic alterations in subsurface electrical conductivity associated with contamination often originate from highly industrialized areas with significant amounts of buried metallic infrastructure. The deleterious influence of such infrastructure on imaging results generally limits the utility of ERT where it might otherwise prove useful for subsurface investigation and monitoring. In this manuscript we present a method of accurately modeling the effects of buried conductive infrastructure within the forward modeling algorithm, thereby removing them from the inversion results. The method is implemented in parallel using immersed interface boundary conditions, whereby the global solution is reconstructed from a series of well-conditioned partial solutions. Forward modeling accuracy is demonstrated by comparison with analytic solutions. Synthetic imaging examples are used to investigate imaging capabilities within a subsurface containing electrically conductive buried tanks, transfer piping, and well casing, using both well casings and vertical electrode arrays as current sources and potential measurement electrodes. Results show that, although accurate infrastructure modeling removes the dominating influence of buried metallic features, the presence of metallic infrastructure degrades imaging resolution compared to standard ERT imaging. However, accurate imaging results may be obtained if electrodes are appropriately located.

  7. Collision-induced Raman scattering and the peculiar case of neon: Anisotropic spectrum, anisotropy, and the inverse scattering problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixneuf, Sophie; Rachet, Florent; Chrysos, Michael

    2015-02-28

    Owing in part to the p orbitals of its filled L shell, neon has repeatedly come on stage for its peculiar properties. In the context of collision-induced Raman spectroscopy, in particular, we have shown, in a brief report published a few years ago [M. Chrysos et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 054701 (2009)], that the room-temperature anisotropic Raman lineshape of Ne–Ne exhibits, in the far wing of the spectrum, a peculiar structure with an aspect other than a smooth wing (on a logarithmic plot) which contrasts with any of the existing studies, and whose explanation lies in the distinct way in which overlap and exchange interactions interfere with the classical electrostatic ones in making the polarizability anisotropy, α{sub ∥} − α{sub ⊥}. Here, we delve deeper into that study by reporting data for that spectrum up to 450 cm{sup −1} and for even- and odd-order spectral moments up to M{sub 6}, as well as quantum lineshapes, generated from SCF, CCSD, and CCSD(T) models for α{sub ∥} − α{sub ⊥}, which are critically compared with the experiment. On account of the knowledge of the spectrum over the augmented frequency domain, we show how the inverse scattering problem can be tackled both effectively and economically, and we report an analytic function for the anisotropy whose quantum lineshape faithfully reproduces our observations.

  8. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collineardouble pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8?nm and 610.3?nm), and ionic (548.4?nm and 478.8?nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  10. Advances in geotectural design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Although the price of oil dropped well below $20 US earlier this year from a previous high above $35 US, the interest and participation shown in this conference does not seem to have been materially affected. Perhaps energy, although not unimportant, is no longer the driving force behind the continuing development and exploration of the earth shelter idiom in architecture. Rather, the thrust of most papers seems to seek an understanding of the adaptation of earth shelter into varied types of settings, especially urban applications, and also the understanding of the physical phenomenon of how an earth shelter works. The paper have been grouped into three basic categories with several subsections in each category. First, vernacular approaches are documented from the viewpoint of habitation, and followed by other types of utilization. Then, recent theoretical developments are reviewed in terms of materials, occupant studies, and heat transfer and air flow analyses. The final section deals with contemporary practice, where design concepts and case studies are presented, followed by building systems and urban planning aspects. All 54 papers have been abstracted separately for inclusion on the Energy Data Base.

  11. ERHIC Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptitsyn,V.; Beebe-Wang,J.; Ben-Zvi,I.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; MacKay, W.W.; Montag, C.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2008-08-25

    The conceptual design of the high luminosity electron-ion collider, eRHIC, is presented. The goal of eRHIC is to provide collisions of electrons (and possibly positrons) with ions and protons at the center-of-mass energy range from 25 to 140 GeV, and with luminosities exceeding 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. A considerable part of the physics program is based on polarized electrons, protons and He3 ions with high degree of polarization. In eRHIC electron beam will be accelerated in an energy recovery linac. Major R&D items for eRHIC include the development of a high intensity polarized electron source, studies of various aspects of energy recovery technology for high power beams and the development of compact magnets for recirculating passes. In eRHIC scheme the beam-beam interaction has several specific features, which have to be thoroughly studied. In order to maximize the collider luminosity, several upgrades of the existing RHIC accelerator are required. Those upgrades may include the increase of intensity as well as transverse and longitudinal cooling of ion and proton beams.

  12. MCFC PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-04-30

    The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOD's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (1) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed. (2) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program (DE-FC21-95MC31184) for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to Year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications.

  13. Interim Design Report for the International Design Study for a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Berg, J.S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Souchlas, N.; Ellis, M.; /Brunel U. /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Fermilab /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Imperial Coll., London /Jefferson Lab /Saha Inst.

    2011-10-01

    The starting point for the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was the output of the earlier International Scoping Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS). The accelerator facility described in section 2 incorporates the improvements that have been derived from the substantial amount of work carried out within the Accelerator Working Group. Highlights of these improvements include: (1) Initial concepts for the implementation of the proton driver at each of the three example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL; (2) Detailed studies of the energy deposition in the target area; (3) A reduction in the length of the muon beam phase-rotation and bunching systems; (4) Detailed analyses of the impact of the risk that stray magnetic field in the accelerating cavities in the ionization cooling channel will reduce the maximum operating gradient. Several alternative ionization-cooling lattices have been developed as fallback options to mitigate this technical risk; (5) Studies of particle loss in the muon front-end and the development of strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of such losses; (6) The development of more complete designs for the muon linac and re-circulating linacs; (7) The development of a design for the muon FFAG that incorporates insertions for injection and extraction; and (8) Detailed studies of diagnostics in the decay ring. Other sub-systems have undergone a more 'incremental' evolution; an indication that the design of the Neutrino Factory has achieved a degree of maturity. The design of the neutrino detectors described in section 3 has been optimized and the Detector Working Group has made substantial improvements to the simulation and analysis of the Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) resulting in an improvement in the overall neutrino-detection efficiency and a reduction in the neutrino-energy threshold. In addition, initial consideration of the engineering of the MIND has generated a design that is feasible and a finite element analysis of the toroidal magnetic field to produce a realistic field map has been carried out. Section 3 also contains, for the first time, a specification for the near-detector systems and a demonstration that the neutrino flux can be determined with a precision of 1% through measurements of inverse muon decay at the near detector. The performance of the facility, the work of the Physics and Performance Evaluation Group, is described in section 1. The effect of the improved MIND performance is to deliver a discovery reach for CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, the determination of the mass hierarchy, and of {theta}{sub 13} that extends down to values of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx} 5 x 10{sup -5} and is robust against systematic uncertainties. In addition, the improved neutrino-energy threshold has allowed an indicative analysis of the kind of re-optimization of the facility that could be carried out should {theta}{sub 13} be found close to the current upper bound. The results presented in section 1 demonstrate that the discovery reach as well as the precision with which the oscillation parameters can be measured at the baseline Neutrino Factory is superior to that of other proposed facilities for all possible values of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}.

  14. Conceptual design summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux for these experiments will be at least five times, and in some cases twenty times, more than is available at the world's best existing facilities. In addition, ANS will provide irradiation capabilities for the production of radioisotopes for medical applications, research, and industry and facilities for materials irradiation testing. The need for a new steady-state neutron research facility in the United States was emphasized by the 1984 National Academy Report and confirmed by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Research Advisory Board in 1985. These studies defined a minimum thermal neutron flux requirement of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center dot} s{sup {minus}1}. The National Steering Committee for an Advanced Neutron Source, with representation from the major fields of science that will use the facility, was established in 1986 and has continued to define the performance requirements and instrument layouts needed by the user community. To minimize technical risks and safety issues, the project adopted a policy of not relying upon new inventions to meet the minimum performance criteria, and the design presented in this report is built on technologies already used in other facilities and development programs: for example, the involute aluminum-clad fuel plates common to HFIR and ILL and the uranium silicide fuel developed in DOE's Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and tested in reactors worldwide. At the same time, every state-of-the-art technique has been implemented to optimize neutron beam delivery at the experiments.

  15. Conceptual design summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides beams of neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux for these experiments will be at least five times, and in some cases twenty times, more than is available at the world`s best existing facilities. In addition, ANS will provide irradiation capabilities for the production of radioisotopes for medical applications, research, and industry and facilities for materials irradiation testing. The need for a new steady-state neutron research facility in the United States was emphasized by the 1984 National Academy Report and confirmed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Energy Research Advisory Board in 1985. These studies defined a minimum thermal neutron flux requirement of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1}. The National Steering Committee for an Advanced Neutron Source, with representation from the major fields of science that will use the facility, was established in 1986 and has continued to define the performance requirements and instrument layouts needed by the user community. To minimize technical risks and safety issues, the project adopted a policy of not relying upon new inventions to meet the minimum performance criteria, and the design presented in this report is built on technologies already used in other facilities and development programs: for example, the involute aluminum-clad fuel plates common to HFIR and ILL and the uranium silicide fuel developed in DOE`s Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program and tested in reactors worldwide. At the same time, every state-of-the-art technique has been implemented to optimize neutron beam delivery at the experiments.

  16. Inverse scattering code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, A.; King, A.

    1997-09-01

    A methodology for the evaluation of complex electromagnetics problems is presented. The methodology reduces the computational requirements for the analysis of large scale computational electromagnetics problems by hybridizing the method of moments and physical optics techniques. The target model is based on triangular facets and the incident field source by its system response function. Data which can be obtained from the analysis are radar cross section, power spectral density, and range profiles.

  17. Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambilla, Sara; Brown, Michael J.

    2012-06-18

    A terrorist attack in a U.S. city utilizing biological weapons could have severe consequences. A biological agent could be aerosolized and emitted into the air in the middle of a city, invisibly traveling with the winds, and dosing an unknowing populace. The magnitude of the problem would only be revealed as sick people started arriving several days later at hospitals with symptoms, many already too ill to be saved. A national program has deployed a network of biological agent collectors in U.S. cities to provide early detection of a bio-weapon attack, thereby hastening medical intervention and potentially saving many thousands of lives. In fact, the most effective treatment takes place prior to infection or in its early stages and early warning might reduce the disease progression and, consequently, the possibility of an outbreak. If a biological attack were to occur in a city, one or more collectors may register hits with specific dosages and the city would be alerted that an attack had taken place. This piece of information alone, however, would not be enough to determine how serious the attack was, i.e., how much biological agent was released into the air and where the bio-plume traveled. The first responders and public health communities will want to know what regions were impacted, how many persons might get sick, which people most need medical supplies, and where to clean up. The law enforcement community will want to look for forensic evidence at the release location. The Bio-Agent Event Reconstruction Tool (BERT) has been developed in order to recreate what might have happened during an airborne biological agent attack based on biological agent collector measurements and wind collectors mounted around a city. The tool can be used to estimate possible release areas while eliminating other areas, and can estimate bounds on the amount of material released. The tool can then be used to project forward from the possible source areas to estimate potential hazard zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

  18. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  19. Naval Waste Package Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.M. Lewis

    2004-03-15

    A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository.

  20. Inverse antagonist activities of parabens on human oestrogen-related receptor ? (ERR?): In vitro and in silico studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Hu, Ying; Jiao, Jian; Hu, Jianying

    2013-07-01

    Parabens are p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters that have been used extensively as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, drugs and toiletries. These intact esters are commonly detected in human breast cancer tissues and other human samples, thus arousing concern about the involvement of parabens in human breast cancer. In this study, an in vitro nuclear receptor coactivator recruiting assay was developed and used to evaluate the binding activities of parabens, salicylates and benzoates via antagonist competitive binding on the human oestrogen-related receptor ? (ERR?), which is known as both a diagnostic biomarker and a treatment target of breast cancer. The results showed that all of the test parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and benzylparaben) possessed clear inverse antagonist activities on ERR?, with a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of 10{sup ?7} M and the 50% relative effective concentrations (REC50) varying from 3.09 10{sup ?7} to 5.88 10{sup ?7} M, whereas the salicylates possessed much lower activities and the benzoates showed no obvious activity. In silico molecular docking analyses showed that parabens fitted well into the active site of ERR?, with hydrogen bonds forming between the p-hydroxyl group of parabens and the Glu275/Arg316 of ERR?. As the paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues are commonly higher than the LOELs observed in this study, parabens may play some role via ERR? in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. In addition, parabens may have significant effects on breast cancer patients who are taking tamoxifen, as ERR? is regarded as a treatment target for tamoxifen. - Highlights: An oestrogen-related receptor ? coactivator recruiting assay was developed. Strong binding activities of parabens with oestrogen-related receptor ? were found. The paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues were higher than their LOELs. Parabens may play some role via ERR? in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. Parabens may have significant effects in breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen.

  1. 3-D moveout inversion in azimuthally anisotropic media with lateral velocity variation: Theory and a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.

    1999-08-01

    Reflection moveout recorded over an azimuthally anisotropic medium (e.g., caused by vertical or dipping fractures) varies with the azimuth of the source-receiver line. Normal-moveout (NMO) velocity, responsible for the reflection traveltimes on conventional-length spreads, forms an elliptical curve in the horizontal plane. While this result remains valid in the presence of arbitrary anisotropy and heterogeneity, the inversion of the NMO ellipse for the medium parameters has been discussed so far only for horizontally homogeneous models above a horizontal or dipping reflector. Here, the authors develop an analytic moveout correction for weak lateral velocity variation in horizontally layered azimuthally anisotropic media. The correction term is proportional to the curvature of the zero-offset travel-time surface at the common midpoint and, therefore, can be estimated from surface seismic data. After the influence of lateral velocity variation on the effective NMO ellipses has been stripped, the generalized Dix equation can be used to compute the interval ellipses and evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy (measured by P-wave NMO velocity) within the layer of interest. This methodology was applied to a 3-D wide-azimuth data set acquired over a fractured reservoir in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The processing sequence included 3-D semblance analysis (based on the elliptical NMO equation) for a grid of common-midpoint supergathers, spatial smoothing of the effective NMO ellipses and zero-offset traveltimes, correction for lateral velocity variation, and generalized Dix differentiation. The estimates of depth-varying fracture trends in the survey area, based on the interval P-wave NMO ellipses, are in good agreement with the results of outcrop and borehole measurements and the rotational analysis of four component S-wave data.

  2. Novel signal inversion of laser beam induced current for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, W. C.; Wang, R.; Xu, Z. J.; Jiang, T.; Cheng, X. A.

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, experimental results of temperature-dependent signal inversion of laser beam induced current (LBIC) for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe are reported. LBIC characterization shows that the traps induced by femtosecond laser drilling are sensitive to temperature. Theoretical models for trap-related p-n junction transformation are proposed and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of traps and mixed conduction are possibly the main reasons that result in the novel signal inversion of LBIC microscope at room temperature. The research results provide a theoretical guide for practical applications of large-scale array HgCdTe infrared photovoltaic detectors formed by femtosecond laser drilling, which may act as a potential new method for fabricating HgCdTe photodiodes.

  3. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-00X-2016_Coupled Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Data for Improved Prediction of Subsur

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coupled Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Data for Improved Prediction of Subsurface CO 2 Migration 28 January 2016 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-004-2016 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

  4. Neutron crystallography aids drug design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron crystallography aids drug design Neutron crystallography aids drug design Researchers have used neutron crystallography for the first time to determine the structure of a clinical drug in complex with its human target enzyme. October 9, 2012 Rich Marquez The Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, where groundbreaking work in new drug-design methods is underway using neutron diffraction techniques. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505)

  5. Designing for the Active Classroom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Donohue, Amy; Davis, Robert G.

    2015-02-01

    The article discusses trends in classroom design and then transitions to a discussion of the future of the classroom and how the lighting industry needs to be preparing to meet the needs of the future classroom. The OSU Classroom building as an example throughout, first discussing how trends in classroom design were incorporated into the Classroom Building and then discussing how future lighting systems could enhance the Classroom Building, which is a clear departure from the actual lighting design and current technology.

  6. Designing for the Active Classroom

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Action Publication | Department of Energy Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE Action Publication Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector provides state regulators, utilities, and other program administrators with an overview of U.S. industrial energy efficiency programs delivered by a

  7. REC Tracking Systems Design Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meredith Wingate

    2004-02-03

    OAK-B135 The Design Guide is presented in three parts. Section II describes the need for REC tracking, the two principal tracking methods available, and, in simple terms, the operation of certificate-based systems. Section III presents the major issues in the design of certificate-based tracking systems and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of alternative solutions. Finally, Section IV offers design principles or recommendations for most of these issues.

  8. Biosystems Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biosystems Design Biosystems Design Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Pablo Rabinowicz, Program Manager, Biosystems Design Program, Biological and Environmental Research (BER), U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon b13_rabinowicz_2-a.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2013 Agenda Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Briefing: DOE and the Life and Medical Sciences

  9. Automated solar collector installation design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-08-26

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives.

  10. ORISE: Instructional Design and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    customized training and instructional design programs, from traditional classroom teaching to online education. ORISE uses a multi-step process to define the instructional...

  11. Congestion Study Designations 2006: FAQ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy: National Electric Transmission Congestion Study and Designation of National Corridors Frequently Asked Questions, August 8, 2006

  12. Zero Student Design Competition Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... life * Extent to which the interior design complements the exterior architecture * Environmental sustainability of materials used for finishes, furniture, and other items within ...

  13. Challenge Home Student Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out student designs of zero energy ready homes -- homes that are so efficient they can produce as much energy as the use with a renewable energy system.

  14. Precision Designs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Precision Designs Place: Rochester, New York Zip: 14624 Product: Manufacturer of test equipment for fuel cells. Coordinates: 43.1555, -77.616033 Show Map Loading map......

  15. Novette chain design and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J.T.; Speck, D.R.

    1980-12-11

    The design and performance of the Novette laser system, which is a two-beam, two-wavelength (1.05 ..mu.. and 0.53 ..mu..) target irradiation facility using phosphate glass laser chains, are discussed with information on the glass properties, controlling factors in the design selection, and projected performance with varying operating conditions. (LCL)

  16. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  17. Ecowatt Design LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecowatt Design LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ecowatt Design LLC Name: Ecowatt Design LLC Address: 10900 Northwest Fwy Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77092 Region: Texas Area...

  18. Bay Solar Power Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power Design Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bay Solar Power Design Place: California Product: US-based PV system installer. References: Bay Solar Power Design1 This...

  19. Preliminary Safety Design RM | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Design RM Preliminary Safety Design RM The Preliminary Safety Design (PSD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the ...

  20. Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods (Patent) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Waterflooding injectate design systems and methods A method of designing an injectate...

  1. Commerce RISE Program Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commerce RISE Program Design Commerce RISE Program Design Community Power Works program design, a document posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  2. Design Code Survey Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Survey of Safety Software Used in Design of Structures, Systems, and Components 1. Introduction The Department's Implementation Plan ...

  3. Geothermal Design Challenge Soars in Submissions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Challenge Soars in Submissions Geothermal Design Challenge Soars in Submissions March 3, 2016 - 9:41am Addthis Geothermal Design Challenge Soars in Submissions The ...

  4. CASE Design/Remodeling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DesignRemodeling Jump to: navigation, search Name: CASE DesignRemodeling Place: Bethesda, MD Website: www.casedesignremodeling.com References: CASE DesignRemodeling1...

  5. Visual Design Group | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visual Design Group Ames Laboratory Logos You are here Home Visual Design Group Graphics Services supports the design, printing and production needs of the Ames Laboratory. For...

  6. California Green Designs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Designs Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Green Designs Place: Encino, California Zip: 91316 Sector: Buildings, Renewable Energy Product: Designs and builds...

  7. Green Integrated Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrated Design Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Green Integrated Design Name: Green Integrated Design Place: Tempe, Arizona Zip: 85283 Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded:...

  8. Chapter 2: Whole-Buildling Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable design is most effective when applied at the earliest stages of a design. This philosophy of creating a good building must be maintained throughout design and ...

  9. Identity and Design Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Guidelines Identity and Design Guidelines Package icon Identity and Design Guidelines More Documents & Publications Collegiate Wind Competition Identity Guidelines Policy ...

  10. Race to Zero Design Competition Webinar: Housing Design Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thinking about joining the 2015 Race to Zero to showcase your university team’s skill and commitment to designing market-ready zero energy ready homes? Join Sam Rashkin, chief architect of the DOE...

  11. HostDesigner, Version 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-18

    HostDesigner is a computer-aided molecular design code that enables the general application of de novo structure-based methods to problems in chemistry and material science. Its purpose is to identify organic molecules with 3D structures that match user-input specifications. To accomplish this, the code connects chemical fragments to build millions of potential molecules, evaluates the resulting structures based on geometric constraints, and outputs a rank-ordered list of candidates. Example applications include the design of metal ion sequestering agents for use in separations processes, molecules that form self-assembled nanoscale containers, and molecular building blocks for metal-organic frameworks.

  12. Audit Implementation Design Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Audit Implementation Design Plan Document Number: NA Effective Date: 08

  13. Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power ...

  14. Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxidation Catalyst for Diesel Engine Emission Treatment Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, ... More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and ...

  15. Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard This Standard is reissued ...

  16. Final Design RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Design RM Final Design RM The Final Design (FD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists Department of Energy (DOE) federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the final design prior to CD-3 approval. The FD RM focuses on the engineering design, technology, safety, and quality assurance to determine whether it meets overall design commitments, technical and safety requirements. PDF icon Final Design RM More Documents & Publications Seismic Design

  17. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  18. Center for Energy Efficient Design

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Rocky Mount, VA As the first Passivhaus public school in North America, the Center for Energy Efficient Design (CEED) in Rocky Mount, Virginia, is a national model for green school construction. An extension of The Leonard A.

  19. Production Facility SCADA Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Baily, Scott A.; Woloshun, Keith Albert; Wheat, Robert Mitchell Jr.

    2015-03-23

    The following report covers FY 14 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production facility. The goal of this effort is to provide Northstar with a baseline system design.

  20. Geothermal Design Challenge Overview Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Office, in partnership with the Center for Advanced Energy Studies and Idaho National Lab is recruiting students in graphic design,...

  1. NREL: Technology Deployment - Microgrid Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid Design Photo of a microgrid test site at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL designs independent electrical generation and distribution systems called microgrids, which deliver energy that is reliable, economical, and sustainable. NREL experts work with military, government, industry, and other organizations that cannot afford to lose power to develop reliable and cost-effective microgrid systems. Expertise and Knowledge NREL offers microgrid technical expertise and project

  2. The TPX Cryostat Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravenscroft, D.; Posey, A.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.

    1993-10-06

    The TPX (Tokamak Physics Experiment) will be the first tokamak to employ both superconducting TF (toroidal field) and PF (poloidal field) magnets. Consequently, the entire device is located within an evacuated cryostat to provide the necessary thermal barrier between the ambient temperature test cell and the magnets that are cooled by supercritical liquid helium at 5{degrees}K. This paper describes the cryostat design requirements, design concepts, and the cryostat fabrication and installation.

  3. Design of Roadside Safety Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis and Design of the Roadside Safety Features for Safety Performance Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) researchers are investigating the performance of a crash wall design to determine its effectiveness in reducing the damage to mechanically supported earth (MSE) wall panels during a vehicular impact. The simulations are based on Test Level 4 impact conditions of the new AASHTO Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH). This involves a 10,000-kg single unit truck (SUT) impacting at 90

  4. Fuel cell design and assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myerhoff, Alfred

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel bipolar cooling plate, fuel cell design and method of assembly of fuel cells. The bipolar cooling plate used in the fuel cell design and method of assembly has discrete opposite edge and means carried by the plate defining a plurality of channels extending along the surface of the plate toward the opposite edges. At least one edge of the channels terminates short of the edge of the plate defining a recess for receiving a fastener.

  5. Design guidance for elastic followup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  6. TAPS design concepts: environmental concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    The engineering concepts used in the design, construction, and operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) were often new and in many cases in the state of the art. To accommodate environmental concerns for operating a hot oil pipeline in permafrost soil, unique features were incorporated into TAPS. Design concepts include a sophisticated leak detection and internal pipeline monitoring system. Additional features for accommodating thaw-unstable soils, earthquakes, and river systems are described. (23 references)

  7. RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

    2010-08-01

    Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

  8. Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  9. Y-12 Sustainable Design Principles for Building Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. G.

    2008-11-01

    B&W Y-12 is committed to modernizing the Y-12 complex to meet future needs with a sustainable and responsive infrastructure and to integrating sustainability principles and practices into Y-12 work (Y72-001, B&W Y-12 Environmental, Safety and Health Policy). This commitment to sustainability and specifically sustainable design of buildings is also incorporated into Presidential Executive Orders (EO), DOE Orders (DOE O), and goals. Sustainable building design is an approach to design, construct, and operate facilities in an efficient and environmentally sound manner that will produce a healthful, resource-efficient and productive working environment that is inherently protective of the environment. The DOE has established the following 5 Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB), and has issued directives that require Y-12 to incorporate the principles and a number of supporting specific practices and techniques into building design, construction and renovation projects: (1) Employ Integrated Design Principles; (2) Optimize Energy Performance; (3) Protect and Conserve Water; (4) Enhance Indoor Environmental Quality; and (5) Reduce Environmental Impact of Materials. The purpose of this document is to present the required sustainable building principles, practices and techniques, summarize the key drivers for incorporating them into Y-12 projects, and present additional recommendations and resources that can be used to support sustainable buildings to enhance the environmental and economic performance of the Y-12 Complex.

  10. Effects of overburden, biomass and atmospheric inversions on energy and angular distributions of gamma rays from U, K, Th, and airborne radon sources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, R.M.; Leggett, D.; Wells, M.B.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes a set of radiation transport calculations that were run with the AHISN S/sub n/ discrete ordinates code and a point kernel code to determine the energy, polar angle and height in air distributions of the total and direct gamma-ray flux densities from: (1) uranium sources of 3.2, 200 and 800 ppM in a sandstone orebody covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (2) thorium sources of 12, 25 and 80 ppM in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (3) potassium source (2.5 wt %) in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (4) constant airborne source with height for no inversion and for inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (5) exponentially decreasing airborne source for no inversion and inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (6) 3.2 ppM uranium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; (7) 12 ppM thorium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm; (8) 2.5 wt % of potassium in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; and (9) 3.2 ppM, 200 ppM, and 800 ppM uranium source in sandstone orebody covered with overburden thicknesses of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm. Gamma-ray emission from the decay of natural uranium, thorium, radon, and potassium are given in a 45-energy group structure applicable to the energy windows used to map the potential uranium ore reserves.

  11. Simulation study of HEMT structures with HfO{sub 2} cap layer for mitigating inverse piezoelectric effect related device failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagulapally, Deepthi; Joshi, Ravi P.; Pradhan, Aswini

    2015-01-15

    The Inverse Piezoelectric Effect (IPE) is thought to contribute to possible device failure of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). Here we focus on a simulation study to probe the possible mitigation of the IPE by reducing the internal electric fields and related elastic energy through the use of high-k materials. Inclusion of a HfO{sub 2} “cap layer” above the AlGaN barrier particularly with a partial mesa structure is shown to have potential advantages. Simulations reveal even greater reductions in the internal electric fields by using “field plates” in concert with high-k oxides.

  12. Passive solar design handbook. Volume III. Passive solar design analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Kosiewicz, C.E.; Lazarus, G.S.; McFarland, R.D.; Wray, W.O.

    1982-07-01

    Simple analytical methods concerning the design of passive solar heating systems are presented with an emphasis on the average annual heating energy consumption. Key terminology and methods are reviewed. The solar load ratio (SLR) is defined, and its relationship to analysis methods is reviewed. The annual calculation, or Load Collector Ratio (LCR) method, is outlined. Sensitivity data are discussed. Information is presented on balancing conservation and passive solar strategies in building design. Detailed analysis data are presented for direct gain and sunspace systems, and details of the systems are described. Key design parameters are discussed in terms of their impact on annual heating performance of the building. These are the sensitivity data. The SLR correlations for the respective system types are described. The monthly calculation, or SLR method, based on the SLR correlations, is reviewed. Performance data are given for 9 direct gain systems and 15 water wall and 42 Trombe wall systems. (LEW)

  13. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design: CESSAR design certification. Volume 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report has been prepared in support of the industry effort to standardize nuclear plant designs. This document describes the Combustion Engineering, Inc. System 80+{trademark} Standard Design. This volume contains sections 2 thru 7 of Chapter 15 -- Accident Analyses. Topics covered are: decrease in heat removal by the secondary system; decrease in reactor coolant flow rate; reactivity and power distribution anomalies; increase in RCS inventory; decrease in RCS inventory; and radioactive material release from a system or component. Appendices 15A, 15B, and 15C are included.

  14. Career Map: Design Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Engineer Career Map: Design Engineer A product designer watches as several engineers work on a wind turbine component. Design Engineer Position Title Design Engineer Alternate Title(s) Materials Engineer, Composite Engineer, Product Designer, Structural Engineer Education & Training Level Bachelor's degree required, graduate degree preferred Education & Training Level Description Design engineers typically hold a bachelor's degree or higher in electrical or mechanical engineering

  15. Safety Design Strategy RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety Design Strategy RM Safety Design Strategy RM The SDS Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the conceptual safety design strategy documentation package (Conceptual Safety Design Report) prior to CD-1 approval and the adequacy of the preliminary safety design strategy documentation packaged (Preliminary Safety Design Report) prior to CD- 2 approval. PDF icon Safety Design Strategy RM More Documents & Publications Safety

  16. HostDesigner, Version 3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-18

    HostDesigner is a computer-aided molecular design code that enables the general application of de novo structure-based methods to problems in chemistry and material science. Its purpose is to identify organic molecules with 3D structures that match user-input specifications. To accomplish this, the code connects chemical fragments to build millions of potential molecules, evaluates the resulting structures based on geometric constraints, and outputs a rank-ordered list of candidates. Example applications include the design of metal ionmore » sequestering agents for use in separations processes, molecules that form self-assembled nanoscale containers, and molecular building blocks for metal-organic frameworks.« less

  17. Passive Energy Building Design Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    SOLAR5 is a computer aided design tool to help architects design better, more energy efficient buildings. It is intended for use at the beginning of the design process. To get started, only four pieces of information are necessary to compute the energy needed: the square footage, the number of stories, the kind of building (such as school, home, hotel, or any one of 20 types), and its location (the program stores the temperature ranges formore » fourty major cities). Additional information may be given later to fine tune the design. An expert system using heuristics from a wide range of sources, automatically creates a passive solar baseline building from the four facts specified for that project. By modifying and adapting prior designs the user can create and work upon as many as nine schemes simultaneously. SOLAR5 can analyze the buildings thermal performance for each hour of each month and plot its total heat gain or loss as a three-dimensional surface. After reading the plot, the user can immediately redesign the building and rerun the analysis. Separate heat gain/loss surfaces can be plotted for each of the different parts of the building or schemes that add together to make up the total, including walls, roof, windows, skylights, floor, slab on grade, people, lights, equipment, and infiltration. Two different schemes can be instantly compared by asking for a three-dimensional plot showing only the difference in their performances. The objective of SOLAR5 is to allow the designer to make changes easily and quickly with detailed instantaneous pictorial feedback of the implications of the change.« less

  18. Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO2 Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A L; Hao, Y; White, D; Carle, S; Dyer, K; Yang, X; Mcnab, W; Foxall, W; Johnson, J

    2009-12-02

    During Phase 1 of the Weyburn Project (2000-2004), 4D reflection seismic data were used to map CO{sub 2} migration within the Midale reservoir, while an extensive fluid sampling program documented the geochemical evolution triggered by CO{sub 2}-brine-oil-mineral interactions. The aim of this task (3b.11) is to exploit these existing seismic and geochemical data sets, augmented by CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O injection and HC/H{sub 2}O production data toward optimizing the reservoir model and thereby improving site characterization and dependent predictions of long-term CO{sub 2} storage in the Weyburn-Midale reservoir. Our initial project activities have concentrated on developing a stochastic inversion method that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. This report describes the technical approach we have followed, the data that supports it, and associated implementation activities. The report fulfills deliverable D1 in the project's statement of work. Future deliverables will describe the development of the stochastic inversion tool that uses geochemical data to optimize the reservoir model.

  19. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a-priori information to a surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven river bank storage along the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. First, a transient warping mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table boundary through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk-conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Second, because river water specific conductance is less than groundwater specific conductance, a non-linear inequality constraint is used to allow only negative transient changes in bulk conductivity to occur within the saturated zone during periods of elevated river stage with respect to baseline conditions. Whereas time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river bank storage, the water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time. A surface based ERT array of 352 electrodes was used to autonomously produce four images per day of changes in bulk conductivity associated with river water intrusion over an area of approximately 300 m2 from April through October of 2013. Results are validated by comparing changes in bulk conductivity time series with corresponding changes in fluid specific conductance at several inland monitoring wells.

  20. Sensitivity analysis for joint inversion of ground-penetratingradar and thermal-hydrological data from a large-scale underground heatertest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalsky, M.B.; Birkholzer, J.; Peterson, J.; Finsterle, S.; Mukhopadhya y, S.; Tsang, Y.T.

    2007-06-25

    We describe a joint inversion approach that combinesgeophysical and thermal-hydrological data for the estimation of (1)thermal-hydrological parameters (such as permeability, porosity, thermalconductivity, and parameters of the capillary pressure and relativepermeability functions) that are necessary for predicting the flow offluids and heat in fractured porous media, and (2) parameters of thepetrophysical function that relates water saturation, porosity andtemperature to the dielectric constant. The approach incorporates thecoupled simulation of nonisothermal multiphase fluid flow andground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel times within an optimizationframework. We discuss application of the approach to a large-scale insitu heater test which was conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to betterunderstand the coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemicalprocesses that may occur in the fractured rock mass around a geologicrepository for high-level radioactive waste. We provide a description ofthe time-lapse geophysical data (i.e., cross-borehole ground-penetratingradar) and thermal-hydrological data (i.e., temperature and water contentdata) collected before and during the four-year heating phase of thetest, and analyze the sensitivity of the most relevantthermal-hydrological and petrophysical parameters to the available data.To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, and as a first step towardcomprehensive inversion of the heater test data, we apply the approach toestimate one parameter, the permeability of the rock matrix.

  1. Effective software design and development for the new graph architecture HPC machines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechev, Damian

    2012-03-01

    Software applications need to change and adapt as modern architectures evolve. Nowadays advancement in chip design translates to increased parallelism. Exploiting such parallelism is a major challenge in modern software engineering. Multicore processors are about to introduce a significant change in the way we design and use fundamental data structures. In this work we describe the design and programming principles of a software library of highly concurrent scalable and nonblocking data containers. In this project we have created algorithms and data structures for handling fundamental computations in massively multithreaded contexts, and we have incorporated these into a usable library with familiar look and feel. In this work we demonstrate the first design and implementation of a wait-free hash table. Our multiprocessor data structure design allows a large number of threads to concurrently insert, remove, and retrieve information. Non-blocking designs alleviate the problems traditionally associated with the use of mutual exclusion, such as bottlenecks and thread-safety. Lock-freedom provides the ability to share data without some of the drawbacks associated with locks, however, these designs remain susceptible to starvation. Furthermore, wait-freedom provides all of the benefits of lock-free synchronization with the added assurance that every thread makes progress in a finite number of steps. This implies deadlock-freedom, livelock-freedom, starvation-freedom, freedom from priority inversion, and thread-safety. The challenges of providing the desirable progress and correctness guarantees of wait-free objects makes their design and implementation difficult. There are few wait-free data structures described in the literature. Using only standard atomic operations provided by the hardware, our design is portable; therefore, it is applicable to a variety of data-intensive applications including the domains of embedded systems and supercomputers.Our experimental evaluation shows that our hash table design outperforms the most advanced locking solution, provided by Intel's TBB library, by 22%. When compared to more traditional locking designs we show a performance improvement by a factor of 7.92. When compared to alternative non-blocking designs, our hash table demonstrates solid performance gains in a large majority of cases, typically by a factor of 3.44.

  2. Design of experiments and data analysis challenges in calibration for forensics applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Burr, Thomas L.; Hamada, Michael S.; Ruggiero, Christy E.; Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-07-15

    Forensic science aims to infer characteristics of source terms using measured observables. Our focus is on statistical design of experiments and data analysis challenges arising in nuclear forensics. More specifically, we focus on inferring aspects of experimental conditions (of a process to produce product Pu oxide powder), such as temperature, nitric acid concentration, and Pu concentration, using measured features of the product Pu oxide powder. The measured features, Y, include trace chemical concentrations and particle morphology such as particle size and shape of the produced Pu oxide power particles. Making inferences about the nature of inputs X that were usedmore » to create nuclear materials having particular characteristics, Y, is an inverse problem. Therefore, statistical analysis can be used to identify the best set (or sets) of Xs for a new set of observed responses Y. One can fit a model (or models) such as Υ = f(Χ) + error, for each of the responses, based on a calibration experiment and then “invert” to solve for the best set of Xs for a new set of Ys. This perspectives paper uses archived experimental data to consider aspects of data collection and experiment design for the calibration data to maximize the quality of the predicted Ys in the forward models; that is, we assume that well-estimated forward models are effective in the inverse problem. In addition, we consider how to identify a best solution for the inferred X, and evaluate the quality of the result and its robustness to a variety of initial assumptions, and different correlation structures between the responses. In addition, we also briefly review recent advances in metrology issues related to characterizing particle morphology measurements used in the response vector, Y.« less

  3. Design of experiments and data analysis challenges in calibration for forensics applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Burr, Thomas L.; Hamada, Michael S.; Ruggiero, Christy E.; Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-07-15

    Forensic science aims to infer characteristics of source terms using measured observables. Our focus is on statistical design of experiments and data analysis challenges arising in nuclear forensics. More specifically, we focus on inferring aspects of experimental conditions (of a process to produce product Pu oxide powder), such as temperature, nitric acid concentration, and Pu concentration, using measured features of the product Pu oxide powder. The measured features, Y, include trace chemical concentrations and particle morphology such as particle size and shape of the produced Pu oxide power particles. Making inferences about the nature of inputs X that were used to create nuclear materials having particular characteristics, Y, is an inverse problem. Therefore, statistical analysis can be used to identify the best set (or sets) of Xs for a new set of observed responses Y. One can fit a model (or models) such as ? = f(?) + error, for each of the responses, based on a calibration experiment and then invert to solve for the best set of Xs for a new set of Ys. This perspectives paper uses archived experimental data to consider aspects of data collection and experiment design for the calibration data to maximize the quality of the predicted Ys in the forward models; that is, we assume that well-estimated forward models are effective in the inverse problem. In addition, we consider how to identify a best solution for the inferred X, and evaluate the quality of the result and its robustness to a variety of initial assumptions, and different correlation structures between the responses. We also briefly review recent advances in metrology issues related to characterizing particle morphology measurements used in the response vector, Y.

  4. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdan Neculaes, V. Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-05-15

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

  5. Waste Package Design Methodology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A. Brownson

    2001-09-28

    The objective of this report is to describe the analytical methods and processes used by the Waste Package Design Section to establish the integrity of the various waste package designs, the emplacement pallet, and the drip shield. The scope of this report shall be the methodology used in criticality, risk-informed, shielding, source term, structural, and thermal analyses. The basic features and appropriateness of the methods are illustrated, and the processes are defined whereby input values and assumptions flow through the application of those methods to obtain designs that ensure defense-in-depth as well as satisfy requirements on system performance. Such requirements include those imposed by federal regulation, from both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and those imposed by the Yucca Mountain Project to meet repository performance goals. The report is to be used, in part, to describe the waste package design methods and techniques to be used for producing input to the License Application Report.

  6. ADVANCES IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, P.G.; Gardiner, J.T.; Russell, P.R.Z.; Lachman, K.D.; McDaniel, P.W.; Boutin, R.J.; Brown, N.R.; Trautner, L.J.

    2003-02-27

    Since site designation of the Yucca Mountain Project by the President, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the transition from the site characterization phase of the project to preparation of the license application. As part of this transition, an increased focus has been applied to the repository design. Several evolution studies were performed to evaluate the repository design and to determine if improvements in the design were possible considering advances in the technology for handling and packaging nuclear materials. The studies' main focus was to reduce and/or eliminate uncertainties in both the pre-closure and post-closure performance of the repository and to optimize operations. The scope and recommendations from these studies are the subjects of this paper and include the following topics: (1) a more phased approach for the surface facility that utilize handling and packaging of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in a dry environment rather than in pools as was presented in the site recommendation; (2) slight adjustment of the repository footprint and a phased approach for construction and emplacement of the repository subsurface; and (3) simplification of the construction, fabrication and installation of the waste package and drip shield.

  7. Protein design for pathway engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksen, DT; Lian, JZ; Zhao, HM

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 3, Design and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-30

    Several models have been formed for investigating the maximum electromagnetic loading and magnetic field levels associated with the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) superconducting Poloidal Field (PF) coils. The analyses have been performed to support the design of the individual fourteen hoop coils forming the PF system. The coils have been sub-divided into three coil systems consisting of the central solenoid (CS), PF5 coils, and the larger radius PF6 and PF7 coils. Various electromagnetic analyses have been performed to determine the electromagnetic loadings that the coils will experience during normal operating conditions, plasma disruptions, and fault conditions. The loadings are presented as net body forces acting individual coils, spatial variations throughout the coil cross section, and force variations along the path of the conductor due to interactions with the TF coils. Three refined electromagnetic models of the PF coil system that include a turn-by-turn description of the fields and forces during a worst case event are presented in this report. A global model including both the TF and PF system was formed to obtain the force variations along the path of the PF conductors resulting from interactions with the TF currents. In addition to spatial variations, the loadings are further subdivided into time-varying and steady components so that structural fatigue issues can be addressed by designers and analysts. Other electromagnetic design issues such as the impact of the detailed coil designs on field errors are addressed in this report. Coil features that are analyzed include radial transitions via short jogs vs. spiral type windings and the effects of layer-to-layer rotations (i.e clocking) on the field errors.

  9. ALS beamline design requirements: A guide for beamline designers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This manual is written as a guide for researchers in designing beamlines and endstations acceptable for use at the ALS. It contains guidelines and policies related to personnel safety and equipment and vacuum protection. All equipment and procedures must ultimately satisfy the safety requirements set aside in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000) which is available from the ALS User Office or on the World WideWeb from the LBNL Homepage (http:// www.lbl.gov).

  10. D light design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    light design Jump to: navigation, search Name: d.light design Place: New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip: 1110049 Product: d.light is a US-founded, India-based designer and...

  11. Fusion reactor design | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactor design Subscribe to RSS - Fusion reactor design The design of devices that use powerful magnetic fields to control plasma so fusion can take place. The most widely used ...

  12. Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide featuring schematic design, designing using ...

  13. Passive Solar Home Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design » Design for Efficiency » Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography. This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot

  14. On the design of reversible QDCA systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.; Frank, Michael P. (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL); Ottavi, Marco; Frost-Murphy, Sarah E.

    2006-10-01

    This work is the first to describe how to go about designing a reversible QDCA system. The design space is substantial, and there are many questions that a designer needs to answer before beginning to design. This document begins to explicate the tradeoffs and assumptions that need to be made and offers a range of approaches as starting points and examples. This design guide is an effective tool for aiding designers in creating the best quality QDCA implementation for a system.

  15. Trust Management Considerations For the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense Framework: Trust Relationships, Evidence, and Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2009-12-01

    Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID) is a hierarchical, agent-based, adaptive, cyber-security framework designed to collaboratively protect multiple enclaves or organizations participating in a complex infrastructure. CID employs a swarm of lightweight, mobile agents called Sensors designed to roam hosts throughout a security enclave to find indications of anomalies and report them to host-based Sentinels. The Sensors’ findings become pieces of a larger puzzle, which the Sentinel puts together to determine the problem and respond per policy as given by the enclave-level Sergeant agent. Horizontally across multiple enclaves and vertically within each enclave, authentication and access control technologies are necessary but insufficient authorization mechanisms to ensure that CID agents continue to fulfill their roles in a trustworthy manner. Trust management fills the gap, providing mechanisms to detect malicious agents and offering more robust mechanisms for authorization. This paper identifies the trust relationships throughout the CID hierarchy, the types of trust evidence that could be gathered, and the actions that the CID system could take if an entity is determined to be untrustworthy.

  16. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector This ...

  17. Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs Clean energy finance programs PDF icon Presentation Microsoft ...

  18. Home Design & Remodeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Design & Remodeling Home Design & Remodeling Ultra-Efficient Home Design Ultra-Efficient Home Design An ultra-efficient home can be designed and built to produce as much energy as it uses -- or even more! Read more Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design Passive solar design takes advantage of a building's site, climate, and materials to minimize energy use. Read more Whole-House Systems Approach Whole-House Systems Approach A whole-house systems approach considers the

  19. Malczewski Product Design LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Malczewski Product Design LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Malczewski Product Design LLC Place: Neenah, Wisconsin Zip: 54956 Sector: Wind energy Product: Product development...

  20. Chemical Design Inc CDI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Design Inc CDI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chemical Design Inc (CDI) Place: Lockport, New York Zip: 14094 Product: US-based engineer of separation and purification plants;...

  1. Separation Design Group LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Separation Design Group LLC Place: Waynesburg, Pennsylvania Zip: 15370 Product: Separation Design Group is a research and product development firm established in...

  2. Electrochemical Design Associates EDA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Design Associates EDA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrochemical Design Associates (EDA) Place: California Zip: 94608-2513 Product: EDA is a technology development company...

  3. Thermoelectric Materials by Design, Computational Theory and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Design, Computational Theory and Structure Thermoelectric Materials by Design, Computational Theory and Structure 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  4. Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2015...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Society, and the International Association of Lighting Designers, NGL promotes excellence in the design of energy-efficient LED products for commercial lighting applications. ...

  5. System Design - Lessons Learned, Generic Concepts, Characteristics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design - Lessons Learned, Generic Concepts, Characteristics & Impacts System Design - Lessons Learned, Generic Concepts, Characteristics & Impacts Presented at the DOE-DOD ...

  6. Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics Transient materials is an emerging area of materials design with the key attribute being the ability to physically...

  7. Design & Construct New Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design & Construct New Buildings Design & Construct New Buildings Photo of NREL's Research Support Facility under construction, with two workers straddling I-beams. Establishing ...

  8. Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings ...

  9. Savings by Design (Offered by five Utilities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In conjunction with the California Department of Public Utilities, Savings by Design offers services and incentives to help owners and designers of commercial buildings raise energy performance....

  10. Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality This report ...

  11. Low-Energy Parking Structure Design (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    This guide provides design teams with best practices for parking structure energy efficiency in the form of goals for each design aspect that affects energy use.

  12. Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2013 Outdoor Winners Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2013 Outdoor Winners February 27, 2014 -...

  13. Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse oxidoreductase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse oxidoreductase functions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse...

  14. Preliminary Design RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design RM Preliminary Design RM The PD Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the PD prior to CD-2 approval. This PD RM can be applied anytime during the design prior to CD-2 approval. However, in practice, the design is typically review at the 30% design stage, which is corresponding to the end of the PD before initiation of final design. PDF icon Prelminary Design RM More Documents & Publications Final Design RM

  15. China Building Design Consultants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Design Consultants Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Building Design Consultants Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: Beijing-based architecture...

  16. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... software, and hardware in an integrated computational co-design process. * Designed Cruft, a suite of molecular dynamics proxy applications (software) developed to explore ...

  17. Functional Design Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Functional Design Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Functional Design Engineering Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website:...

  18. proposed surface and subsurface marker designs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images of proposed markers for the surface and subsurface Large Surface Marker - Proposed Design with Plaques of Text and Images Small Subsurface Marker - Proposed Design

  19. Solar Site Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Site Design Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Site Design AgencyCompany Organization: Loyal Enterprises LLC Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar...

  20. James Madison University: Technical Design Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Each design was modeled analytically using SolidWorks and mathematically analyzed using ... wind turbine design was modeled using SolidWorks 2012. In addition, technical documents ...

  1. Lighting Control Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Control Design Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lighting Control & Design Place: Glendale, California Zip: CA 91201 Product: California-based manufacturer of digital lighting...

  2. Cambridge Design & Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Design & Development Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cambridge Design & Development Place: Cambridge, MA Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes...

  3. Designation Memo: Federal Technical Capability Panel Chairperson...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Technical Capability Panel Chairperson Designation Memo: Federal Technical Capability Panel Chairperson May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen ...

  4. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics You are accessing a ...

  5. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Authors: Baer, Howard ; ...

  6. University of Alaska Fairbanks: Technical Design Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University of Alaska Fairbanks Collegiate 2014 Technical Report 2 Table of Contents Turbine Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 3 Blade Design Techniques and Methods ......................................................................................................... 3 Hub Design Techniques and Methods

  7. Memorandum: Regarding Delegation of Designated Federal Officials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memorandum: Regarding Delegation of Designated Federal Officials for Site Specific Advisory Boards Memorandum: Regarding Delegation of Designated Federal Officials for Site ...

  8. Wind Turbine Blade Design | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fabric Wind Turbine Blade Design Offers Clean Energy Click to email this to a friend ... Fabric Wind Turbine Blade Design Offers Clean Energy Today, conventional wind turbine ...

  9. Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two Summary Report This ...

  10. Nano Design Works | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano Design Works Nano Design Works (NDW) capitalizes on the power of nanotechnology and provides services to strengthen its impact. With expertise in nanomaterials, computing,...

  11. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at the octahedral sites provides the charge carriers that, by a hopping mechanism between Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} adjacent sites, leads to a significant conductivity, up to 0.85 S cm{sup −1} at 800 °C in air.

  12. A GRAND DESIGN FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS: CONNECTIONS AND PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavaliere, A.; Lapi, A.; Fusco-Femiano, R.

    2011-11-20

    We analyze with our entropy-based Supermodel a library of 12 galaxy clusters featuring extended X-ray observations of their intracluster plasma (ICP). The few intrinsic parameters of the model-basically, the central level and the outer slope of the entropy profile-enable us to uniformly derive not only robust snapshots of the ICP thermal state, but also the 'concentration' parameter marking the age of the host dark matter (DM) halo. We test these profiles for consistency with numerical simulations and observations. We find the central and the outer entropy correlate, so that these clusters split into two main classes defined on the basis of low (LE) or high entropy (HE) conditions prevailing throughout the ICP. We also find inverse correlations between the central/outer entropy and the halo concentration. We interpret these in terms of mapping the ICP progress on timescales around 5 Gyr toward higher concentrations, under the drive of the DM halo development. The progress proceeds from HE clusters to LE clusters, toward states of deeper entropy erosion by radiative cooling in the inner regions and of decreasing outer entropy production as the accretion peters out. We propose these radial and time features constitute a cluster Grand Design that we use here to derive a number of predictions. For HE clusters we predict sustained outer temperature profiles. For LEs we expect the outer entropy ramp to bend over; hence the temperature declines before steepening at low z; this feature goes together with an increasing turbulent support, a condition that can be directly probed with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. We finally discuss the looming out of two intermediate subsets: a wiggled HE-tilde at low z that features central temperature profiles retaining imprints of entropy discharged by active galactic nuclei or deep mergers and high-z LEs where the cosmogony/cosmology had little time to enforce a sharp outer entropy bending.

  13. Designs of SSRF Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q. G.; Chen, N.; Zhang, M.; Li, Y.; Su, W. L.

    2007-01-19

    Five IDs will be built for the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Two identical mini-gap undulators with the period length 25mm and the minimum gap 6mm will use the in-vacuum technology and can operate in tapered mode. Two wigglers with the period lengths 7.9cm and 14cm and the same minimum gap 14mm will produce the peak fields of 1.2T and 1.94T. A variable polarization undulator of the APPLE-II type with 4.2m long and the period length 10cm can provide linearly, circularly and elliptically polarized radiation in a wide spectral range. This paper describes the magnet designs and the mechanical structure designs of these IDs.

  14. Single wire drift chamber design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krider, J.

    1987-03-30

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 ..mu..m rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles.

  15. Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-19

    The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Supersedes DOE 5480.1, dated 1-19-93. Certified 11-18-10.

  16. advanced wave energy control design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wave energy control design - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  17. Security-by-design handbook.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Jaeger, Calvin Dell; Scharmer, Carol; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Tanuma, Koji; Ochiai, Kazuya; Iida, Toru

    2013-01-01

    This document is a draft SecuritybyDesign (SeBD) handbook produced to support the Work Plan of the Nuclear Security Summit to share best practices for nuclear security in new facility design. The Work Plan calls on States to %E2%80%9Cencourage nuclear operators and architect/engineering firms to take into account and incorporate, where appropriate, effective measures of physical protection and security culture into the planning, construction, and operation of civilian nuclear facilities and provide technical assistance, upon request, to other States in doing so.%E2%80%9D The materials for this document were generated primarily as part of a bilateral project to produce a SeBD handbook as a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which represented the US Department Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under a Project Action Sheet PASPP04. Input was also derived based on tours of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) Rokkasho Mixed Oxide Fuel fabrication facilities and associated project lessonslearned. For the purposes of the handbook, SeBD will be described as the systemlevel incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new nuclear power plant or nuclear facility resulting in a PPS design that minimizes the risk of malicious acts leading to nuclear material theft; nuclear material sabotage; and facility sabotage as much as possible through features inherent in (or intrinsic to) the design of the facility. A fourelement strategy is presented to achieve a robust, durable, and responsive security system.

  18. Inverse magnetocaloric effect in Mn{sub 2}NiGa and Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga magnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sanjay Barman, S. R.; Esakki Muthu, S.; Arumugam, S.; Senyshyn, A.; Rajput, P.; Suard, E.

    2014-02-03

    Inverse magnetocaloric effect is demonstrated in Mn{sub 2}NiGa and Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga magnetic shape memory alloys. The entropy change at the martensite transition is larger in Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga, and it increases linearly with magnetic field in both the specimens. Existence of inverse magnetocaloric effect is consistent with the observation that magnetization in the martensite phase is smaller than the austenite phase. Although the Mn content is smaller in Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga, from neutron diffraction, we show that the origin of inverse magnetocaloric effect is the antiferromagnetic interaction between the Mn atoms occupying inequivalent sites.

  19. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. McDaniel

    2002-04-05

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new subsurface area (high cost); surface aging in the complete waste package (risk to the waste package and impact on the Waste Handling Facility); and aging in the stainless steel liner (impact on the waste package design and new high risk operations added to the waste packaging process). The selection of a design basis for aging will be made in conjunction with the other design re-evaluation studies.

  20. Pyroelectric field assisted ion migration induced by ultraviolet laser irradiation and its impact on ferroelectric domain inversion in lithium niobate crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, C. Y. J.; Mailis, S.; Daniell, G. J.; Steigerwald, H.; Soergel, E.

    2013-08-28

    The impact of UV laser irradiation on the distribution of lithium ions in ferroelectric lithium niobate single crystals has been numerically modelled. Strongly absorbed UV radiation at wavelengths of 244–305 nm produces steep temperature gradients which cause lithium ions to migrate and result in a local variation of the lithium concentration. In addition to the diffusion, here the pyroelectric effect is also taken into account which predicts a complex distribution of lithium concentration along the c-axis of the crystal: two separated lithium deficient regions on the surface and in depth. The modelling on the local lithium concentration and the subsequent variation of the coercive field are used to explain experimental results on the domain inversion of such UV treated lithium niobate crystals.

  1. Mid-infrared pump-related electric-field domains in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As quantum-cascade structures for terahertz lasing without population inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giehler, M.; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the effect of mid-infrared (MIR) pumping on the transport properties of GaAs/(Al,Ga)As terahertz (THz) quantum lasers (TQLs), which rely on quantum coherence effects of intersubband transitions. Aiming at THz lasing at elevated temperatures, we extend the concept of THz gain with and without population inversion of a single, MIR-pumped, electrically driven THz stage proposed by Waldmueller et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 117401 (2007)] to an entire TQL. However, experiments using a CO{sub 2} as well as a free-electron laser and numerical simulations show that this resonant MIR pumping causes a negative differential conductivity (NDC) in addition to the NDC caused by sequential tunneling. Lasing of these TQLs is prevented by the formation of electric-field domains below the resonance field strength for gain of each single THz stage.

  2. Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  3. Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Action, Certification | Department of Energy Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) PDF icon Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents &

  4. Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G-H.; Pesaran, A.

    2006-10-01

    Presents the objectives and motivations for a battery thermal management vehicle system design study.

  5. National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S

    1997-03-01

    This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

  6. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  7. Designing an ultrasupercritical steam turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klotz, H.; Davis, K.; Pickering, E.

    2009-07-15

    Carbon emissions produced by the combustion of coal may be collected and stored in the future, but a better approach is to reduce the carbon produced through efficient combustion technologies. Increasing the efficiency of new plants using ultrasupercritical (USC) technology will net less carbon released per megawatt-hour using the world's abundant coal reserves while producing electricity at the lowest possible cost. The article shows how increasing the steam turbine operating conditions for a new USC project in the USA and quantify the potential CO{sub 2} reduction this advanced design makes possible. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Beyond Design Basis Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the

  9. Advanced Energy Design Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » Design & Decision Support Tools » Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Design Guides Cover of Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings The 50% AEDGs provide practical approaches to achieve 50% energy savings compared to base code requirements. Download them free from ASHRAE: Small to Medium Office Buildings K-12 School Buildings Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings Large Hospitals Grocery Stores The Advanced Energy Design Guides

  10. Seismic Design Expectations Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to Critical Decision (CD) approvals at CD-0, CD-1, CD-2, CD-3 and CD-4. PDF icon Seismic Design Expectations Report More Documents & Publications Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook DOE-STD-1020-2012 DOE

  11. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math » Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Computational co-design may facilitate revolutionary designs in the next generation of supercomputers. Get Expertise Tim Germann Physics and Chemistry of Materials Email Allen McPherson Energy and Infrastructure Analysis Email Turab Lookman Physics and Condensed Matter and Complex Systems Email Computational co-design involves developing the interacting components of a

  12. GAX absorption cycle design process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priedeman, D.K.; Christensen, R.N.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents an absorption system design process that relies on computer simulations that are validated by experimental findings. An ammonia-water absorption heat pump cycle at 3 refrigeration tons (RT) and chillers at 3.3 RT and 5 RT (10.5 kW, 11.6 kW, and 17.6 kW) were initially modeled and then built and tested. The experimental results were used to calibrate both the cycle simulation and the component simulations, yielding computer design routines that could accurately predict component and cycle performance. Each system was a generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle, and all were sized for residential and light commercial use, where very little absorption equipment is currently used. The specific findings of the 5 RT (17.6 kW) chiller are presented. Modeling incorporated a heat loss from the gas-fired generator and pressure drops in both the evaporator and absorber. Simulation results and experimental findings agreed closely and validated the modeling method and simulation software.

  13. AGING SYSTEM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Beesley

    2005-02-07

    This plan provides an overview, work to date, and the path forward for the design development strategy of the Aging cask for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository site. Waste for subsurface emplacement at the repository includes US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE SNF, commercial fuel in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), uncanistered bare fuel, naval fuel, and other waste types. Table 1-1 lists the types of radioactive materials that may be aged at YMP, and those materials that will not be placed in an aging cask or module. This plan presents the strategy for design development of the Aging system. The Aging system will not handle naval fuel, DOE HLW, MCOs, or DOE SNF since those materials will be delivered to the repository in a state and sequence that allows them to be placed into waste packages for emplacement. Some CSNF from nuclear reactors, especially CSNF that is thermally too hot for emplacement underground, will need to be aged at the repository.

  14. Advanced Design Mixer Pump Tank 18 Design Modifications Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, B.J.

    2002-12-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is preparing to retrieve high level waste (HLW) from Tank 18 in early FY03 to provide feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and to support tank closure in FY04. As part of the Tank 18 project, WSRC will install a single Advanced Design Mixer Pump (ADMP) in the center riser of Tank 18 to mobilize, suspend, and mix radioactive sludge in preparation for transfer to Tank 7. The use of a single ADMP is a change to the current baseline of four (4) standard slurry pumps used during previous waste retrieval campaigns. The ADMP was originally conceived by Hanford and supported by SRS to provide a more reliable and maintainable mixer pump for use throughout the DOE complex. The ADMP underwent an extensive test program at SRS between 1998 and 2002 to assess reliability and hydraulic performance. The ADMP ran for approximately 4,200 hours over the four-year period. A detailed tear down and inspection of the pump following the 4,2 00-hour run revealed that the gas mechanical seals and anti-friction bearings would need to be refurbished/replaced prior to deployment in Tank 18. Design modifications were also needed to meet current Authorization Basis safety requirements. This report documents the modifications made to the ADMP in support of Tank 18 deployment. This report meets the requirements of Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Milestone 3591.4-1, ''Issue Report on Modifications Made to the ADMP,'' contained in Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR16WT51, ''WSRC Retrieval and Closure.''

  15. Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Ultra-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Design for Efficiency Ultra-Efficient Home Design Ultra-Efficient Home Design All Kaupuni Village homes in Oahu, Hawaii, incorporate energy efficiency and renewable ...

  17. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design...

  18. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide. PDF icon Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide...

  19. Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design...

  20. An interactive version of PropID for the aerodynamic design of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninham, C.P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    The original PROP code developed by AeroVironment, Inc. and its various versions have been in use for wind turbine performance predictions for over ten years. Due to its simplicity, rapid execution times and relatively accurate predictions, it has become an industry standard in the US. The Europeans have similar blade-element/momentum methods in use for design. Over the years, PROP has continued to be improved (in its accuracy and capability), e.g., PROPSH, PROPPC, PROP93, and PropID. The latter version incorporates a unique inverse design capability that allows the user to specify the desired aerodynamic characteristics from which the corresponding blade geometry is determined. Through this approach, tedious efforts related to manually adjusting the chord, twist, pitch and rpm to achieve desired aerodynamic/performance characteristics can be avoided, thereby making it possible to perform more extensive trade studies in an effort to optimize performance. Past versions of PropID did not have supporting graphics software. The more current version to be discussed includes a Matlab-based graphical user interface (GUI) and additional features that will be discussed in this paper.