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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; More Documents & Publications...

2

2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet 3 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet Org Unit Additional Information ID Agency Bureau Organization unit City StateCode Country Total FTEs FunctionCode Status ReasonCode YrFirstOnInventory YearofCostComapre CIF/FTESavings EstAnnualSavings MEOPerfReview 3659 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y210 I 1999 3660 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y210 I 1999 3661 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y000 C B 1999 3662 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y815 C B 2003 3663 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y815 C A 1999 3664 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y815 C A 2002 4060 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 E100 I 1999 4061 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 E100 I 2003 4062 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 E100 I 1999 4063 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 Y401 I 1999 4064 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 Y401 I 2003 4065 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 E100 I 1999 4066 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM US 1 E100 I 1999 4067 019 10 AL CARLSBAD NM

3

OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls&0; OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls&0; More Documents & Publications 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; 3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls&0; N:My Documentsporfin.pdf...

4

3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls&0; 3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls&0; More Documents & Publications N:My Documentsporfin.pdf&0; OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web...

5

Hawaii Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Hawaii Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF)Tier II Form Type Required Reporting...

6

life cycle inventory | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

life cycle inventory life cycle inventory Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions Source USLCI Database Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords eGrid Electricity grid LCI life cycle inventory US Data application/zip icon egrid_electricity_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 7 MiB)

7

EIA910_Form.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- - - - - - Address 2: City: State: Zip: - 1. Report State (Enter one of the following States in the box): District of Columbia, Florida, 2. To how many end-use customers did you sell natural gas? 3. 4. For companies reporting sales in all States except Georgia: 5. For companies reporting sales in Georgia: has sales to residential and/or commercial end-use customers. Therm Therm (Number of Customers) Comments: Identify any unusual aspects of your reporting month's activity.

8

FFATA sub reporting data model_draft_100715.xls | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

FFATA sub reporting data modeldraft100715.xls FFATA sub reporting data modeldraft100715.xls FFATA sub reporting data modeldraft100715.xls More Documents & Publications...

9

EIA-912.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feet) (IL, IN, IA, KY, MI, MN, MO, TN, & WI) South Central Region (Million Cubic Feet) (AL, AR, KS, LA, MS, OK, & TX) Mountain Region (Million Cubic Feet) PART 4. INVENTORY...

10

Fig1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 8, 2010 Release Highlights  Crude oil prices fluctuated considerably last month, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot price ranging from a high of $86 per barrel on May 3 to a low of $65 on May 25, before ending the month at $74. According to some market analysts, uncertainty over the global economic recovery, particularly with respect to Europe's debt crisis and the tightening of credit by China, and liquidation of futures contracts contributed to the crude price decline. Moreover, WTI prices fell further than most other crudes because of record high inventories in Cushing, Oklahoma. EIA projects WTI crude oil spot prices

11

eia912.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Month Month 2 0 Address 2: City: State: Zip: - to meet the due date.) (Volume of gas in the reservoir that is in addition to the base gas.) Working Gas as of Friday 9:00 AM (Million Cubic Feet) Producing Region Complete and return form no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Monday. If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: EIA ID NUMBER: ATTN: EIA-912 Energy Information Administration, EI-45 U. S. Department of Energy (202) 586-2849 912 Company Name: oog.eia912@eia.gov Fax No.: Email: Ext: Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Fax to: Address 1: Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/notice912.jsp Questions? Email address: Comments: Please explain in this section any unusual data reports. For example, explain any change in working gas as a result of changes in the number or capacity

12

eia910.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Address 2: Address 2: City: State: Zip: - 1. Report State (Enter one of the following States in the box): Georgia, New York, 2. To how many end-use customers did you sell natural gas? 3. 4. For companies reporting sales in all States except Georgia: 5. For companies reporting sales in Georgia: PART 2. SUBMISSION INFORMATION (Dollars) Do not report negative numbers or decimals. You may report in either Thousand cubic feet (Mcf) or in Therms. Indicate unit of measure by placing an "X" in the appropriate box. Commercial Residential Commercial Residential Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Mail to: ATTN: EIA-910 (Dollars) Commercial Residential Mcf Call: Email address: (877) 800 - 5261 Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp

13

Table1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Entities, Data Year 2005 Reporting Entities, Data Year 2005 Reporter Name Sector Type of Form Number of Projects Reported (Schedule II) Entity-Wide Report (Schedule III) Commitments (Schedule IV) A&N Electric Cooperative Electric Providers 1605 2 No Yes Abe Krasne Home Furnishings, Inc. Services and Retail 1605 0 Yes No AES Hawaii, Inc. Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes No AES SeaWest, Inc. Electric Providers 1605 11 No No AES Shady Point, LLC Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes No AES Thames, LLC Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes Yes AES Warrior Run, LLC Electric Providers 1605 2 Yes No Alabama Biomass Partners, Ltd Alternative Energy 1605EZ 1 No No Alcan Primary Products Corporation, Sebree Works Industrial 1605 1 Yes Yes Algonquin Power - Cambrian Pacific Genco LLC Alternative Energy 1605 9 No No Allegheny Energy, Inc. Electric Providers

14

owip_jobs_calculator_v11-0.xls | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

owipjobscalculatorv11-0.xls owipjobscalculatorv11-0.xls owipjobscalculatorv11-0.xls More Documents & Publications bbanxxxxxxxpmcprogressreport2y12qx.xlsx Job...

15

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, section 313 toxic chemical release inventory reporting forms for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Forms and the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Certification Statement Form A(s) for chlorine for 1996 for the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The reporting forms contain information on the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Y-12 Plant and Johnson Controls Water Treatment Plant operational releases for specific toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land in addition to transfers to off-site disposal locations in CY 1996. Personnel from U.S. West reported no usage of the specified toxic chemicals in CY 1996; therefore, no Form R or Form A reporting data are included for U.S. West.

Evans, R.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls More Documents & Publications...

17

FINAL Combined SGIG Selections - By State for Press -5.xls |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- By State for Press -5.xls More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July 2010 FINAL Combined SGIG...

18

monthly_peak_2003.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

O Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric...

19

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

20

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PIPELINE INVENTORIES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inventory that are in the transportation network, the distribution system, and intermediate stocking points are called . The higher the time for the materials to move through the pipeline the larger the pipel...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls More Documents &...

23

Copy of FINAL SG Demo Project List 11 13 09-External.xls | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Copy of FINAL SG Demo Project List 11 13 09-External.xls More Documents & Publications Smart Grid Regional and Energy Storage Demonstration Projects: Awards Energy Storage...

24

WasteStreamForecast2010.xls  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Reporting Reporting Site Disposition Facility Field Stream ID Actual Dispos 2009 Starting Inventory 2010 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 to 2019 2020 to 2024 2025 to 2029 2030 to 2034 2035 to 2039 2040-50 1 Ames Energy Solutions-Clive (formerly Envirocare) 8020-01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.00 60.00 2 Argonne Area 5 LLW Disposal Unit (NTS) AEL105DOEa 55.12 50.45 72.36 29.22 29.22 29.22 29.22 29.22 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3 Argonne Area 5 LLW Disposal Unit (NTS) AEL106DOEa 0.38 0.07 0.09 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4 Argonne Area 5 LLW Disposal Unit (NTS) AE-L104DOE 0.19 10.85 11.19 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5 Argonne Area 5 LLW Disposal Unit (NTS) AEL103DOE 74.13 87.37 110.16 30.39 30.39 30.39 30.39 30.39 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6 Argonne Area 5 LLW Disposal Unit (NTS)

25

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 1. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides baseline inventories of transuranic wastes for the WIPP facility. Information on waste forms, forecasting of future inventories, and waste stream originators is also provided. A diskette is provided which contains the inventory database.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Forms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are in .pdf format) After Hours Access Policy After Hours Request Form Cleanroom Access Procedures for New Users Deposition Request Form Exit Form Flycutting Request Form Hot...

27

CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY Revision 1 10/31/07 Approved by: DOE Records Management Division, IM-23 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY 1. GENERAL. A records inventory is compiling a descriptive list of each record series or system, including the location of the records and any other pertinent data. A records inventory is not a list of each document or each folder. 2. DEFINE THE RECORDS INVENTORY GOAL(S). The goals of a records inventory should be to: a. Gather information for scheduling purposes; b. Prepare for conversion to other media or to identify the volume of classified and/or permanent records in your organization's custody; and c. Identify any existing shortcomings, deficiencies, or problems with

28

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - 5, 2005 FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION Models for Environmentally Models for Environmentally Sound and Economically Sound and Economically Viable Carbon Dioxide Viable Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Opportunities Sequestration Opportunities Timothy R. Carr, Alan P. Byrnes, Martin K. Dubois, Scott W. White & Richard G. Nelson May 2 - 5, 2005 FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION Kansas Approach * Inventory & Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Resources - Multiple Scales (Nation - Regional - Local - Single Source * Inventory & Evaluate Sequestration Opportunities - Multiple Scales (Nation -

29

2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory More Documents & Publications DOE FAIR 2007 (OMB).xls 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls...

30

stocked inventory.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

08 08 AUDIT REPORT STOCKED INVENTORY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES JUNE 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Stocked Inventory at the Savannah River Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) management and operating contractor at the Savannah River Site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), is responsible for managing the majority of the Department's missions and associated stocked inventory at the site. As of March 2001, Westinghouse maintained about

31

STABILITY OF PRODUCTION-INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEMS CONSIDERING INVENTORY SHORTAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STABILITY OF PRODUCTION-INVENTORY CONTROL SYSTEMS CONSIDERING INVENTORY SHORTAGES Jayendran@iitb.ac.in) Extended Abstract The modelling and analysis of the production-inventory control systems of manufacturing to examine the production and inventory dynamics is the application of system dynamics and control theoretic

Venkateswaran, Jayendran

32

Analysis and reduction of excess inventory at a heavy equipment manufacturing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this thesis explores two hypotheses focused on excess inventory at a heavy equipment manufacturing facility. The scope of the thesis includes inventory in the form of raw materials, purchased ...

Romanov, Alexander, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Media Inventory Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 1 of 5 8 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Media Inventory Control Document Number: ITTP-018 Rev. 09_0910 Document Owner: Janet Lee Backup Owner: Ben Aragon Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: Referenced Document(s): MGTP-003 Customer Property, ISDP-002 Training Production Process, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMP-003 Receiving/Inspection Process, ITTF-013 Media Requests ITTP-018 Media Inventory Control 11_0406 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release B Added use of ITTF-013, Media Requests (SMS Records) 08_0904 Changed Media Specialist to Online Learning support Specialist (OLSS). Modified process to better fit actual media request process.

34

Initial Radionuclide Inventories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as 2030 and 2033, depending on the type of waste. TSPA-LA uses the results of this analysis to decay the inventory to the year of repository closure projected for the year of 2060.

H. Miller

2004-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

With Mathematica Gasoline Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preprint 1 With Mathematica and J: Gasoline Inventory Simulation Cliff Reiter Computational for the number of gallons of gasoline sold by a station for a thousand weeks. The pattern involves demands with the delivery and storage of the gasoline and we desire not to run out of gasoline or exceed the station

Reiter, Clifford A.

36

Lecture outline Basic inventory problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lecture outline Basic inventory problems The economic order quantity An inventory game.B. Powell 1 #12;© 2013 W.B. Powell 2 Basic inventory problems Examples: » Products: · Customers consume). · Rainfall randomly replenishes reservoirs. · Release water from dam to maintain level. » Oil being stored

Powell, Warren B.

37

Brain Cluster Leiden -InventoryBrain Cluster Leiden -Inventory Inventory of organizations working inInventory of organizations working in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain Cluster Leiden - InventoryBrain Cluster Leiden - Inventory Inventory of organizations working brain Annelieke Hoenderkamp Leiden Bio Science Park foundation in assignment of Municipality of Leiden November 2011 #12;IntroductionIntroduction · The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Its

Galis, Frietson

38

CLEAN Inventory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN Inventory CLEAN Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Inventory There are a number of international efforts to provide assistance for the creation of low emission development plans and strategies including work on technology needs assessments (TNAs), Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), low carbon growth plans and roadmaps. This user-generated inventory presents many of these assistance efforts occurring internationally. The inventory was developed to provide information on relevant activities and tools that can inform and support future work. The goals of this inventory activity are to avoid duplication of effort, to promote efficient use of resources, to assess assistance gaps and to

39

HSS Information and Services Inventory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HSS Topical Areas HSS Topical Areas Quality Assurance Enforcement / Oversight Environment HSS Outreach and Communications HSPD-12 Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System (NMMSS) HSS Internal Operations Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) HSS Information and Services Inventory Web Site Priorities and Schedules The Office of Health, Safety and Security maintains an inventory of the HSS Website content as required by Section 207(f)(2) of the E-Government Act of 2002. This inventory is reviewed periodically for relevance and content update, and establishes a schedule for publishing information. HSS Information Inventory last updated: MAY 4, 2009 Priority 1: Required by law, regulation, Presidential directive, or other official directive or to ensure national security.

40

Inventory of miscellaneous streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miscellaneous streams discharging to the soil column on the Hanford Site are subject to requirements of several milestones identified in Consent Order No. DE 9INM-177 (Ecology and DOE 1991). The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Stream (DOE/RL-93-94) provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of miscellaneous streams to satisfy one of the Section 6.0 requirements of the Consent Order. One of the commitments (Activity 6-2.2) established in the plan and schedule is to annually update, the miscellaneous streams inventory. This document constitutes the 1998 revision of the miscellaneous streams inventory. Miscellaneous stream discharges were grouped into four permitting categories (Table 1). The first miscellaneous streams Permit (ST 4508) was issued May 30, 1997, to cover wastewater discharges from hydrotesting, maintenance, and construction activities. The second miscellaneous streams Permit (ST4509) covers discharges from cooling water and condensate discharges. The third permit application for category three waste streams was eliminated by recategorizing waste streams into an existing miscellaneous streams permit or eliminating stream discharges. Elimination of the third categorical permit application was approved by Ecology in January 1997 (Ecology 1997). The fourth permit application, to cover storm water, is due to Ecology in September 1998. Table 1 provides a history of the miscellaneous streams permitting activities.

Haggard, R.D.

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Marketing Case Inventory --1 Marketing Curriculum Case Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marketing Case Inventory -- 1 Marketing Curriculum Case Inventory AY 13-14 Case / Publisher / Case# Marketing Management ConsumerResearch MarketingStrategy MarketingResearch B2BMarketing Entrepreneurial Marketing BehavioralDecision Making SocialMedia&Digital Marketing Competitive Pricing AdvancedMarketing

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

42

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Pulverized Limestone for Benign in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Pulverized Limestone for Benign Ocean Storage D. Golomb, * E. Barry, D. Ryan, C. Lawton, P. Swett University of Massachusetts Lowell R. Warzinski, R. Lynn US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Abstract When ordinary seawater and liquid carbon dioxide are mixed in the presence of pulverized limestone (CaCO 3 ), a macro-emulsion is formed. The emulsion consists of liquid CO 2 droplets sheathed with a monolayer of calcite crystals dispersed in water. The sheath of crystals prevents the coalescence of the CO 2 droplets. The emulsion has a gross density that is greater than seawater, therefore upon release from a pipe the emulsion plume will sink deeper into the density-stratified ocean while entraining ambient

43

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

44

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance The Federal Energy Management Program provides performance data illustrating...

45

California Statewide Property Inventory Website | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inventory Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Statewide Property Inventory Website Abstract The Statewide Property...

46

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

47

Introduction: Landslide Inventories and Databases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is a short introduction to the Session B9 of the WLF3 entitled Inventory and Database with summarized overview of all contributions. Papers included in this part of the volume deals with landslide mappi...

Snjeana Mihali? Arbanas; Marko Komac

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

GRR/Section 18-HI-e - Chemical Inventory Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-HI-e - Chemical Inventory Reporting GRR/Section 18-HI-e - Chemical Inventory Reporting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-e - Chemical Inventory Reporting 18HIEHawaiiChemicalInventoryReportingProcedure.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18HIEHawaiiChemicalInventoryReportingProcedure.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Chemical Inventory Reporting 18-HI-e.1 to 18-HI-e.2 - Will the facility store, use or manufacture any

49

Fair Act Inventory | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fair Act Inventory Fair Act Inventory Fair Act Inventory This page provides guidance for submission of the DOE FAIR Act Inventory, or otherwise known as the Inherently Governmental Commercial Activities (IGCA) Inventory. This inventory will be used to respond to various reporting requirements including, but not limited to, the Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act of 1998, Public Law 105-270 (FAIR Act) and the inventory of inherently governmental activities required by OMB. OMB requires the submission of the IGCA Inventory in a specified electronic format. As a result, an updated version of the collection tool used last year is provided along with this guidance. This data collection tool is somewhat different than the tool used by OMB. However, the data fields can be easily converted to the OMB tool and will be completed by OPAM.

50

National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Agency for International Development Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/ghginventorycapacitybuilding/templ National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Screenshot References: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems[1]

51

Environmental management inventory of Galveston Bay. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to provide an inventory of those agencies and laws along with their associated regulations, that constitute the regulatory framework for environmental protection of Galveston Bay, one of the estuaries of national significance covered under the 1987 law. The inventory is largely descriptive, serving as the first phase in a larger project which will ultimately evaluate the effectiveness of the existing regulatory framework. That assessment in turn will form the basis for the Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan as well as for policy recommendations to improve the coordination of environmental management of the Bay.

Hadden, S.G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Inventory pre-positioning for humanitarian operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research examines the impact of inventory pre-positioning on humanitarian operations. The study identifies optimal locations for warehousing non-consumable inventories required for initial deployment of aid. These ...

Akkihal, Anup Roop

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROCUREMENT & ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROCUREMENT & ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT INHERENTLY GOVERNMENTAL AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES (IGCA) INVENTORY GUIDANCE Name Date Tel E-Mail Created by: Jeff Davis March 16, 2011 202-287-1877 Jeff.Davis@hq.doe.gov Modified by: i Table of Contents Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 1 Guide to Inventory Submission ............................................................................................................ 2 DOE FUNCTION CODES .............................................................................................................................. 2 CODING RULES FOR THE IGCA INVENTORY .............................................................................................. 3

54

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Service Contract Inventory Analysis 0 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Office of Procurement & Assistance Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) January 2012 (REVISED) FY2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Contents Page Section 1: Background 1 Section 2: Analysis and Findings 3 Section 3: Next Steps 5 FY2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy 1 Section 1: Background Section 743 of Division C of the FY 2010 Consolidated Appropriations Act, P.L. 111-117, requires civilian agencies to prepare an annual inventory of their service contracts. The Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) November 5, 2010 and December 19, 2012 Memorandums entitled, "Service Contract

56

Methods of valuing and pricing inventories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kracke, "Ualuation of Inventories;" The Control and Valuation of Inventories, p. 180, Montgomexy, Auditing Theory and. Practice, p, 151, $t may be seen that an asset may be an inventory item to one concern and a fixed asset to another, For example, a... find that the suppl1es inventories are insignificant and do not show them on the balance sheet. They charge them to expense at the time oi' purchase~ 10 VALUATION OF INVENTORIES I Accounting theory and, practice have evolved several methods...

Futch, George Peyton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 The United States currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal envisioned in a deep mined geologic repository. This report provides an estimate of potential waste inventory and waste form characteristics for the DOE used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx More Documents & Publications Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis

58

Monitoring the progress of emission inventories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L. [Exponent Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Chemical Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Inventory Chemical Inventory Use the following dropdown menus to filter the results for chemical records. To reset the results clear the entries and click "update". Facility - Any - SSRL LCLS Building - Any - 120 131 999 Room - Any - 109 113 209 257 Storage Area Storage Category Apply Title Facility Building Room Storage Area Storage Category Available to All Qty. Size Units Responsible Person 1,3-cyclohexadiene SSRL 131 209 CI L No 1 25 milliliters (ml) Tsu-Chien Weng 1,4- dioxane SSRL 120 257 CB1 L Yes 1 1 liters (l) Cynthia Patty 1,8-Octanedithiol SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 5 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Chloronapthalene SSRL 131 209 CA3 L No 1 100 grams (g) Schmidt 1-Propanol LCLS 999 109 B1 L Yes 1 4 liters (l) Lisa Hammon

60

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ANNUAL TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY REPORT - 2013 (Data Cutoff Date 12/31/2012) DOE/TRU-13-3425 Revision 0 October 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office DOE/TRU-13-3425 Page 1 of 392 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information PO Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 576-8401 Additional information about this document may be obtained by calling 1-800-336-9477. Unlimited, publicly available full-text scientific and technical reports produced since 1991 are available online at Information Bridge (www.osti.gov/bridge). U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors may obtain full-text reports produced prior to 1991 in paper form, for a processing fee, from:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742c2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9. TOTALS 9. TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC FORM 742C (7-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 8. BATCH DATA of Page Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 6 hours. This information is required by NRC to fulfill its safeguards responsibilities, bilateral agreements, and responsibilities as a participant in the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and

62

Optimization and optimality of a joint pricing and inventory control policy in periodic-review systems with lost sales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a periodic review dynamic pricing and inventory control problem with fixed ordering cost included. Demand is uncertain and price-sensitive in a general form. At the end of each period, all unmet demand is lost. We focus on the optimization ... Keywords: Inventory, Lost sales, Pricing, Setup cost

Ying Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Backorders Under the (R,r) Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Backorders Under the (R Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA) in the class of Make-to Stock (MTS) production-inventory systems regularity assumptions. The paper then analyzes the SFM counterpart and derives closed-form IPA derivative

64

IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/gpglulucf/gpglulucf_contents.html IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF Screenshot References: IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF[1] "This report on Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (GPG-LULUCF) is the response to the invitation by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to develop good practice

65

FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Service Contract Inventory Analysis 1 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan Department of Energy Office of Procurement & Assistance Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) December 2011 Department of Energy FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory Plan for Analysis The Department of Energy (DOE) approach will be performed in accordance with the criteria set out in Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010, (Pub. L. No. 111-117, § 743 (2009)) and Appendix D of the November 5, 2010 OMB Memorandum on Service Contract Inventories, and will ultimately identify contracts for a more in-depth review. DOE will develop the basic inventory in accordance with OMB guidance using FPDS-NG data to address a number of the inventory requirements consistent with the Consolidated Appropriations Act and collect

66

FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Service Contract Inventory Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan Department of Energy Office of Acquisition and Project Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) December 2012 Department of Energy FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory Plan for Analysis The Department of Energy (DOE) approach will be performed in accordance with the criteria set out in Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010, (Pub. L. No. 111-117, § 743 (2009)) and Appendix D of the November 5, 2010 OMB Memorandum on Service Contract Inventories, and will ultimately identify contracts for a more in-depth review. DOE will develop the basic inventory in accordance with OMB guidance using FPDS-NG data to address a number of the inventory requirements consistent with the Consolidated Appropriations Act. APM will

67

Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Tritium inventory tracking and management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation has identified a number of useful applications of the analysis of the tracking and management of the tritium inventory in the various subsystems and components in a DT fusion reactor system. Due to the large amounts of tritium that will need to be circulated within such a plant, and the hazards of dealing with the tritium an electricity generating utility may not wish to also be in the tritium production and supply business on a full time basis. Possible scenarios for system operation have been presented, including options with zero net increase in tritium inventory, annual maintenance and blanket replacement, rapid increases in tritium creation for the production of additional tritium supplies for new plant startup, and failures in certain system components. It has been found that the value of the tritium breeding ratio required to stabilize the storage inventory depends strongly on the value and nature of other system characteristics. The real operation of a DT fusion reactor power plant will include maintenance and blanket replacement shutdowns which will affect the operation of the tritium handling system. It was also found that only modest increases in the tritium breeding ratio are needed in order to produce sufficient extra tritium for the startup of new reactors in less than two years. Thus, the continuous operation of a reactor system with a high tritium breeding ratio in order to have sufficient supplies for other plants is not necessary. Lastly, the overall operation and reliability of the power plant is greatly affected by failures in the fuel cleanup and plasma exhaust systems.

Eichenberg, T.W.; Klein, A.C.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory - Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory Correction February 7, 2014 The was an...

70

National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable...

71

Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANNUAL TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY REPORT - 2013 (Data Cutoff Date 12312012) DOETRU-13-3425 Revision 1 February 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office DOE...

72

Projected radionuclide inventories of DWPF glass from current waste at time of production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the DWPF estimate the inventory of long-lived radionuclides present in the waste glass, and report the values in the Waste Form Qualification Report. In this report, conservative (biased high) estimates of the radionuclide inventory of glass produced from waste currently in the Tank Farm are provided. In most cases, these calculated values compare favorably with actual data. In those cases where the agreement is not good, the values reported here are conservative.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Projected radionuclide inventories of DWPF glass from current waste at time of production. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the DWPF estimate the inventory of long-lived radionuclides present in the waste glass, and report the values in the Waste Form Qualification Report. In this report, conservative (biased high) estimates of the radionuclide inventory of glass produced from waste currently in the Tank Farm are provided. In most cases, these calculated values compare favorably with actual data. In those cases where the agreement is not good, the values reported here are conservative.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing countries.

75

Soil & Crop Sciences Inventory & IP Information Request Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to safeguard against malicious code shall be installed and functioning on susceptible information resources

76

Random switching exponential smoothing and inventory forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exponential smoothing models represent an important prediction tool both in business and in macroeconomics. This paper provides the analytical forecasting properties of the random coefficient exponential smoothing model in the multiple source of error framework. The random coefficient state-space representation allows for switching between simple exponential smoothing and local linear trend. Therefore it enables controlling, in a flexible manner, the random changing dynamic behavior of the time series. The paper establishes the algebraic mapping between the state-space parameters and the implied reduced form ARIMA parameters. In addition, it shows that the parametric mapping allows overcoming the difficulties that are likely to emerge in estimating directly the random coefficient state-space model. Finally, it presents an empirical application comparing the forecast accuracy of the suggested model vis--vis other benchmark models, both in the ARIMA and in the exponential smoothing class. Using time series relative to wholesalers inventories in the USA, the out-of-sample results show that the reduced form of the random coefficient exponential smoothing model tends to be superior to its competitors.

Giacomo Sbrana; Andrea Silvestrini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG UNIVERSITYGHG Report - FY10 3 Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people Oil: Amber Sams · Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Davion Reese · First Student: Brian Maxwell · Good Company

Escher, Christine

78

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program #12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many - First Student: Brian Maxwell - Carson Oil: Gena Conner Government Organizations - Baker County: Jason

Escher, Christine

79

A Stochastic Perishable Inventory System with Random Supply Quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers a continuous review perishable inventory system with demands ar-rive according to a Markovian arrival process (MAP). We model, in this paper, the situation in which not all the ordered items are usable and the supply may contain a fraction of defec-tive items. The number of usable items is a random quantity. We consider a modified (s, S) policy which allows a finite number of pending order to be placed. We assume full back-logging of demands that occurred during stock out periods and that the recent backlogged demand may renege the system after an exponentially distributed amount of time. The limiting distribution of the inventory level is derived and shown to have matrix geometric form. The measures of system performance in the steady state are derived.

Paul Manuel; A. Shophia Lawrence; G. Arivarignan

80

High Crude Prices Go With Low Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: As global production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of "over supply" in 1998 to one of "under supply" in 1999 and 2000. Inventories are a good means of seeing the imbalance between petroleum production and demand. For example, when production exceeds demand, inventories rise. A large oversupply will put downward pressure on prices, while undersupply will cause prices to rise. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world balance. OECD inventories rose to very high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices plummeted to almost $10 in December 1998. However, when inventories fell to the low levels seen above during 1999 and early 2000 as demand exceeded production, prices rose to $35 per barrel at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Inventory Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the basis for a compilation of inventory for radioactive contaminants of interest by year for all potentially impactive waste sites on the Hanford Site for which inventory data exist in records or could be reasonably estimated. This document also includes discussions of the historical, current, and reasonably foreseeable (1944 to 2070) future radioactive waste and waste sites; the inventories of radionuclides that may have a potential for environmental impacts; a description of the method(s) for estimating inventories where records are inadequate; a description of the screening method(s) used to select those sites and contaminants that might make a substantial contribution to impacts; a listing of the remedial actions and their completion dates for waste sites; and tables showing the best estimate inventories available for Hanford assessments.

Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Miley, Terri B.; Nelson, Iral C.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Evans, John C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

83

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

84

Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment of Material from Building 3019 Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment of Material from...

85

Joint pricing and inventory control under reference price effects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In many firms the pricing and inventory control functions are separated. However, a number of theoretical models suggest a joint determination of inventory levels and (more)

Gimpl-Heersink, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

87

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools) Jump to:...

88

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability. GHG INVENTORY DESIGN .............................................................................. 6 ................................................................................................................................. 6 2.2. GHG EMISSION SOURCES

Brownstone, Rob

89

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inventory Data) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Data AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate...

90

UNFCCC Individual Reviews of GHG Inventories | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reviews of GHG Inventories Jump to: navigation, search Name UNFCCC Individual Reviews of GHG Inventories AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Framework Convention on Climate...

91

PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) This document lists the...

92

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Review Training Program) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Training materials Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/inventory_review_t UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Screenshot References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program The Basic Course of the updated training programme covers technical aspects of the review of GHG inventories under the Convention. It consists of seven modules, including a general module and six individual modules on the

93

McGILL UNIVERSITY BIKE RACK INVENTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McGILL UNIVERSITY BIKE RACK INVENTORY DOWNTOWN CAMPUS 09.2012 #12;McGILL UNIVERSITY BIKE RACK RACK INVENTORY MAP - ZONE A DOWNTOWN CAMPUS 2012 #12;32 32 6xA-8, 4xC-11 11 40 8 1xA-8 32 16 24 1xG-8 16 11 1xA-8 7xC-11 16 54 8 8 8 32 48 40 12 16 2xA-8 1xA-8 22 McGILL UNIVERSITY BIKE RACK INVENTORY

Kambhampati, Patanjali

94

Transuranic waste baseline inventory report. Revision No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties from across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system into a series of {open_quotes}waste profiles{close_quotes} that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The purpose of Revisions 0 and 1 of this report was to provide data to be included in the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) performance assessment (PA) processes for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revision 2 of the document expanded the original purpose and was also intended to support the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) requirement for providing the total DOE TRU waste inventory. The document included a chapter and an appendix that discussed the total DOE TRU waste inventory, including nondefense, commercial, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-contaminated, and buried (predominately pre-1970) TRU wastes that are not planned to be disposed of at WIPP.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Inventory of state energy models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

97

The Quebec Life Cycle Inventory Database Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) in Quebec (Canada) is increasingly important. Yet, ... life cycle inventory (LCI) data. The Quebec government invested in the creation of a Quebec LCI database. The approach is to work...

Pascal Lesage; Rjean Samson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mobile RFID system for inventory automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As RFID technology proliferates within the industry, more added value applications employing RFID technology are being created. One main application is inventory tracking where RFID technology is used to create a visibility ...

Ong, JinHock

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information...

100

Materials System Inventory Management Practices at Washington...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Materials System Inventory Management Practices at Washington River Protection Solutions OAS-M-15-01 January 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optimization of surgical supply inventory and kitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project centered on inventory optimization for operative custom surgical packs and soft good supplies for Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a 947-bed medical center. Custom surgical packs are used in every surgical ...

Schlanser, Matthew R. (Matthew Ross)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

FY13 Energy Department Federal Program Inventory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Per the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Modernization Act, DOE's Federal Program Inventory (FPI) is part of a Federal-wide program list intended to facilitate coordination by making...

103

National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory MARCH 1984 Wetlands of the United States: Current Status and Recent, Childers, Tiner, USFWS #12;WETLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES : CURRENT STATUS AND RECENT TRENDS by Ralph W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What Is A Wetland

104

2011 & 2012 Queen's University Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 & 2012 Queen's University Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory Summary Queen's University completes annual GHG inventories as part of the ongoing commitment to reduce GHG emissions and address climate in 2010. This is the fourth inventory report. This inventory report accounts for GHG emissions from

Abolmaesumi, Purang

105

Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOEs 1997 Notice 440.1, Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease. After DOEs issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNLs Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Sites program. This document reconstructs PNNLs baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

Johnson, Michelle Lynn

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/training_material/metho Cost: Free References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Visit the website for GHG inventory training materials, software support

107

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/training_material/metho Cost: Free References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials

108

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Training materials Website: unfccc.int/national_reports/annex_i_ghg_inventories/inventory_review_t UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program Screenshot References: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program[1] Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program The Basic Course of the updated training programme covers technical aspects of the review of GHG inventories under the Convention. It consists of seven modules, including a general module and six individual modules on the review of individual IPCC sectors.

109

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing

110

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

N:\\My Documents\\porfin.pdf | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

N:My Documentsporfin.pdf&0; N:My Documentsporfin.pdf&0; More Documents & Publications 3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls&0; OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls...

112

Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding technetium (Tc) inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanfords 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into a final waste form; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other "pools" such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. A thorough understanding of the inventory for mobile contaminants is key to any performance or risk assessment for Hanford Site facilities because potential groundwater and river contamination levels are proportional to the amount of contaminants disposed at the Hanford Site. Because the majority of the total 99Tc produced at Hanford (~32,600 Ci) is currently stored in Hanfords 177 tanks (~26,500 Ci), there is a critical need for knowledge of the fate of this 99Tc as it is removed from the tanks and processed into a final solid waste form. Current flow sheets for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant process show most of the 99Tc will be immobilized as low-activity waste glass that will remain on the Hanford Site and disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); only a small fraction will be shipped to a geologic repository with the immobilized high-level waste. Past performance assessment studies, which focused on groundwater protection, have shown that 99Tc would be the primary dose contributor to the IDF performance.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rapko, Brian M.

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Notice of Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM) Removal Request for Correction of Online ACM Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(s) for Removal: Materials Removed (attach additional pages as necessary): Room Number Description, size, colorNotice of Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM) Removal and Request for Correction of Online ACM Inventory This form is to be completed for all asbestos abatement/removal work at the University of Maryland

Rubloff, Gary W.

114

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

115

Object-oriented inventory classes: Comparison of implementations in KEE and CLOS (Common Lisp Object System)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modeling of manufacturing processes can be cast in a form which relies heavily on stores to and draws from object-oriented inventories, which contain the functionalities imposed on them by the other objects (including other inventories) in the model. These concepts have been implemented, but with some difficulties, for the particular case of pyrochemical operations at the DOE's Rocky Flats Plant using KEE, a frame-oriented expert system shell. An alternative implementation approach using CLOS (the emerging Common Lisp Object System) has been explored and found to give significant simplifications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Silbar, R.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Forecasting for inventory control with exponential smoothing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exponential smoothing, often used in sales forecasting for inventory control, has always been rationalized in terms of statistical models that possess errors with constant variances. It is shown in this paper that exponential smoothing remains appropriate under more general conditions, where the variance is allowed to grow or contract with corresponding movements in the underlying level. The implications for estimation and prediction are explored. In particular, the problem of finding the predictive distribution of aggregate lead-time demand, for use in inventory control calculations, is considered using a bootstrap approach. A method for establishing order-up-to levels directly from the simulated predictive distribution is also explored.

Ralph D. Snyder; Anne B. Koehler; J.Keith Ord

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ARM - VAP Suggestion Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsVAP Suggestion Form ProductsVAP Suggestion Form Showcase Data ARM Best Estimate Data Products (ARMBE) This is a collection of data products that represents "best estimates" derived from several instruments and/or VAPs. We are interested in your feedback; please contact us. VAP Update Information on new, existing, and future value-added products for July-September 2013 is now available. Have a VAP idea? Use this form to let us know. Datastream Status Further details on the status of VAPs being processed or developed, can be found at on the ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Status web page. Use the Data File Inventory tool to view VAP data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Suggestion Form

118

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: ncsp.undp.org/document/managing-national-greenhouse-gas-inventory-proc Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Screenshot References: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process[1] The objective of the handbook is to provide non-AnnexI Parties with a strategic and logical approach to a sustainable inventory process. About "The handbook was developed by United Nations Development Programme with

119

AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUAL FOR AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES IN SWEDEN NILS YEAR for aerial photo interpretation 1 www-nils.slu.se SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics. 901 83 Umeå, Sweden #12;NILS ­ manual for aerial photo interpretation 2 Table of contents 1 About NILS

120

INEEL Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Trend Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the INEEL GHG Inventory and Trend Analysis is to establish INEEL expertise in carbon management decision making and policy analysis. This FY-99 effort is the first step toward placing the INEEL in a leadership role within the DOE laboratories to support carbon management systems and analysis.

Shropshire, David Earl; Teel, Dale Milton

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bayesian decision-making in inventory modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......by means of a Bayesian approach with a suitably chosen...demand distribu- tion. Management Science 31, 1150-1160. AZOURY...non-Bayesian inventory models. Management Science 30,993-1003...K. 1990 A Bayesian approach to the two-period style-goods......

ROGER M. HILL

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Large neighborhood search for LNG inventory routing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is steadily becoming a common mode for commercializing natural gas. Due to the capital intensive nature of LNG projects, the optimal design of LNG supply chains is extremely important from a profitability perspective. Motivated ... Keywords: LNG, Liquefied natural gas, Maritime inventory routing, Ship schedule optimization

Vikas Goel; Kevin C. Furman; Jin-Hwa Song; Amr S. El-Bakry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides links to progress data tables illustrating Federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by the Federal agencies.

124

State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The focus of this inventory, some of which has been placed into a searchable spreadsheet, is to support the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and to research cost information in state-mandated energy efficiency program evaluations e.g., for use in updating analytic and modeling assumptions used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

4 Inventory of Existing Activities Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

element of the subbasin plans. The following section summarizes agency program, management and regulatory. This subbasin plan's inventory of projects includes projects from the last ten years. An extensive effort presented in this section is specifically designed to provide context for subbasin planners and to reduce

126

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

127

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY More Documents & Publications Records Management Handbook Records Management Handbook Information and Records Management Transition Guidance...

128

Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

US Forest Service - Annonymous,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Market Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complement past returns when predicting return reversals. A portfolio long high-inventory/low-return stocks and short low-inventory/high-return stocks yields 1.05% over the following 5 days. Order imbalancesMarket Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott U.C. Berkeley Mark S. Seasholes U

Kearns, Michael

130

Inventory management with dynamic Bayesian network software systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory management with dynamic Bayesian network software systems Mark Taylor1 and Charles Fox2 1.fox@sheffield.ac.uk Abstract. Inventory management at a single or multiple levels of a supply chain is usually performed-the-shelf graphical software systems. We show how such sys- tems may be deployed to model a simple inventory problem

Barker, Jon

131

April 2004. The Interest Rate, Learning, and Inventory Investment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confirm our predictions and show a highly significant long-run relationship between inventoriesApril 2004. The Interest Rate, Learning, and Inventory Investment Louis J. Maccini Bartholomew@ccs.carleton.ca [JEL Classification: E22. Keywords: Inventories, Interest Rates, Learning] We thank Heidi Portuondo

Niebur, Ernst

132

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 On March 11, 2008, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman signed a policy statement1 on the management of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory (Policy Statement). This Policy Statement provides the framework within which DOE will make decisions concerning future use and disposition of this inventory. The Policy Statement commits DOE to manage those inventories in a manner that: (1) is consistent with all applicable legal requirements; (2) maintains sufficient uranium inventories at all times to meet the current and reasonably foreseeable needs of DOE missions; (3) undertakes transactions involving non-U.S. Government entities in a transparent and competitive manner, unless the Secretary of

134

DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Excess Uranium Inventory Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Plan DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan December 16, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) today issued its Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan (the Plan), which outlines the Department's strategy for the management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. The Plan highlights DOE's ongoing efforts to enhance national security and promote a healthy domestic nuclear infrastructure through the efficient and cost-effective management of its excess uranium inventories. The Department has a significant inventory of uranium that is excess to national defense needs and is expensive both to manage and secure. "The Plan provides the general public and interested stakeholders more

135

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department's surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical environmental cleanup and national security missions. The Plan is not a commitment to specific activities beyond those that have already been contracted nor is it a restriction on actions that the Department may undertake in the future as a result of changing conditions. It replaces an earlier plan issued in 2008 and reflects updated information on the Department of Energy's management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan More Documents & Publications

136

IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Agency/Company /Organization: World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials References: 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories[1] Logo: IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories "The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 Guidelines) were produced at the invitation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change(UNFCCC) to update the Revised 1996 Guidelines and associated good practice guidance which provide internationally agreed

137

Building GHGs National Inventory Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHGs National Inventory Systems GHGs National Inventory Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Building GHGs National Inventory Systems - Capacity Development for National GHG´s Inventories in Non-Annex I Countries Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The forthcoming climate regime will include a global mechanism called REDD - Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Each developing country must draw up a Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHG Inventory)

138

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. At the end of December, crude oil stocks were near 289 million barrels, about 4% below the 5-year average, and slightly higher than at the end of 1999. The latest weekly data, for the week ending January 19, show U.S. crude oil stocks at 286 million barrels, just about a million barrels above their level a year ago. Near-term tightness in U.S. crude oil markets have kept current prices above forward prices, reflecting current strength in crude oil demand relative to supply. Relatively strong U.S. oil demand next year should keep crude oil

139

FY 2007 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

08 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES 08 FAIR ACT INVENTORY REASON CODES Office of Procurement and Assistance Management A The Commercial Activity is not appropriate for private sector performance pursuant to a written determination by the CSO. B The Commercial Activity is suitable for a streamlined or standard competition. D The Commercial Activity is performed by government personnel as the result of a standard or streamlined competition (or a cost comparison, streamlined cost comparison, or direct conversion) within the past five years. D1 Graphics FTEs representing the implemented MEO resulting from the 2002-2003 Competitive Sourcing Studies. D2 Financial Services FTEs representing the implemented MEO resulting from the 2002-2003 Competitive Sourcing Studies. D3 NNSA Logistics FTEs representing the implemented MEO resulting from the 2002-2003 Competitive Sourcing Studies.

140

U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Total distillate stocks rose only marginally in November, to about 117 million barrels from about 115 million barrels at the end of October. The "normal" or average inventory level at end November is 146 million barrels. Thus, by the end of November, instead of seeing an improvement, US distillate inventories were 30 million barrels less than normal rather than the 26 million barrels less as of the end of October, indicating greater tightness in markets for heating oil and diesel fuel. If the currently depressed level of distillate stocks continues, the result could be strong upward pressure on prices for the distillate fuels through the winter. In fact, the tightness in distillate markets, particularly in the Northeast, has worsened and left the heating oil market more vulnerable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Like the rest of the OECD countries, US petroleum inventories are low and Like the rest of the OECD countries, US petroleum inventories are low and are not expected to recover to the normal range this winter. Preliminary data for the end of October indicate it may be the lowest level for crude oil stocks in the United States since weekly data began being collected in 1982, when crude oil inputs to refineries were about 3-4 million barrels per day less than today. U.S. crude oil stocks stood at about 283 million barrels on November 3, according to EIA's latest weekly survey. This puts them about 21 million barrels or 7% below the level seen at the same time last year. Current market conditions do suggest some improvement in the near term. Days supply of commercial crude oil stocks in the United States is estimated to have been 19 days in October, the lowest for that month since

142

Savannah River Site 1991 Road Erosion Inventory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 28 pp. Abstract - This paper explains the rationale and results of a 1991 road erosion inventory conducted by members of the USDA Forest Service Savannah River (FS-SR) and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The inventory provided information for the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) to justify the need for developing an erosion and sediment control program with appropriate funding, personnel, and equipment. Federally managed since the early 1950s, the SRS is located on 198,344 acres (80,301 hectares) in the South Carolina counties of Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale. Located along the eastern border of the Savannah River, the SRS is located within the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains of South Carolina.

Jones, Cliff.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

144

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

145

Department of Homeland Security Inventory DHS_inventory_form_revision_4_2011.doc Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-90-3 Phosphorus oxychloride 10025-87-3 Phosphorus trichloride 7719-12-2 Thiodiglycol 111-48-8 #12;Department feet) Acetylene 74-86-2 Ammonia (anhydrous) 7664-41-7 Arsine 7784-42-1 Boron trichloride 10294-77-4 Diborane 19287-45-7 Dichlorosilane 4109-96-0 Dinitrogen tetroxide 10544-72-6 Fluorine 7782-41-4 Germane

Pawlowski, Wojtek

146

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

147

Time (in)consistency of multistage distributionally robust inventory ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study these phenomena in the context of managing an inventory over time, ...... the same transition kernel every time a given state (and action, depending on

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

CESP Tool 4.2: Activity Inventory Template  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

CESP Tool 4.2: Activity Inventory Template from the Step 4: Assess the Current Energy Profile, Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

149

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability ................................................................................................................................. 6 1.2. GHG EMISSION SOURCES .............................................................................................................. 7 1.3. REPORTED GHG EMISSIONS

Brownstone, Rob

150

Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework...

151

UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: unfccc.intghgdata...

152

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols The Magnesium Industry Partnership's SF6 emissions tracking and reporting software tool (Excel based) can be accessed by visiting the Partnership's...

153

2008 DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste Inventory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management >> National Spent Nuclear Fuel INL Logo Search 2008 DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste Inventory Content Goes Here Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL...

154

CESP Tool 7.1: Financing Inventory Template  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

CESP Tool 7.1: Financing Inventory Template from Step 7: Put Together a Financing Strategy, Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

155

Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova Second National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy, Land Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Country Moldova Eastern Europe References UNDP National Communications Support Program[1] "Key Lessons Learned From The Process of Preparing Moldova's SNC 1. National experts stated that IPCC default Emission Factors (EFs) were sometimes inappropriate for sources highly dependent on local conditions. Active involvement of key stakeholders and relevant organizations made it possible for Moldova to develop local EFs for prioritized key sources;

156

BCM 1 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Equipment Inventory 1 Equipment Inventory « Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Title Equipment Type Description Agilent 8453 UV-Vis Spectrophotometer Analytical Agilent 8453 UV-VIS diode-array spectrophotometer. Wavelength range 190-1100 nm with a 1 nm optical slit width. Disposable plastic cuvettes are available in the lab, and quartz cuvettes and microcuvettes are available on a check-out basis. Beckman GPKR Centrifuge Centrifuge Beckman GPKR refrigerated centrifuge with fixed angle rotor, 8000 rpm max speed, temperature range -10°C to 40°C, fits 50mL tubes. Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter The Corning 430 pH meter is designed to handle laboratory applications from the most routine to the highly complex. Encased in spill-resistant housings and feature chemical-resistant, sealed keypad. Model 430 (pH range 0.00 to 14.00) is a basic, yet reliable meter providing accurate, efficient digital measurements. Offers simplified, four-button operation, automatic calibration and temperature compensation, % slope readout, self-diagnostics test on powerup and analog recorder output. Unique LCD shows pH, mV

157

S:\\csa\\Admin\\A3\\FORMS\\Pharmacy\\OTC Order Sheet.xls Page 1 UHS Ph aarm cy UHS Pharmacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antidiarrheals ALLERGY, COUGH, COLD Loperamide (Imodium AD) Tabs 2mg ALLERGY, COUGH, COLD Loperamide (Imodium

Kammen, Daniel M.

158

Natural Resources Inventories A Guide for New Hampshire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Lands (DRED), and the USDA Forest Service - State and Private Forestry. The University of New HampshireNatural Resources Inventories A Guide for New Hampshire Communities and Conservation Groups Natural for New Hampshire Communities and Conservation Groups #12;#12;Natural Resources: An Inventory Guide for NH

New Hampshire, University of

159

Assessment of Learning Outcomes Using a Mathematical Reasoning Concept Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Learning Outcomes Using a Mathematical Reasoning Concept Inventory Svetlana V Using a Mathematical Reasoning Concept Inventory Svetlana V. Drachova-Strang Jason O. Hallstrom Rich Pak@denison.edu ABSTRACT Undergraduate CS students need to learn analytical reasoning skills to develop high quality

Hallstrom, Jason

160

Assessment of Learning Outcomes Using a Mathematical Reasoning Concept Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Learning Outcomes Using a Mathematical Reasoning Concept Inventory Svetlana Drachova Reasoning Concept Inventory Svetlana V. Drachova Jason O. Hallstrom Murali Sitaraman Clemson University analytical reasoning skills to develop high quality software and to understand why the software they develop

Hallstrom, Jason

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Dynamic Stochastic Inventory Management with Reference Price Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Stochastic Inventory Management with Reference Price Effects Xin Chen Department in which demand depends on not only the current selling price but also a memory-based reference price. Pricing and inventory decisions are made simultane- ously at the beginning of each period. Assuming all

Chen, Xin

162

BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS Carmen M. Benkovitz Atmospheric-5000 March 2001 To be presented at the International Workshop on Emissions ofChemical Species and Aerosols perspectives accurate inventories of emissions of the trace species at the appropriate spatial, temporal

163

Titan's Inventory of Organic Surface Materials Ralph D. Lorenz1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Titan's Inventory of Organic Surface Materials Ralph D. Lorenz1,* , Karl L. Mitchell2 , Randolph observations now permit an initial assessment of the inventory of two classes, presumed to be organic, of Titan observed, of which dozens are each estimated to contain more hydrocarbon liquid than the entire known oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

164

1997 toxic chemical release inventory -- Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid.

Zaloudek, D.E.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

table10.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,112 1,079 1,014 979 1,067 1,143 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast........................... 1,044 972 917 886 982 1,027 New England....................... 1,019 972 942 911 1,006 1,086 Middle Atlantic .................. 1,054 971 909 877 973 1,001 Midwest ............................ 1,104 1,070 1,016 1,008 1,104 1,176 East North Central................ 1,082 1,025 996 1,008 1,102 1,164 West North Central ............... 1,149 1,163 1,062 1,008 1,110 1,205 South............................... 1,178 1,137 1,046 1,008 1,109 1,193 South Atlantic.................... 1,177 1,099 1,028 963 1,111 1,146 East South Central................ 1,160 1,164 1,036 1,083 1,167 1,273 West South Central................ 1,192 1,185 1,081 1,033 1,073 1,244 West................................

166

b28.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 15 33 Q 9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 5 13 Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 3 Q 2 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 141 172 14 24 Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 94 68 Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 282

167

b16.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 15,492 6,166 7,803 10,989 7,934 6,871 9,528 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,659 1,264 689 155 Q Q N 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 3,323 1,373 1,109 689 Q Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 4,006 2,075 2,456 2,113 692 Q N 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,222 836 1,327 2,920 1,648 667 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 704 291 1,157 2,865 2,151 1,518 371 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 804 Q Q 1,558 2,014 2,455 1,452 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q Q Q 533 1,077 1,706 2,571 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N Q Q Q 5,087 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

168

b4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 233 493 696 571 874 348 553 299 580 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 127 237 369 356 457 215 294 165 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 48 101 117 97 189 56 116 56 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 37 90 122 75 139 51 88 54 81 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 10 26 44 27 47 15 26 14 32 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 21 24 10 21 10 18 5 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 3 12 12 5 16 Q 8 Q 6 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 2 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 Q 1 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

169

table13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

736 736 722 550 650 668 787 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 731 NA 532 660 647 766 New England........................................................ 706 NA 526 687 637 810 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 740 NA 534 651 651 746 Midwest ................................................................. 738 NA 539 651 644 793 East North Central............................................... 751 NA 539 650 639 792 West North Central ............................................. 714 NA 538 654 656 793 South..................................................................... 758 NA 575 663 673 776 South Atlantic.......................................................

170

b23.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 63,343 63,307 43,468 15,157 5,443 2,853 7,076 1,401 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,362 6,346 3,084 600 Q Q 806 199 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 6,212 6,197 3,692 716 Q Q 725 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 11,370 11,370 7,053 966 289 Q 1,014 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,385 8,385 6,025 825 369 240 638 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 9,031 9,031 6,683 1,740 574 332 925 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 9,018 9,018 6,645 2,927 1,399 793 989 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 7,056 7,051 5,679 3,400 1,018 495 1,165 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,908 5,908 4,606 3,981 1,693 822 Q Q Principal Building Activity

171

b41.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,776 1,683 1,155 2,301 240 729 4,264 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,331 1,388 1,440 1,958 332 1,722 4,732 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,339 993 1,158 2,259 793 2,366 4,504 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,565 1,136 1,273 1,223 495 3,023 3,834 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,591 569 1,334 1,095

172

a2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North North east Mid- west South West All Buildings North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .................................... 4,859 761 1,305 1,873 920 71,658 13,995 18,103 26,739 12,820 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 374 728 985 499 6,922 1,059 1,908 2,618 1,337 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 155 228 386 179 7,033 1,169 1,676 2,844 1,343 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 138 211 308 152 12,659 2,122 3,317 4,859 2,361 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 39 75 96 50 9,382 1,388 2,712 3,474 1,808 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 31 35 58 22 10,291 2,272 2,376 4,059 1,584 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 15 18 30 10 10,217 2,238 2,486 4,140 1,353 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

173

table6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 .4 9.9 10.2 10.6 11.4 12.0 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 9.5 NA 10.3 10.9 11.3 11.9 New England........................................................ 9.6 NA 10.2 11.4 11.1 12.3 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 9.5 NA 10.3 10.8 11.3 11.7 Midwest ................................................................. 9.2 NA 10.0 10.5 11.6 11.9 East North Central............................................... 9.3 NA 10.1 10.7 11.6 11.9 West North Central ............................................. 8.8 NA 9.8 10.0 11.8 11.9 South..................................................................... 9.7 NA 10.6 10.8 11.7 12.4 South Atlantic.......................................................

174

b11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lodging Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Inpatient Outpatient All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 386 226 297 8 121 142 443 Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food

175

a6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

71,658 71,658 6,922 7,033 12,659 9,382 10,291 10,217 7,494 7,660 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ....................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 3,163 165 280 313 157 364 395 514 973 Inpatient .......................................... 1,905 N N Q Q Q Q 467 973 Outpatient ....................................... 1,258 165 280 312 Q 206 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 5,096 99 160 631 803 841 930 1,185 Q Mercantile ......................................... 11,192 771 1,173 2,409 1,291 1,505 1,677 462 1,905 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 4,317 638

176

b34.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 178 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 663 523 498 2,962 64,783 4,756 6,850 8,107 45,071 Table B34. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 570 353 292 1,921 25,981 3,237 3,336 2,534 16,875 Two ................................................... 1,031 70 135 111 714 16,270 862 2,027 1,643 11,739 Three ................................................

177

c5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71 71 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 148 228 250 150 1,972 3,098 4,378 2,087 75.3 73.6 57.2 71.7 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 106 247 205 114 1,292 2,567 3,168 1,643 82.4 96.3 64.8 69.4 50,001 to 100,000 ........................... 203 212 255 89 2,040 2,260 3,435 1,322 99.4 93.6 74.3 67.6 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 209 252 375 97 2,117 2,296 3,475 1,177 98.8 109.8 107.9 82.7 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 189 244 191 100 1,781 2,196 1,914 1,286 106.3 111.1 99.9 78.1 Over 500,000 ..................................

178

c32.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

571 571 871 427 12,097 19,763 11,608 47.2 44.1 36.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .................................. 85 98 59 1,222 1,214 648 69.5 81.0 91.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................ 56 90 56 1,131 1,733 828 49.8 51.9 67.7 10,001 to 25,000 .............................. 103 141 57 2,392 2,909 1,752 42.9 48.4 32.3 25,001 to 50,000 .............................. 90 102 58 1,827 2,700 1,498 49.3 37.7 38.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 68 112 57 1,636 3,178 1,869 41.4 35.1 30.5 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 63 120 59 1,501 2,745 2,399 42.0 43.6 24.5 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 45 104 50 1,496 2,748 1,435 30.1 37.8 34.8 Over 500,000 ................................... 62 105 Q 893 2,535 Q 69.1 41.4 Q Principal Building Activity Education .........................................

179

january2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, November 2007 was the twenty-fifth warmest November over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 3.3 percent below the average for the month of November, but 11.6 percent higher than what was recorded in a fairly mild November 2006. In November 2007, electricity generation was 1.4 percent higher than what was observed in November 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 2.6 percent when compared to November 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to generation is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas.

180

natgas1980.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Member Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168 Midwest 15.5 12.4 29.4 164 70 131.6 46 586 0.25 470 165 East North Central 10.9 8.5 20.0 175 75 136.5 47 646 0.28 503 174 West North Central 4.6 3.9 9.4 141 59 120.0 44 456 0.19 389 143 South 13.3 11.4 21.1 99 53 84.4 30 389 0.21 333 118 South Atlantic 4.9 3.8 8.3 111 51 87.5 30 519 0.24 408 140 East South Central 2.3 2.0 3.7 102 55 86.4 33 371 0.2 314 119 West South Central 6.1 5.5 9.1 89 54 81.1 29 306 0.19 279 99 West 11.9 9.4 19.3 91 44 71.9 26

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

sup_rci.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.38 10.71 11.03 11.32 11.60 11.83 12.09 12.35 12.60 12.86 13.13 13.39 13.64 Electric Other 21.53 21.59 21.64 21.69 21.72 21.78 21.87 21.96 22.07 22.18 22.30 22.41 22.53 Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Natural Gas Other 59.99 60.71 61.44 62.11 62.81 63.56 64.34 65.12 65.90 66.68 67.46 68.22 68.97 Distillate 8.02 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 4.95 5.00 5.03 5.05 5.08 5.12 5.17 5.21 5.26 5.31 5.36 5.41 5.45 Kerosene 0.82 0.81 0.80 0.79 0.78 0.77 0.76 0.75 0.75 0.74 0.74 0.74 0.73 Wood Stoves 2.05 2.05 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.00 1.99 1.98 1.97 1.96 1.95 1.94 1.94 Geothermal Heat Pumps 0.06 0.07 0.09 0.10 0.12 0.13 0.15

182

november2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: September 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data September is a transitional month between summer and fall, when decreased electricity use coincides with a decline in cooling demand. In contrast to recent Septembers, which have been warmer than normal, cooling and heating degree days for September 2006 were each within 10 percent of the norm. In September 2006, cooling degree days were 35.0 percent lower than September 2005 and 57.1 percent lower than August 2006. The changes in temperature translated into a 5.2 percent decline in September 2006 net electricity generation when compared to September 2005, and an 18.2 percent decline when compared to August 2006. Similarly, September 2006 retail sales of electricity

183

P4.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P4. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, Ranked by State, 2011 P4. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, Ranked by State, 2011 United States 1,095,628 United States e 24,036,351 United States f 2,062,932 United States 331,646 1 Wyoming 438,673 Texas 7,112,863 Texas 531,524 Iowa 87,314 2 West Virginia 134,785 Louisiana 3,029,206 Alaska 204,829 Nebraska 47,120 3 Kentucky 108,971 Wyoming 2,159,422 California 193,691 Illinois 30,068 4 Pennsylvania 59,899 Oklahoma 1,888,870 North Dakota 152,985 Minnesota 27,536 5 Texas 45,904 Colorado 1,637,576 Oklahoma 76,681 South Dakota 24,850 6 Montana 42,008 Pennsylvania 1,310,592 New Mexico 71,274 Indiana 22,547 7 Illinois 37,938 New Mexico 1,237,303 Louisiana 68,984 Wisconsin 12,278 8 Indiana 37,544 Arkansas 1,072,212 Wyoming 54,710 Ohio 10,811 9 North Dakota 28,231 Utah 457,525 Kansas 41,503 Kansas 10,676 10 Ohio 28,175 West Virginia 394,125 Colorado

184

october2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: August 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Year-to-date net electric generation through August 2006 was 0.8 percent higher compared to year-to-date generation through August 2005. Comparing month-to-month, August 2006 net generation was 0.1 percent higher than August 2005, and 2.4 percent lower than July 2006. The higher net generation above last year was influenced by a continued strong economy and warmer than normal August weather. The index of industrial production was 4.7 percent higher comparing August 2006 to August 2005, but eased down, by 0.2 percent, between July 2006 and August 2006. Setting a new high, the national average retail price of electricity for August 2006 was 9.52 cents per kilowatthour. Comparing year-to-

185

september2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: July 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the United States had its second hottest July on record due to a blistering heat wave throughout the country. The first seven months of 2006 was also the warmest on record in the Nation since recordkeeping began in 1895. July 2006 cooling degree days were near their historical high and more than 21 percent above normal. Year-to-date cooling degree days through July 2006 were 9.1 percent higher than in 2005. In July 2006 net generation, retail sales and retail prices of electricity all reached new highs. Year-to-date net generation for July 2006 was up 1.3

186

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The weather through May 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since record keeping began in 1895. Year-to-date, heating degree days were down 10.2 percent and cooling degree days were up 44.7 percent through May. For May alone heating degree days were down 22.5 percent, and cooling degree days were 38.5 percent higher than last May. Year-to-date net generation through May was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. Because of the advent of the summer cooling season and strong seasonal economic activity, May 2006 generation was up 5.1 percent compared to May 2005, and up 11.5 percent

187

august2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports that warmer- and drier-than-average conditions dominated much of the United States during the first half of 2007. June 2007 was the 23rd warmest June on record, increasing the cooling needs of the residential and commercial customers in the Nation. Cooling degree days for June 2007 were 9.3 percent above the average, but unchanged from June 2006. June 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were little changed from June 2006. Retail sales of electricity for the month of June 2007 increased only 0.2 percent compared to June 2006, while June 2007 generation for electric power was down 0.4 percent. The average U.S. retail price of electricity (all sectors) for June 2007 showed a 2.4-percent increase from

188

09 budget.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Budget Information Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Budget Information FY 2007 FY 2009 Operating Plan Request Appropriation Request Research and Development High Temperature Superconductivity 45,750 28,186 27,930 28,186 Visualization and Controls 24,388 25,305 25,075 25,305 Energy Storage and Power Electronics 2,823 6,803 6,741 13,403 Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration 23,546 25,700 25,466 33,306 Congressionally Directed Activities - - 24,290 - SUBTOTAL, Research and Development

189

july2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In May 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above the monthly average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the West, Southwest, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced near normal temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States were 20.8 percent below the average for the month of May and 31.1 percent below a much colder May 2008. Likewise, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 12.4 percent above the average for the month of May and 19.8 percent above May 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 5.0 percent in May 2009 compared to May 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly

190

october2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second month in a row, record warmth was observed throughout a majority of the country while the heavily populated Northeast experienced near average temperatures. Accordingly, cooling degree days for August 2007 were 26.0 percent above the average for the month of August, and 9.2 percent higher than August 2006. August 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were both up when compared to August 2006. Retail sales of electricity were 1.2 percent higher when compared to August 2006. However, residential retail sales of electricity decreased by 0.1 percent compared to August 2006. Generation for electric power was 3.8 percent higher than what was recorded in August

191

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 13,391 9,500 1,737 272 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 10,347

192

sup_tran.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Trillion Btu) 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Energy Use by Mode Highway Light-Duty Vehicles 14970.8 15191.3 15547.6 16054.3 16397.0 16743.0 17049.5 17379.1 17749.7 18129.3 18485.4 18843.9 19193.1 19518.8 19800.2 20071.6 20352.6 20620.8 20874.5 21140.7 21367.4 1.8% Automobiles 8641.2 8557.7 8554.5 8628.8 8632.3 8639.0 8622.6 8629.9 8669.2 8715.0 8763.0 8824.1 8891.3 8958.2 9010.9 9065.1 9131.3 9196.1 9258.6 9330.1 9387.4 0.4% Light Trucks 6304.8 6609.0 6968.5 7400.7 7739.9 8079.1 8402.1 8724.4 9055.5 9389.2 9697.2 9994.5 10276.3 10534.9 10763.4 10980.5 11195.1 11398.3 11589.2 11783.8 11953.0 3.3% Motorcycles 24.8 24.6 24.6 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.9 25.0 25.2 25.3 25.5 25.7 25.9 26.0 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.8 27.0 0.4% Commercial Light Trucks 1/ 637.6 624.1

193

c13.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25th 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 202 14.1 12.2 3.6 8.2 17.1 15.7 1.09 0.078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 47 17.8 11.4 3.8 8.9 20.3 4.3 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 92 12.4 10.3 3.8 7.4 14.5 8.7 1.18 0.095 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 164 10.5 11.1 2.9 6.3 13.4 13.8 0.88 0.084 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 439 12.2 11.6 3.8 8.8 16.2 33.6 0.94 0.077 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 927 13.1 14.1 4.5 9.9 17.0 68.0 0.97 0.073 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,181 15.7 12.2 5.3 13.0 23.4 146.4 1.05 0.067 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

194

c16.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,262 ,262 14,172 25,540 15,057 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.11 0.85 1.12 1.37 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 1,617 2,401 4,142 2,188 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.62 1.39 1.78 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 1,202 1,212 2,721 2,160 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.11 0.84 1.11 1.78 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 1,795 2,145 3,763 2,299 0.10 0.07 0.08 0.10 0.92 0.69 0.88 1.11 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 1,168 2,042 2,864 1,797 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 0.90 0.82 0.95 1.12 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 2,130 1,777 3,190 1,620 0.09 0.06 0.06 0.10 1.04 0.79 0.93 1.25 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,286 1,963 3,810 1,440 0.09 0.06 0.06 0.08 1.08 0.86 1.11 1.22 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 1,985 1,497 2,312 1,530

195

c21.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Square Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 190 341 360 12,543 28,786 21,977 15.1 11.8 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ....................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q Food Service ..................................... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ....................................... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 47 N Q 1,723 N Q 27.0 Outpatient ....................................... 6 11 Q 445 652 Q 13.1 17.4 Q Lodging ............................................. 4 31 34 260 2,274 2,563 14.0 13.5 13.5 Retail (Other Than Mall)..................... 17 28 18 1,363 2,133 821 12.2 12.9 21.5 Office ................................................

196

Fig1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2009 December 2009 1 December 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 8, 2009 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil will average about $76 per barrel this winter (October-March). The forecast for the monthly average WTI price dips to $75 early next year then rises to $82 per barrel by December 2010, assuming U.S. and world economic conditions continue to improve. EIA's forecast assumes that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 1.9 percent in 2010 and world oil-consumption-weighted real GDP grows by 2.6 percent.  Rising crude oil prices contribute to an increase in the annual average regular-

197

sup_tran.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Type Type (Trillion Btu) 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Energy Use by Mode Highway Light-Duty Vehicles 15161.1 15575.7 15906.8 16472.8 16956.1 17383.6 17761.0 18145.3 18523.6 18909.9 19286.4 19680.7 20088.4 Automobiles 8876.0 8832.9 8766.0 8824.8 8847.8 8851.9 8868.7 8891.4 8906.8 8939.0 8971.8 9011.9 9058.7 Light Trucks 6259.5 6717.3 7115.4 7622.5 8082.6 8506.0 8866.5 9228.1 9591.0 9945.0 10288.6 10642.6 11003.3 Motorcycles 25.6 25.5 25.4 25.6 25.7 25.7 25.8 25.8 25.9 26.0 26.0 26.2 26.3 Commercial Light Trucks 1/ 583.8 586.5 584.4 605.0 624.7 637.7 648.0 658.6 670.4 683.6 696.8 709.8 724.5 Buses 251.1 238.9 239.8 242.3 244.6 246.6 248.7 250.7 252.8 254.8 256.6 258.2 259.4 Transit 98.9 94.1 94.5 95.5 96.4 97.2 98.0 98.8 99.6 100.4 101.1 101.7 102.2 Intercity 36.6 34.7 34.8 35.2 35.5 35.8 36.1 36.4 36.7

198

c23.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25th 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet (dollars) All Buildings* ................................. 782 43.0 36.0 17.6 37.1 70.9 6.1 0.33 7.77 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 219 78.7 42.6 23.7 46.3 92.0 1.9 0.70 8.88 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 408 54.8 42.5 13.9 28.8 65.7 3.4 0.46 8.34 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 667 42.5 40.8 14.4 29.2 52.1 5.6 0.36 8.41 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 1,483 41.5 39.1 16.0 31.5 55.3 11.1 0.31 7.46 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 2,498 35.4 39.1 10.1 27.6 48.8 19.7 0.28 7.90 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 5,029 36.3 26.1 6.1 23.6 55.2 36.2 0.26 7.19 200,001 to 500,000 ..........................

199

february2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data While average temperatures prevailed across the majority of the Nation in December 2007, warmer-than-average temperatures in the more heavily populated eastern United States led to a decrease in total heating degree-days for the contiguous U.S. of 3.3 percent below the average for the month of December. However, heating degree days were still 14.5 percent above the level from December 2006, leading to an increase in electricity demand from a year ago. Retail sales of electricity for the month of December 2007 increased 2.1 percent compared to December 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for December 2007 showed a 4.2-percent increase from December 2006 and a 0.8-percent decrease from

200

Attachment B.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Competitive Sourcing Studies, 2002-2003 Competitive Sourcing Studies, 2002-2003 (Full-Time Equivalent Positions Under Review) DOE Organization State(s) I n f o r m a t i o n T e c h n o l o g y H u m a n R e s o u r c e s F i n a n c i a l S e r v i c e s P e r s o n n e l S e c u r i t y I n v e s t i g a t i o n s L o g i s t i c s G r a p h i c s C i v i l R i g h t s R e v i e w s P a r a l e g a l S u p p o r t T O T A L Headquarters Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO MD, DC 6 15 60 86 13 180 Chief Information Officer MD, DC 113 113 Economic Impact and Diversity MD, DC 2 2 8 2 14 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy MD, DC 7 1 8 Environment, Safety, and Health MD, DC 7 4 11 Energy Information Administration MD, DC 28 28 Environmental Management MD, DC 22 5 27 General Counsel MD, DC 7 7 Fossil Energy MD, DC 6 2 8 Hearings and Appeals MD, DC 7 7 Inspector General MD, DC 2 1 3 Nuclear Energy Science and Technology MD, DC 1 1 Oversight and Performance Assurance

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201

b35.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooled Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Build- ings* Not Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 1,020 985 629 2,011 64,783 7,843 16,598 13,211 27,132 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 710 407 279 1,155 6,789 1,782 1,206 781 3,021 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 157 226 133 374 6,585 1,177 1,704 995 2,710 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 109 225 126 277 11,535 1,612 3,517 2,034 4,372 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 25 64 43 109 8,668 893 2,369 1,479 3,928 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 11 41 25 52 9,057 726 2,926 1,751 3,654 100,001 to 200,000 ...........................

202

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276

203

a7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 43 13 6 5 4 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 15 5 Q 1 3 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service .....................................

204

b46.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 52,974 26,768 20,254 10,425 17,218 38,884 35,335 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,333 1,310 916 366 935 3,174 830 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 4,738 1,406 909 497 894 3,609 1,407 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 8,646 2,230 1,188 614 1,665 6,725 4,072 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,068 2,829 1,626 676 1,933 5,289 4,910 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,038 4,291 3,124 1,354 2,438 5,760 6,342 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,096 5,116 4,148 1,926 3,302 5,667 6,578 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,238 4,606 4,199 2,034 2,685 4,524 5,691 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,816 4,979 4,146 2,958

205

c37.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 9,475 116.44 62.2 108.3 1.33 11.43 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 34,658 121.16 143.2 Q Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 85,182 99.92 52.4 911.2 1.07 10.70 Principal Building Activity

206

c28.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

171 171 210 99 3,593 6,326 2,281 47.6 33.2 43.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 23 25 11 346 325 209 66.6 75.3 53.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 13 34 Q 305 620 Q 44.0 54.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 29 28 Q 756 987 565 37.9 28.6 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 44 17 12 840 714 363 52.6 24.4 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 27 Q Q 806 Q Q 33.1 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 19 Q Q 512 1,238 Q 37.8 30.8 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 23 Q Q 786 Q Q 28.9 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 18 Q Q Q Q Q 21.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 14 25 Q 380 1,274 Q 38.1 19.6 Q Food Sales .......................................

207

c18.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 15 24 5 949 1,672 442 16.1 14.4 10.9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8 25 10 642 1,470 650 12.8 16.7 14.8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 8 39 Q 614 2,087 Q 12.3 18.9 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 Q Q 1,072 Q Q 20.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 29 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 25.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5 39 Q 549 2,445 Q 8.8 16.0 Q Food Sales .......................................

208

Grantsdown.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding Opportunity Announcement Table TITLE FOA # Demonstration of Integrated Biorefinery Operations DE-FOA-0000096 Expansion of Infrastructure for Ethanol Blends DE-FOA-0000125 Development of Algal / Advanced Biofuels Consortia DE-FOA-0000123 Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps DE-FOA-0000116 Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis DE-FOA-0000075 Geothermal Technologies Program: Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies; Geothermal Energy Production; Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance DE-FOA-0000109 Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstrations DE-FOA-0000092 Hydroelectric Facility Modernization DE-FOA-0000120

209

september2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July 2007 brought record warmth to many of the states in the western U.S. However, cooler than average temperatures observed in the heavily populated eastern half of the country kept residential energy demand in the contiguous United States close to normal, with cooling degree days 1.2 percent below the average for the month of July. Due to the below normal temperatures observed in the heavily populated eastern United States, July 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were down when compared to July 2006. Retail sales of electricity was 1.6 percent lower when compared to July 2006, with residential retail sales decreasing the most at 4.9 percent. Furthermore, generation for electric

210

a1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2003 Commercial Buildings 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables October 2006 Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables Introduction................................................................................................................................ vii Change in Data Collection Procedures in Malls ........................................................................ viii Guide to the 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables............................................................................... ix Building Characteristics Tables All Buildings (Including Malls) Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls) ............................................... 1 Table A2. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for All Buildings

211

c19.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 14 56 96 7,449 3,633 7,397 15.3 15.4 13.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 17 7 12 696 437 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 11 5 14 787 404 810 13.4 12.0 16.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11 10 13 1,267 831 1,232 8.9 11.7 10.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 12 7 12 897 511 1,088 13.6 13.2 11.0 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 16 5 12 1,314 374 922 12.1 12.7 13.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 20 Q 13 1,096 Q 895 18.2 Q 14.5 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 12 5 11 659 Q 827 18.4 14.3 13.5 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q 9 Q Q 766 Q Q 12.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 15 6 11 1,198 640 1,027 12.8 9.4

212

P3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 1,401 1,931 530 Alaska 1,642 638 -1,004 Arizona 618 1,431 814 Arkansas 1,390 1,117 -273 California 2,625 7,858 5,234 Colorado 2,747 1,481 -1,266 Connecticut 197 742 545 Delaware 4 272 268 District of Columbia 0 180 180 Florida 524 4,217 3,693 Georgia 544 3,002 2,458 Hawaii 19 286 267 Idaho 180 526 345 Illinois 2,200 3,978 1,777 Indiana 1,063 2,869 1,806 Iowa 701 1,513 812 Kansas 780 1,162 382 Kentucky 2,841 1,911 -929 Louisiana 3,976 4,055 79 Maine 154 413 258 Maryland 273 1,426 1,153 Massachusetts 101 1,395 1,294 Michigan 673 2,803 2,130 Minnesota 429 1,867 1,438 Mississippi 441 1,163 723 Missouri 200 1,878 1,678 Montana 1,105 398 -707 Nebraska 397 871 475 Nevada 54 633 579 New Hampshire 130 292 162 New Jersey 387 2,438 2,052 New Mexico 2,261 688 -1,573 New York 873 3,615 2,742 North Carolina

213

c3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

trillion trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 70.4 759 5,901 83.8 90.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 138.8 934 14,300 103.0 80.3 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 289.0 725 29,189 101.0 105.3 Over 500,000 ....................................

214

september2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2010 July 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in July 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 19.9 percent above the July normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 9.5 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.3 percent. For the 12-month period ending July 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 1.4 percent over the previous 12-month period ending July 2009. In July 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 9.2 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.4 percent, and natural gas generation increased 11.4 percent. Petroleum

215

february2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: December 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

216

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2006 October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Primary Site All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 District Heat Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 990 1,232 408 431 63 88 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 1,761 2,305 763 679 63 255 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 1,134 1,713 567 337 90 140 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276 15,739 1,213 2,259 748 358 6 101 2,000 CDD or More and --

217

february2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: December 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climatic Data Center reports 2006 as the warmest year on record for the contiguous United States, with El Niño contributing to milder winter temperatures. NOAA also reports that December 2006 was the fourth warmest December since 1895. (For more information see http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2007/s2772.htm.) As a consequence of the warmer weather, December 2006 generation lagged behind the December 2005 generation by 3.6 percent, although it increased 8.7 percent from November 2006. Mirroring generation, December 2006 retail sales of electricity were up 8.4

218

c29.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 162 149 4,704 2,797 5,016 32.2 57.9 29.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 29 18 Q 334 265 363 87.9 68.4 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 23 Q Q 519 Q 496 44.2 Q 53.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 14 38 22 514 630 748 28.1 61.1 29.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 17 23 21 512 464 733 33.5 49.1 28.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 18 Q 18 888 Q 730 20.5 Q 24.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 16 Q 12 760 Q 651 21.5 Q 17.8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q Q 14 470 Q 675 Q Q 20.8 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 16 21 28 797 420 802 20.6 48.8 34.8 Food Sales .......................................

219

P5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank State State State State United States 22,057.2 United States d 26,489.9 United States e 11,965.0 United States 8,268.7 1 Wyoming 7,591.7 Texas 8,047.4 Texas 3,082.8 Illinois 1,002.7 2 West Virginia 3,321.1 Louisiana 3,240.2 Alaska 1,188.0 Pennsylvania 796.8 3 Kentucky 2,623.8 Wyoming 2,384.4 California 1,123.4 South Carolina 553.6 4 Pennsylvania 1,511.5 Oklahoma 2,163.4 North Dakota 887.3 New York 446.8 5 Illinois 864.2 Colorado 1,831.2 Oklahoma 444.8 North Carolina 424.1 6 Indiana 841.0 New Mexico 1,405.2 New Mexico 413.4 Texas 414.9 7 Montana 746.7 Pennsylvania 1,375.6 Louisiana 400.1 Alabama 411.8 8 Ohio 679.2 Arkansas 1,090.9 Wyoming 317.3 California 383.6 9 Texas 605.3 Utah 498.0 Kansas 240.7 New Jersey 351.7 10 Colorado 586.8 West Virginia 442.4 Colorado 226.9

220

june2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The overall temperature for the contiguous U.S. during April 2007 was 0.3ºF (0.2ºC) below the average temperature observed for the month of April over the 1971-2000 time period. A record cold outbreak was observed from April 4th to April 10th as record low temperatures were set in 1,200 locations across the contiguous U.S. before warmer weather returned later in the month. This cold snap was evident in the fact that heating degree days were 10.7 percent higher than normal as observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 44.7 percent higher than what was recorded in April 2006. Consequently, retail sales of electricity for the month of April 2007 increased 2.7 percent compared to April 2006, while April 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

b25.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Space Heating Cooling Water Heating Cooking Manu- facturing All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 60,028 56,940 56,478 22,237 3,138 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 5,007 4,759 997 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 5,408 5,348 1,136 214 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 9,922 9,562 1,954 472 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 7,776 7,734 2,511 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 8,331 8,412 3,575 540 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 8,339 8,300 3,991 473 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,907 6,565 6,680 4,047 605 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,792

222

b13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 5 Q Q Q Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 2 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 330 70 31 Q 65 Q 20 1920 to 1945 ..................................... 527 85 36 Q 52 90 39 1946 to 1959 ..................................... 562 75 45 Q 58 59 44 1960 to 1969 .....................................

223

b19.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,754 643 55 23 14 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,131 311 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 720 136 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 590 104 22 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 163 50 11 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 87 25 4 5 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 11 4 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 15 5 Q 1 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 1 Q Q 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 270 26 Q N N N Health Care .......................................

224

b32.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,478 27,490 28,820 1,880 3,088 1,422 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,759 2,847 1,699 116 N 169 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,348 2,821 2,296 Q Q 205 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,562 4,809 4,470 265 Q 430 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,734 3,924 4,055 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,412 3,659 5,005 Q 303 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,300 3,884 4,754 Q 822 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,680 2,722 4,076 Q 621 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,683 2,824 2,467 Q 1,064 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 9,481 3,829

225

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Buildings RSEs for Total Floorspace RSEs for Mean Square Feet per Building RSEs Not Available for Medians All Buildings .................................... 3.8 3.1 4.0 _ Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 5.7 5.6 1.3 _ 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 5.6 5.5 0.8 _ 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 4.9 4.9 0.9 _ 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 5.5 5.8 1.2 _ 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 6.1 6.0 1.0 _ 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9.9 10.0 1.5 _ 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 9.8 10.2 1.8 _ Over 500,000 .................................... 12.6 12.8 4.2 _ Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 7.1

226

b8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 330 527 562 579 731 707 876 334 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 174 315 331 298 350 438 481 165 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 71 107 90 120 180 98 158 66 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 55 64 90 95 122 103 151 58 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 19 23 26 33 48 32 39 21 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 9 14 22 16 20 28 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 Q 5 8 8 10 10 15 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 4 2 3 4 4 4 2 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 0 1 2 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 12 26 78 60 58 44 75 32 Food Sales ....................................... 226 Q Q Q Q Q 33 56 Q Food Service .....................................

227

b30.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Chilled Water Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,625 3,589 17 33 64,783 56,940 54,321 1,018 2,853 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,841 1,838 Q Q 6,789 5,007 4,994 Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 732 727 Q Q 6,585 5,408 5,367 Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 629 618 Q Q 11,535 9,922 9,743 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 216 211 Q 6 8,668 7,776 7,557 Q 240 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 118 114 Q 5 9,057 8,331 8,086 Q 332 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 55 Q 6 9,064 8,339 7,657 Q 793 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 21 Q 2 7,176 6,565 6,112 Q 495 Over 500,000 ....................................

228

a4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings .................................... 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 9,382 366 1,022 1,763 949 1,867 545 1,062 568 1,239 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 10,291 590 1,682 1,712 664 1,797 749 1,514 492 1,092 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 10,217 448 1,790 1,872 614 2,422 Q 1,426 346 1,007 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

229

table3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29.3 29.3 137.3 147.5 151.2 156.8 191.0 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 23.9 NA 26.6 27.0 26.6 31.7 New England........................................................ 6.6 NA 6.6 6.5 7.6 10.0 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 17.3 NA 20.1 20.5 19.0 21.7 Midwest ................................................................. 32.5 NA 37.8 38.4 41.1 47.1 East North Central............................................... 21.3 NA 26.0 27.6 29.0 32.4 West North Central ............................................. 11.3 NA 11.8 10.8 12.1 14.7 South..................................................................... 45.1 NA 50.6 52.7 56.0 70.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

230

b44.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 62,060 38,528 59,688 27,571 20,643 17,703 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,038 2,918 5,579 1,123 312 604 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 6,090 3,061 5,726 1,109 686 781 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 11,229 6,424 10,458 2,944 1,721 1,973 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,297 5,176 8,001 3,662 2,191 2,013 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,912 5,296 8,667 4,330 3,646 2,599 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,732 6,042 8,612 5,268 4,349 3,473 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,946 4,913 6,839 4,610 3,918 2,775 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,816 4,698 5,806 4,526 3,819 3,485 Principal Building Activity

231

b21.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 1,477 116 64,783 24,735 6,604 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 771 Q 6,789 2,009 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 259 Q 6,585 1,912 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 263 33 11,535 4,158 520 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 92 18 8,668 3,277 630 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 49 13 9,057 3,381 911 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 28 12 9,064 3,935 1,723 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 13 5 7,176 3,568 1,438 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 2 5,908 2,494 1,235 Principal Building Activity

232

b39.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 60,028 8,814 19,615 12,545 5,166 20,423 18,021 3,262 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 685 2,902 1,047 Q 461 1,159 330 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 462 2,891 1,282 Q 773 1,599 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 1,400 4,653 2,129 289 2,164 2,765 456 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 1,150 2,761 1,748 325 2,829 2,449 419 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 1,524 2,086 1,819 549 3,497 3,328 450 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 1,245 1,974 1,625 1,365 4,283 2,797 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,907 1,295 1,456 1,313 1,010 3,844 2,156 514 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,792

233

June2010.XLS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-2008 -2008 2009 2010 2011 CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1. Federal Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, MS (DOE/EIS-0428) 2. Federal Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN (DOE/EIS-0429) 3. Federal Loan Guarantee to Support Construction of the Taylorville Energy Center, Taylorville, IL (DOE/EIS-0430) 4. Federal Loan Guarantee for the Medicine Bow Fuel and Power Coal-to-Liquid Facility, Carbon County, WY (DOE/EIS-0432) ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY 5. Presidential Permit Application, Energia Sierra Juarez

234

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2006 The weather through April 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9.3 percent through April. For April alone heating degree days were down 13.8 percent from last year and were 24.0 percent lower than normal. Cooling degree days for April 2006 were 97 percent higher than last year, although April is not a significant month for space heating.

235

c12.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,488 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 172 328 173 2,449 4,128 2,091 70.4 79.4 82.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 150 380 228 2,060 4,018 2,979 73.0 94.6 76.7 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 214 438 281 2,124 3,947 2,993 100.7 111.1 94.0 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 219 354 152 2,155 3,427 1,593 101.7 103.2 95.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 176 421 Q 1,566 2,986 1,357 112.1 141.2 Q Principal Building Activity

236

c2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 13,391 9,500 1,737 272 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 10,347 7,323 1,343 272 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5,908 11,201 7,977 1,344 71 1,810 Principal Building Activity

237

c11.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* ................................. Buildings* ................................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ...................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q Food Service ................................... 318 108 Q 986 664 Q 322.9 163.2 Q Health Care ..................................... 32 104 457 445 835 1,883 71.8 125.1 242.9 Inpatient ........................................ N Q 436 N 182 1,723 N Q 252.9 Outpatient ...................................... 32 66 Q 445 652 160 71.8 100.5 Q Lodging ........................................... 29 207 273 260 2,274 2,563 111.0 91.2 106.7 Retail (Other Than Mall)................... 110 137 72 1,363 2,133 821 80.9 64.1 87.8 Office ...............................................

238

c17.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32 32 116 153 2,942 9,867 11,373 10.8 11.7 13.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 4 9 20 345 652 908 12.7 13.8 22.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 3 7 8 350 732 781 7.7 9.6 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 16 20 Q 1,390 1,934 Q 11.2 10.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 8 16 Q 944 1,534 Q 8.5 10.4 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 15 21 Q 1,524 1,618 Q 10.2 12.9 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 17 26 Q 1,703 1,671 Q 10.1 15.5 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 24 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 13.1 13.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 22 18 Q 1,248 1,126 Q 17.3 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 12 16 Q 1,384 1,990 Q 8.4 7.9 Food Sales .......................................

239

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climatic Data Center, after "the 11th record warmest December on record in 2006", more typical winter conditions returned, particularly in the Eastern United States, in the latter part of January 2007. For the month, heating degree days were 26.1 percent higher than January 2006, but still 8.9 percent lower than normal. In January 2007, increased demand for winter heating, coupled with economic strength, as observed by growth in industrial production, resulted in a 7.7 percent growth in electricity generation compared to January 2006. (Industrial production increased 1.92

240

c38.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Worker Worker (million Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 9,475 116.44 62.2 108.3 1.33 11.43 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 34,658 121.16 143.2 Q Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 85,182 99.92 52.4 911.2 1.07 10.70 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

c6.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,344 21,521 31,595 18,118 16.79 12.74 16.22 19.88 1.65 1.26 1.35 1.60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,298 3,235 4,752 2,526 19.47 15.74 19.77 23.48 2.24 1.71 1.88 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,806 1,694 3,368 2,529 17.72 14.50 18.24 22.49 1.61 1.08 1.27 2.04 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,606 3,157 4,530 2,846 17.56 13.85 18.09 19.03 1.32 1.02 1.03 1.36 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 1,768 3,033 3,422 2,170 16.61 12.27 16.67 19.02 1.37 1.18 1.08 1.32 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 3,479 2,592 3,959 1,866 17.16 12.25 15.52 20.88 1.71 1.15 1.15 1.41 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 3,292 3,029 5,328 1,743 15.74 12.02 14.20 17.92 1.55 1.32 1.53 1.48 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 2,877 2,798

242

august2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: June 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since recordkeeping began in 1895. Year-to-date cooling degree days through June 2006 were 11.7% higher than in 2005, and June cooling degree days were 12.7 percent higher than normal. As a result, retail sales of electricity through June were up 1.0 percent year-to-date, and increased 1.1 percent compared to June 2005. The average retail price of electricity was up 11.3 percent year-to-date, largely due to higher fuel prices. Year-to-date net generation through June was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. June 2006 generation was up 0.5 percent compared

243

P1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2011 P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2011 Alabama 19,381 195,581 8,374 0 Alaska 2,149 356,225 204,829 0 Arizona 8,111 168 37 1,345 Arkansas 133 1,072,212 5,877 0 California 0 250,177 193,691 4,321 Colorado 26,890 1,637,576 39,125 3,057 Connecticut 0 0 0 0 Delaware 0 0 0 0 District of Columbia 0 0 0 0 Florida 0 15,125 2,023 0 Georgia 0 0 0 2,456 Hawaii 0 0 0 0 Idaho 0 0 0 1,321 Illinois 37,938 2,121 9,234 30,068 Indiana 37,544 9,075 1,987 22,547 Iowa 0 0 0 87,314 Kansas 37 309,124 41,503 10,676 Kentucky 108,971 124,243 2,326 866 Louisiana 3,865 3,029,206 68,984 37 Maine 0 0 0 0 Maryland 2,937 34 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 0 0 Michigan 0 138,162 6,977 6,543 Minnesota 0 0 0 27,536 Mississippi 2,747 81,487 24,216 1,321 Missouri 465 0 118 6,261 Montana 42,008 74,624 24,151 0 Nebraska 0 1,959 2,542 47,120 Nevada 0 3 408 0 New Hampshire 0 0 0 0 New Jersey 0 0 0 0 New Mexico 21,922 1,237,303 71,274

244

january2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data November is typically the month when generation reaches a trough before the winter season heating demand picks up in December. November 2006 was also warmer than normal and the heating degree days were 12.9 percent lower than normal. Consequently, total net generation in November 2006 was down 3.9 percent from October 2006, but was up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Similarly, retail sales of electricity in November 2006 were down 4.8 percent from October 2006, but were up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Year-to-date, through November 2006, total net generation rose 0.3 percent and retail sales of electricity were up 0.4 percent,

245

c20.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 224 166 219 161 10,393 17,076 11,375 15,172 9,290 11.5 13.1 14.6 14.5 17.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 19 26 14 31 23 1,204 1,595 918 1,759 871 15.7 16.5 14.9 17.8 26.3 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 12 24 13 1,124 1,547 950 1,738 839 9.9 10.9 12.8 13.7 15.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 29 23 25 24 2,183 3,140 1,402 2,822 1,823 8.3 9.2 16.1 9.0 13.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 18 24 15 25 22 1,451 2,199 1,272 2,027 1,435 12.2 10.8 11.6 12.3 15.1 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 15 32 24 28 19 1,295 2,549 1,823 2,037 1,327 11.8 12.6 13.2 13.8 14.3 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 15 40 24 41 22 1,206 2,641 1,752 2,259 1,160 12.4 15.3 13.5 17.9 18.8 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 14 27 21 25 19 1,115 1,943 1,619

246

november2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data

247

april2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February February 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Stan Kaplan at 202-287-1803, or at stan.kaplan@eia.doe.gov. * Change in total consumption or generation for the latest 12 month period (March 2004 to February 2005) compared to the prior 12 month period ( March 2003 to February 2004). Latest 12 Month Period* 6.0% 0.8% n/a Year to Date: -2.9% -1.4% n/a February 2004 -11.9% -2.7% -8.4% January 2005

248

c7.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

294 294 978 1,254 2,964 9,941 11,595 99.0 98.3 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 33 85 146 360 666 974 91.2 128.1 149.7 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 64 73 359 764 843 Q 83.7 86.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 115 163 553 1,419 1,934 Q 81.2 84.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 74 140 347 944 1,618 Q 78.7 86.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 134 148 516 1,524 1,618 Q 87.8 91.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 150 203 414 1,703 1,682 Q 87.9 120.8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 177 214 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 105.8 118.8 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q 1,248 1,126 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 143

249

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 65 170 104 63 6,080 2,832 4,122 2,123 0.21 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 757 Q 255 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 375 63 Q Q 1,704 643 833 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 509 20 44 Q 3,618 1,983 3,034 1,673 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 837 Q 44 40 3,426 1,281 1,644 984 0.24 Q 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 555 Q Q Q 2,126 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

250

c24.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* ................................. Buildings* ................................. 782 43.0 36.0 17.6 37.1 70.9 6.1 0.33 7.77 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 219 78.7 42.6 23.7 46.3 92.0 1.9 0.70 8.88 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 408 54.8 42.5 13.9 28.8 65.7 3.4 0.46 8.34 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 667 42.5 40.8 14.4 29.2 52.1 5.6 0.36 8.41 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 1,483 41.5 39.1 16.0 31.5 55.3 11.1 0.31 7.46 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 2,498 35.4 39.1 10.1 27.6 48.8 19.7 0.28 7.90 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 5,029 36.3 26.1 6.1 23.6 55.2 36.2 0.26 7.19 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 10,234 35.0 35.5 10.0 22.7 47.2 69.2 0.24 6.76 Over 500,000 ................................... 39,551 43.0 28.8 2.8 20.0

251

c27.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73 73 343 512 1,465 7,716 9,570 49.5 44.4 53.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q 41 68 Q 417 729 Q 99.5 93.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 31 43 Q 482 654 Q 64.8 66.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 45 90 Q 931 1,681 Q 47.9 53.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 39 70 Q 829 1,422 Q 47.4 49.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 43 73 Q 1,263 1,554 Q 34.1 47.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 41 67 Q 1,445 1,264 Q 28.3 52.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 55 56 Q 1,484 1,277 Q 37.3 44.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 47 44 Q 865 989 Q 54.0 44.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 49 99 Q 1,247 1,804 Q 39.5 54.6 Food Sales .......................................

252

c4.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 70.4 11,897 92.5 1.31 15.68 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 138.8 13,391 205.1 1.48 14.34 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 289.0 10,347 416.7 1.44 14.28 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5,908 896.1 11,201 1698.8 1.90 14.62 Principal Building Activity

253

c33.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Worker (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 3,555 0.11 81.6 3.9 0.12 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 1,187 0.41 315.2 1.4 0.49 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 2,639 0.37 456.4 3.1 0.43 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 3,238 0.20 218.5 3.8 0.24 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 5,383 0.14 109.4 5.8 0.15 1.08 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8,163 0.11 78.4 8.8 0.12 1.08 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 12,681 0.09 80.6 13.1 0.09 1.03 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 22,353 0.08 62.1 23.6 0.08

254

october2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: August 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

255

P2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 468.7 226.8 48.6 411.8 0.0 245.3 245.3 1,401.2 Alaska 33.5 404.7 1,188.0 0.0 0.0 15.7 15.7 1,641.9 Arizona 174.8 0.2 0.2 327.3 7.8 107.4 115.2 617.7 Arkansas 3.0 1,090.9 34.1 148.5 0.0 113.5 113.5 1,390.0 California 0.0 279.7 1,123.4 383.6 25.0 812.8 837.8 2,624.6 Colorado 586.8 1,831.2 226.9 0.0 17.7 84.0 101.7 2,746.7 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 166.7 0.0 29.9 29.9 196.5 Delaware 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.8 3.8 3.8 District of Columbia 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 Florida 0.0 15.4 11.7 230.4 0.0 266.7 266.7 524.2 Georgia 0.0 0.0 0.0 338.1 14.2 192.1 206.3 544.4 Hawaii 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 19.1 19.1 19.1 Idaho 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.6 172.8 180.4 180.4 Illinois 864.2 3.7 53.6 1,002.7 174.0 102.3 276.3 2,200.5 Indiana 841.0 9.2 11.5 0.0 130.5 71.2 201.7 1,063.4 Iowa 0.0 0.0 0.0 54.6 505.3 140.7 645.9 700.5 Kansas 0.8 356.8 240.7 76.6 61.8

256

june2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

257

oil1993.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(thousand Household Member (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219 Midwest 2.3 2.2 6.0 60 22 58.4 21 378 0.14 370 132 East North Central 1.5 1.5 4.1 51 19 49.3 18 328 0.12 318 116 West North Central 0.7 0.7 2.0 78 29 77.8 27 481 0.18 481 165 South 3.1 2.9 5.4 43 24 41.0 15 306 0.17 292 108 South Atlantic 2.6 2.5 4.6 47 26 44.4 16 334 0.18 316 116 East South Central 0.4 0.4 0.6 24 14 23.8 9 168 0.10 168 65 West South Central Q Q Q 5 2 4.8 2 47 0.02 47 18 West 0.6 0.5 1.2 61 27 58.8 23 444 0.20 427 164 Mountain

258

april2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Flash Estimates of Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: February 2006 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data After an unusually warm January, February weather reverted to a historically more normal seasonal pattern. February 2006 heating degree days were, however, still 8 percent higher than in February 2005, which had been warmer than normal.

259

sup_elec.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Electric Power Projections for EMM Region 0. Electric Power Projections for EMM Region East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Electricity Generating Capacity 1/ (gigawatts) Coal Steam 84.34 84.34 84.33 84.17 83.59 82.17 81.85 81.85 81.32 81.32 81.32 81.32 81.32 Other Fossil Steam 2/ 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.81 3.81 3.81 3.81 3.81 Combined Cycle 4.24 8.72 11.97 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.91 12.91 13.96 14.60 15.67 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 13.84 19.59 21.22 21.22 21.14 21.14 21.11 21.08 18.97 19.21 19.83 19.93 20.20 Nuclear Power 7.68 7.69 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 Pumped Storage/Other 3/ 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 Fuel Cells 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Renewable Sources 4/ 1.72

260

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data During March 2007, the contiguous U.S. experienced the second warmest March over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 15.7 percent lower than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period, and 16.7 percent lower than March 2006. Despite the unseasonably warm March, retail sales of electricity increased 0.8 percent compared to March 2006, while March 2007 generation of electric power increased 0.9 percent over March 2006. These increases were primarily due to economic growth, evident by a 2.1-percent increase in the real gross domestic product for the U.S. in the first quarter of 2007 over the first quarter of 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for March 2007 showed a 5.0-percent

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261

2010 APS.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain tbd FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost tbd Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-10 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) DOE SRS expects to initiate one or more new EAs over the next 12 months. * Please include projected NEPA milestones, if planned. 1 of 6 Annual NEPA Planning Summary (2010) DOE Savannah River Site Attachment: Memo, Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:

262

LNG 2006.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 0.0 2.8 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 17.4 Malaysia 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Nigeria 3.0 3.1 0.0 6.0 3.1 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.0 9.0 5.7 3.1 57.3 Oman 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Trinidad 30.5 27.6 30.2 36.4 44.3 38.6 33.4 37.0 25.2 24.7 24.6 36.7 389.3 Egypt 3.0 5.3 0.0 13.6 19.8 14.3 15.0 8.9 8.8 2.6 16.9 11.4 119.5 Qatar 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TOTAL 39.5 38.7 33.2 58.8 67.3 61.7 57.6 52.1 40.0 36.2 47.2 51.2 583.5 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2006 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cove Point, MD 11.9 11.0 8.9 14.4 11.6 14.6 12.0 11.8 5.4 3.0 3.0 9.0 116.6 Elba Island, GA 7.9 7.9 7.9 13.4 13.7 13.8 13.6 16.8 13.9 10.4 13.5 14.0 146.8 Everett, MA 16.6 16.8 16.4 13.9 16.6 13.6 14.3 14.2 9.1 13.9 14.0 16.6 176.1 Lake Charles, LA 3.0 3.1

263

Webinar Schedule.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Session Session Date Time Conference Number iPortal Web Conference ID Session 1 Monday, September 14 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259443 Session 2 Monday, September 14 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259451 Session 3 Tuesday, September 15 12:00 PM ET 202-586-9248 259463 Session 4 Tuesday, September 15 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259476 Session 5 Wednesday, September 16 12:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259481 Session 6 Wednesday, September 16 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259491 Session 7 Thursday, September 17 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259505 Session 8 Thursday, September 17 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259519 Session 9 Friday, September 18 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259522 Session 10 Friday, September 18 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259540 Session 11 Monday, September 21 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259557 Session 12 Monday, September 21 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073

264

VSC's.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

e e Description of Organization VSC name VSC e-mail Phone # DOE - Bonneville Power Administration Carolyn Stokke ccstokke@bpa.gov 360-418-2330 DOE - Southeastern Power Administration Carol Rice carolr@sepa.doe.gov 706-213-3822 DOE - Southwestern Power Administration Cheryl Crosswell & Shirley Shumate cheryl.crosswell@swpa.gov; shirley.shumate@swpa.gov 918/595-6616; 918/595-6686 DOE - Western Area Power Administration Frances Hamada hamada@wapa.gov 801/524-6379 DOE - Office of the CFO Teresa Collins Teresa.Collins@hq.doe.gov 202/586-4459 DOE - Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs Liz Renner elizabeth.renner@hq.doe.gov 202/586-5450 DOE - Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Dan Broehl daniel.broehl@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0696 DOE - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Nicole McGowan

265

b12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 9,874 1,255 1,654 1,905 1,258 5,096 4,317 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 409 409 544 N 165 99 638 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 399 356 442 N 280 160 725 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 931 Q 345 Q 312 631 1,284 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,756 Q Q Q Q 803 578 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 2,690 Q Q Q 206 841 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 2,167 Q N Q Q 930 524 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,420 N Q 467 Q 1,185 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N 973 N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 410 Q 281 Q Q Q 220 1920 to 1945 .....................................

266

eia176.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 7 6 EIA-176 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Distribution company - investor owned Storage operator Distribution company - municipally owned Synthetic natural gas (SNG) plant operator Distribution company - privately owned Producer Distribution company - cooperative Distribution company - other ownership Interstate pipeline (FERC regulated) Intrastate pipeline B. Vehicles Powered by Alternative Fuels Does your company's vehicle fleet include vehicles powered by alternative fuels? No D. Sales/Acquisitions No or sale this year? If Yes, please describe the sale or acquisition in the Comments box below. Page 1 C. Customer Choice Program Participating Eligible If there is a Customer Choice program available in your service territory, enter the number

267

Table 2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Indirect 1 85 621 699 3,129 3,411 4,120 3,850 5,988 4,211 6,193 4,890 4,102 6,243 Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 Direct 16 Indirect 16,191 14,656 17,745 17,748 17,859 19,897 18,925 21,070 85,711 118,115 156,534 236,368 215,033 214,678 220,420 Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 Sequestration 550,000 70,000 290,000 370,000 480,000 440,000 440,000 590,000 530,000 370,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 Direct 1,091 38,702 44,227

268

schedule_2006.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 Long Range Operations Schedule 6 Long Range Operations Schedule (October 2005 - September 2006) 1 1 1 1 → 1 1 1 4 → 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 → 2 1 → 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 → 2 3 3 4 3 1 → 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 → 3 4 4 4 4 1 → 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 → 4 5 5 4 5 1 → 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 1 → 5 6 6 4 6 1 6 6 6 4 6 6 6 6 6 1 → 6 7 7 4 7 1 → 7 7 7 4 7 7 7 7 7 1 → 7 8 8 4 8 1 → 8 8 8 4 → 8 8 8 8 8 1 8 9 9 9 1 → 9 9 9 4 9 9 9 9 9 1 → 9 10 10 10 1 → 10 10 10 4 10 10 10 10 10 1 → 10 11 11 11 1 → 11 11 11 4 11 11 11 11 11 1 → 11 12 12 12 1 → 12 12 12 4 12 1 → 12 12 12 4 → 12 1 → 12 13 13 13 1 13 13 13 4 13 1 → 13 13 13 4 13 1 → 13 14 14 14 5 → 14 14 14 14 1 → 14 14 14 4 14 1 → 14 15 15 15 5 15 15 15 15 1 → 15 15 15 4 15 1 15 16 16 16 5 16 16 16 16 1

269

table14.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30 2.44 2.60 2.85 3.12 3.47 3.84 4.31 4.81 5.28

270

crib.xls  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

August 2003 August 2003 D I S C L A I M E R This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document will be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

271

recommendations.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia PA 6, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia PA Rec Type Recommendations/Comments Name Organization Communication The reliability coordinator needs an understanding from others, from a broad perspective, what's going on. Sometimes you may not have all the information, and this is what happens most times in blackout situations. Michael Calimano New York ISO System Operations Reliability coordination needs to have authority in real time to order actions to be taken by control areas or operators under emergency conditions. Authorities and procedures have to be spelled out well beforehand. Michael Calimano New York ISO Emergency Response We have to look at how we can do this better, how we can let other people know better and faster. In our shop, when there is an emergency going, everybody's involved in

272

c15.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 216 375 152 12,809 16,701 22,766 11,030 11.5 12.9 16.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 13 30 50 19 997 1,729 2,324 1,295 13.4 17.5 21.7 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 10 15 33 19 1,083 1,447 2,454 1,214 9.0 10.7 13.4 15.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 19 29 49 22 1,944 3,098 4,266 2,063 9.6 9.3 11.6 10.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 12 31 41 19 1,292 2,483 3,012 1,599 9.0 12.6 13.7 11.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 22 29 50 17 2,040 2,260 3,435 1,296 11.0 12.9 14.6 13.1 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 25 33 66 18 2,117 2,285 3,439 1,177 11.6 14.6 19.1 15.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 24 28 38 16 1,781 2,196 1,909 1,166 13.3 12.7 20.1 13.7 Over 500,000 ....................................

273

oil1987.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.4 7.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204 Midwest 3.1 3.0 7.1 53 23 51.8 19 318 0.13 309 113 East North Central 2.5 2.4 5.9 56 23 54.2 19 334 0.14 326 116 West North Central 0.6 0.6 1.2 43 21 41.6 17 250 0.12 239 96 South 4.6 4.2 7.0 41 24 37.0 14 257 0.15 233 87 South Atlantic 3.6 3.2 5.3 46 27 41.1 15 285 0.17 256 95 East South Central 1.0 0.9 1.5 27 16 25.8 10 175 0.11 168 63 West South Central Q Q Q 10 4 6.9 4 73 0.03 49 26 West 0.6 0.6 1.4 32 13 31.1 12 195 0.08 190 76 Mountain 0.2 0.2 0.3 26 12 26.1 11 144 0.07 144 62 Pacific 0.4 0.4 1.1 34 14 32.9 13 213 0.08 207 81 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 12.6 9.4 24.6 102 39 75.9 29 596 0.23 444 167 Central City 5.0 2.8 7.2 119 47 66.9 29 664 0.26 372 160 Suburban 7.6 6.6 17.4 94 36

274

c8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

436 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 65 126 Q 1,164 2,240 810 55.9 56.4 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 107 112 Q 949 1,672 498 112.5 67.3 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 64 123 59 642 1,470 650 99.0 83.4 91.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 49 237 Q 614 2,087 Q 79.8 113.5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 110 Q 395 1,072 Q Q 102.2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 137 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 122.1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 45 198 Q 552 2,445

275

c30.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

418 418 659 327 347 119 7,645 12,850 8,113 10,509 4,350 54.7 51.3 40.3 33.0 27.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 56 81 35 55 16 660 979 421 789 234 85.0 82.9 82.5 69.8 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 47 53 27 59 16 644 944 526 1,212 367 72.5 56.5 51.2 49.0 43.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 88 103 50 47 13 1,679 2,134 958 1,781 501 52.4 48.0 51.7 26.4 25.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 59 87 52 34 18 1,251 1,839 1,031 1,441 463 47.2 47.2 50.4 23.7 38.6 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 55 88 42 41 11 1,043 2,129 1,300 1,569 642 52.4 41.5 32.3 26.0 16.5 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 35 114 31 Q 9 970 2,090 1,320 1,550 714 36.2 54.5 23.4 34.0 12.4 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 54 61 38 31 15 1,001 1,471 1,380 1,161 666 53.6 41.7 27.3

276

wf01.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-00 -00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04 Average 99-04 04-05 Warm Base Cold Warm Base Cold Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 81.7 87.3 67.7 87.4 79.9 80.8 79.8 71.9 78.8 85.7 -9.9 -1.3 7.4 Price ($/mcf) 8.39 10.01 9.41 9.74 11.47 9.81 12.90 16.82 17.18 17.73 30.4 33.2 37.4 Expenditures ($) 685 874 637 851 917 793 1,029 1,208 1,353 1,518 17.5 31.6 47.6 Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 88.3 99.1 78.2 92.3 85.7 88.7 85.3 81.1 88.9 96.7 -4.9 4.2 13.3 Price ($/mcf) 5.74 8.77 6.26 7.61 8.76 7.48 10.01 14.71 15.48 16.36 46.9 54.6 63.4 Expenditures ($) 507 869 490 702 751 664 855 1,194 1,377 1,583 39.7 61.1 85.2 South Consumption (mcf) 55.6 67.1 52.7 60.3 55.4 58.2 53.8 52.1 56.6 61.2 -3.2 5.3 13.7 Price ($/mcf) 7.65 10.22 8.17 9.02 10.67 9.19 12.35 17.53 18.33 19.24 41.9 48.4 55.8 Expenditures ($) 425 685 431 543 591 535 664 913 1,038

277

LNG 2005.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 6.0 11.3 2.8 9.0 11.4 12.0 6.0 3.2 6.0 11.8 9.0 8.6 97.2 Malaysia 3.0 0.0 2.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 8.7 Nigeria 2.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.6 0.0 2.9 0.0 0.0 8.1 Oman 2.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 Trinidad 43.7 39.2 40.4 35.7 41.2 41.5 41.2 26.8 34.8 33.2 30.1 31.4 439.2 Egypt 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.9 0.0 2.9 5.9 11.1 11.0 8.5 18.9 11.3 72.5 Qatar 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 TOTAL 57.8 53.5 45.9 47.6 52.6 56.4 53.1 43.6 51.8 59.6 58.0 51.3 631.3 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2005 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cove Point, MD 18.3 20.6 18.7 17.1 23.5 20.7 20.4 8.3 17.3 17.6 18.8 20.5 221.7 Elba Island, GA 7.9 10.6 7.9 7.8 7.9 13.3 13.1 11.1 15.6 13.6 12.5 10.7 132.1 Everett, MA 18.0 13.8 16.7 13.6 12.8 13.4 13.6 13.3 10.4 16.5 12.3 14.3 168.5 Lake Charles, LA 13.7

278

longterm.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Schedule Operations Schedule Run 2008-3 Run 2009-1 Run 2009-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 1 1 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 1 1 6 6 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 10 10 1 1 1 10 4 4 10 10 10 1 10 10 10 10 1 1 1 10 10 11 11 1 11 4 4 4 11 11 11 4 4 11 11 11 11 1 1 1 11 11 12 12 1 1 12 4 4 4 12 12 12 4 4 4 12 12 12 12 1 1 1 12 4 4 12 13 13 1 1 1 13 4 4 4 13 13 13 4 4 4 13 13 13 13 1 1 1 13

279

b11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables Revised June 2006 81 Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Inpatient Outpatient All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 386 226 297 8 121 142 443 Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Lodging

280

b20.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 45,144 10,960 1,958 1,951 2,609 2,161 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,613 916 Q Q N 223 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,304 1,031 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,098 1,732 383 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 5,807 1,837 355 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 6,218 1,739 273 337 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 6,102 1,545 539 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 4,246 1,361 Q 389 531 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,756 800 Q Q 1,522 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 8,714 946 Q N N N Food Sales .......................................

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281

b38.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 194 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,982 476 1,864 819 65 579 953 205 Table B38. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 2,566 334 1,193 550 14 190 682 140 Two ................................................... 1,031 960 97 487 174 19 194 207 50 Three ................................................ 339 319 31 155 68 10 119 41 Q Four to Nine ...................................... 128 125 11 28 25 19 69 20 4 Ten or More ......................................

282

b37.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floor- Floor- space a Heated Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Cooled Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Lit Floor- space b All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 60,028 53,473 56,940 41,788 62,060 51,342 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 4,988 5,007 4,017 6,038 4,826 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 5,010 5,408 3,978 6,090 4,974 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 8,865 9,922 6,927 11,229 8,618 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 7,260 7,776 5,663 8,297 6,544 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 7,815 8,331 5,665 8,912 7,548 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 8,012 8,339 6,462 8,732 7,470 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

283

b2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Worker Median Hours per Week Median Age of Buildings (years) All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 72,807 4.6 1,000 50 30.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 9,936 2.4 750 48 30.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7,512 7.2 1,300 50 30.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 10,787 15.0 1,611 55 28.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 8,881 35.0 1,364 60 30.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 8,432 67.0 1,500 60 25.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 11,632 130.0 1,457 75 24.5 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

284

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276 15,739 17,178 12.3 916 57 2,000 CDD or More and -- Fewer than 4,000 HDD ...................

285

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

286

b6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 2,552 889 738 241 129 65 25 7 Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Building Size Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any Elevators .................................... 309 Q 29 61 81 57 41 19 5 Number of Elevators One ................................................. 208 Q 29 57 62 29 11 4 Q Two to Five ..................................... 88 N N Q 19 28 29 9 Q Six or More .....................................

287

suptab_1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New England 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel 0.349 0.344 0.362 0.371 0.371 0.372 0.370 0.369 0.366 0.364 0.362 0.360 0.357 Kerosene 0.031 0.017 0.023 0.031 0.031 0.031 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.029 0.029 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.032 0.032 0.031 0.031 0.032 0.032 0.033 0.033 0.033 0.033 0.034 0.034 0.034 Petroleum Subtotal 0.412 0.393 0.417 0.434 0.434 0.435 0.433 0.432 0.429 0.427 0.425 0.423 0.419 Natural Gas 0.181 0.182 0.199 0.197 0.197 0.200 0.202 0.204 0.205 0.207 0.208 0.209 0.209 Coal 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Renewable Energy 1/ 0.026 0.024 0.028 0.026 0.026 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 Electricity 0.147 0.153 0.157 0.158 0.161 0.164 0.167 0.169 0.170 0.172 0.173 0.175 0.175

288

sup_rci.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Residential Sector Equipment Stock and Efficiency (1 of 2) 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.23 10.58 10.86 11.14 11.44 11.72 11.93 12.14 12.36 12.57 12.77 12.98 13.18 13.37 13.56 13.76 13.96 14.17 14.38 14.59 14.78 1.9% Electric Other 20.12 20.18 20.20 20.24 20.29 20.33 20.39 20.46 20.53 20.60 20.67 20.73 20.79 20.84 20.89 20.95 21.00 21.07 21.14 21.22 21.29 0.3% Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.08 0.08 0.09 0.09 0.10 0.10 0.11 0.11 10.2% Natural Gas Other 55.78 56.39 57.14 57.85 58.57 59.32 60.12 60.93 61.74 62.57 63.42 64.28 65.11 65.91 66.71 67.52 68.34 69.17 70.02 70.87 71.74 1.3% Distillate 9.41 9.38 9.35 9.33 9.31 9.29 9.27 9.25 9.23 9.21 9.19 9.17 9.15 9.12 9.10 9.07 9.04 9.02 8.99

289

oil1997.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260 Midwest 1.5 1.4 3.0 75 36 72.6 26 522 0.25 504 184 East North Central 1.0 1.0 1.9 71 35 67.3 23 509 0.25 482 165 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.1 83 38 83.5 35 548 0.25 548 232 South 2.9 2.9 4.6 34 21 33.7 13 279 0.17 275 105 South Atlantic

290

c14.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 202 14.1 12.2 3.6 8.2 17.1 15.7 1.09 0.078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 47 17.8 11.4 3.8 8.9 20.3 4.3 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 92 12.4 10.3 3.8 7.4 14.5 8.7 1.18 0.095 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 164 10.5 11.1 2.9 6.3 13.4 13.8 0.88 0.084 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 439 12.2 11.6 3.8 8.8 16.2 33.6 0.94 0.077 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 927 13.1 14.1 4.5 9.9 17.0 68.0 0.97 0.073 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,181 15.7 12.2 5.3 13.0 23.4 146.4 1.05 0.067 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 4,347 15.0 15.4 5.8 12.1 20.7 301.0 1.04 0.069 Over 500,000 .................................... 17,034 19.0 12.8 10.0

291

august2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In June 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 31.0 percent above the June normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 8.0 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity remained relatively unchanged. For the 12-month period ending June 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased by 1.9 percent over the previous 12-month period ending June 2009. Total electric power generation in the United States increased 7.9 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.2 percent, and natural gas generation increased 8.7 percent. Petroleum liquids

292

oil1982.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Member Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272 Midwest 2.4 2.1 4.8 74 33 66.2 24 609 0.27 548 202 East North Central 1.8 1.7 3.8 80 35 71.6 25 666 0.29 595 212 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.0 51 24 46.6 20 410 0.20 377 160 South 3.7 3.4 6.7 52 27 48.1 17 446 0.23 409 144 South Atlantic 3.2 2.9 5.8 58 29 52.6 19 492 0.25 447 163 East South Central 0.4 0.4 0.8 22 10 21.2 6 183 0.08 179 52 West South Central Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q West 0.6 0.6 1.2 48 25 46.8 16 412 0.22 402 138 Mountain 0.2 0.2 0.3 48 24

293

november2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data September 2007 was the eighth warmest September on record for the contiguous United States as reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the month were 24.4 percent above the average for the month of September, and 44.2 percent higher than September 2006. Retail sales of electricity and electricity generation were both higher when compared to September 2006. Electricity generation increased by 6.9 percent, while retail sales of electricity for September 2007 increased by 6.2 percent when compared to September 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for September 2007 was 1.3 percent higher than September 2006 and 2.5 percent lower than the previous month, reflecting the reduced demand for electricity following the

294

may2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: March 2006 The weather through March 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9 percent through March. For March alone heating degree days were down 7.8 percent from last year and were 2.2 percent lower than normal. Because of the warmer weather, year-to-date net generation through March was 1.3 percent less than in 2005, and

295

oil2001.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260 Midwest 1.3 1.3 3.5 48 18 48.1 18 434 0.16 431 162 East North Central 0.9 0.9 2.3 41 15 40.3 15 364 0.13 360 137 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.2 63 25 62.9 23 565 0.23 565 208 South 2.3 2.2 4.5 34 17 32.4 12 338 0.16 320 120 South Atlantic 1.8 1.7 3.5 40 19 37.2

296

c36.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,393 ,393 176 125 81 1.10 1.03 1.21 1.28 0.23 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ................................. 460 Q Q Q 1.21 Q Q Q 0.61 Q Q Q 10,001 to 100,000 ............................. 408 70 Q Q 1.09 1.12 1.29 1.31 0.24 0.11 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................... 524 21 47 Q 1.03 1.05 1.07 1.26 0.14 0.01 0.02 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care........................................ Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office ................................................ 122 8 18 Q 1.16 1.32 1.26 1.44 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others .......................................... 936 Q 59 50 1.12 1.01 1.34 1.26 0.27 0.11 0.04 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before .................................. 612 Q Q Q 1.10 Q Q Q 0.29

297

december2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data

298

december2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, October 2007 was the ninth warmest October on record as reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Accordingly, heating degree days were 32.3 percent below the average for the month of October, and 37.2 percent lower than what was recorded in October 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the United States, cooling degree days were 55.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 89.1 percent higher than October 2006. In October 2007, electricity generation was 3.4 percent higher than what was observed in October 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 5.0 percent when compared to October 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to

299

c26.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,553 3,553 4,844 3,866 2,261 8.56 7.09 8.40 7.28 0.39 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 456 782 599 317 9.84 8.57 9.21 7.94 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 348 427 582 332 9.15 7.54 9.08 7.60 0.56 0.45 0.43 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 502 945 656 422 9.74 7.96 9.41 7.02 0.43 0.39 0.32 0.31 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 408 738 402 317 9.14 6.44 8.60 7.24 0.42 0.33 0.25 0.27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 531 662 493 182 9.08 7.04 8.39 7.26 0.32 0.34 0.23 0.19 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 454 573 555 156 6.94 6.66 Q 6.59 0.27 0.32 0.25 0.17 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 457 423 286 178 7.64 5.97 7.05 6.46 0.29 0.25 0.20 0.18 Over 500,000 ....................................

300

oil1980.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.4 5.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335 Midwest 2.0 1.9 4.4 92 39 84.5 28 728 0.31 669 220 East North Central 1.5 1.4 3.3 92 39 84.4 28 731 0.31 673 220 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.1 93 40 85.0 29 720 0.31 657 220 South 3.6 3.2 6.0 79 42 68.8 26 637 0.34 558 214 South Atlantic 3.5 3.0 5.6 80 43 70.0 27 651 0.35 568 218 East South Central 0.1 0.1 0.3 45 23 45.3 15 365 0.18 365 123 West South Central Q Q Q 68 50 41.1 41 521 0.39 317 317 West 0.6 0.5 1.2 67 30 64.0 24 522 0.24 501 187 Mountain 0.1 0.1 0.2 70 30 64.7 24 534 0.23 494 185 Pacific 0.5 0.5 1.0 66 30 63.8 24 519 0.24 503 187 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 9.5 6.0 17.2 170 60 107.5 40 1,372 0.48 865 324 Central City 4.8 2.1 6.8 249 77 109.3 41 2,014 0.62

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

oil1981.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.6 4.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322 Midwest 2.3 2.2 5.1 86 37 79.5 29 751 0.32 693 254 East North Central 1.7 1.7 3.8 79 35 76.8 28 688 0.31 672 243 West North Central 0.6 0.4 1.3 115 40 87.7 33 993 0.35 759 286 South 2.8 2.5 4.7 56 30 50.2 20 497 0.27 448 180 South Atlantic 2.5 2.2 4.2 56 30 49.7 20 500 0.27 445 182 East South Central 0.3 0.3 0.5 55 31 55.4 20 482 0.27 482 171 West South Central Q Q Q 48 56 48.0 11 425 0.49 425 99 West 0.5 0.5 1.2 63 27 58.4 23 548 0.24 511 197 Mountain 0.1 0.1 0.2 45 24 44.6 18 384 0.20 384 153 Pacific 0.5 0.4 1.0 66 27 60.9 23 580 0.24 534 205 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 8.9 5.5 16.3 157 53 97.4 37 1,402 0.47 868 331 Central City 4.2 1.8 5.9 229 70 98.5 39 2,051 0.62

302

c22.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 16 56 31 2,344 3,994 2,047 6.7 13.9 15.3 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 15 58 46 2,060 4,018 2,953 7.5 14.3 15.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 19 69 53 2,113 3,911 2,993 9.2 17.7 17.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 21 57 27 2,030 3,427 1,593 10.5 16.6 17.2 Over 500,000 .................................... 18 65 29 1,566 2,986 1,357 11.4 21.9

303

december2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: October 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data As the transition from the summer into the fall season continues, October 2006 total net generation declined 2.9 percent from September 2006 due to declining cooling needs. Similarly, October 2006 retail sales of electricity were down 8.4 percent from September 2006. Comparing October 2006 to October 2005, however, net generation increased by 1.8 percent, due to a cooler October in 2006, leading to higher heating demand. October 2006 heating degree days were up 27.4 percent from October 2005. Year-to-date, through October 2006, both total net generation and retail sales of electricity were up 0.3 percent, compared to the first

304

c20.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

76 148 129 143 100 5,673 9,426 7,813 8,157 5,269 13.4 15.7 16.5 17.5 19.1 Laser Printers ... 67 113 84 109 82 5,811 8,950 5,910 7,675...

305

c8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Servers ... 274 684 200 2,796 6,839 1,606 97.9 99.9 124.7 Laser Printers ... 228 525 163 2,784 6,059 1,813 81.9 86.7...

306

c3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dedicated Servers ... 1,175 36,338 30.9 3,760 3,201 103.5 71.6 Laser Printers ... 1,970 33,012 16.8 3,009 1,528 91.2 75.1...

307

c22.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Servers ... 84 322 190 8,136 17,936 10,265 10.4 17.9 18.5 Laser Printers ... 77 233 145 9,240 15,256 8,516 8.3 15.2...

308

c15.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 113 142 241 100 8,143 9,252 12,649 6,294 13.9 15.3 19.1 16.0 Laser Printers ... 76 104 188 86 7,095 8,463 11,566 5,888...

309

c6.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

15,313 13,036 19,117 11,911 16.84 12.69 15.39 20.51 1.88 1.41 1.51 1.89 Laser Printers ... 11,298 10,344 15,714 10,523 16.49 12.40...

310

c10.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

592 1,099 851 762 456 5,673 9,426 7,813 8,157 5,269 104.4 116.6 108.9 93.4 86.6 Laser Printers ... 558 924 565 585 377 5,811 8,950 5,910 7,675...

311

c7.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Servers ... 202 707 754 1,656 6,486 6,456 121.9 109.1 116.8 Laser Printers ... 160 525 606 1,569 5,526 5,678 102.1 95.0...

312

c5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

909 1,028 1,242 581 8,143 9,252 12,649 6,294 111.7 111.1 98.2 92.3 Laser Printers ... 685 834 966 524 7,095 8,463 11,566 5,888...

313

c4.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dedicated Servers ... 1,175 36,338 30.9 59,377 50.6 1.63 15.79 Laser Printers ... 1,970 33,012 16.8 47,880 24.3 1.45 15.91...

314

c16.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10,454 9,056 15,375 10,055 0.09 0.06 0.06 0.10 1.28 0.98 1.22 1.60 Laser Printers ... 7,450 7,000 12,900 8,681 0.10 0.07 0.07...

315

c12.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 771 1,959 1,031 8,136 17,936 10,265 94.7 109.2 100.4 Laser Printers ... 766 1,460 783 9,240 15,256 8,516 82.9 95.7...

316

c9.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Servers ... 359 228 353 4,204 1,959 4,335 85.3 116.6 81.3 Laser Printers ... 278 227 297 3,694 2,165 3,723 75.2 105.0...

317

c14.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Servers ... 508 16.4 11.4 6.9 12.3 20.7 38.3 1.24 0.075 Laser Printers ... 231 13.8 11.3 4.7 9.0 17.6 18.3 1.09...

318

OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls  

Energy Savers [EERE]

US 1 R999 I 1999 214 019 05 AL NNSA NM ALBUQUERQUE US 1 R999 I 2005 215 019 05 AL NNSA TN OAK RIDGE US 1 S000 I 1999 216 019 05 AL NNSA TN OAK RIDGE US 1 S000 I 1999 217 019 05 AL...

319

AAA-CLIMATE.XLS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DATE MAXIMUM MINIMUM AVERAGE DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65F) COOLING DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65F) TOTAL (WATER EQUIVALENT IN IN.) SNOW, ICE PELLETS (SLEET)...

320

Climat.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DATE MAXIMUM MINIMUM AVERAGE DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65F) COOLING DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65F) TOTAL (WATER EQUIVALENT IN IN.) SNOW, ICE PELLETS (SLEET)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

b3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

94 185 272 113 14,357 3,476 3,114 5,157 2,611 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 47 45 304 80 8,814 1,213 1,058 4,942...

322

b15.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 149 23 Q 21 31 23 22 16 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 236 89 64 42 23 16 5 Packaged Heat...

323

c38.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... Q Q Q Q Q Q Packaged Heat Pumps...

324

b27.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

45,071 20,168 28,197 4,370 4,541 2,272 679 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 8,814 8,814 8,688 4,643 295 413 516 Q...

325

b34.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386 276 Q Q 68 3,210 1,767 Q Q 1,068 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 N 37 61 378 8,814 N 670 1,497 6,647...

326

c27.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

22 125 214 410 2,418 3,741 53.1 51.6 57.3 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... Q 37 22 Q 799 591 Q 46.2 36.7 Packaged...

327

c2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

664 14,357 27,349 19,987 4,409 468 2,486 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 476 8,814 14,249 11,629 1,804 50 Q...

328

c33.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,996 0.12 86.6 4.4 0.13 1.10 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... 2,093 0.02 11.1 2.4 0.02 1.13 Packaged...

329

c37.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps ... Q Q Q Q Q Q Packaged Heat Pumps...

330

table_13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected million short tons 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 AEO 1994 999...

331

nstec_home.xls  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2309 NSTec Employees Home Address Counts by State and Zip Code State Postal Total AL 35811 1 AL Total 1 AZ 85032 1 85282 1 85331 1 85353 1 86004 1 86045 1 86305 1 86413 1 86432 1...

332

b33.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Propane Elec- tricity Natural Gas Propane All Buildings* ... 4,645 801 410 457 108 64,783 22,237 13,161 15,438 1,460 Building Floorspace (Square...

333

table10.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,400 60 Years or More... NA NA 824 822 907 966 Race of Householder 1 White... 1,103 1,091 1,028 985 1,099 1,170 Black...

334

November 2014.xls  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury (DOEEIS-0423) 10. Supplemental EIS for the Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury (DOEEIS-0423-S1) 11. Hanford Natural Gas...

335

c30.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

135 246 129 127 51 2,506 4,172 2,922 2,931 2,063 53.8 59.0 44.2 43.2 24.8 Economizer Cycle ... 185 298 125 122 50 3,349 4,824 3,401 3,573 1,508...

336

c36.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Air-Volume System ... 184 30 50 9 1.05 1.11 1.12 1.25 0.08 0.02 0.02 0.01 Economizer Cycle ... 253 21 51 5 1.09 1.08 1.08 1.26 0.11 0.01 0.02...

337

c24.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Air-Volume System ... 2,369 47.2 29.2 19.7 37.9 83.8 17.5 0.35 7.37 Economizer Cycle ... 2,242 46.9 30.4 18.9 41.8 85.7 16.4 0.34 7.30 HVAC...

338

b36.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

14,357 1,576 2,228 3,629 6,924 Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply) Incandescent ... 2,184 Q 506 673 990 38,528 Q 6,483 12,947...

339

All Beams 2013.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1598 29 1079 9 1070 3.8 3.8 20.1 78 Kr 77.920 40 3117 140 622 20 602 14.2 14.4 41.4 Proton 1.007 40 40 0.1 8148 1.2 8147 0.012 0.012 0.56 Available Beams 40 A MeV 25 A MeV 15 A MeV...

340

RangeTables.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MeVcmmg) LET vs. Range in Si for 25 MeV SEE Beams (low LET) 4 He 14 N 0 0.5 1 1.5 0 600 1200 1800 2400 3000 3600 4 He 14 N 22 Ne 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 100 200 300 400 500...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

September 2014.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WA (DOEEIS-0467) FOSSIL ENERGY 13. Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, CA (DOEEIS-0431) NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 14....

342

eia-857.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Electric Power Other (not included in above categories) Total of all deliveries (Lines 3.0 through 12.0) Does any information provided in lines 1-13 include prior period...

343

table14.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Years... NA NA 1,497 1,736 1,727 2,239 Households Without Children... NA NA 882 1,011 1,100 1,241...

344

table7.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

17 Years... NA NA 28.9 28.0 29.9 34.0 Households Without Children... NA NA 16.3 16.5 18.9 19.6 One...

345

table3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 Years... NA NA 13.8 13.8 15.2 18.2 Households Without Children... NA NA 87.7 86.2 92.2 111.2 One...

346

oil1984.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

21 763 0.37 468 160 Other 0.5 0.2 0.6 281 77 81.6 25 1,941 0.53 564 175 Householder of Hispanic Descent Yes 0.8 0.3 1.0 235 65 78.7 23 1,619 0.45 542 158 No 16.7 13.5 31.0 88 38...

347

table8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to 17 Years... NA NA 8.7 8.4 9.6 12.0 Households Without Children... NA NA 46.0 44.0 50.2 60.0 One...

348

table12.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 Years... NA NA 8.5 10.0 11.1 15.9 Households Without Children... NA NA 45.3 52.2 58.0 76.6 One...

349

oil1990.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households that Use Fuel OilKerosene, 1990 Residential Buildings Average Fuel Oil...

350

a8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q N N Q N Food Service ... 1,654 1,375 246 Q N N N Health Care ... 3,163 2,004 735 Q Q Q N Inpatient...

351

c28.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ... Q 42 Q Q 339 Q Q 123.8 Q Health Care ... Q Q 17 Q 508 196 Q 87.5 86.2 Inpatient...

352

c29.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ... 37 Q Q 211 Q Q 175.7 Q Q Health Care ... 26 19 19 282 162 274 91.4 115.5 68.7...

353

c23.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Service ... 870 141.2 72.0 77.0 150.3 301.8 7.1 1.16 8.20 Health Care ... 3,283 92.5 44.1 19.1 40.1 65.7 21.5 0.60...

354

b24.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

188 210 186 84 Q Food Service ... 297 282 283 297 284 Q Health Care ... 129 124 129 127 12 Q Inpatient...

355

c21.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

51.1 Q Food Service ... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3...

356

c31.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Q Q Food Service ... 149 48 N 774 622 N 192.5 77.2 N Health Care ... 12 37 187 233 520 1,792 49.5 70.8...

357

b29.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

437 568 Q N Food Service ... 1,654 1,608 436 957 Q Q Health Care ... 3,163 3,100 592 1,972 Q 388 Inpatient...

358

b18.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

N Q Q Food Service ... 1,654 1,547 489 1,058 N Q N Q Q Health Care ... 3,163 2,662 1,611 1,051 N 501 121 Q...

359

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.5 9.5 3.5 Food Service ... 7.4 9.0 10.5 6.5 8.4 3.5 Health Care ... 10.0 6.9 8.2 11.4 3.9 5.6 Inpatient...

360

c13.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 213 38.4 20.3 18.8 37.4 70.3 17.4 3.13 0.082 Health Care ... 564 22.9 11.5 6.1 12.0 18.4 37.9 1.54...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q N Food Service ... 297 1,654 6,865 5,176 1,615 Q Q Health Care ... 129 3,163 7,440 4,882 1,538 79 Q...

362

c11.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q Q Food Service ... 318 108 Q 986 664 Q 322.9 163.2 Q Health Care ... 32 104 457 445 835 1,883 71.8 125.1...

363

table5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

215 215 1,353 1,511 1,602 1,793 2,287 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 227 248 274 295 299 378 New England........................................................ 64 64 67 75 84 122 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 164 184 208 221 215 256 Midwest ................................................................. 298 327 379 403 479 560 East North Central............................................... 198 216 263 296 335 385 West North Central ............................................. 99 111 115 108 144 175 South..................................................................... 436 486 534 571 655 871 South Atlantic.......................................................

364

b22.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 144 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391 451 67 33 502 132 Table B22. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Number of Workers (main shift) Fewer than 5 ..................................... 2,653 2,425 2,415 1,082 252 20 Q 318 84 5 to 9 ................................................ 778 775 775 474 67 Q Q 75 Q 10 to 19 ............................................. 563 563 563 359 38 Q Q 59 Q 20 to 49 ............................................. 398 397 397

365

table12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 5.1 99.1 81.1 98.2 104.7 150.3 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 17.5 17.6 14.2 17.8 17.2 24.3 New England........................................................ 4.7 4.4 3.5 4.5 4.8 8.1 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 12.8 13.2 10.7 13.3 12.4 16.2 Midwest ................................................................. 24.0 24.7 20.4 25.0 26.5 37.4 East North Central............................................... 16.0 16.1 14.0 17.9 18.5 25.7 West North Central ............................................. 8.0 8.7 6.3 7.1 8.0 11.7 South..................................................................... 34.2 35.7 29.1 34.9 37.7 54.4 South Atlantic.......................................................

366

b10.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

One One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Build- ings* One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,136 1,031 339 128 12 64,783 25,981 16,270 7,501 10,085 4,947 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,014 411 115 Q N 6,789 5,192 1,217 343 Q N 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 564 239 70 Q N 6,585 4,150 1,814 504 Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 399 248 74 18 Q 11,535 6,160 3,966 1,115 292 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 92 77 46 26 Q 8,668 3,296 2,772 1,631 964 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 46 35 21 25 Q 9,057 3,187 2,456 1,481 1,822 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 16 13

367

table4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.8 .8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 New England........................................................ 1.8 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.9 1.9 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 Midwest ................................................................. 1.8 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 East North Central............................................... 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 West North Central ............................................. 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.9 2.0 South..................................................................... 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 South Atlantic.......................................................

368

b5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 2,964 9,941 11,595 5,485 12,258 3,393 7,837 3,675 7,635 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 360 666 974 922 1,207 538 788 464 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 359 764 843 722 1,387 393 879 418 820 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 553 1,419 1,934 1,164 2,240 810 1,329 831 1,256 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 347 944 1,618 949 1,672 498 998 511 1,132 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 516 1,524 1,618 642 1,470 650 1,314 374 948 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 414 1,703 1,682 614 2,087 Q 1,131 Q 895 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,673 1,801 395 1,072

369

b17.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 4,011 1,841 2,029 141 635 46 164 425 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,272 980 1,205 87 280 Q 77 183 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 783 384 375 Q 106 Q Q 87 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 625 320 293 Q 113 Q 40 64 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 185 91 86 Q 56 Q 16 36 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 82 35 40 Q 47 Q 9 37 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 21 20 Q 22 Q 8 12 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 16 7 8 Q 9 2 1 5 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5 2 3 N 2 1 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 141 83 58 N 245 Q 59 175 Food Sales ....................................... 226 224 94 130 N Q N

370

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2006 October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) All Buildings .................................... 4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 882 11,529 13.1 4.8 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,229 18,808 15.3 5.0 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 701 12,503 17.8 4.8 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,336 17,630 13.2 4.5 2,000 CDD or More and -- Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 711 11,189 15.7 5.0 Number of Establishments One ...................................................

371

table11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 5.1 16.1 18.3 19.3 19.8 20.2 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 15.6 NA 19.6 20.9 20.7 20.9 New England........................................................ 16.5 NA 19.7 21.1 20.4 21.0 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 15.3 NA 19.6 20.8 20.8 20.8 Midwest ................................................................. 14.8 NA 18.2 19.0 20.1 20.2 East North Central............................................... 14.9 NA 18.4 19.4 20.1 20.3 West North Central ............................................. 14.5 NA 17.8 17.9 20.0 20.0 South..................................................................... 15.0 NA 18.0 19.2 19.6 20.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

372

b22.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391 451 67 33 502 132 Table B22. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Number of Workers (main shift) Fewer than 5 ..................................... 2,653 2,425 2,415 1,082 252 20 Q 318 84 5 to 9 ................................................ 778 775 775 474 67 Q Q 75 Q 10 to 19 ............................................. 563 563 563 359 38 Q Q 59 Q 20 to 49 ............................................. 398 397 397 289 36 16 6 30 13 50 to 99 .............................................

373

b45.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,176 1,007 666 308 696 2,370 996 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,591 486 332 142 353 1,159 268 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 642 188 124 65 117 494 181 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 548 138 75 40 103 427 250 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 196 78 44 19 53 148 134 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 114 60 44 19 34 81 89 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 58 36 29 13 23 41 48 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 21 16 14 7 9 16 19 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 5 5 3 3 4 6 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 254 93 59 31 54 203 113 Food Sales ....................................... 226 212

374

b9.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 3,769 6,871 7,045 8,101 10,772 10,332 12,360 5,533 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 490 796 860 690 966 1,149 1,324 515 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 502 827 643 865 1,332 721 1,209 486 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 804 988 1,421 1,460 1,869 1,647 2,388 958 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 677 838 935 1,234 1,720 1,174 1,352 739 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 491 641 927 1,483 1,146 1,390 2,058 921 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 Q 704 1,148 1,039 1,411 1,496 1,934 1,060 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,288 569 947 1,243 1,237 984 609 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q 790 541 382 1,085 1,518 1,111 Q Principal Building Activity

375

Summer Tables.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 September 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 9, 2008 Release Highlights The monthly average price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased from over $133 per barrel in June and July to about $117 per barrel in August, reflecting expectations of a slowdown in world petroleum demand growth. WTI, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, is projected to average $116 per barrel in 2008. Projected stronger growth in world petroleum demand is expected to increase the annual average WTI price to $126 per barrel in 2009. The weekly price of regular-grade gasoline, which peaked at $4.11 per gallon on July 14, averaged $3.65 per gallon on September 8. Annual average retail

376

july2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the contiguous U.S., the overall temperature for May 2007 was 2.1ºF (1.2ºC) above the average temperature observed for the month of May over the 1971-2000 time period. This was the 11th warmest May on record, with most of the contiguous U.S. observing warmer-than-normal temperatures except for Texas and South Carolina. Heating degree days for May 2007 were 32.7 percent below the normal observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 21.9 percent lower than what was recorded in May 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the U.S., cooling degree days for May 2007 were 7.7 percent above the 1971-2000 normal, and 2.8 percent higher than what was recorded in May 2006.

377

web_comments.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rec Type Rec Type Recommendations/ Comments Name Organization 1/9/2004 Reliability Standards Future reliability standards must strike a balance between detailed, rigid requirements, which provide little or no latitude for deviation, and standards, which are objective-based and allow for innovation and invention to achieve intended goals. Each standard should identify its importance on the BPS reliability in terms of the potential short-term (operating time horizon) vs. long-term (planning time horizon) impacts of non-compliance. Ajay Garg, Mike Penstone Hydro One Networks Inc. 1/9/2004 Reliability Standards Core Reliability Standards: comprising a small number of technical standards designed to enable the BPS to withstand and recover from unexpected contingencies. Core Reliability

378

January 2014.XLS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 - 2012 5 - 2012 2013 2014 2015 ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY - ENERGY Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1. Engineered High Energy Crops Programmatic EIS (DOE/EIS-0481) ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY 2. Presidential Permit Application, Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line (DOE/EIS-0447) 3. Presidential Permit Application, Northern Pass Transmission LLC, NH (DOE/EIS-0463) 4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (DOE/EIS-0486) 5. Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic EIS (DOE/EIS-0459) ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 6. Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste

379

b14.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 12,208 3,939 1,090 3,754 4,050 10,078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 1,382 336 122 416 1,034 895 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 938 518 Q 744 722 868 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 1,887 1,077 Q 1,235 1,021 2,064 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,506 301 Q 930 560 1,043 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 1,209 474 Q Q Q 1,494 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 1,428 868 Q Q Q 1,162 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,493 Q Q Q Q 1,322 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,365 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 749 323 Q 586 Q 254 1920 to 1945 .....................................

380

b26.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,766 2,165 360 65 372 113 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 888 1,013 196 Q 243 72 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 349 450 86 Q 72 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 311 409 46 18 38 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 114 151 11 9 11 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 60 84 8 8 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 29 39 9 9 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 11 15 4 4 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 3 4 1 2 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 180 186 21 25 36 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 98 79 Q N Q Q Food Service .....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

table2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 89 89 89 87 92 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 77 NA 79 83 75 85 New England........................................................ 88 NA 82 83 82 89 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 74 NA 78 82 74 84 Midwest ................................................................. 86 NA 91 90 92 91 East North Central............................................... 82 NA 89 90 92 91 West North Central ............................................. 94 NA 95 91 94 94 South..................................................................... 87 NA 91 91 89 96 South Atlantic....................................................... 87 NA 89 90 88 94 East South Central...............................................

382

Table 4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Report Name Sector Reduction Type Project Level Entity Level A&N Electric Cooperative Electric Providers Indirect 6,243 AES Hawaii, Inc. Electric Providers Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 AES SeaWest, Inc. Electric Providers Direct 16 Indirect 220,420 AES Shady Point, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 AES Thames, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 410,000 410,000 AES Warrior Run, LLC Electric Providers Direct 41,386 41,386 Alabama Biomass Partners, Ltd Alternative Energy Unspecified (EZ) 77,012 Alcan Primary Products Corporation, Sebree Works Industrial Direct 457,800 457,800 Algonquin Power - Cambrian Pacific Genco LLC Alternative Energy

383

eia857.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

operational sendout to consumers of gas owned and not owned operational sendout to consumers of gas owned and not owned Residential Industrial Electric Power Other (not included in above categories) Residential Commercial (excluding vehicle fuel) Vehicle Fuel Industrial Electric Power Other (not included in above categories) Total of all deliveries (Lines 3.0 through 12.0) Heat content of gas delivered to consumers (Btu/cubic ft.): 6.0 4.1 (Specify Type) ................................................................... Deliveries of natural gas that you do not own to consumers within the report State U. S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 12.0 Revenue (Mcf @ 14.73 psia-60 o F) (Including taxes) Call: (Mcf @ 14.73 psia-60 o F) (877) 800-5261 Cost Questions? Volume (Including taxes)

384

b6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 49 Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 2,552 889 738 241 129 65 25 7 Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Building Size Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any Elevators .................................... 309 Q 29 61 81 57 41 19 5 Number of Elevators One ................................................. 208 Q 29 57 62 29 11 4 Q Two to Five .....................................

385

table1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.2 2.2 77.7 81.3 84.6 84.9 98.9 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 13.9 15.0 15.2 16.0 14.7 17.7 New England........................................................ 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.1 5.4 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 10.1 11.3 11.6 12.1 10.7 12.3 Midwest ................................................................. 18.3 19.5 20.4 21.1 21.6 23.6 East North Central............................................... 12.3 13.2 14.3 15.1 15.1 16.3 West North Central ............................................. 6.0 6.4 6.1 6.0 6.5 7.3 South..................................................................... 24.7 27.0 28.3 29.5 30.2 36.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

386

b38.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,982 476 1,864 819 65 579 953 205 Table B38. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 2,566 334 1,193 550 14 190 682 140 Two ................................................... 1,031 960 97 487 174 19 194 207 50 Three ................................................ 339 319 31 155 68 10 119 41 Q Four to Nine ...................................... 128 125 11 28 25 19 69 20 4 Ten or More ......................................

387

b43.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 4,248 2,184 3,943 941 455 565 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,261 1,070 2,068 382 101 205 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 821 416 772 148 88 107 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 716 412 665 189 105 123 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 231 145 223 102 60 55 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 126 75 123 60 51 37 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 63 43 62 38 32 25 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 17 24 16 13 10 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 5 6 5 4 4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 384 132 368 97 59 39 Food Sales ....................................... 226 221 78 217 35 Q Q Food Service .....................................

388

table8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80.3 80.3 83.9 82.4 82.8 90.6 113.1 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 14.5 14.6 14.0 14.1 14.5 18.1 New England........................................................ 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.5 4.1 5.8 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 10.7 11.0 10.6 10.6 10.4 12.3 Midwest ................................................................. 20.2 20.9 20.8 21.3 23.8 27.8 East North Central............................................... 13.3 13.5 14.3 15.2 16.7 19.1 West North Central ............................................. 6.8 7.4 6.5 6.0 7.2 8.7 South..................................................................... 29.1 30.7 29.6 29.8 33.5 43.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

389

b40.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,841 581 260 383 Q Q 678 58 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 732 207 78 134 Q Q 367 26 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 629 140 87 114 Q 26 332 26 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 216 47 33 62 6 19 119 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 118 19 20 27 5 24 67 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 8 8 16 6 17 32 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 4 4 4 2 10 13 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 1 1 1 3 3 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 352 59 63 87 14 36 139 Q Q Food Sales .......................................

390

a3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 8 23 25 10 26 11 21 7 15 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 3 12 14 5 18 Q 10 3 7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 3 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales .......................................

391

b31.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,472 1,910 1,445 94 27 128 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,715 1,020 617 41 N 66 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 725 386 307 Q Q 27 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 607 301 285 16 Q 27 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 217 110 114 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 119 53 70 Q 5 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 27 35 Q 5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 9 14 Q 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 3 3 Q 1 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 298 144 149 10 6 15 Food Sales ....................................... 226 186 109 68 Q N Q Food Service .....................................

392

b7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Square Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 6,789 6,585 11,535 8,668 9,057 9,064 7,176 5,908 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ....................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 3,163 165 280 313 157 364 395 514 973 Inpatient .......................................... 1,905 N N Q Q Q Q 467 973 Outpatient ....................................... 1,258 165 280 312 Q 206 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 5,096 99

393

eia-910.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 calendar days following the end of the report period. U. S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Email: Year: If...

394

eia191.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

EIA-191 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Storage Field Name Reservoir Name Location State Location County Total Storage Field Capacity (Mcf) Maximum...

395

Chapter 09 - Accounting for Inventory and Related Property  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5-4-2012 5-4-2012 9-1 CHAPTER 9 ACCOUNTING FOR INVENTORY AND RELATED PROPERTY 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the DOE inventory and related property managerial accounting policies and general procedures defined by statutory requirements, FASAB, and other Federal guidance as required. b. Background. In the Department of Energy (DOE), the term "inventory" has been used broadly to cover inventory, materials, and other related property. In this chapter the term is used as defined in the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards No. 3 (SFFAS No. 3), "Accounting for Inventory and Related Property," promulgated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on October 27, 1993. In this

396

DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory March 12, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released a Policy Statement on the management of the Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory, providing the framework within which DOE will make decisions concerning future use and disposition of its inventory. During the coming year, DOE will continue its ongoing program for downblending excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) into low enriched uranium (LEU), evaluate the benefits of enriching a portion of its excess natural uranium into LEU, and complete an analysis on enriching and/or selling some of its depleted uranium. Specific transactions are expected to occur in

397

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Environmental Research Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nies.go.jp/gaiyo/media_kit/9.WGIA_I067.pdf Country: Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia Screenshot

398

Correlation of Price to Inventory Levels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Notes: Gasoline prices move with changes in crude oil prices, and crude prices have varied significantly over the past decade, as illustrated above with the monthly average spot prices for West Texas Intermediate crude oil. Gasoline prices were as low as 91 cents per gallon in early 1999 when crude prices were very low, and were around $1.56 per gallon mid to late September 2000 when crude prices were high, even though the peak gasoline demand season was over at that point. We have observed that crude oil., like other commodities, responds to basic market fundamentals of supply and demand. Inventories are a good means of measuring the balance between demand and supply in the marketplace, and thus are a good barometer of price pressure. For example, when demand exceeds supply over and above the typical situation,

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - archaeological inventory research Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inventory research Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: archaeological inventory research Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Center for...

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - autoradiographic inventory methods Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF EMISSIONS INVENTORIES: WHAT HAS BEEN DONEWHAT NEEDS... in National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, Paris, France October 13-15, 1998 12;- 1 - ... Source: Brookhaven...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emissions inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - air emission inventory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) The goals of the inventory were to determine how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Duke is responsible... Emissions Inventoried 12;2004 Greenhouse Gas...

403

Earth Forms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Earth Forms narrates and explains the Masters Project Exhibition by the same name. The sculptures included in the exhibition, Earth Forms, use a variety of (more)

Mock, Janelle Marie Tullis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Below are links to life cycle inventory (LCI) databases, life cycle assessment (LCA) information, LCA tools, research institutes utilizing LCA, labeling initiatives and organizations, international LCA initiatives, LCA online forums. Life Cycle Inventory Data Ecoinvent: Swiss Centre for Life Cycle Inventories IVAM LCA Data 4: Dutch LCA Database KITECH (Korea Institute of Industrial Technology): Korea National Cleaner Production Center LCI Database Life Cycle Assessment Information IERE (The Institute for Environmental Research and Education): The American Center for Life Cycle Assessment SETAC (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry): SETAC Life Cycle Assessment SPOLD (Society for Promotion of Life-cycle Assessment Development): 2.0 LCA Consultants homepage

405

Time-to-Produce, Inventory, and Asset Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in-process. Although there is no de- preciation in inventory given the real good assumption, the agent pays storage costs 3In the steady state, ? ( S K ) = SK and ? ? ( S K ) = 1, where S and K are the project and capital stock at the steady state. 12 1970... 1980 1990 2000 2010 -4 -2 0 2 Percent Q GDP (a) Cyclical Component of Real GDP and Inventory Holdings 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 -4 -2 0 2 Percent Q CGDP (b) Cyclical Component of Real GDP and Inventory/Consumption Ratio Fig. 2...

Chen, Zhanhui

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

involves developing and maintaining waste tank inventories comprising 25 chemical and 46 radionuclide components in the 177 Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These BBIs...

409

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

involves developing and maintaining waste tank inventories comprising 25 chemical and 46 radionuclide components in the 177 Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These...

410

Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." 1, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." Dataset Summary Description This is an electric utility data file that includes such information as peak load, generation, electric purchases, sales, revenues, customer counts and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and distributed generation capacity. The data source is the survey Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." Data for all years are final. The file F861yr09.exe is a file of data collected on the Form EIA-861, Annual Electric Power Industry Report, for the reporting period, calendar year 2009. The zipped .exe file contains 11 .xls files and one Word file, and a .pdf of the Form EIA-861. The data file structure detailed here also applies to data files for prior

411

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

412

Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website Focus Area: Other Crosscutting Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.getagriponemissions.com/index-cycle.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/greenhouse-gas-regional-inventory-pro Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: "Lead by Example" is not in the list of possible values (Audit Programs, Demonstration & Implementation, Green Power/Voluntary RE Purchase, High Performance Buildings, Industry Codes & Standards, Project Development, Public Tenders, Procurement, & Lead Examples, Public-Private Partnerships, Retrofits, Ride Share, Bike Share, etc., Technical Assistance, Training & Education, Voluntary Appliance & Equipment Labeling, Voluntary Industry Agreements) for this property.

413

Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Estimate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appendix B: Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Appendix B: Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Estimate Biomass Density of Tropical Forests: Application to Tropical Africa S. Brown and G. Gaston U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvalis, OR 97333, USA Abstract One of the most important databases needed for estimating emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from changes in the cover, use, and management of tropical forests is the total quantity of biomass per unit area, referred to as biomass density. Forest inventories have been shown to be valuable sources of data for estimating biomass density, but inventories for the tropics are few in number and their quality is poor. This lack of reliable data has been overcome by use of a promising approach that produces

414

Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards agreements,

415

Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasting Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels MICHAEL YE, ∗ JOHN ZYREN, ∗∗ AND JOANNE SHORE ∗∗ Abstract This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermedi- ate crude oil spot price using OECD petroleum inventory levels. Theoretically, petroleum inventory levels are a measure of the balance, or imbalance, between petroleum production and demand, and thus provide a good market barometer of crude oil price change. Based on an understanding of petroleum market fundamentals and observed market behavior during the post-Gulf War period, the model was developed with the objectives of being both simple and practical, with required data readily available. As a result, the model is useful to industry and government decision-makers in forecasting price and investigat- ing the impacts of changes on price, should inventories,

416

Mirage: Mitigating Illicit Inventorying in a RFID Enabled Retail Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given its low dollar and maintenance cost, RFID is poised to become the enabling technology for inventory control and supply chain management. However, as an outcome of its low cost, RFID based inventory control is susceptible to pernicious security and privacy threats. A deleterious attack on such a system is corporate espionage, where attackers through illicit inventorying infer sales and restocking trends for products. In this paper, we first present plausible aftermaths of corporate espionage using real data from online sources. Second, to mitigate corporate espionage in a retail store environment, we present a simple lowcost system called Mirage. Mirage uses additional programmable low cost passive RFID tags called honeytokens to inject noise in retail store inven-torying. Using a simple history based algorithm that controls activation and de-activation of honeytokens, Mirage randomizes sales and restocking trends. We evaluate Mirage in a real warehouse environment using a commercial off-the-shelf Motoro...

White, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FRASER BASIN LANDFILL INVENTORY DOE FRAP 1997-19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term sustainability of the Fraser River Basin. Inventories of point and non-point sources of pollution from both's WASTE database, Federal Indian Band Landfill investigations, and BC Environment's Municipal Landfill

418

Strategic inventory management in an aerospace supply chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces multiple methods to set and optimize inventory levels. These methods are then classified based on the complexity involved to implement them. As an organization develops a deeper understanding of ...

Mauro, Joseph (Joseph Peter)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Deru, M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARCHIVE MAP CASE Inventory DRAWER 1 Archive supplies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARCHIVE MAP CASE Inventory DRAWER 1 Archive supplies DRAWER 2 Empty DRAWER 3 Empty DRAWER 4 Cyrus Road Cars Oil Man #12;DRAWER 9 Michael Wallis papers oversize Promotional posters and banners for Cars

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

422

Preliminary GHG Emissions Inventory for the Slovak Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a greenhouse gas emissions inventory for the Slovak Republic. The key gases included are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Chlorofluorocarbons are excluded ...

Katarna Mare?kova; Pavol Bielek; Stanislav Kucirek

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Psychometric properties of the revised marital satisfaction inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the psychometric properties of the Revised marital Satisfaction Inventory (MSI-R) using archival data from previous validation studies of the original instrument. Normalized T-scores were identified for each of the 11 revised...

Aikman, Grace Glass

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Strategic inventory management of externally sourced medical devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this research was to determine inventory strategies for externally sourced medical devices. In the medical device industry, the desire for high levels of customer service often results in less than optimal ...

Hillstrom, Nichole L. (Nichole Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Legal issues in clouds: towards a risk inventory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Various research areas have developed risk inventories for determining how certain risks can be managed and evaluated to be brought up to an acceptable level-[23]. Most of the steps towards creating the risk inventoryvary across the different...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inventories and the short-run dynamics of commodity prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I examine the behavior of inventories and their role in the short-run dynamics of commodity production and price. Competitive producers of a storable commodity react to price changes by balancing costs of changing production ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Information Role of Spot Prices and Inventories  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information Role of Spot Prices and Inventories James L. Smith, Rex Thompson, and Thomas Lee June 24, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information...

428

Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inventories and Performance Inventories and Performance Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance October 7, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides links to progress data tables illustrating Federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by the Federal agencies: Federal GHG Requirements Overview E.O. 13514 required Federal agencies to set individual targets for reduction of combined Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. When all agency targets are combined, the overall target for the entire Federal Government is a 28% reduction in FY 2020 compared to FY 2008. GHG emissions from certain

429

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data. * Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making tool. * Maintain compatibility with international LCI databases. * Provide exceptional data accessibility.

430

Proton inventory investigations of acyl transfer reactions: transition state structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTON INVENTORY INVESTIGATIONS OF ACYL TRANSFER REACTIONS: TRANSITION STATE STRUCTURES A Thesis by JACOB FLOYD PATTERSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Chemistry PROTON INVENTORY INVESTIGATIONS OF ACYL TRANSFER REACTIONS: TRANSITION STATE STRUCTURES A Thesis by JACOB FLOYD PATTERSON Approved as to style and content by: airman o omm ttee Ya~~+ ea o...

Patterson, Jacob Floyd

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the subbasin but also the utility and success of those activities. Below is a preview of the web-based form. The preview of the web-based form is provided below so that you may collect the information you will need to the web-based survey is http://clientzone.golder.com/YSBI/Site/Login.asp As you are filling out the web

432

Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

434

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve LEDS Capacity Building and Training Activities and Resources Upcoming Capacity Building Events CLEAN shares capacity building activity information to encourage technical institutions to better coordinate efforts and avoid duplication of effort. If you are aware of an upcoming LEDS-related training or capacity building event please add it to the calendar below. Add Capacity Building or Training Event Webinars Title Developer Biopower Tool Webinar National Renewable Energy Laboratory United States Department of Energy Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) CESC-Webinar: Building an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Driven Economy: How Policies Can Foster Risk Capital Investment in Renewable Energy Clean Energy Solutions Center

435

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the volume of low level waste resulting from a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. This study provides an estimate of Class A/B/C low level waste (LLW), greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed LLW and mixed GTCC waste generated from the following initial set of fuel cycles and recycling processes: 1. Operations at a geologic repository based upon a once through light

436

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory Low Level Waste Disposition - Quantity and Inventory This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the volume of low level waste resulting from a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. This study provides an estimate of Class A/B/C low level waste (LLW), greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed LLW and mixed GTCC waste generated from the following initial set of fuel cycles and recycling processes: 1. Operations at a geologic repository based upon a once through light

437

EEOC FORM  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Management Directive-715 Fiscal Year 2012 DOE NNSA February 4, 2013 i National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy ANNUAL EEO PROGRAM STATUS REPORT EEO PLAN TO ATTAIN THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A MODEL EEO PROGRAM Table of Contents Page FORM 715-01 Part A Department or Agency Identifying Information......................1 FORM 715-01 Part B Total Employment....................................................................1 FORM 715-01 Part C Agency Official(s) Responsible for oversight of EEO Program(s)................................................................................................................1

438

order form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Customer Order Form Customer Order Form Fermilab Education Office - Customer Order Form PO BOX 500, MS 777, Batavia, IL 60510 * ph. 630-840-8258 * fax 630-840-2500 * avarry@fnal.gov Date: This order be: SHIPPED PICKED UP? Bill to: Ship to: Contact/Institution name: Email: Phone: Fax: Payment method (please circle): Visa/MasterCard - Check - Purchase Order  Visa/MasterCard # P.O. # Exp Date: Quantity Ordered Item Name Item Description (color, size, etc.) Price Each Total Amount  For purchases over $200 only *IL residents ONLY: Add 7.5% sales tax to your order.

439

Benefits of dealing with uncertainty in greenhouse gas inventories: introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assessment of greenhouse gases emitted to and removed from the atmosphere is high on the international political and scientific agendas. Growing international concern and cooperation regarding the climate change problem have increased the need for policy-oriented solutions to the issue of uncertainty in, and related to, inventories of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The approaches to addressing uncertainty discussed in this Special Issue reflect attempts to improve national inventories, not only for their own sake but also from a wider, systems analytical perspective-a perspective that seeks to strengthen the usefulness of national inventories under a compliance and/or global monitoring and reporting framework. These approaches demonstrate the benefits of including inventory uncertainty in policy analyses. The authors of the contributed papers show that considering uncertainty helps avoid situations that can, for example, create a false sense of certainty or lead to invalid views of subsystems. This may eventually prevent related errors from showing up in analyses. However, considering uncertainty does not come for free. Proper treatment of uncertainty is costly and demanding because it forces us to make the step from 'simple to complex' and only then to discuss potential simplifications. Finally, comprehensive treatment of uncertainty does not offer policymakers quick and easy solutions. The authors of the papers in this Special Issue do, however, agree that uncertainty analysis must be a key component of national GHG inventory analysis. Uncertainty analysis helps to provide a greater understanding and better science helps us to reduce and deal with uncertainty. By recognizing the importance of identifying and quantifying uncertainties, great strides can be made in ongoing discussions regarding GHG inventories and accounting for climate change. The 17 papers in this Special Issue deal with many aspects of analyzing and dealing with uncertainty in emissions estimates.

Jonas, Matthias [IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria; Winiwarter, Wilfried [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna, Austria; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; White, Thomas [Canadian Forest Service; Nahorski, Zbigniew [Systems Research Institute, Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw, Poland; Bun, Rostyslav [Lviv Polytech National University, Lviv, Ukraine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols EPA/IAI PFC Measurement Protocol (PDF 243 KB) Download Acrobat Reader EPA and the International Aluminium Institute have collaborated with the global primary aluminium industry to develop a standard facility-specific PFC emissions measurement protocol. Use of the protocol will help ensure the consistency and accuracy of measurements. International Aluminum Institute's Aluminum Sector Greenhouse Gas Protocol (PDF 161 KB) Download Acrobat Reader The International Aluminum Institute (IAI) Aluminum Sector Addendum to the WBCSD/WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable Development/World Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and reporting protocol.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Form Approved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION: The items RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION Company Name and OTHER PARTY NAME (Item 1.A.), and SELLER'S NAME (Item 3.B.) on Form EIA-858 are DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION: The items RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION Company Name and OTHER PARTY NAME (Item 1.A.), and SELLER'S NAME (Item 3.B.) on Form EIA-858 are NOT considered confidential and may be publicly released in identifiable form. All other information you provide will be used for statistical purposes only. In accordance with the Confidential Information Protection provisions of Title V, Subtitle A of Public Law 107-347 and other applicable Federal laws, your responses will be kept confidential and will not be disclosed in identifiable form to anyone other than employees or agents without your consent. By law, every EIA employee, as well as every agent, is subject to a jail term, a fine of up to $250,000, or both if he or she discloses ANY identifiable information about you.

442

Evaluation of transuranium isotopes inventory for Candu/ACR standard and SEU spent fuel and the possibility to transmute them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The main disadvantage of nuclear energy is the quantity of long lived radioactive waste produced in a NPP. Transmutation could be one of the solutions to reduce it. Waste transmutation will require a suitable deployment of techniques for spent fuel reprocessing. At present, reprocessing is done by aqueous methods that are very efficient for Pu separation (up to 99.9%). For transmutation applications, new partitioning processes must be developed for minor actinides separation from the high level waste. Although these processes are still very much at the research stage, industrial scale-up will result in the deployment of new, more specific separation techniques for transmutation applications. Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) techniques could contribute to reduce the radioactive inventory and its associated radio-toxicity. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce both the mass and the radio-toxicity of the nuclear waste to be stored in a deep geological repository, and to reduce the time needed to reach the radioactivity level of the raw material originally used to produce energy. The first stage in the transmutation process is the isotopes inventory formed in the spent fuel. In this paper is made an intercomparison evaluation using WIMS 5B.12 and ORIGEN computer codes. Using these two codes, there is evaluated the isotopes released by a fuel standard from a Candu reactor. Moreover, there is simulated an inventory released by a Candu-SEU reactor and an ACR reactor. (authors)

Ghizdeanu, Elena Nineta; Pavelescu, Alexandru [University Politehnica of Bucharest - Faculty of Power Engineering, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060042, Bucharest 6 (Romania); Balaceanu, Victoria [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation Multiperiod Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Competitive Supply Chain Networks with Inventorying and A Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation

Nagurney, Anna

444

Registration Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SNAP COLLABORATION MEETING JUNE 1 - 3, 2006 REGISTRATION FORM To register, please fill out the registration form below and click on the "SEND" button. Your registration will allow us to make security access and hospitality arrangements for you. Deadline: Please register NLT Wednesday, May 24, 2006. 1. Your Name (Last, First): 2. Your Institution: 3. Email address: 4. Citizenship (for non-DOE employees/guests): 5. Arrival date: 6. Departure Date: 7. Will you be attending the working dinner on Thursday, June 1? Yes No 8. Any dietary restrictions? Please click on the "Send" button below to email this form automatically to snap@lbl.gov. An automatic email reply receipt confirmation will be sent back to your email address. Send Reset Thank you!

445

Multi-echelon inventory management for a fresh produce retail supply chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perishability presents a challenging problem in inventory management for the fresh produce industry since it can lead to higher inventory costs and lower service levels. If a supply chain has multiple echelons, that further ...

Suryawanshi, Yogeshwar D. (Yogeshwar Dattatraya)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Developing global inventory and resupply forecasting policies for the vaccines industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appropriate inventory management is important for many businesses throughout the world. For the vaccines industry, appropriate inventory policies impact both the business' profitability and people's lives. An optimal policy ...

Stark, Julia (Julia Anne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Johnson and Johnson journey deploying SmartOps for multi-echelon inventory optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-echelon inventory technology enables firms to significantly reduce inventory costs. It gives managers the ability to make tradeoffs based on information from the entire supply chain, which results in a more powerful ...

Hayden, Arnita

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

Mason, R.G. (Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp., Houston, TX (US))

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

INVENTORY -EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY - EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department: Principal Investigator: SARA Reporter) 75-71-8 Dielectric Oil 64742-53-6 Emetine Dihydrochloride 316-42-7 Formaldehyde 50-00-0 Fuel Oil, #2 (Inside) 68476-30-2 Fuel Oil, #4 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #4 (Underground) 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #6 68553

Entekhabi, Dara

450

Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

Vaidotas, Algirdas [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)] [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Improving GHG inventories by regional information exchange: a report from Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major outcomes of WGIAs intended to help countries improve GHG inventories, can be summarised as follows:...

Chisa Umemiya

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the policy where several small loads will be dispatched as a single, combined load. From an inventory-modeling perspec- tive, the integrated inventory-transportation problems add dispatch quantities as decision variables to the stochastic dynamic inventory...): The vendor makes the inventory replen- ishment decisions on how much to order from the outside supplier. 2. Pure Outbound Transportation Models (PO): The collection depot makes the delivery schedules of order dispatches to the buyer(s). 3. Integrated...

Zhang, Liqing

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Revenue Maximization in Reservation-based Online Advertising Through Dynamic Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and oftentimes a publisher uncontrollably runs out of a highly desirable inventory type, failing to meetRevenue Maximization in Reservation-based Online Advertising Through Dynamic Inventory Management inventory on content sites owned by publishers (e.g., CNN, amazon, etc.). Sales representatives, acting

Tomkins, Andrew

455

Inventory and software distribution solutions for midsize businesses Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solutions also make it easy to keep up-to-the- moment, highly detailed inventories to help your organizationInventory and software distribution solutions for midsize businesses Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria Select inventory and software distribution tools that simplify PC and server management. March

456

A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions by Christopher D. Dresser OF WISCONSIN - MADISON Abstract A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions Christopher Studies This study presents a "bottom-up" emissions inventory for NOx, PM2.5, SO2, CO, and VOCs from heavy

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

457

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, S.K.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

S. K. Zohner

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

IIFET 2004 Japan Proceedings OPTIMAL STORAGE TEMPERATURE DESIGN FOR FROZEN SEAFOOD INVENTORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IIFET 2004 Japan Proceedings 1 OPTIMAL STORAGE TEMPERATURE DESIGN FOR FROZEN SEAFOOD INVENTORIES a model for optimal temperature design for semi-perishable seafood inventory, and apply the model with the rate of inventory dissipation. Keywords: frozen seafood, cold storage, pacific whiting, surimi

460

Form1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FORM 3304.2, B. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FORM 3304.2, APPROVAL OF EXPERT OR CONSULTANT EMPLOYMENT REQUEST U.S.DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVAL OF EXPERT OR CONSULTANT EMPLOYMENT REQUEST (Continued on Reverse) DOE F 3304.2 (01-07) 1. Name of Expert or Consultant: 2. Organization: 9. Current Employment (position, company, and location): 10. Home Address (city, state, and zip code): 11. Official Worksite (where services are to be performed): 12. APPROVALS 3. Action Requested: 4. Hourly Rate of Pay: 5. Nature of Appointment: 6. Period for Which Services Are Desired: 7. Estimated Number of Days to Be Worked: 8. Number of Days Worked Under Present Appointment: (Extension Only) 13. Description of Services Required: 14. Justification for this Expert/Consultant Action and Qualifications of Candidate Related to Need for Appointment:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) emissions inventory (version 2): Development of the national utility reference file, 1985. Final report, January-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of a project conducted to create a file containing comprehensive data on all electric utilities in the US. The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's (NAPAP's) emissions inventory activities focus on the estimation of emissions from pollutants that contribute to acid deposition. Electric utilities, which emit a large share of total acid deposition precursor emissions, are important for modeling analyses. Data reported by states to the National Emissions Data System (NEDS) for the 1985 NAPAP Emissions Inventory and data reported to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on EIA Form 759, EIA Form 767, FERC Form 423, and the Integrated Data Base System (IDBS) were matched and combined. The resulting 1985 National Utility Reference File (NURF) contains detailed unit level data for nearly 10,000 electricity generating plants.

Wagner, J.K.; Rothschild, S.S.; Istvan, D.A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The IPCC/OECD/IEA Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme: International Methods for the Estimation, Monitoring and Verification of GHG Emission Inventories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aims of this paper are to summarise the current status in international methods for the estimation of GHG inventories and the relevance of this work...

Dr. Bo Lim; Pierre Boileau; Yamil Bonduki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Integrated Data Base for 1991: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1990. These data are based on the most reliable information available form government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated generally through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 160 refs., 61 figs., 142 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Integrated Data Base for 1991: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1990. These data are based on the most reliable information available form government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated generally through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 160 refs., 61 figs., 142 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: GHG Inventory  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols GHG Inventory Protocols Petroleum Industry Guidelines for Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions (PDF 2.0 MB) Download Acrobat Reader IPIECA, as part of a joint industry task force with the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (OGP), has developed, on behalf of the petroleum industry, a voluntary industry-endorsed approach for measuring and reporting GHG emissions. The petroleum industry has recognized the need for GHG accounting and reporting guidance that is focused specifically on the industry. Current approaches vary among government reporting programs. Companies also differ in how they voluntarily report their emissions data. This variability in approaches has resulted in a lack of comparability of reported GHG

466

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with producing a material, component, or assembly in the U.S. The goals of the U.S. LCI Database project are: Maintain data quality and transparency Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making

467

Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuels and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes were compiled through December 31, 1983, based on the most reliable information available from government sources and the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Future waste and spent fuel to be generated over the next 37 years and characteristics of these materials are also presented, consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) or projection of US commercial nuclear power growth and expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities. Materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, airborne waste, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated, based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions. 48 figures, 107 tables.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Environmental inventories for future electricity supply systems for Switzerland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Swiss Association of Producers and Distributors of Electricity (VSE) identified a number of possible supply mix options to meet the future electricity demand in Switzerland. In this context, PSI, in co-operation with ETHZ, analysed environmental inventories for the selected electricity supply systems. Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) was used to establish the inventories, covering the complete energy chains associated with fossil, nuclear and renewable systems. The assessment was performed on three levels: (1) individually for each system considered; (2) comparison of systems; (3) comparison of supply mix options. In absolute value, the emissions of the major pollutants considered are, in most cases, significantly reduced in comparison with the currently operating systems. Due to the considerable advancements in fossil power plant technologies, the relative importance of other activities increases in the fossil energy systems. Selected results for systems and supply options are given in the present paper.

R. Dones; U.; Ganter; S. Hirschberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 2 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 12/23/2002 10:51 AM Org Unit Additional Information 2002ID Agency Bureau Organization unit City StateCode Country Total FTEs FunctionCode Status ReasonCode ReasonSub_Code YrFirstOnInventory YearofCostComapre CIF/FTESavings EstAnnualSavings MEOPerfReview 444 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 15 K999 I 1999 452 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 R660 I 1999 436 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y220 I 1999 437 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y999 I 1999 438 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 T833 I 1999 439 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 R660 I 1999 440 019 05 AL KANSAS CITY MO US 1 K999 I 1999 441 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 3 K999 I 1999 434 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y150 I 1999 443 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 14 K999 I 1999 433 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 4 Y150 I 1999 445 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 K999 I 1999 446 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 3 K999 I 1999

471

Form Approv  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

'JOE I' ':0 'JOE I' ':0 ) e " Flee/romc Form Approv ed by CGIR· 01120195 (8 ./1" United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administra ion memorandum DATE : uC l J !:' ZD y REPLY TO ATTN OF : KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO ; Rob Ochs Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Lane-Wendson No.1 Structure 10/5 Access Road Improvement and Pole Replacement Project Budget Information: Work Order # 224549 PP&A Project No.: 1117 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Sub part 0,10 C.F.R. Part) 021): B 1.3, Routine maintenance activities ... for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ... .are required to maintain

472

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 In 1992, the United the relative contribution of different emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. 2 Parties

Little, John B.

473

Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Counting the Gigatones: Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldwildlife.org/climate/Publications/WWFBinaryitem16605.pdf Country: China, United States UN Region: Eastern Asia, Northern America Counting the Gigatones: Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China Screenshot References: GHG inventories China and US[1] "China and the United States are the world's largest emitters of

474

2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

Norris, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, David C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zemlick, Catherine M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

475

Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Road to Re-certification: WIPP TRU Waste Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by atomic energy defense activities. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) [1] requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to submit documentation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that demonstrates WIPP's continuing compliance with the disposal regulations in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191 Subparts B and C, not later than five years after initial receipt of waste for disposal at the repository, and every five years thereafter until the decommissioning of the facility is completed. On May 18, 1998, after review of the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) (63 FR 27405), the EPA certified that the WIPP did comply with the final disposal regulations and criteria of 40 CFR parts 191 and 194. On March 26, 1999, the first receipt of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste was received at WIPP thus initiating the 5-year countdown to the first re-certification. Five years after the first receipt of waste at WIPP, on March 26, 2004, the DOE submitted a Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) [2]. The CRA includes TRU waste inventory as a key factor. The TRU waste inventory defines what is expected to be emplaced in the repository; and, therefore, how the performance of the repository will be affected. Performance of the WIPP is determined via the Performance Assessment (PA), a set of complex algorithms used to model the long-term performance of the repository. The TRU waste inventory data that are important to this assessment include: 1) volumes of stored, projected and emplaced waste; 2) radionuclide activity concentrations; 3) waste material parameter densities; 4) estimates of the masses of chelating agents; 5) estimates of the oxyanions; 6) estimates of expected cement masses; and 7) estimates of the types and amounts of materials that will be used to emplace the waste. The data that are collected and maintained as the TRU waste inventory provide the waste source term used in the PA to model long-term repository performance. (authors)

Crawford, B.A.; Lott, S.A.; Sparks, L.D.; Van Soest, G.; Mclnroy, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory -Carlsbad Operations, 115 N. Main St., Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Environmental inventory of the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Environmental Inventory of the Armand Bayou designed to assist in the development of a management plan for the preserve. The objective of the report was to gather and integrate existing data, identify data gaps, and describe the environmental attributes of the Armand Bayou. The report concludes that: establishment of an additional monitoring station that will reflect the contribution of pollutants from Horsepen Bayou is needed; an investigation of toxicants in water and sediment samples should be conducted; investigations of the commercial and recreational uses of Mud Lake should be undertaken.

McFarlane, R.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

LNG Monthly Summary 2008.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Egypt 3.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 3.1 6.3 6.4 3.0 9.0 3.0 9.2 8.7 54.8 Equatorial Guinea 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Nigeria 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 3.1 0.0 3.2 2.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 12.0 Norway 0.0 3.0 2.9 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 2.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 14.9 Qatar 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 Trinidad 25.5 20.6 20.8 26.1 25.5 20.6 24.6 26.3 20.0 24.4 13.6 19.0 266.8 TOTAL 28.4 23.6 23.7 32.2 31.6 33.1 31.0 35.4 31.8 27.4 22.8 30.7 351.7 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2008 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cove Point, MD 5.8 3.0 5.6 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 5.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 25.9 Elba Island, GA 4.9 5.0 5.3 13.8 14.0 13.7 17.1 16.8 13.9 14.0 6.1 11.2 135.7 Everett, MA 17.7 15.6 12.8 12.5 10.8 13.2 14.0 13.1 12.0 13.5 13.6 16.5 165.3

480

tablehc4.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 11.4 1.6 1.0 1.9 6.6 0.3 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 8.0 1.9 0.8 1.5 3.5 0.3 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 5.6 1.5 0.7 1.2 1.9 0.2 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 4.3 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 Q 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 2.0 0.9 0.2 0.3 0.4 Q 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 1.7 0.8 Q 0.3 0.4 Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 5.2 0.6 0.7 1.1 2.7 Q $10,000 to $14,999......................................... 8.5 4.6 0.8 0.3 0.9 2.4 Q $15,000 to $19,999.........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inventory forms xls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

c32a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .................................. 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ................................ 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 .............................. 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7 25,001 to 50,000 .............................. 92 117 62 1,895 3,008 1,702 48.4 38.7 36.3 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 70 131 69 1,672 3,629 2,198 41.6 36.0 31.2 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 64 137 66 1,538 3,363 2,644 41.8 40.7 24.8 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 45 108 51 1,520 2,874 1,499 29.9 37.5 34.2 Over 500,000 ................................... 62 117 38 933 3,294 1,737 66.4 35.4 22.0 Principal Building Activity Education .........................................

482

c11a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings .................................. Buildings .................................. 1,248 2,553 2,721 13,955 32,332 25,371 89.4 79.0 107.3 Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ...................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q Food Service ................................... 318 108 Q 986 664 Q 322.9 163.2 Q Health Care ..................................... 32 104 457 445 835 1,883 71.8 125.1 242.9 Inpatient ........................................ N Q 436 N 182 1,723 N Q 252.9 Outpatient ...................................... 32 66 Q 445 652 160 71.8 100.5 Q Lodging ........................................... 29 207 273 260 2,274 2,563 111.0 91.2 106.7 Mercantile ........................................ 171 482 369 1,944 5,204 4,044 87.9 92.6 91.2 Retail (Other Than Mall) ................

483

1-cc June2011.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were above normal in June 2011. In particular, southern states experienced significantly above average temperatures which exacerbated drought conditions present in the region. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 20.2 percent above the June normal (though still less than in June 2010; see Table 11.1). In June 2011, retail sales of electricity remained relatively unchanged from June 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 0.9 percent. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for the 12- month period ending June 2011 increased 1.6 percent over the previous 12-month period ending June 2010.

484

PT2_US.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, United States, 1960 - 2011 PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, United States, 1960 - 2011 1960 10,590 14,119 14,935 6 NA 2,928 2,928 42,578 1961 10,239 14,642 15,206 20 NA 2,952 2,952 43,060 1962 10,671 15,322 15,522 26 NA 3,117 3,117 44,658 1963 11,605 16,270 15,966 38 NA 3,096 3,096 46,976 1964 12,274 17,152 16,164 40 NA 3,225 3,225 48,854 1965 12,832 17,691 16,521 43 NA 3,396 3,396 50,483 1966 13,281 18,967 17,561 64 NA 3,432 3,432 53,305 1967 13,697 20,019 18,651 88 NA 3,690 3,690 56,146 1968 13,487 21,276 19,308 142 NA 3,773 3,773 57,986 1969 13,833 22,764 19,556 154 NA 4,095 4,095 60,402 1970 14,877 24,098 20,401 239 NA 4,070 4,070 63,686 1971 13,518 24,747 20,033 413 NA 4,262 4,262 62,972 1972 14,392 24,819 20,041 584 NA 4,382 4,382 64,218 1973 14,006 24,873 19,493 910 NA 4,411 4,411 63,694 1974 14,025 23,723 18,575 1,272 NA 4,742 4,742 62,336 1975 14,982 22,098 17,729 1,900 NA 4,687 4,687

485

c1a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Primary Site All Buildings .................................... 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 District Heat Table C1A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 882 11,529 1,086 1,412 468 468 63 88 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,229 18,808 1,929 2,621 868 737 67 257 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 701 12,503 1,243 1,947 645 368 91 140 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,336 17,630 1,386 2,686 890 389 6 101 2,000 CDD or More and --

486

c36a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,437 ,437 178 130 82 1.10 1.04 1.21 1.28 0.22 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ................................. 460 Q Q Q 1.21 Q Q Q 0.60 Q Q Q 10,001 to 100,000 ............................. 444 70 Q Q 1.10 1.12 1.29 1.31 0.25 0.11 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................... 533 22 48 Q 1.03 1.06 1.08 1.26 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care........................................ Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office ................................................ 122 8 18 Q 1.16 1.32 1.26 1.44 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others .......................................... 980 Q 64 50 1.12 1.02 1.34 1.26 0.26 0.10 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before .................................. 620 Q Q Q 1.10 Q Q Q 0.29

487

c29a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68 68 185 165 5,453 3,263 5,644 30.9 56.6 29.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 29 18 Q 334 266 363 87.9 68.5 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 25 Q Q 545 291 514 45.6 62.7 54.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 20 45 26 626 699 844 32.1 63.9 30.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 18 25 23 552 521 831 32.8 48.4 27.4 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 21 Q 21 992 Q 821 20.7 Q 25.9 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 20 Q 15 958 Q 754 21.4 Q 19.3 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q Q 14 502 Q 687 21.0 Q 20.6 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 16 21 28 797 420 802 20.6 48.8 34.8 Food Sales .......................................

488

c27a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

85 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 42 78 Q 900 1,567 Q 47.1 49.6 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 49 77 Q 1,421 1,611 Q 34.4 47.7 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 44 73 Q 1,531 1,454 Q 28.4 50.4 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 55 58 Q 1,484 1,323 Q 37.3 43.5 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 52 45 Q 1,068 1,056 Q 48.6 43.0 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 49 99 Q 1,247 1,804 Q 39.5 54.6 Food Sales .......................................

489

1-MFE January 2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data

490

c9a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

684 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 70 56 71 1,062 568 1,239 65.8 98.2 57.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 92 49 78 1,514 492 1,092 61.0 100.2 71.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 119 Q 79 1,426 346 1,007 83.4 Q 78.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 60 Q 68 749 339 977 80.4 Q 69.6 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q Q 1,119 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 74 53 76 1,198

491

1-cc January2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Near normal temperatures prevailed across the contiguous United States in January 2009, marking the fifth straight month that temperatures have been close to average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western United States experienced warmer than normal temperatures while the Northeast and the central United States experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 3.9 percent above the average for the month of January 2009 and 6.8 percent above a warmer January 2008. Even with the colder weather, retail sales of electricity decreased 1.8 percent compared to January 2008. This decrease in January

492

LNG Monthly Summary 2010.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Egypt 16.8 11.6 8.8 5.8 9.1 5.7 6.1 0.0 6.1 3.0 0.0 0.0 73.0 Equatorial Guinea 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Nigeria 0.0 0.0 2.6 8.7 8.8 11.1 5.3 0.0 2.9 2.4 0.0 0.0 41.7 Norway 5.8 5.9 5.8 2.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.7 0.0 0.0 26.0 Peru 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.2 3.2 3.2 6.4 16.0 Qatar 11.9 6.4 0.7 8.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.5 8.7 4.3 45.6 Trinidad 21.9 16.0 16.2 15.2 16.3 10.7 16.6 16.5 16.4 15.2 13.7 15.2 189.7 Yemen 0.0 5.9 3.1 0.0 2.6 5.0 8.3 5.1 0.0 0.0 6.0 2.9 38.9 TOTAL 56.4 45.8 37.1 41.6 36.8 32.5 36.3 21.6 28.6 34.1 31.6 28.7 431.0 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2010 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cameron, LA 4.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0 Cove Point, MD 14.8 8.7 8.8 5.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.7 0.0 0.0 43.4

493

New 2001 Survey.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands NEPA Case Dispositions - 2001 FERC 0 0 pre-2001 2001 All Navy 2 1 Judgment for defendant 41 20 66 NRC 0 0 TRO 2 3 5 DOI - BLM 20 2 Preliminary injunction 4 5 6 - FWS 17 1 Permanent injunction 7 0 9 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 8 8 18 - NPS 7 2 Dismissal w/ settlement 16 8 24 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 23 23 41 - MMS 0 0 Other action 9 4 15 - OSM 0 0 Pending 135 USDA - FS 40 15 - APHIS 2 1 DOC - NOAA 8 3 Army - COE 7 2 Plaintiffs Army 0 0 Public Interest groups 175 DOT - FHWA 3 2 Individual/Citizen assoc. 95 - FTA 13 1 State government 11 - FAA 7 0 Local government 37 - MARAD 0 0 Business groups 52 - SLSC 0 0 Property owners/residents 15 DOE 2 0 Indian tribes 11 EPA 4 0 Combination plaintiffs* 63 HUD 0 0 * i.e. local government AND individuals;

494

c1a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2006 October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Primary Site All Buildings .................................... 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 District Heat Table C1A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 882 11,529 1,086 1,412 468 468 63 88 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,229 18,808 1,929 2,621 868 737 67 257 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 701 12,503 1,243 1,947 645 368 91 140 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,336 17,630 1,386 2,686 890 389 6 101 2,000 CDD or More and --

495

all_alpha_00.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA 3.2TL 3.2 6 Auto-L5 2WD Gasoline CL ULEV ULEV YHNXV03.2GL4 midsize car 3 14 23 17 4 no ACURA 3.2TL 3.2 6 Auto-L5 2WD Gasoline NL LEV LEV YHNXV03.2GF3 midsize car 2 14 23 17 4 no ACURA 3.5RL 3.5 6 Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline CL LEV LEV YHNXV03.5YA3 midsize car 2 13 19 15 3 no ACURA Integra 1.8 4 Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline CL TLEV TLEV YHNXV01.8WA2 small car 1 17 24 19 5 no ACURA Integra 1.8 4 Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL TLEV TLEV YHNXV01.8WA2 small car 1 17 24 19 5 no ACURA Integra 1.8 4 Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL TLEV TLEV YHNXV01.8XA2 small car 1 17 24 19 5 no ACURA Integra 1.8 4 Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL T1 TIER 1 YHNXV01.8XA1 small car 0 17 24 19 5 no ACURA NSX 3 6 Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline CL LEV LEV YHNXV03.2AA3 small car 2 13 19

496

c22a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 17 63 36 2,412 4,383 2,303 7.2 14.5 15.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 16 78 59 2,095 4,763 3,406 7.8 16.4 17.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 20 88 63 2,150 4,671 3,350 9.5 18.9 18.9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 22 61 29 2,054 3,623 1,692 10.6 16.8 17.2 Over 500,000 .................................... 19 84 44 1,606 3,974 2,080 11.6 21.1

497

c8a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

456 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 71 145 74 1,204 2,443 861 59.0 59.3 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 107 133 Q 949 1,867 545 112.5 71.1 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 66 163 71 664 1,797 749 99.0 90.4 95.1 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 49 278 Q 614 2,422 Q 79.8 114.8 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 118 Q 441 1,148 Q Q 102.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 171 Q Q 1,572 Q Q 109.0 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 45 198 Q

498

c12a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 181 370 191 2,517 4,518 2,347 71.8 81.8 81.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 156 473 285 2,095 4,763 3,433 74.3 99.3 82.9 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 219 523 323 2,161 4,706 3,350 101.1 111.1 96.5 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 221 371 160 2,179 3,623 1,692 101.4 102.3 94.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 179 497 Q 1,606 3,974 2,080 111.2 125.0 Q Principal Building Activity

499

c31a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 467 882 688 7,144 21,928 19,401 65.4 40.2 35.5 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 137 101 419 3,629 2,997 53.9 37.6 33.7 Food Sales ....................................... 16 Q Q 339 Q Q 46.6 Q Q Food Service ..................................... 149 48 N 774 622 N 192.5 77.2 N Health Care ....................................... 12 37 187 233 520 1,792 49.5 70.8 104.4 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 181 N Q 1,662 N Q 109.0 Outpatient ....................................... 12 20 Q 233 377 Q 49.5 52.3 Q Lodging ............................................. Q 83 113 Q 1,750 2,374 Q 47.6 47.4 Mercantile ......................................... 60 134 61 1,094 3,572 3,205 55.2 37.6 19.1 Retail (Other Than Mall) ..................

500

c24a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings .................................. Buildings .................................. 803 42.0 17.9 37.4 71.0 6.3 0.33 7.86 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 220 78.6 23.8 46.8 92.0 2.0 0.70 8.93 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 410 54.8 15.0 29.6 66.2 3.4 0.46 8.41 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 685 43.8 16.2 31.0 55.9 5.8 0.37 8.45 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 1,464 40.9 16.0 31.0 55.4 11.1 0.31 7.60 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 2,519 35.8 10.8 28.6 48.9 20.1 0.29 7.97 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 4,898 35.4 6.4 23.8 51.9 36.1 0.26 7.36 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 10,109 34.7 10.0 23.2 47.2 69.1 0.24 6.83 Over 500,000 ................................... 34,579 36.4 4.0 17.5 48.8 239.4 0.25 6.92 Principal Building Activity