Sample records for invasive plant species

  1. Final Report Parris Island Depot Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Species Occurrence and Management Page 6 a. Invasive Species Survey Conducted in 2001 Page 7 b. Management Plant Control Inc. (IPC) was contracted to survey and prescribe a management plan to control invasive and Control Efforts Page 9 c. Herbicides Page 10 IV. 2010 Survey of Invasive Species Page 16 a. Survey Methods

  2. Invasive Species Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    monograph The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants [1] helped inspire two generations of scientists species on its environment. Invasibility The vulnerability of a habitat, community, or ecosystem of Species, Darwin (1859) warned "Let it be remembered how powerful the influence of a single introduced tree

  3. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  4. Introduction to the Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    actions that it believes are likely to cause or promote the introduction or spread of invasive species positive role that bioenergy crops can play in offsetting the global rise in atmospheric CO2Tomaso et al. 2007). It was with this in mind that the WSSA Sustainable Agriculture Committee organized

  5. Planting History and Propagule Pressure as Predictors of Invasion by Woody Species in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Region MARTIN KRIV´ANEK, § PETR PYSEK, AND VOJTECH JAROS´IK Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences Invasi´on de Especies Le~nosas en una Regi´on Templada Resumen: Estudiamos 28 especies de ´arboles no nativos que actualmente est´an sembrados con fines fore- stales en la Rep´ublica Checa para determinar la

  6. Invasive Species Conservation Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    and decline of birds, mammals, and other species · Result in electrical outages ­ 1600+ between `78-'97 #12;

  7. Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    ····· Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest extinction species a major cause of animal extinctions, or has the extinction threat of invasive species been exaggerated? By what mechanisms have invasive species driven animal species to extinction? Are certain animal

  8. Alex Lester Invasive Plants: Just A Nuisance?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Terence

    by altering the type of disturbance, the frequency of the disturbance, its intensity, and its duration (Gordon, and an altered disturbance regime (Gordon 1998). Geomorphologically, invasive plant species can affect processes to the soil. The final ecosystem level impact is seen in changed disturbance regimes. This can take place

  9. Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sax, Dov

    Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

  10. Spatial Interactions among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial Interactions among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project title: Spatial Interactions Among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project location: Colorado State University, Western Forest, wildfire severity, exotic plant invasions, and post-fire fuel flammability in grasslands, shrub lands

  11. Born of Fire--Restoring Sagebrush Steppe reversing the presence of invasive species,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    displace native species, but can fuel fires that favor invasion and yet more fires. Restoring a healthy and present use of native and nonnative plants in revegetation projects. Invasive Species Influenced by Fire between 1988 and 1999 indicated that there was a doubling of fires in the last 12 years, mostly between

  12. 3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic concepts: · In most plant communities at most times, most of the resources that are available makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic

  13. Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Jessica Gurevitch and Dianna K. Padilla species invasions and the extinction of natives is widely accepted by scientists as well species on extinctions. Greater clarity in our under- standing of these patterns will help us to focus

  14. Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions Miguel Clavero and Emili Garci and extinctions of species is unproven. They analyzed the IUCN Red List database [2] and stated that only 6% of the taxa are threatened with extinction as a result of invasion by alien species and !2% (ten terrestrial

  15. Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

  16. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  17. Predicting invasive plants in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brusati, Elizabeth D; Johnson, Douglas W; DiTomaso, Joseph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pueraria montana (Lour. ) Merr. Kudzu Bignoniaceae Spathodeaan animal forage species, kudzu (Pueraria montana) escapedthe southern United States. Kudzu is neither naturalized nor

  18. Tradeable risk permits to prevent future introductions of invasive alien species into the Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    or control of IAS populations (e.g., integrated pest management [IPM]), or adaptation. Historically, efforts; Risk management; Permit trading 1. Introduction Invasive alien species (IAS)--species that establish, damage, or degrade assets (e.g., power plants, boats, piers, and reservoirs) and result in significant

  19. What is an Invasive Species? Invasion Ecology's terminology problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Plants in Forests Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Golden bamboo

  20. PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

  1. Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion Dana Blumenthala,1, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor levels of available resources in their native range are particularly susceptible to enemies

  2. 1A Appendix A--Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon APPENDIX A. OREGON STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY OISC Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive will not be shared. Rather, survey responses will be compiled as part of this statewide management assessment Species Survey and Management Question 2 If you conducted invasive species work in your fiscal year 2008

  3. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  4. Application of Branching Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    and their empirical growth rates. We then characterize the estimated spatial-temporal rate of spread of red banana services. Pimentel et al. (2005, 2007) estimates the financial impact of invasive species in the United States at over 120 billion dollars per year, and Colautti et al. (2006) estimates the cost of eleven

  5. Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessment Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    , such as an insect stowed away in a cargo box or a lar- val fish brought on board a ship in the bal- last water. When is not just an eco- nomic issue--the health of our unique coastal and marine ecosystems is a source of pride into new areas--such as the unintentional transport of species in the ballast water of freight ships

  6. Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, S.J.

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of this research can be used to prioritize management and research activities related to these invasive taxa on the Research Park as a whole and for specific Natural or Reference Areas. Additional research on the autecology and synecology of each species surveyed is suggested. In particular, research should focus on assessing the impacts of these species on the invaded plant and animal communities and ecosystems. Finally, this ranking system could be used to similarly rank the many other nonnative, invasive species present on the Research Park not included in this study.

  7. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993. The recovery of an endangered plant. I. Creating a newEffects of invasive alien plants on fire regimes. Bioscience2008. Effects of an invasive plant on a desert sand dune

  8. University of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    , diversions, and inter-basin water transfers alter disturbance regimes (flood frequency, magnitude, timingUniversity of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance GRACE MORTENSON entitled Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance

  9. www.biosciencemag.org October 2011 / Vol. 61 No. 10 Invasive Plant Atlas of New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    : The Role of Citizens in the Science of Invasive Alien Species Detection SARAH T. BOIS, JOHN A. SILANDER JR allows citizen science data to be used by the general public and as a data source for researchers efforts in invasion ecology. Keywords: citizen science, species distribution database, invasive species

  10. USDA Orange County Invasive Plant Management (OCIM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Sarah

    (Treatments) No Action Passive Restoration Intermediate Restoration Active Restoration Exotic plant management type of CSS and 22% grasslands. 16 Control 53 Passive 37 Intermediate 25 Active · 21% had the goal of increasing California Gnatcatcher habitat. · 39% of the restorations were in house and 44% were contracted

  11. aquatic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 243 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  12. accumulator plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 135 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  13. anthocyanic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 109 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  14. altered plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 129 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  15. alien plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 224 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  16. amazonian plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species. In 1999, the National Key Protected Wild Plants identified about 1700 rare and endangered plant species (Chinese State Report on Biodiversity Editorial...

  17. Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    declines and extinctions of native species worldwide.and even extinctions, of native species through variousG (2004) How species respond to multiple extinction threats.

  18. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  19. Stationary Policies in the Control of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant. A CHP plant uses hotter steam and higher pressure boilers. It, too

  20. alien species introductions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of the introduced species...

  1. HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, George

    . Vidra What are exotic plant species? Perhaps you have noticed huge thickets of kudzu vine along, it grows _ inch per hour! Kudzu is one example of an exotic plant species. In North Carolina, exotics change the structure of the forest, as kudzu does when it covers every surface. Exotics may also

  2. alien invasive species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vegetables, fooder, live fancing etc. Harmful effects were identified on native plants, crop production, livestock grazing human health,water drainage etc. Kalyan Das; Pallwabee...

  3. aquatic invasive species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species:321-333 DOI 10.1007s11258-009-9645-9 12;biogeographical isolation (Office of Technology Assessment 1993 (Robinia pseudoaca- cia) introduced to Europe in the...

  4. Cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or bias against those not mentioned. Larva and frass. (Photo: Coutin R. OPIE) Cabbage damaged by cabbage. / OPIE) Larvae feeding on the plants at night. Management notes Sex pheromones for the cabbage moth have

  5. Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Danny 1983-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically...

  6. BUTYRIC ACID INCREASES INVASIVENESS OF HL-60 LEUKEMIA CELLS: ROLE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Microbiol Lett 518, 1-3 (2002) 159-63" #12;2 Abbreviations: AML-2, acute myeloid leukemia type 2; ATRA, all leukemia cell line HL-60 represent a widely used model of acute myeloid leukemia type 2 (AML-2) [8], which1 BUTYRIC ACID INCREASES INVASIVENESS OF HL-60 LEUKEMIA CELLS: ROLE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

  7. Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species-quarantined pathogen of potatoes that has been previously confirmed in the eastern United States. The detection from the Andean region of South America, the pathogen now has worldwide distribution where potatoes

  8. Invasive Species: Major Laws and the Role of Selected Federal Agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    the globe can pose a significant threat to native animal and plant communities, and may result and nuclear power plants in the Great Lakes and the Mississippi basin. The light brown apple moth, a native species) refers to an animal or plant that is introduced into an environment where it is not native

  9. Remote sensing has been used to determine the occurrence of many non-indigenous plant species. GIS are used to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    requires an objective-based approach using integrated techniques and technology for geospatial analysis are used to manage data acquired with remote sensing and field surveys. Geospatial models are designed." Invasive Plant Species Management with Geospatial Information Technologies and Computational Science

  10. TAXON 43 -FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ). The converse pro- cess, the winnowing of lineages or extinction, acts through disappearance of species, since genera and families go extinct when their last species disappears. Species also represent the basic unitTAXON 43 - FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic? Loren H. ~ i e s e b e r ~ '& Luc

  11. TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES" ABOVE GROUND Utilities: Electric issue) Parking proximity: Distance from car doors __________________ Wind: Problem _________ No problem:________________________________________________ Fire hydrant: ________________________________________________ Electric

  12. Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123­127 © 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

  13. OIKOS 103: 4558, 2003 Plant species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil community on abandoned land across EuropeOIKOS 103: 45­58, 2003 Plant species diversity, plant biomass and responses of the soil community on abandoned land across Europe: idiosyncracy or above-belowground time lags K. Hedlund, I. Santa Regina, W. H

  14. alien plant invasions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems and intentional plantings. Threats Because of its appearance and ease of cultivation, parrots feather has been used extensively in both indoor and outdoor aquaria and...

  15. aquatic plant management: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

  16. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness Peter B. Adler,1 * Eric W. Seabloom,2 that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found

  17. Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Jill Ellen

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    native species "'n the nursery trade because they can be produced more economically. Effi- cient and successful production methods nave been developeo whicn enable a nurseryman to cultivate many exotic plants in suffic' en numbers to profitably meet... native species such as Redbud, Sycamore, Flowering Dogwood, Live Cak, Yucc , Desert Willow, Virginia "reeper present ln the nursery trade. Similar efforts ln cultivation whicn have made these spec'es readily available could be applied to many other...

  18. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF AN UNPRECEDENTED OUTBREAK Allan L. Carroll University of British Columbia, Department of Forest carbon dynamics. The loss of carbon uptake and the increased emissions from decaying trees have converted

  19. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , NC 27606 ABSTRACT Our geospatial analysis estimated that LBAM could establish throughout most on LBAM. Our economic analysis had two components: (1) a geospatial analysis that identified areas at risk2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE

  20. 106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND ()--PINENE FOR DETECTING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND (­)--PINENE FOR DETECTING traps baited with ethanol or ethanol and (-)--pinene for bark and ambrosia beetles in pine stands control; (2) ethanol; (3) (-)--pinene; and (4) ethanol + (-)--pinene. The release rates for ethanol

  1. Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

  2. BROMUS TECTORUM INVASION AND GLOBAL CHANGE: LIKELIHOOD OF SPREAD AND FEASIBILITY OF CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concilio, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and T. Taylor. 2011. Composting one invasive species toproject, chipping and composting one invasive species was

  3. IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive of a tree can mean to different social groups. The organizers see this "citizen science" (one definition

  4. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  5. Water Quality at Caddo Lake, Center for Invasive Species Eradication: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Knutson, A.; Ederton, E.; Mukherjee, A.; Baumann, P.; Masser, M.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Giant salvinia, a highly invasive aquatic fern native to South America, poses a serious threat to Texas’ waters and has done so since its discovery in the state in the 1990s. If left unmanaged, giant salvinia can cause a multitude of impacts...

  6. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter B. Adler; et al.

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating local diversity. The original view, which is still widely accepted, holds that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity. Although recent meta-analyses questioned the generality of hump-shaped patterns, these syntheses have been criticized for failing to account for methodological differences among studies. We addressed such concerns by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found no clear relationship between productivity and fine-scale (meters-2) richness within sites, within regions, or across the globe. Ecologists should focus on fresh, mechanistic approaches to understanding the multivariate links between productivity and richness.

  7. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 111 FORESTRY-RELATED PATHWAYS FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), non-wood forest products, and trees for planting. Pests may infest these commodities prior to harvest or transport, or may attach themselves as hitchhikers at any time during the extraction, transport, or trading fauna, and lower the water table. Some invade undisturbed forests, changing species composition

  8. Non-invasive imaging of cadmium distribution in intact oilseed rape plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tracer imaging system. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 2006;52:717-725advanced imaging tool for plant physiology. ITE Lett. Batterand Assimilation in Plants. Leiden: Backhuys Publishers;

  9. Introduction Many tropical plant species house scale insects (Ho-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    al. 2001) and honeydew is known to provide a large percentage of the energy budget for some ant off small coccinellid larvae, but sometimes also regulating the aphid population (El-Ziady and Kennedy and invasive in Western Europe, is frequently observed with myrmecophilic aphids, ants, and non

  10. Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yantis, James Hugh

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Vegetation associations are often distinguished on the basis of the dominant plant species. Associations with markedly different dominants (e.g., evergreen and deciduous trees) are expected to indicate high complementarity. In this study I evaluated...

  11. Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal tissuesw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Observations on the measurement of total antimony and antimony species in algae, plant and animal of total antimony and antimony speciation in algae, plant and animal tissues. Digestion with nitric acid.g. some plants and algae, the addition of tetrafluorboric acid is required to dissolve silica as some

  12. Conference on Invasive Species in Natural Areas, October 2529, 2010, Coeur D'Alene, ID. Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ Vehicles as a vector of plant seed dispersal: quantifying seed loss by vehicles is an important but relatively unmeasured component of the invasion story, and few data exist quantifying how far propagules are dispersed once present on a vehicle and under different driving conditions

  13. From Seed Banks to Communities: Effects of Plant Invasions and Nitrogen Deposition on Desert Annual Forbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Heather

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasions 11:673-686. Beatley, J. C. 1967. Survival ofPress, San Diego, CA. Beatley, J. C. 1966. Ecological statuswater pulses (Went 1948, Beatley 1967, Noy-Meir 1973).

  14. alpine plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GLORIA Target Region in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA; Alpine Plant Monitoring for Global Climate Change CiteSeer Summary: The earth experiences climate change whether from...

  15. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  16. S-nitrosothiols and reactive oxygen species in plant disease resistance and development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brzezek, Kerstin

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitric oxide (NO) as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in defence signalling in plants. After successful recognition of an invading pathogen, an increase in ROS occurs, the ’oxidative burst’; ...

  17. Disturbance, spatial turnover, and species coexistence in grassland plant communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Questad, Erin

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Humans have dramatically altered natural disturbance regimes. We thus need to understand how these alterations affect plant communities and whether natural disturbance regimes can be restored. I explored the effect of ...

  18. Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Debbie John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

  19. Invasive Bluegills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    " policy and offering recipes for blue gill fried, marinated and in chili sauce. Hmmm. Maybe we can adopt that approach to deal with our own invasive Japanese species... so would you like that kudzu with a balsamic vinaigrette or the house dressing? #ceas...

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species increasing more in pathogen load. Elevated CO2 increased pathogen load of C3 grasses, perhaps by decreasing

  1. Prediction of plant species distributions across six Peter B. Pearman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    LETTER Prediction of plant species distributions across six millennia Peter B. Pearman,1 The usefulness of species distribution models (SDMs) in predicting impacts of climate change on biodiversity alternative way to evaluate the predictive ability of SDMs across time is to compare their predictions

  2. Biogeochemistry of Woody Plant Invasion: Phosphorus Cycling and Microbial Community Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kantola, Ilsa Beth

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally-prevalent vegetation change phenomenon that has shifted grass-dominated ecosystems to mixed grass and woody plant matrices over the last century. In the Rio Grande Plains of Texas, the introduction of N...

  3. Species richness in a successional grassland: effects of nitrogen enrichment and plant litter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Bromus inermis. The most common forb species in the community were Daucus carota, Achillea mil- lefolium, Hypericum perforatum, and Potentilla recta. Soils underlying the field site are a well-drained, Osh- temo sandy loam formed from glacial till... designed to explain the interdepen- dence of species diversity and productivity invoke the mechanism of competition for light occurring among living plants in causing species extinctions and reduc- tions in diversity at high levels of productivity (Gold...

  4. Occupation, Dispersal, and Economic Impact of Major Invasive Plant Species in Southern U.S. Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thunb.), 2. air yam (Dioscorea bulbifera L.), 3. winter creeper (Euonymus fortunei (Turcz.) Hand.-Maz.), 4. English ivy (Hedera helix L.), 5. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.), 6. kudzu (Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata...

  5. Synergistic Eradication: Center's first project tackles invasive plant at treasured lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was first infested with giant salvinia in 2006, and within two years the plant?s coverage expanded from less than 2 acres to more than 1,000 acres,? said Dr. Michael Masser, AgriLife Extension fisheries specialist. ?The plant can form thick mats over... the lake, choking off sunlight to the fish, plants, and animals below, and greatly hinders boating, fishing, and other recreational uses of the water. ?So far, efforts to control giant salvinia such as chemical spraying and mechanically removing...

  6. Synergistic eradication: Center's first project tackles invasive plant at treasured lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was first infested with giant salvinia in 2006, and within two years the plant?s coverage expanded from less than 2 acres to more than 1,000 acres,? said Dr. Michael Masser, AgriLife Extension fisheries specialist. ?The plant can form thick mats over... the lake, choking off sunlight to the fish, plants, and animals below, and greatly hinders boating, fishing, and other recreational uses of the water. ?So far, efforts to control giant salvinia such as chemical spraying and mechanically removing...

  7. EO 13112: Invasive Species

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR CertifiedRed LionDepartment183

  8. Coexistence of congeneric native and invasive species: The case of the green algae Codium spp. in northwestern Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    Biological invasions have increased in number in coastal eco- systems in recent decades, although until are carried with the sand and rock ballast of ships, such as seaweeds, molluscs and arthro- pods (Carlton

  9. Full story from the April 2010 issue CENTER FOR INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT | Montana State University | PO Box 173120 Bozeman, MT 59717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    .weedcenter.org | email: weedcenter@montana.edu Seed Dispersal by Vehicles By Dr. Lisa Rew and Fredric Pollnac1 If you have ever driven your vehicle off-road or on an unpaved road surface, chances are that you have played vehicle only moved a few seeds of this invasive species a short distance, natural events such as wind

  10. Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may pro- mote yet another form of global change- propane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced

  11. Occurrence and distribution of special status plant species on the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.; Cypher, B.L.; Holmstead, G.L.; Hammer, K.L.; Frost, N.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several special status plant species occur or potentially occur at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Special status species are defined as those species that are either federally listed as endangered or threatened, or candidate taxa. Candidate species are classified as Category 1 or Category 2. Category 1 taxa are those species for which there is sufficient evidence to support listing, while Category 2 taxa are those species for which listing may possibly be appropriate, but for which sufficient data are lacking to warrant immediate listing. Determining the presence and distribution of these species on NPRC is necessary so that appropriate conservation or protection measures can be implemented. In the spring of 1988, a survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) was conducted to determine the occurrence of Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri), Kern Mallow (Eremalche kemensis), San Joaquin wooly-threads (Lembertia congdonii), and California jewelflower (Caulanthus califonicus), all listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as Category 2 species at that time. Of the four species, only Hoover`s wooly-star was found. It was concluded that Kern mallow and San Joaquin wooly-threads could potentially be found on NPR-1, but habitat for California jewelflower did not occur on NPR-1 and its occurrence was unlikely. As part of an ongoing effort to document the presence or absence of sensitive plant species on NPRC, surveys for species other than Hoover`s wooly-star were conducted in the spring of 1993. Abundant spring rains in 1993 created favorable growing conditions for annual forbs. Surveys in 1993 focused on potential habitat of several endangered and candidate species. The results of those surveys are presented in this report.

  12. Adaptive Management Plan for Sensitive Plant Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site supports numerous plant species considered sensitive because of their past or present status under the Endangered Species Act and with federal and state agencies. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office (DOE/NV) prepared a Resource Management Plan which commits to protects and conserve these sensitive plant species and to minimize accumulative impacts to them. This document presents the procedures of a long-term adaptive management plan which is meant to ensure that these goals are met. It identifies the parameters that are measured for all sensitive plant populations during long-term monitoring and the adaptive management actions which may be taken if significant threats to these populations are detected. This plan does not, however, identify the current list of sensitive plant species know to occur on the Nevada Test Site. The current species list and progress on their monitoring is reported annually by DOE/NV in the Resource Management Plan.

  13. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  14. Accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soils contaminated with different mercury compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Yi; Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Monts, David L. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Mississippi State University, 205 Research Blvd, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, where mercury contamination is a major concern. In order to cost effectively implement mercury remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds.. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal-accumulating plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, and Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation, and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots (<65 mg/kg), even though root mercury accumulation is significant (maximum 2298 mg/kg). Consequently, this plant species may not be suitable for mercury phyto-remediation. Other plant species, such as Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), a well-studied metal accumulator, exhibited severe chlorosis symptoms during some experiments. Among all the plant species studied, Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) accumulated significant amount of mercury in both roots and shoots and hence may be considered as a potential candidate for mercury phyto-extraction. During one experiment, Chinese brake ferns accumulated 540 mg/kg and 1469 mg/kg in shoots after 18 days of growing in soils treated with 500 parts-per-million (ppm) and 1000 ppm HgCl{sub 2} powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contained HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, or Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. We have found that up to hundreds of ppm mercury can be accumulated in the roots of Indian mustard plants grown with soil contaminated by mercury sulfide; HgS is assumed to be the most stable and also the predominant mercury form in flood plain soils. We have also started to investigate different mercury uptake mechanisms, such as root uptake of soil contaminant and foliar mercury accumulation from ambient air. We have observed mercury translocation from roots to shoot for Chinese fern and two Indian mustard varieties. (authors)

  15. PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS -ORIGINAL PAPER Utilization of invasive tamarisk by salt marsh consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    dynamics techniques and stable isotope enrichment experi- ments. The observations of a short residence time and labile food source. With an isotopic (15 N) enrichment of tamarisk, we demonstrated that numerous dominance within the invertebrate community to species not widely consumed. Keywords Isotope enrichment Á

  16. COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Plant Resources and Colony Growth in an Invasive Ant: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helms, Ken

    : The Importance of Honeydew-Producing Hemiptera in Carbohydrate Transfer Across Trophic Levels KEN R. HELMS1 AND S-producing Hemiptera grew signiÞcantly and substantially ( 50%) larger. Our experiment also showed that S. invicta was unable to acquire signiÞcant nutritional resources directly from the Hemiptera host plant but acquired

  17. Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

  18. Changes in soil organic matter driven by shifts in co-dominant plant species in a grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of carbon sequestration. The quality and quantity of soil organic carbon is probably influenced. It is suggested that, in conservation projects based on higher carbon sequestration, the plant species with more sequestration, Plant species, Soil organic carbon, Vegetation type, Prangus uloptera stands. hal-00875310

  19. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

  20. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-?B signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-?B and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-?B, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ? Endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed enhanced invasiveness. ? Nicotine induces uPAR expression and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness. ? MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signals are involved in nicotine-induced uPAR.

  1. 122 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 COMPARISON OF FECUNDITY AND SURVIVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID (HEMIPTERA: ADELGIDAE) IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN POPULATIONS Artemis Roehrig), Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an introduced species first reported in the eastern

  2. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  3. Tropical leguminous species for acid soils: studies on plant form and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilki, Fahrettin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 5 m); Vochysia ferrugt'nea (79'/o, 9. 7 cm, 7. 8 m); Hyeronima alchorneides (834zo, 8. 1 cm, 7 9 m); Dipteryx panamensis (78'lo, 5. 5 cm, 7. 2 m); Calophyllum brasiliense (80'lo, 6. 3 cm, 6. 2 m) (Butterfield and Espinoza, 1995). Butterfield... were the tallest, followed by V. guatemalensis and Cailophylum brasiliense, with no significant differences between pure and mixed conditions for any species. Stryphnadendran microstachyum had the lowest survival. Thirty months after planting in a...

  4. Response of five tropical plant species to natural solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searles, P.S.; Caldwell, M.M. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)); Winter, K. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropical latitudes currently receive high solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) even without ozone depletion. Thus, the influence of natural, present-day UV-B irradiance was examined for three native rainforest tree species and two economically important species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama (9[degrees] N). Solar UV-B radiation conditions were obtained using a UV-B excluding plastic film or a near-ambient UV-B transmitting film over potted plants in a small clearing. Significant differences were often exhibited as increased foliar UV-B absorbing compounds, increased leaf mass pre area, and reduced leaf blade length for plants receiving solar UV-B radiation. Plant height was typically reduced under solar UV-B, but some variation among species in response was seen. Biomass and photosystem II function were generally unaffected. The results provide evidence that tropical vegetation responds to the present level of Solar UV-B radiation. This suggests even a small increase in UV-B radiation with ozone depletion may have biological implications.

  5. Abstract--A study was conducted on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada to determine adaptable plant species, methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adaptable plant species, methods to prepare seedbeds for direct seeding and water harvesting, and proper irrigation rates. Plotswerepreparedwithvariousseedbed/ water harvesting treatments including, pitting, land imprinting, and straw mulching. Other plots were treated with large water harvesting structures. Three

  6. 96 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 THE COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL PEST SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY PROGRAM (CAPS): SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT TO OPTIMIZE A NATIONAL PROGRAM Lisa D. Jackson and Daniel A Survey (CAPS) program is to provide a survey profile of exotic plant pests in the United States deemed decisions and operations through methods development work, scientific investigation, analyses

  7. A comparison of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangel, R.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year-round sampling. This study compares the environmental {sup 137}Cs concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage {sup 137}Cs concentrations. The study`s objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation {sup 137}Cs concentrations are statistically the same.

  8. A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinojosa, H. [comp.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

  9. Effects of different site preparation treatments on species diversity, composition and plant traits in Pinus halepensis woodlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    drought, its edaphic plasticity, and its ability to colonize land after agricultural abandonment1 Effects of different site preparation treatments on species diversity, composition and plant, yet studies on the effects of silvicultural treatments on plant diversity are scarce. Our experiment

  10. INVASION NOTE Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revell, Liam

    INVASION NOTE Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake R 2012 Abstract The tropical island Puerto Rico is poten- tially vulnerable to invasion by some species and genetically characterize the nascent invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake of the family

  11. Selenium Accumulation in Brassicaceae Plant Species and its Biotransfer to Insect Pollinators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hladun, Kristen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a cost to accumulating Se in secondary accumulator plants.In secondary accumulator plants, selenate can be reduced toelements found in non-accumulator plants (Brown and Shrift

  12. Appendix S1. Plant species extinction patterns following animal extinction scenarios of systematic removal from the strongest interactor and systematic removal from the weakest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Appendices Appendix S1. Plant species extinction patterns following animal extinction scenarios on interaction strength data. #12;Appendix S3. Same as Appendix S1 for animal species extinction patterns following plant extinction scenarios. #12;Appendix S4. Same as Appendix S2 for animal species extinction

  13. Invasion of a Sphagnum-peatland by Betula spp and Molinia caerulea impacts on organic matter biochemistry. Implications for carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the extent of the influence of this invasion on the biochemical characteristics of the peat. Elemental substrate injection as invading plants have a lower ratio than Sphagnum spp and Sphagnum peat. Total the availability of resources to other species (Jones et al, 1994). Sphagnum species, by regulating

  14. A ten-year decrease in plant species richness on a neotropical inselberg:1 detrimental effects of global warming?2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of global warming?2 3 EMILE FONTY*, CORINNE SARTHOU, DENIS LARPIN§ and JEAN-FRAN�OIS4 PONGE*1 5 6 *Muséum 15 Keywords: aridity, biodiversity loss, global warming, low forest, plant communities, tropical16 probable cause of the observed species disappearance is global warming, which severely28 affected northern

  15. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  16. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  17. Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yantis, James Hugh

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy for conserving biodiversity is to select large-area preserves that complement each other so the maximum number of species is conserved. Estimates of biodiversity and complementarity are needed for optimum ...

  18. Development of Transcriptomic Resources for Interrogating the Biosynthesis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Medicinal Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongora-Castillo, Elsa

    The natural diversity of plant metabolism has long been a source for human medicines. One group of plant-derived compounds, the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), includes well-documented therapeutic agents used in the ...

  19. Performance of Planted Herbaceous Species in Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) Plantations: Overstory Effects of Competition and Needlefall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagley, C.M.

    2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Research to determine the separate effects of above-ground and below-ground competition and needlefall of over-story pines on under-story plant performance. Periodic monitoring of over-story crown closure, soil water content, temperature, and nutrients were conducted. Results indicate competition for light had a more determental effect on performance of herbaceous species in longleaf pine plantations than that resulting from competition for below-ground resources.

  20. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  1. Appendix 15 Red and Blue-Listed Vertebrate and Vascular Plant Species The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicate the SRMMP. Ranges for vertebrates were obtained from Cannings et al. (1999), Fraser et al. (1999, and industrial activities. Competition with introduced exotic species. Distribution: Mottled Sculpin are found agricultural, urban and industrial activities. Competition and hybridization with introduced species

  2. A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Ruben Canales

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology...

  3. A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Ruben Canales

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of ...

  4. Formally Modeling a Metal Processing Plant and its Closed Loop Speci cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    control systems automatic synthesis is a viable and pro table especially as far as design e ort@univaq.it, http: univaq.it tronci Abstract We present a case study on automatic synthesis of control software from formal speci cations for an indus- trial automation control system. Our aim is to compare the e

  5. aphid species aphis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABS1003775P NEW INVASIVE SPECIES OF APHIDS (HEMIPTERA, APHIDIDAE) IN SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO CiteSeer Summary: Abstract-. Three new invasive species of aphids have been found in...

  6. Twig and foliar biomass estimation equations for major plant species in the Tanana River basin of interior Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, B.R.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equations are presented for estimating the twig, foliage, and combined biomass for 58 plant species in interior Alaska. The equations can be used for estimating biomass from percentage of the foliar cover of 10-centimeter layers in a vertical profile from 0 to 6 meters. Few differences were found in regressions of the same species between layers except when the ratio of foliar-to-twig biomass changed drastically between layers, for example, Rosa acicularis Lindl. Eighteen species were tested for regression differences between years. Thirteen showed no significant differences, five were different. Of these five, three were feather mosses for which live and dead biomass are easily confused when measured.

  7. Comparative analyses of soil contaminant levels and plant species diversity at developing and disused oil well sites in Qianjiang oilfield, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Z.T.; Hu, H.X.; Wang, Y.X. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China)] [and others] [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China); and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oilfield development contaminates soils and waters with crude oil, brine and heavy metals. Oil well sites are probably the most contaminated places in oilfields. During drilling and crude oil extraction from underground stores, a significant amount of oil and brine discharges into soils at oil well sites by blowouts, container spillages and pipeline ruptures. In oilfields in China, it was estimated that about 0.77 - 1.85% crude oil discharged into soils at oil well sites during oilfield development. Exposure to oil and salt contaminants could evoke toxicological effects in plants. Responses of plants to the contaminant exposure include inhibition of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, cessation of growth, reduced reproductive success and mortality. These harmful impacts on plants would be expected to result in remarkable loss of biodiversity. Qianjiang oilfield has been developed for about thirty-five years. Oil well sites in it have long been contaminated with oil and brine since, and plants at the well sites are rare. In the last three years however some wells have fallen into disuse. In result, a few plant species have intruded into the disuse well sites and formed new populations, and plant species diversity in these places has increased thereby. For benefit of restoration of the disuse well sites, it is interesting to know the relationships between contaminant levels and plant biodiversity. The present paper focuses the attention on comparative analyses of soil contaminations by crude oil, salt and some heavy metals and plant species diversity at developing and disuse oil well sites. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Rare Plants of the Redwood Forest and Forest Management Effects1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    on their life history and habitat requirements, as well as the type, intensity, and frequency of disturbance disturbances and short rotation periods. What does this repeated disturbance mean for rare plants associated behavior of invasive exotics. Individual species will have different responses to disturbance based

  9. Effects of Local Adaptation of Invasion Success: A Case Study of Rhithropanopeus harrisii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Terrence Michael

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider the potential for differential success among different source populations. This study looked at the inland invasion of Rhithropanopeus harrisii in the context of a current invasion model. This species has been introduced worldwide, but has only...

  10. Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion; accepted in revised form 10 October 2005 Key words: eutrophication, food web, invasive species) run- off, which causes eutrophication. Eutrophication has a myriad of negative consequences, including

  11. Scale and ecological and historical determinants of a species' geographic range: The plant parasite Phoradendron californicum Nutt. (Viscaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lira Noriega, Andres

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geographic ranges of species are fundamental units of study in ecology and evolutionary biology, since they summarize views of how species' populations and individuals are organized in space and time. Here, I assess how ...

  12. Plant Species Biology (2006) 21, 112 doi: 10.1111/j.1442-1984.2006.00145.x 2006 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal compilation © 2006 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Publishing AsiaMelbourne, AustraliaPSBPlant Species Biology0913-557XThe Society for the Study of Species Biology, 2006April 2006211112Invited Article CONSERVATION OF FRAGMENTED POPULATIONSM. OHARA ET AL. Correspondence: Masashi Ohara Email

  13. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using a Nitrogen Gas Analyzer combustion method (LECO FP-was determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Methodwas determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Method

  14. Post-Project Evaluation of Channel Morphology, Invasive Plant Species, and Native Fish Habitat in Putah Creek in Winters, CA Six Years After Channel Relocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Gina; Boisrame, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources Association 46(2):211-226. Putah Creek Council.2007. Putah Creek Explorer Book. Accessed November 2011. creek- watershed>. StreamWise.

  15. Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael Thomas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerous benefits that wetlands provide make them essential to ecosystem services and ecological functions. Historically, wetland losses have been caused by natural and anthropogenic changes. In Texas, nearly 50% of coastal wetland habitat has...

  16. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watersheds of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. D'Antonio,53. Rugen, F. J. 1987. Fires in Ventura County: 1871-1879.Ventura County Historical Museum (docent class). Rundel, P.

  17. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = 0.138). The energy production values may be underestimatedin the median 24 h energy production of M. polymorpha (TableNocturnal and diurnal energy production of M. polymorpha We

  18. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune 20,in the NextPopulations |

  19. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR CertifiedRed LionDepartment183EO

  20. Invasive, Nonnative Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open EnergyIGPIntevac Jump

  1. The influence of annual species composition and density on perennial seedling density in four plant communities in the Northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, P.F.; Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for long-term underground storage of high-level nuclear waste. Part of the overall site characterization program is to monitor potential impacts on the biological resources at Yucca Mountain. A part of the biological monitoring program, assessed vegetation parameters included density of annual and perennial seedlings. This data was used to evaluate: (1) seed germination and seed survival; and (2) if annual plant species density and cover influence perennial seedling survival. Twelve permanent 200 {times} 200-m ,study plots were established in each of four vegetation associations present in the Yucca Mountain Project area. During the spring of 1992, 20 to 60, 1-m{sup 2} randomly-located quadrats per study plot were measured for perennial seedling density, annual species density, and annual species composition. Perennial seedlings found in 1992 were relocated in the spring of 1993, and survival determined. Cover was measure in the spring of 1992. Annual plant density and cover was greatest in the Larrea-Lycium-Grayia vegetation association, and lowest in the Larrea-Ambrosia vegetation association. Annual seedling density had a negative exponential relationship with perennial seedling density in 1992. However, non-linear regression analysis indicated that 1992 annual seedling density had a greater impact on survival of pernnial seedlings from 1992 to 1993.

  2. angiography nimiscad-non invasive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark A. Davis Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , and ecological impacts of invasive species as well as the variety of management strategies developed to...

  3. Modelling the Distributions and Richness of Lowland Savanna Plant Species in Belize using a Maximum-Entropy Approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollings, Felicity J.

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , and analyses showed the most species-rich savanna as the least suitable areas for agriculture. In addition, the current protected areas were compared against the proposed areas for conservation, and showed overlap of up to 26%....

  4. Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - australian native species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration... of the river. The distribution of flows and non-native species prior...

  6. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  7. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, T.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  8. aquatic species program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite 5 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Review of Alternative Aquatic Pest Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  9. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    favors IGCC technology over existing power plant designs (technologies either retrofitted to existing power plants, ortechnologies that could either be retrofitted to existing coal-fired power plants,

  10. Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridgham, Scott D. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Bart [University of Oregon

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 ºC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges was negatively impacted by increased temperatures, but for species planted north of their current range, increased temperature was neutral. However, for surviving plants climate treatments and site-specific factors (e.g., nutrient availability) were the strongest predictors of plant growth and seed set. When recruitment and plant growth are considered together, increased temperatures are negative within a species current range but beyond this range they become positive. Germination was the most critical stage for plant response across all sites and climate treatments. Our results underscore the importance of including plant vital rates into models that are examining climate change effects on plant ranges. Warming altered plant community composition, decreased diversity, and increased total cover, with warmed northern communities over time becoming more like ambient communities further south. In particular, warming increased the cover of annual introduced species, suggesting that the observed biogeographic pattern of increasing invasion by this plant functional group in US West Coast prairies as one moves further south is at least in part due to climate. Our results suggest that with the projected increase in drought severity with climate change, Pacific Northwest prairies may face an increase of invasion by annuals, similar to what has been observed in California, resulting in novel species assemblages and shifts in functional composition, which in turn may alter ecosystem function. Warming generally increased nutrient availability and plant productivity across all sites. The seasonality of soil respiration responses to heating were strongly dependent on the Mediterranean climate gradient in the PNW, with heating responses being generally positive during periods of adequate soil moisture and becoming neutral to negative during periods of low soil moisture. The asynchrony between temperature and precipitation may make soils less sensitive to warming. Precipitation effects were minimal for all measured responses indicating the importance of increased temperature

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    species form mutual- isms with honeydew-producing Hemiptera and their aggressive presence deters the natural enemies of the Hemiptera. Invasive ant species like the Argentine ant have often been associated decades (Bronstein 1994; Bruno et al. 2003). Mutualisms involving ants and Hemiptera have been described

  12. arecaceae species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    73 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  13. avian species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  14. animal species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  15. affects species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  16. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  17. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Toxic Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants: Phase Ito restrict SO 2 emissions from coal-burning power plants (Coal-fired Power Plant (after Weber et al. , 1996) .42 Hazardous Organic Compounds in Combined Stack Emissions

  18. 19USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. A variety of vascular plant species exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making them useful as bioindicators ozone monitors are not available. Bioindicators are often introduced plant species known as sentinels. They are known to be sensitive to ozone and will respond rapidly if they are given special care to ensure ozone

  19. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    website from Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. , (plant operated by Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. , and

  20. INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo Æ.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

  1. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effluent steam from a conventional power plant. However,Steam Cycle Parameters Total turbine generator output Total auxiliary power Net plantpower plants provide a substantial improvement in thermodynamic efficiency over that possible with conventional steam

  2. accumulating terrestrial plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith Green, Megan Murphy, Jenna Pathways for Terrestrial Vertebrates. In Carlton, J., G. Ruiz, and R. Mack (Eds.), Invasive species: vectors and management strategies (pp....

  3. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  4. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  5. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO 2the inventory of most hazardous trace elements are capturedequilibrium concentrations of hazardous trace elements in

  6. High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

  7. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Units Current Plant MEA CO 2 Recovery O 2 fired, Direct CO 2 Compression` MEA/MDEA CO 2 Recovery Steam

  8. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from combustion and gasification of coal – an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

  9. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO x ) in a flue gas desulphurization system. The ventedscrubbing in a flue gas desulphurization (FGD) plant usingx , e.g. , flue gas desulphurization (FGD) through injection

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Inter-species interactions and ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    (increased propagule load). Model simulations of hypothetical interactions of Dendroctonus rufipennis and I species of Ips and Dendroctonus in North America and Eurasia have failed to establish outside communities, and loss of biodiversity. Keywords Species introduction Á Invasive species Á Ips Á Dendroctonus Á

  11. Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F. Schaefer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F 66506, USA b Department of Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 in Oklahoma and Kansas to examine spatial patterns of species invasions in the Great Plains region of the US

  12. Marine Invaders in the Northeast: Rapid Assessment Survey of Non-native and Native Marine Species of Floating Dock Communities, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his seminal book on The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Elton (1958) laid the foundation for the science of biological invasions. He identified the importance of human-mediated vectors as means of transporting ...

  13. nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public, and land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 I nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public and spread. For example, invasive plants may be introduced to an ecosystem through unintentional escape from to a country where the dis- ease was not previously present. An invasive plant can also be referred

  14. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale insects on o rnamental plants B-6097 8-00 Mark A. Muegge and Michael Merchant* M any species of scale insects damage land- scape plants, shrubs and trees. Scale insects insert their mouthparts into plant tissues and suck out the sap. When... period. Most species never move again in their lives. Scale insects feed by inserting their hairlike mouth- parts into plant tissue and siphoning the plant?s sap. While feeding, many species excrete a sweet, sticky liquid referred to as ?honeydew...

  15. Comparison of growth at six years of four native and three exotic timber species planted on abandoned pasture land in Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bir, John Andrew

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into a new environment. As stated by Liang and Gan (1988), "species can perform in unexpected ways when introduced to new locations. " All one has to do is imagine the countryside in parts of the southeastern U. s. covered with the escaped kudzu vine...

  16. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture environmental pollutants in the gaseous state and co-inject them with the CO2, in order to mitigate problems associated with solid waste disposal in surface impoundments. Under such conditions, the injected pollutant concentrations could be roughly equivalent to their concentrations in the coal feed. The fate of the injected contaminants can only be determined through further testing and geochemical modeling. However, the concentrations of inadvertent contaminants in the injected CO2 would probably be comparable to their ambient concentrations in confining shales of the injection zone. In general, the aqueous concentrations of hazardous constituents in distal parts of the injection zone, regardless of source, are likely to be limited by equilibrium with respect to coexisting solid phases under the acid conditions induced by the dissolved high pressure CO2, rather than by the initial concentrations of injected contaminants. Therefore, even if a deliberate policy of contaminant recovery and injection were to be pursued, water quality in USDWs would more likely depend on thermodynamic controls governing aqueous contaminant concentrations in the presence of high pressure CO2 rather than in the injected CO2. The conclusions reached in this report are preliminary, and should be confirmed through more comprehensive data evaluation and supporting geochemical modeling.

  17. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  18. Letters Response Response to Ricciardi. Assessing species invasions as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    , pollution and toxic sediments [4­7]), har- vest for the cultured pearl industry, and loss of native fishes, the primary extinction threats are habitat loss and degradation (including construction of dams, development of the legacy of toxic sediments left from decades of pollution [6]. We feel that it is essential to determine

  19. European cabbageworm Pieris brassicae Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rusticana), radish (Raphanus sativus), watercress (Nasturtium microphyllum) and garlic mustard (Alliaria

  20. Combating Invasive Species Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioenergetics model that indicates Asian carp cannot survive in Lake Michigan given the available food types and bioenergetics modeling are providing information for the first two projects. Bioenergetics is the study

  1. Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) ­ By smothering (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu) ­ By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree loosestrife (competition) Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU Kudzu (mat

  2. Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    honeysuckle, kudzu) By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree, privet, bamboo) #12;2 Photo Photo by Randy Westbrooks, USGS Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU #12 / Cultural Uses Environmental Remediation (e.g. Kudzu!) Food for wild game (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle

  3. Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of honeydew-producing Hemiptera (Holway et al. 2002). Weof Nysius seed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) occurred in aColeoptera Diptera Hemiptera Lepidoptera Psocoptera

  4. 2009 AARES Annual Symposium Invasive Species and Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    analysis, optimal border quarantine and surveillance, environmental valuation methods, search and spread

  5. Mechanisms controlling the distribution of two invasive Bromus species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bykova, Olga

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and altitudinal gradients (Beatley 1966). While B. tectorumand inspiration. References Beatley, J.C. (1966) Ecologicalmid elevations below 1500m (Beatley 1966). More- over, while

  6. Golden nematode Globodera rostochiensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Venezuela. Oceania

  7. Poisonous Plant Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Toxic plants also contribute to indirect losses such as reduced calving , lambing or kidding percentages and reduced fiber production and weight gain. Direct and indirect losses from poisonous plants in Texas cost livestock producers from $50 million... to $100 million annually. In the United States, more than 400 species of poisonous plants have been identified. These toxic plants are generally not found in greatest abundance on good-to-excellent condition range but are, with few exceptions...

  8. ancient biological invasion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who has published in the areas of invasion Davis, Mark A. 4 1 Invasion Ecology syllabus, spring 2012 Description: Mechanisms and hypotheses to explain biological invasions....

  9. The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado September 11, 2009 8 am - 4 pm, endangered, candidate, and petitioned plant species. The second symposium, held in Pagosa Springs in 2005, covered the globally critically imperiled (G1) plant species of Colorado that are not federally listed

  10. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  11. Making the best of a pest: the potential for using invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) biomass as a supplement to commercial chicken feed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlan, Claire; Rose, Paul; Aldridge, David C.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasive non-native species frequently occur in very high densities. Where such invaders present an economic or ecological nuisance this biomass is typically removed and landfill is the most common destination, which is undesirable from both...

  12. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  13. Title: Stepping stones for biological invasion: A bioeconomic model of transferable risk Authors: Travis Warziniacka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    equilibrium estimates. If ecosystem services and market goods are substitutes the partial equilibrium bias #12;2 1. Introduction We investigate three sources of bias in valuation methods for invasive species), failure to consider nonseparability of ecosystem services with market goods (general equilibrium

  14. [Plant Signaling & Behavior 3:10, 839-841; October 2008]; 2008 Landes Bioscience The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessa, Guido

    [Plant Signaling & Behavior 3:10, 839-841; October 2008]; ©2008 Landes Bioscience The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) represents a model and the attempt of a crop plant to counteract pathogen invasion. To investigate plant responses activated during

  15. PERSPECTIVE Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions Antoine Guisan,1,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    for analysis and learning. Furthermore, the decision framework within which SDMs are used is rarely made explicit. Using case studies from biological invasions, identification of critical habitats, reserve planning, critical habitats, environmental suitability, reserve selection, species distribution model

  16. Spatially heterogeneous invasion of toxic plant mediated by herbivory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Introduction. Climate change is apparently already causing latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in ecosystems, as a result of changes in temperature and precipi-

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Climate change increases risk of plant invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    : kudzu (Pueraria lobata), privet (Ligustrum sinense; L. vulgare), and cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica privet and kudzu expands north into Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and New England states by 2100. Risk

  18. MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

  19. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. February 2,...

  20. Distributed Controller Synthesis for Local Speci cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Madhusudan

    | and a speci#12;cation, say, a temporal logic formula. The plant is viewed as an existing program which speci Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA (On leave from Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India) thiagu as a temporal logic formula, whether there exists a program for the system such that no matter how

  1. SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

  2. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice LovatoEndangered Species

  3. Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

  4. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  5. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  6. Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G1 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leaves San Juan NF revising Management Plan ­ make sure it is included, although it occurs on the Rio (Tamara Naumann) has no resources to survey for this species, focus is on weed management. CNE population. Can survey for this species almost any time of year. In Arches NP, sand blowing over the plants

  7. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  8. ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15: 148-153.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15 quantities of nuclear DNA from a wide variety of plants including pine, tomato, juniper, cypress, sorghum for plants in which polyphenols are a problem, although it has provided good results for every plant species

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant control Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crafts 1973). Bartley and Gangstad (1974) reported that for aquatic plant control, acrolein... al. 1989). Fluridone is used to control a variety of aquatic plant species in...

  10. Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Modelling multi-species response to landscape dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    and to the spatio-temporal configuration of urban brownfield habitats in a multi-species approach (37 plant and 43- sion time of brownfield habitats required to support all and especially regionally rare species Dynamic landscape Á Species distribution model Á Habitat model Á Urban brownfields Á Model averaging Á

  12. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  13. Modeling Potential DistributionModeling Potential Distribution of Common Plant Species inof Common Plant Species in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that map unit. SSURGO, SMU W/ 4 Component Soils SSURGO, SMU W/ 4 Component Soils SWGap Land cover distribution within one SMU SWGap Land cover distribution within one SMU #12;Frequencyof

  14. Deciphering the relative contributions of multiple functions within plant-microbe symbioses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Benjamin A.; Powell, Jeff R.; Rillig, Matthias C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that vary based on the microbial species or functional group, plant species, and environment. Here we quantified the relative contributions of multiple functions provided by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to symbiont-mediated changes in plant biomass. We...

  15. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  16. The Value of Endangered Species: the Importance of Conserving Biological Diversity1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    - tion. Since time began, countless species have gone extinct from natural processes. The extinction of dinosaurs is the best known example. Why Save Endangered Species? If extinction is a natural process, why extinction of plants and animals to natural causes. Today most species of plants and animals become extinct

  17. Trap cultures reveal higher species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in comparison to soil samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves (Brundett 1999). Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are another type of root colonizing fungi mainly classified

  18. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Sarah J.

    Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements Tony Birch Chris Breward Sarah Campbell Igor, September 2007 Tony Birch et. al. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements #12;Overview: Finapres. al. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements #12;The Problem Under normal resting

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Fire frequency and tree canopy structure influence plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    composition (Huston 1994). Ecological theory predicts important linkages between disturbance frequency frequencies and severities that minimize species losses due to competitive exclusion and direct disturbanceORIGINAL PAPER Fire frequency and tree canopy structure influence plant species diversity

  20. activates plant immunity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  1. activated sludge plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  2. autonomously activated plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  3. activity alters plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  4. algae activates plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  5. activated sludge plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400 plants to test their anti-obesity activity using porcine pancreatic lipase assay (PPL; triacylglycerol lipase, EC 3.1.1.3) in vitro activity. Among the 400 plants species...

  6. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Virginia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  7. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS Heteranthera sp. (Mud plantain) Water star grass, a submersed or floating rooted plant, usually is found along muddy shores and in water up to 5 ft. deep. The leaves are approximately 2 inches long and 3/16 inch wide... PONDWEEDS Potamogeton sp. The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds...

  8. Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................. 12 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Pagosa Springs area 13's viability and threats by participants of a June 2008 workshop. The primary audience is intended

  9. Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................................................... 10 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Piceance area........... 12 and threats by participants of a July 2008 workshop. The primary audience is intended to be the workshop

  10. Beyond Plants Indicators and Soil Surface Properties in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    micro-aggregates · Gives soil its dark color Short term Long term #12;Biotic Integrity Organic matter and mortality · Erosion · Vegetation changes · Establishment and growth of invasive plants · Water yields and water quality · Air quality · Wildlife habitat · Carbon sequestration #12;Transitions Cause

  11. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  12. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [¹?F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmore »of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [¹?F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.« less

  13. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    include thermal expansion of the warming oceans along with melting of glaciers and ice caps (Church et al considerably this century, potentially affecting species that rely on coastal habitat. The Northwestern

  14. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  15. R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Jane

    . Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration on stream restoration in the United States in the last decade, yet fewer than 10% of projects monitorR E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species Removal on Recovery

  16. 88 2008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species AN ASSESSMENT OF SIREX NOCTILIO SPREAD AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -FBM biophysical component simulates the spread of invading organism, forest biomass growth, timber yields AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON PINE WOOD SUPPLY AND HARVESTS IN EASTERN CANADA Denys Yemshanov1 , Daniel W. McKenney1 Forest Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre 1219 Queen St. East, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, P6A 2E5 Canada 2 U

  17. European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . (Photo: Coutin R. / OPIE) Larva exiting the cherry fruit. (Photo: Coutin R. / OPIE) #12;European cherry

  18. Plum fruit moth Cydia funebrana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's entry hole, premature ripening and fruit drop. Adult resting on a plum leaf. (Photo: R. Coutin / OPIE) Larva in a plum. (Photo: R. Coutin / OPIE) #12;Plum fruit moth 2 MSU is an affirmative-action, equal

  19. 132008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species DISPERSALAND DYNAMICS OF THE WOODWASP SIREX NOCTILIO IN ARGENTINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    population outbreaks. In Patagonia (Southern Argentina), pine trees (mainly Pinus ponderosa) are increasingly ecological and behavioral studies of this forest pest carried out in Patagonia. Our aim is to help increase). Number of attacked trees was estimated through a census of a 70-ha pine plantation in Northwest Patagonia

  20. European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    common names European grape moth, European vine moth, grape berry moth, vine moth Systematic position on nectar. Identification Adult : 5-7 mm wingspan; forewings have cream-white color with gray, black State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color

  1. Golden twin spot Chrysodeixis chalcites Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper) Global distribution any time of year. Flights occur at dusk and moths are attracted to lights. Identification Adult State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color

  2. Silver Y moth Autographa gamma Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Other common name gamma moth Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Autographa gamma per year in Asia and Europe, and adults are seen from May through October. Identification Adult moth programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender

  3. Dynamics of invasion and native species recovery following fire in coastal sage scrub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gressard, Scott Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology. 16: 909-23. O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal sageSpringer-Verlag, New York O'Leary, J. F. 1990. Post-fireof Vegetation Science 1:173-180 O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal

  4. Pale cyst nematode Globodera pallida Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , United Kingdom; Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Venezuela

  5. Chrysanthemum white rust Puccinia horiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Uruguay, Venezuela. Quarantine status Localized introductions

  6. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girondot, Marc

    Metropolitan University, Department of Zoology, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa 2 Laboratoire Écologie 183 Amber Valley, Private Bag X 30, Howick 3290, South Africa ABSTRACT: Average age and size at first of a species/ population are highly modified by energy availability (Berner & Blanckenhorn 2007). Therefore

  7. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E.; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive all other species to extinction. However, empiricalA will always drive species B to extinction (unless f A = fductivity species (species B) to extinction (Fig. 2a). In

  8. Weevils successfully destroy acres of lake-invading plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    28 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Kathy Wythe Through a statewide giant salvinia management program, a weevil that feeds exclusively on giant salvinia successfully destroyed about #28;#18;#29; acres of the invasive plant on B.A. Steinhagen Lake...Life Extension Service and Texas Weevils successfully destroy acres of lake-invading plant A&M AgriLife Research are working in Texas to control giant salvinia, a free-#23;oating aquatic fern native to South America. #31;e plant has invaded #28;#14; Texas...

  9. ENDANGERED SPECIES PETITION MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 a. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species

  10. Src, PKCalpha, and PKCdelta are required for alphavbeta integrin-mediated metastatic melanoma invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Andrew J; Schulz, Veronique V; Freiter, Eric M; Bill, Heather M; Miranti, Cindy K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mediated metastatic melanoma invasion Andrew J Putnam †1,2 ,capacity of malignant melanomas, yet it remains unclear howof this integrin triggers melanoma invasion and metastasis.

  11. The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Biological invasions complicate the conservation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    and energy cycles), "provisioning" (ie produc- tion of goods), "regulating" (ie maintenance of ecosystem through the DAISIE project (www.europe-aliens.org) have facilitated the development of the first pan plants. Alien species from all taxonomic groups affect "supporting", "provisioning", "regulating

  12. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  13. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for producing single-node cuttings. Regardless of reapplication stages, nutrient termination on 1 Oct. caused taller plants with more nodes, more leaves, more flowering nodes, more total flowers, and fewer aborted flowers than those being terminated earlier...

  14. Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort area T. van Eck, F.H. Goutbeek, B. Dost De Bilt, February 2008 #12 differ significantly. Figure 1. Situation overview. The site of the LNG plant situated in the center

  15. Systematics and Glacial Population History of the Alternifolium Group of the Flowering Plant Genus Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levsen, Nicholas David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flowering plant genus Chrysosplenium comprises approximately 57 species of herbaceous perennials. These species are mainly distributed in the Northern Hemisphere where they occur in moist habitats. Though the center ...

  16. Preservation of a species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

  17. Cell specific transcript profiling of plant-pathogen interaction M. F. Lyngkjr1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of orthologs between plant genomes (e.g. rice and Arabidopsis) in relation to similar stress responses, examine genomics in a legume species. The Plant Journal, 40, 622-31. #12;

  18. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  19. Hypothetical Intelligent Plants, or, What Kind of Terminal Could a Tulip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Paul E.

    Hypothetical Intelligent Plants, or, What Kind of Terminal Could a Tulip Abstract What would the dominant species of a world be like if it were a plant instead of an animal? Examining existing plants, we suggest a plausible intelligent plant. It is definitely

  20. Uptake and Cellular Compartmentalization of Metals from the Rhizosphere by Hyperaccumulating Plants: A Real Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Uptake and Cellular Compartmentalization of Metals from the Rhizosphere by Hyperaccumulating Plants in hyperaccumulating plants. Previous attempts to establish the path of metal ingress into plant tissues have suffered-vivo response of plants to heavy metals in the rhizosphere. We first focused on characterizing the species

  1. Effects of Simvastatin and Fluvastatin on Endothelial Invasion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Evan

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    (bFGF), as well as the lysosphingolipid Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P). Invasion is distinguishable by dramatic EC morphological changes from simple squamous cells to sprouting structures that ultimately form new lumens. Cholesterol synthesis...

  2. Brassica tournefortii: Phenology, Interactions and Management of an Invasive Mustard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marushia, Robin Gene

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasions 11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1966). "EcologicalEcology 47(4): 548-&. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological events

  3. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  4. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  5. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  6. Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Dan D., E-mail: petersen.dan@epa.gov

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) and the Cincinnati-based Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) were analyzed to determine the incidence and trends of human plant poisonings since the year 2000. Approximately 3.4% of the approximately 4.3 million annual calls to the AAPCC centers involved plants, with a higher fraction (4.5%) for pediatric exposures. Nearly 70% of plant exposures occurred in children under six. Only 8% of cases required treatment in a health-care facility, and only 0.1% (in 2008) were considered severe outcomes. The most prominent groups of plants involved in exposures are those containing oxalates, and the most common symptom is gastroenteritis. The top 12 identified plants (in descending order) nationally were Spathiphyllum species (peace lilly), Philodendron species (philodendron), Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinssettia), Ilex species (holly), Phytolacca americana (pokeweed), Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy), Capsicum (pepper), Ficus (rubber tree, weeping fig), Crassula argentea (jade plant), Diffenbachia (dumb cane), Epipremnum areum (pothos) and Schlumbergera bridesii (Christmas cactus). Broad overlaps between the DPIC and the AAPCC incidence data were noted, with essentially the same plant species in each dataset. The nature of the various toxins, the symptomatology and potential treatments are discussed for the highest ranking plant species.

  7. La Jolla workshop Native plant restoration working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nutrients. Lab versus field studies (Todd Chadwell study). We still need to know which species are more provides refugia for other organisms (Dibble). b. Higher diversity increases the success of planting

  8. Arthropod and plant responses to resource availability and heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khavin, Irene Samantha

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Species diversity is one of the central topics of ecological research, and there is still uncertainty about what shapes diversity in communities. These studies explore the responses of plant and arthropod communities to alterations of nutrients...

  9. Soil microbes drive the classic plant diversity­ productivity pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Stefan A.; Klironomos, John N.; HilleRisLambers, Jannek; Kinkel, Linda L.; Reich, Peter B.; Xiao, Kun; Rillig, Matthias C.; Sikes, Benjamin A.; Callaway, Ragan M.; Mangan, Scott A.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem productivity commonly increases asymptotically with plant species diversity, and determining the mechanisms responsible for this well-known pattern is essential to predict potential changes in ecosystem productivity ...

  10. Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant family Apiaceae, which, cilantro, chervil, fen- nel, anise, dill, and caraway. It is a tall, invasive, highly poisonous weed that is sometimes mistaken for one of its crop relatives. Poison hemlock was introduced from Europe as an ornamental

  11. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An errorPlant

  12. Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalles, J.F. (Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (USA)); Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.; Leversee, G.J.; Knox, J.N. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the research to date on the Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant and elsewhere has focused on certain species or on environmental features. Different levels of detail exist for different groups of organisms and reflect the diverse interests of previous investigators. This report summarizes aspects of research to date and presents data from numerous studies. 70 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Altered Fire Regimes Affect Landscape Patterns of Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    , average parameters can be hard to define as the frequency of the disturbance is of the same order of magni of disturbance and plant succession, to examine the resilience of dominant plant species, representing different disturbance response strate- gies, to the effect of varying fire rotation intervals (FRI). The simulated fire

  14. Tent-making by Artibeus jamaicensis (Chiroptera: Phyllostomatidae) with comments on plants used by bats for tents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Mercedes S.; Timm, Robert M.

    1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four species of bats have been reported to modify leaves of various plants to produce tents for daytime roosts. Herein we report tent-making by a fifth species, Artibeus jamaicensis (Chiroptera: Phyllostomatidae) In addition ...

  15. Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability in Invasive Nonindigenous Plants: A Bernd Blossey; Rolf Notzold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    will result in only minor reductions in growth. Resource availability is then the primary force deter- mining and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use allocation among maintenance, growth, storage, reproduction, and defence (Coley et al. 1985; Bazzaz et al

  16. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,Southeastern Deserts Bioregion. Chp 16 in: Sugihara, N. G. ,

  17. TIMING TREATMENTS TO THE PHENOLOGY OF ROOT CARBOHYDRATE RESERVES TO CONTROL WOODY INVASIVE PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    spent two years helping in both the field and laboratory. Alison Dibble, Cathy Rees, Jon Parrott, Tom Warhol, and Mike Perusse all helped with field work. #12;vi Douglas Rollins II, Suzanne Decoursey

  18. Patterns of plant invasions in China: Taxonomic, biogeographic, climatic approaches and anthropogenic effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RS LF HA U W Prov. RE Canary Islands Africa and MadagascarAmerica South Europe, Canary Islands Tropical Asia America

  19. Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    study the interaction of wind energy, electric vehicle charging and grid technology. The turbine is also estimated to offset more than 10 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions...

  20. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Ecology 22:67-77. Beatley, J. C. 1966. EcologicalNorth America are grasses (Beatley 1966, Seabloom et al.

  1. Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducationRemediationDepartment of Energy

  2. Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired)of Energy Photothe Mojave Desert | Department

  3. The Tri-Trophic Interactions Hypothesis: Interactive Effects of Host Plant Quality, Diet Breadth and Natural Enemies on Herbivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, Kailen A.; Pratt, Riley T.; Singer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keltonia balli (Knight) (Hemiptera: Miridae: Phylinae): Ain densities of plant bugs (Hemiptera, Miridae) on Juniperusaphid species (Insecta: Hemiptera: Aphididae) (Fig. 2), an

  4. Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract What's Invasive and Project Budburst are citizen science projects mobile-based citizen science deployment, as well as issues surrounding system development

  5. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses, an estimate of plant biomass generated through satellite remote sensing, both described similar proportions

  6. Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  7. Techniques for studying the nuclear condition of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Bin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are known as Â?root-knotÂ? nematodes due to the characteristic knots or galls found on the roots of infected plants. Root-knot nematodes attack over 2000 species of plants and cause over 80 billion dollars lost...

  8. Techniques for studying the nuclear condition of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Bin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are known as Â?root-knotÂ? nematodes due to the characteristic knots or galls found on the roots of infected plants. Root-knot nematodes attack over 2000 species of plants and cause over ...

  9. Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia By Alemu, Forestry Research Sector, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 2 Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Tree spp. are among the most widely planted exotic trees in Ethiopia. Several damaging leaf pathogens

  10. Research Paper Abstract: Numerous species of Ardisia (shrubs in the Myrsina-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    . For the symbiotic species, performance was assessed for intact plants, for plants with nodules clipped off colonies in the shoot buds infect each develop- ing leaf through specialized marginal pores, and infect notable investment in nodule structure, replete with transfer surfaces, and extensive vascularization

  11. Soil Processes Affected by Sixteen Grassland Species Grown under Different Environmental Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    with the environment, de- termine both the quantity and chemistry of organic matter inputs to soils. Indeed, countless studies have ex- amined how variation in the quantity and chemistry of plant inputs, caused by either in plant biomass and chemistry of roots, the dominant detrital input in the system. The 16 species caused

  12. Economic Incentives for Controlling Trade-Related Biological Invasions in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    efforts focused on post-invasion control or eradication (Lupi, Hoehn, and Christie 2003). But there is now

  13. Exotic Species What's the Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    of introduced species as "the stealth destroyers of the American environment" (McDonald 1999: A15). Another seeds, eggs, spores, or other biological material capable of propagating that species

  14. STRUCTURED AND FLEXIBLE GRAY-BOX COMPOSITION USING INVASIVE DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    problems for SAP AG's SOA infrastructure are considered, e.g., in the CESSA research project). Fig. 1.sudholt@mines-nantes.fr ABSTRACT The evolution of complex distributed software systems often requires intricate composition of complex software systems that require invasive modifications. Concretely, we provide three contributions

  15. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation Algorithm (IDEA) is an ex­ ample of one such algorithm. However, little is known about the practical benefits of these algorithms even though AI--techniques are often favored in practice because

  16. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    in practice because of their general applicability and good performance on com- plicated real­world problemsBringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation university technical report UU-CS-2004-049 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization

  17. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Packer, Samuel (Floral Park, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  18. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  19. Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production in British Columbia by Rupananda Widanage Ph.D. (Economics), University of Ruhuna, 2007 M.Sc., Asian: Master of Resource Management Report Number: 529 Title of Research Project: Economics of Biological

  20. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  1. Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments Christopher Niederauer exploded views of 3D architectural environments such as multi-story buildings. These exploded views allow viewers to simultaneously see the internal and external structures of such environments. To create

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasion dynamics of the glassy-winged sharpshooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in French Polynesia Je´ro^me N. Petit Æ Mark S. Hoddle Æ Julie Grandgirard Æ George Homalodisca coagulata (Say)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), has recently emerged as a serious invasive pest. From Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Takiya et al. 2006)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) is native to the southeast USA

  3. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of all insect groups. Scale insects are generally small ( 1 /4 inch long or less) and often mimic various plant parts, such as bark and buds. Other species appear as small, white, waxy blotches or small bits of cotton on leaves and stems. The one... crawlers are pre- sent, they will fall onto the paper, where you can eas- ily see them moving about. Using natural enemies to control scales Many natural enemies?small parasitic wasps, lady- bird beetles and some fungi?can significantly reduce scale insect...

  4. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terakawa, Yuzo [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Croul, Sidney E. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neuropathology, University Health Network, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (Canada); Rutka, James T., E-mail: james.rutka@sickkids.ca [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ? Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ? Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ? We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ? Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  5. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  6. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants are the foundation of the range ecosystem. The plant species growing on a property can indicate the health of the watershed and the success of the land manager. Learn how to "read your plants to understand the effect of your management....

  7. ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE GULF OF MAINE for the maintenance of plant communities (Cruden 1966; Gillham 1970; Howe and Smallwood 1982; Mulder and Keall 2001 to botanists as they often determine which plant species are dispersed and become established in such remote

  8. Abundant C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the Lateglacial and early Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covino, Tim

    Abundant C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the Lateglacial and early Holocene Elizabeth K t Plants using the C4 (Hatch-Slack) photosynthetic pathway are key for global food production and account of modern naturally-occurring C4 plant species at elevations up to 4500 m in Tibet and 3000 m in Africa

  9. Using Genetic Algorithms to Improve the Visual Quality of Fractal Plants Generated with CSGPLSystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Using Genetic Algorithms to Improve the Visual Quality of Fractal Plants Generated with CSG­system, that generates a desired plant. Especially the tuning of the parameter values is time consuming and demands a lot genetic algorithms to find PL­systems that generate natural looking plants of a desired species. PL

  10. Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803818, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    Plant Molecular Biology 50: 803­818, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed. Unfortunately, such markers are not available for most plant species, including woody perennial plants. Here, we, and provides a minimal tiling path of 16 contiguous and overlapping BAC clones, thus generating a sequence

  11. An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 043065 Estimating Water Stress in Plants Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Carol

    plant species (corn, spinach and snap beans) grown in a greenhouse and subjected to different watering the best method of nondestructively estimating plant water content. In corn and snap beans, the 1450 nmAn ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 043065 Estimating Water Stress in Plants Using

  12. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  13. amazonian vegetation coupled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management policies and practices include the encouragement of quick plant growth after construction (to avoid soil erosion), the control of invasive species, and roadway...

  14. ambiental ceniza vegetal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roadside vegetation management policies and practices include the encouragement of quick plant growth after construction (to avoid soil erosion), the control of invasive species,...

  15. Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

  16. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

  17. Ethylene insensitive plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  18. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  19. Loopless non-trapping invasion percolation model for fracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless non-trapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium, and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a 2D square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. W...

  20. From invasion percolation to flow in rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettstein, Salomon J; Araujo, Nuno A M; Lanyon, Bill; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work is to simulate two-phase flow in the form of immiscible displacement through anisotropic, three-dimensional (3D) discrete fracture networks (DFN). The considered DFNs are artificially generated, based on a general distribution function or are conditioned on measured data from deep geological investigations. We introduce several modifications to the invasion percolation (MIP) to incorporate fracture inclinations, intersection lines, as well as the hydraulic path length inside the fractures. Additionally a trapping algorithm is implemented that forbids any advance of the invading fluid into a region, where the defending fluid is completely encircled by the invader and has no escape route. We study invasion, saturation, and flow through artificial fracture networks, with varying anisotropy and size and finally compare our findings to well studied, conditioned fracture networks.

  1. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  2. Molecular Dissection of The Cellular Mechanisms Involved In Nickel Hyperaccumulation in Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Salt

    2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperaccumulator plant species are able to accumulate between 1-5% of their biomass as metal. However, these plants are often small, slow growing, and do not produce a high biomass. Phytoextraction, a cost-effective, in situ, plant based approach to soil remediation takes advantage of the remarkable ability of hyperaccumulating plants to concentrate metals from the soil and accumulate them in their harvestable, above-ground tissues. However, to make use of the valuable genetic resources identified in metal hyperaccumulating species, it will be necessary to transfer this material to high biomass rapidly growing crop plants. These plants would then be ideally suited to the phytoremediation process, having the ability to produce large amount of metal-rich plant biomass for rapid harvest and soil cleanup. Although progress is being made in understanding the genetic basis of metal hyperaccumulation a more complete understanding will be necessary before we can take full advantage of the genetic potential of these plants.

  3. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  4. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  5. Vascular Plants of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an updated listing of the vascular plants present on and near the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. This document is an update of a listing of plants prepared by Sackschewdky et al. in 1992. Since that time there has been a significant increase in the botanical knowledge of the Hanford Site. The present listing is based on an examination of herbarium collections held at PNNL, at WSU-Tri Cities, WSU-Pullman, Bringham Young University, and The University of Washington, and on examination of ecological literature derived from the Hanford and Benton county areas over the last 100 years. Based on the most recent analysis, there are approximately 725 different plant species that have been documented on or around the Hanford Site. This represents an approximate 20% increase in the number of species reported within Sackschewsky et al. (1992). This listing directly supports DOE and contractor efforts to assess the potential impacts of Hanford Site operations on the biological environment, including impacts to rare habitats and to species listed as endangered or\\ threatened. This document includes a listing of plants currently listed as endangered, threatened, or otherwise of concern to the Washington Natural Heritage Program or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as those that are currently listed as noxious weeds by the State of Washington. Also provided is an overview of how plants on the Hanford Site can be used by people. This information may be useful in developing risk assessment models, and as supporting information for clean-up level and remediation decisions.

  6. alien invasive slider: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass...

  7. alien invasive centaurea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass...

  8. acacia longifolia invasion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants have the capacity to significantly impact the future of Minnesotas environment, recreation, and industry. The effects of their presence can already be witnessed....

  9. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  10. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  11. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  12. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  13. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  14. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8596 itr-t C,d.. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS jmethods of isolating the hydrocarbon-like material from I.privatelyownedrights. HYDROCARBONS AND ENERGY FROM PLANTS

  15. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety method SOFTWARE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS USING A QUALITATIVE FORMAL

  16. Propagation of Ornamental Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of Ornamental Plants I A. I?. DEWERTH, Head Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture Texas A. & M. College System THE MULTIPLICATION of ornamental plants is After sterilizing, firm the soil to within 1; receiving more...

  17. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  18. 82 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 MULTITROPHIC EFFECTS OF CALCIUM AVAILABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Delaware, Departments of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, Newark, DE 19716 ABSTRACT Acid rain adsorbed to soil surfaces, and (2) aluminum is released to soil water by acid rain and displaces adsorbed, causing calcium to be more readily leached from the soil. The effects of acid rain on soil calcium

  19. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 69 DISTRIBUTION AND BIOLOGY OF NATIVE SIRICIDAE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    placed in each of the three states. Traps were baited with Sirex lure alone, Sirex lure + ethanol. There was no significant difference in catches between Sirex lure alone and Sirex lure + UHR ethanol. More siricids were as including ethanol. Future studies will focus on re-sampling these study sites using similar trapping methods

  20. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 107 ATTRACTANTS FOR LONGHORN BEETLES IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pheromones, ipsenol and ipsdienol, to the binary combination of pine volatiles, ethanol and (-)--pinene). The following treatments were randomly assigned to one of the three traps within each replicate: ethanol + (-)--pinene (EA) ; ipsenol and ipsdienol (SD); and ethanol, (-)--pinene, ipsenol and ipsdienol (EA + SD

  1. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 141 MANAGING SIREX NOCTILIO POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN PATAGONIA (ARGENTINA): SILVICULTURE AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL José Villacide, Deborah Fischbein, Nélida Jofré (Corley and Villacide 2005). In Patagonia (Argentina), as in other Sirex-affected regions, remarkable contribution to woodwasp mortality in Patagonia (Corley and Bruzzone 2009). We note that, among an array

  2. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 93 IMPACT OF ENHANCIN GENES ON POTENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lacking E1 (E1cat), E2 (E1del) or both (E1delE2del) in larvae fed on artificial diet in the presence enhancin genes (E1 and E2) encoding proteases that degrade key peritrophic matrix (PM) proteins, thereby

  3. Evaluation of oocyte competency in bovine and canine species via non-invasive assessment of oocyte quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willingham-Rocky, Lauri A.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ), and intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) using rhodamine 123, JC-1 and Fluo-4, AM, respectively in bovine and canine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. Comparison of morphological grading with fluorescence intensity yielded similar trends between all grades...

  4. PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants James S. Coleman Kelly D.M. McConnaughay David D. Ackerly Plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists frequently examine patterns of phenotypic phenotypic traits change throughout growth and development of individual plants, and that rates of growth

  5. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  6. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  7. Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

  8. Use of novel synchrotron-based techniques to explore the connection between metal speciation in soils and plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    speciation in soils and plants David H. McNear Jr.1, Edward Peltier1, Jeff Everhart1, D. L. Sparks1, Rufus L. Chaney2, S. Sutton3, and M. Newville3. (1) Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware as the primary interplant metal species. To ascertain the partitioning of metals within the plant tissue, SEM

  9. The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbon harvest for biofuel would result in no net carbon sequestration as declines in soil carbon offset plant

  10. Contrasting hydraulic architecture and function in deep and shallow roots of tree species from a semi-arid habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Contrasting hydraulic architecture and function in deep and shallow roots of tree species from of tomography for vessel network analysis and the important role of 3-D xylem organization in plant hydraulic Root water uptake and hydraulic transport through xylem are critical for plant functioning and survival

  11. Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

  12. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Michael P. (Albquuerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  13. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  14. Insect Conservation under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lugo, Ezequiel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 'protection for species on the verge of extinction. 43. Id.about the extinction of any species 3 1 and, unlike earlier

  15. Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Tamás

    Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction? Yimin Du Penny Langhammer Yijun Lou John population declines, species extinctions ­ Biodiversity loss · Theoretical ­ Host extinction generally to amphibian species Stuart et al. 2004. Science 306: 17831786 #12;Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd

  16. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

  17. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer Matthew J Burfeindt1 , Earl Zastrow1 adjuvant to other treatment modalities for a variety of cancers (e.g., Overgaard et al 1995, Kapp 1996, VanMicrowave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain

  18. R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon sequestration D . A . P E LT Z E R on the effects of some of the major drivers of global change on carbon (C) sequestration, particularly carbon that drive C sequestration. Keywords: biological invasion, carbon sequestration, community structure, forest

  19. Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs Serena whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type

  20. Biological Invasions 4: 333338, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Netherlands. Invasion note First report of the Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida in the northeastern Pacific in revised form 28 May 2002 Key words: California, invasions, kelp, nonindigenous, Undaria, wakame Abstract The Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida was discovered in southern California in the spring of 2000

  1. Role of the scaffolding protein p62Dok in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkington, Ryan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy to determine the subcellular distribution of p62Dok and to determine if p62Dok is required for tumor cell invasion. We have successfully induced invasive structures in fibroblasts and have made a fluorescent Dok1 fusion protein. Preliminary data...

  2. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar,1 Vinod. Culturing melanomas of different meta- static capacities within the system showed that each cell type (i.e., matrix components, interstitial cell presence) on planar and vertical melanoma invasion. We

  3. Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

  4. Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    1 Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially flowering plants) a major force driving the diversity of insects As diversity of land plants has increased, the diversity of insects has increased Interaction between plants and insects is an example of coevolution Coevolution

  5. Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

  6. Phosphotyrosine Profiling of NSCLC Cells in Response to EGF and HGF Reveals Network Specific Mediators of Invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Hannah

    Growth factor signaling is deregulated in cancer and often leads to invasion, yet receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways driving invasion under different growth factor conditions are not well understood. To identify ...

  7. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  8. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants Jeff Ollerton & Louise Cranmer) was an effective pollinator of these species. Keywords Bird vision . Canary Islands . Mutualism . Pollinator. Tenerife Introduction The endemic flora of the Canary Islands, situated off the west coast of North Africa

  10. Influence of planting treatments on American chestnut (Castanea dentata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    replaced www.epa.gov #12;4/25/2009 2 Historic surface mining reclamation practices Left "as is" Valleys and Reclamation Act of 1977 Compaction Erosion Heavy Liming Grass Planted The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA or greater productivity Valuable forested land Alternative Species Used: Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia

  11. High Plant Diversity in Eocene South America: Evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, S. Kathleen

    High Plant Diversity in Eocene South America: Evidence from Patagonia Peter Wilf,1,2,3 * N. Rube in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude 47°S, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic) in northwestern Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina (24, 25). It is derived from tuffaceous caldera-lake depos

  12. Phytoplankton consists of one-celled marine and freshwater microalgae and other plant-like organisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , taking up carbon dioxide and nutrients from the water and using light as an energy source. The microalgaePhytoplankton consists of one-celled marine and freshwater microalgae and other plant microalgae species (Hoff and Snell, 2008). Species Temperature (°C) Light (Lux) Salinity (ppt ­ ) Chaetoceros

  13. Mixed planting of sorghum midge (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) resistant and susceptible sorghums to enhance and assess nonpreference resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez Mass, Nora Cecilia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    varieties at the same level of insect population. " Smith (1989) defined insect resistant plants as those composed of the genetically inherited qualities that result in a plant of one hybrid or species being less damaged than a susceptible plant which.... In a similar approach Horber (1980) defined susceptibility and high susceptibility. The level of plant resistance to insects is genetically determined. Also, there are commonly limitations in the opportunities and abilities to elevate the level...

  14. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

  15. Are tropical fungal endophytes hyperdiverse? Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous fungi that inhabit healthy plant tissues without

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Are tropical fungal endophytes hyperdiverse? Abstract Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous fungi that inhabit healthy plant tissues without causing disease. Endophytes have been found in every plant species sites in a lowland, moist tropical forest of central Panama, we quantified endophyte colonization

  16. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

    1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

  17. Vascular Plant Survey of the Canyonlands Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve, Tyler County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Kelly

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    list with scientific name, authority and all compared entities for each plant species can be found in Appendix E. T A B LE 2. Definitio n of co des use d to indic ate o rigi n, longevity, and seaso n of gro w... for all the plants collected can be found in Appendix A. Checklist of the Vascular Plants of the Canyonlands Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve Pteridophyta ASPLENIACEAE Asplenium platyneuron (L.) B.S.P N P W BLECHNACEAE...

  18. Species Introductions in Large Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    ) ­ No management procedures mandated ­ Fully loaded cargo hold ­ Residual water and accumulated sediment hold #12;Global Ballast Water · Global ballast water transfer: ~10 billion tonnes/year · Ballast water per of animals and plants transported in ballast water: > 3000/day · > 80% of global goods and commodities

  19. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  20. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  1. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  2. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  3. PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

  4. Plant Ecology An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

  5. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  6. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  7. Vascular flora and gradient analysis of the Natchez Trace Parkway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Nena Mae Monique

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and protected species. The NPS has gone to great efforts to control the invasion of many plant species including tree of heaven [Ailanthus altissima (P. Mill.) Swingle] and kudzu [Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata (Willd.) Maesen & S. Almeida...

  8. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger C.

    by nutrient management. Key-words: common reed, invasive species, nutrient enrichment, wetlands Journal. A single S. pectinata plant was grown with each P. australis. In August 2002, plants were harvested

  9. Second nature: improving transportation without putting nature second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Patricia A.; Ernst, Michelle

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Way: “You Wouldn’t Plant Kudzu, would You? ” Oct. 15, 2002.Way: “You Wouldn’t Plant Kudzu, would You? ” Oct. 15, 2002.invasive species such as kudzu and grass- es. Some of these

  10. Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among

  11. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios the degree to which an individual plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem and surface waters were analyzed and compared against high

  12. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains in question. Understanding Coast of the US, from Florida to Maine. Hydrogen isotopic compo- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem

  13. New Ceratocystis species infecting coffee, cacao, citrus and native trees in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Ceratocystis species infecting coffee, cacao, citrus and native trees in Colombia M. Van Wyk a large number of plant and especially tree pathogens. In Colombia, isolates of this fungus cause, cacao and native trees in Colombia, based on morphology and DNA-sequences for three gene regions. Host

  14. Species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay: evidence of fungal host jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    Species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay: evidence Proteccion Vegetal, Facultad de Agronomia, Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay b Forestry and Agricultural Agropecuaria (INIA), Uruguay d Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, USA a r t i c l e i n f

  15. Foliar response of ten tree species exposed to SO/sub 2/ air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, A.R.; Davis, D.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study on the relative susceptibility to SO/sub 2/ damage among 4 birch species - Scotch, Austrian, and eastern white pines, white ash, black cherry, and hybrid poplar - is reported. Controlled exposures were performed and the percentages of plants injured and the percentages of leaf areas damaged were recorded.

  16. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian Analysis (2006) 1, Number 1, pp. 41–92 Explaining Species Distribution Patterns through Hierarchical Modeling Alan E. Gelfand?, John A. Silander Jr†., Shanshan Wu‡, Andrew Latimer§, Paul O. Lewis¶, Anthony G. Rebelo? and Mark Holder..., spatial logistic re- gression, species range, species richness. 1 Introduction Ecologists increasingly use species distribution models to address theoretical and practi- cal issues including predicting the response of species to climate change (Midgley et...

  17. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  18. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  19. Calibration of Cotton Planting Mechanisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per foot. To obtain a perfect stand of one plant to Foot, a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 11 plants per foot wonld have to be thinned out. The number for picker wheel- drop planting mechanisms ranged from a minimum of 2 to a maxi- mum of 27 plants... per foot, requiring the removal of from 1 to 26 nlants per foot to leave one plant per foot. CONTENTS Introduction History of cotton planter development ------------.---------------------------------- Cottonseed planting mechanisms Requirements...

  20. Factoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across the ecoregions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    population density, and the extinction risk of species. This threat index is positively correlated with allFactoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across Biodiversity Species Non-species biological values Threat A B S T R A C T Biodiversity in Africa, Madagascar

  1. Alien invasion Getting to the root of radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    's tsunami, as well as ongoing threats to global energy supplies and national security, has been felt around with a bacterium they hope will produce enough electrical current to power city generators. If their research troublesome alien plants in North America, among other faculty research stories. As usual, you will also hear

  2. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

  3. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  5. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  6. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  8. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  10. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  11. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  16. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  19. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  20. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. Successful tree planting techniques for drastically disturbed lands: A case study of the propagation planting of container-grown oak and nut trees in Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States). Land Reclamation Program

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful tree seedling establishment on drastically disturbed lands is contingent on seven major variables: (1) selection of proper native species, (2) purchase of the best quality planting stock, (3) correct handling of planting stock, (4) correct planting techniques, (5) effective control of competing vegetation, (6) proper soil conditions and preparation, (7) weather. Exotic species should not be planted to avoid past mistakes such as kudzu, Japanese honeysuckle, sericea lespedeza and chestnut blight. A major concern of reclamation specialists and ecosystem restorationists is obtaining high-quality plant materials with the correct provenance. Ecosystem restorationists, reclamation specialists, park managers and private landowners can easily and cheaply propagate native oak or other hardwood species from local parent stock using Whitcomb bottomless containers. Proper seed collection, storage and preparation techniques as well as propagation methods are critical for seedling growth and development into quality air-pruned planting stock. Air-pruned seedlings of local provenance can be outplanted in the fall after one growing season with little transplanting shock while developing extensive root systems prior to soil freezing in winter. Establishment success of container-grown seedlings greatly exceeds that of spring-planted bare-root seedlings. Fall-planted, container-grown seedlings have a decided advantage since their roots continue to grow throughout the fall and much of the winter, enabling them to better withstand summer drought and weedy competitors. Container-grown seedlings also allow a five- to six-month planting season compared to bare-root seedlings` four to six weeks. Since propagation costs are minimal, planters who grow their own save money on the planting stock. Because the quality is higher, home-grown seedlings have greater establishment success, saving labor, time and money. With better survival rates, far fewer trees need be planted as compared to bare-root seedlings.

  2. The Behavior of Invasive Batillaria attramentaria Compared to the Native Horn Snail and the Impacts of the Invader on Bodega Harbor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to Batillaria's effects on the mudflat environment ·This invasive snail is capable of withstanding stressful

  3. A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

  4. Simulation methods and tissue property models for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Christopher W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many brain tumors are localized deeply and are currently surgically inaccessible without causing severe damage to the overlying structures of the brain. The current spectrum of non-invasive methods for treating such tumors ...

  5. Non-invasive assessment of ventilation maldistribution in lung disease using multiple breath inert gas washouts. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horsley, Alex

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinical research in cystic fibrosis (CF) requires study endpoints that are sensitive to airways disease, repeatable and non-invasive. Despite significant advances in the treatment of CF, lung function assessments continue ...

  6. Ultra-low-power electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    New electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring promise low-cost, maintenance-free, and lightweight devices. These devices are critical in long-term medical measurements and in home-based tele-monitoring services, which ...

  7. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  8. Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishiguchi, Michele

    Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the Southwestern United and decision products will be based on geospatial modeling coupled with field experiments and draw on a wealth

  9. Effects of Local Adaptation of Invasion Success: A Case Study of Rhithropanopeus harrisii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Terrence Michael

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    for shelter at high densities and therefore warrant management in order to reduce their effect. This study indicates a need for the invasion models to take the source population into account in order to ensure effective and prudent management strategies....

  10. Minimally-invasive Wearable Sensors and Data Processing Methods for Mental Stress Detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jongyoon

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    conducted for this dissertation, a minimally-invasive wearable sensor platform and physiological data processing methods were developed to analyze a number of physiological correlates of mental stress. We present a minimally obtrusive wearable sensor...

  11. Invasive potential of cattle fever ticks in the southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Busch, Joseph D.; Olafson, Pia U.; Scoles, Glen A.; Davey, Ronald B.; Pound, J. Mathews; Kammlah, Diane M.; Lohmeyer, Kimberly H.; Wagner, David M.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Background For >100 years cattle production in the southern United States has been threatened by cattle fever. It is caused by an invasive parasite-vector complex that includes the protozoan hemoparasites Babesia bovis ...

  12. Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Sasha Alanda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

  13. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar, 1Miller AJ, Mihm MC, Jr. Melanoma. N Engl J Med 2006;355:51 –the microenvironment on melanoma cell fate determination and

  14. Continuous and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using ultrasonic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Joohyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a continuous and non-invasive arterial blood pressure (CNAP) monitoring technique using ultrasound. An arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform provides valuable information in treating cardiovascular ...

  15. Quantitative assessment of invasive mena isoforms (Menacalc) as an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Seema

    Introduction: Mena, an Ena/VASP protein family member, is a key actin regulatory protein. Mena is up-regulated in breast cancers and promotes invasion and motility of tumor cells. Mena has multiple splice variants, including ...

  16. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  17. Poisonous Plant Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are most grass, acid leg paralysis, dribbling urine susceptible to poisoning sorghum, by sorghum sorghum alum Stillingia Trecul Hydrocyanic See prussic acid poisoning Numerous sheep losses to treculiana queensdelight acid this plant have occurred...

  18. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

  19. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  20. Strength in Numbers: Setting Quantitative Criteria for Listing Species under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Kalyani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 9 'to any species at a "measurable risk" of extinction. H.R.dan- ger of extinction while those species that are listed

  1. Mutualism (+, +) (between species) Increased density of species i increased per capitum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraco, Thomas

    & endophytic fungi Plants & mycorrhizal fungi #12;"Pleiotropic Parasite" Pleiotropy: gene has multiple effects, oropendola mutualism #12;Plant-endophyte-herbivore interactions Rasmussen et al. (2007, New Phytologist 173 endophytes outside plasma membrane Aboveground locations Cost to Plant: Consume photosynthate, water

  2. Ecological Applications, 20(4), 2010, pp. 10051020 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    information gaps for biological invasions research priority. To exemplify the usefulness of citizen science ecology and invasion biology. Key words: birds; citizen science; guilds; introduced plants; invasive species remain largely unexplored. As a group, citizen scientists such as ornithologists possess a wide

  3. Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

  4. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  5. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  6. AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY TESTING SERVICE THE SERVICE uses morphological standards for forest to obtain information about the quality of their planting stock before planting. will indicate the likely Potential (RGP) 15 150 FURTHER INFORMATION See the Forest Research, Plant Quality Testing web page: http

  7. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  8. Effects of plant density and row spacing on the ratooning of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priwin A., Ricardo A

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Row Width Sorghum, as all other crops, requires optimum spacing for efficient utilization of nutrients, solar energy and soil moisture. The effect of optimum spacing can be measured by the components which make up yield per unit area and per plant.... If the stand was not adequate, plants were trans- planted to insure a correct stand. The parent and ratoon crops were cultivated to maintain the plots free of weedy species. 20 After harvesting the grain from the parent crop, the plants were cut 8 cm...

  9. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  10. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecologymining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecology

  11. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  12. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  13. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Yoon, Y. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  14. Seed priming of native ornamental species to improve the rate and uniformity of germination in modern greenhouse operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finnerty, Terry Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and assistance with this research; and for the pleasure and privilege of working with such courteous, professional people. Thanks to Mr. Stan Akagi and Native Plants, Inc, of Salt Lake City, Utah; to Mr. Michael Schupe of Containerized Plants in Independence... and Uniformity of Germination in Modern Greenhouse Operations (August 1990) Terry Lee Finnerty B. S. , Utah State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, Jayne M. Zajicek Many wildf1ower species have complex dormancy systems that cause sporadic...

  15. Structure and Biochemical Properties of PRL-1, a Phosphatase Implicated in Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Tumor Invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun,J.; Wang, W.; Yang, H.; Liu, S.; Liang, F.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) phosphatases constitute a novel class of small, prenylated phosphatases that are implicated in promoting cell growth, differentiation, and tumor invasion, and represent attractive targets for anticancer therapy. Here we describe the crystal structures of native PRL-1 as well as the catalytically inactive mutant PRL-1/C104S in complex with sulfate. PRL-1 exists as a trimer in the crystalline state, burying 1140 Angstroms{sup 2} of accessible surface area at each dimer interface. Trimerization creates a large, bipartite membrane-binding surface in which the exposed C-terminal basic residues could cooperate with the adjacent prenylation group to anchor PRL-1 on the acidic inner membrane. Structural and kinetic analyses place PRL-1 in the family of dual specificity phosphatases with closest structural similarity to the Cdc14 phosphatase and provide a molecular basis for catalytic activation of the PRL phosphatases. Finally, native PRL-1 is crystallized in an oxidized form in which a disulfide is formed between the active site Cys104 and a neighboring residue Cys49, which blocks both substrate binding and catalysis. Biochemical studies in solution and in the cell support a potential regulatory role of this intramolecular disulfide bond formation in response to reactive oxygen species such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  16. Willow plant name 'Preble'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.(Salix sachalinensis.times.Salix miyabeana) named `Preble`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 29% more woody biomass than the average of three current production cultivars (Salix.times.dasyclados `SV1` (unpatented), Salix sachalinensis `SX61` (unpatented), and Salix miyabeana `SX64` (unpatented)) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (three growing seasons after coppice) in two different trials in Constableville, N.Y. and Middlebury, Vt. `Preble` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Preble` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  17. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  18. THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION and Learning Company. #12;ii THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT

  19. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  20. B Plant hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  1. Pinellas Plant facts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

  2. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  3. Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    Steam Plant, 6% School of Medicine, 17% Irrigation, 3% Hospital, 22% Athletics, 2% Housing, 5 · Rainwater Cisterns · Reducing the number of once through cooling systems in labs · Expediting the connection for Irrigation ~15 million gallons Percent of Water Used for Irrigation that is Non-Potable ~10-15% Number

  4. Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected automotive rubber components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalkowski, Mark Henry

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to change significantly in the future. It is estimated that by the year 2010, about one half of the MSW in the United States will be incinerated in energy-recovery facilities (8). With this much of our MSW to be incinerated, the issue of toxic species... being introduced to the environment through incinerator emissions and ash must be addressed. Over the last 20 years, more than 100 waste-to-energy plants have been built in the United States. There are almost that many plants currently either...

  5. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Environmental Horticulture major Environmental Horticulture Science option Landscape Design option Biotechnology (Environmental Horticultural Science, Landscape Design, Plant Biology, Crop Science, and Biotechnology major Plant Biotechnology option Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems major Sustainable Crop

  6. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  7. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Oberholster, S. [USDA Forest Service, Montgomery, AL (United States); Parr, P.; Mann, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Rosensteel, B. [JAYCOR Environmental, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

  8. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota; et al, et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles1,2 and herbivore communities3–7 are affecting global biodiversity dramatically2. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems8,9. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  9. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  10. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  11. Plants for passive cooling. A preliminary investigation of the use of plants for passive cooling in temperate humid climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spirn, A W; Santos, A N; Johnson, D A; Harder, L B; Rios, M W

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of vegetation for cooling small, detached residential and commercial structures in temperate, humid climates is discussed. The results of the research are documented, a critical review of the literature is given, and a brief review of energy transfer processes is presented. A checklist of design objectives for passive cooling, a demonstration of design applications, and a palette of selected plant species suitable for passive cooling are included.

  12. Impacts of exotic forest pathogens on Mediterranean ecosystems: four case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , pollution, climate change and introduction of invasive species. Invasive tree pathogens are among planning assisted migration activities to enable plant species to cope with rapid climate change. KeywordsImpacts of exotic forest pathogens on Mediterranean ecosystems: four case studies Matteo Garbelotto

  13. Introduction The bioenergy industry is pursuing low-input crops to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    - leading threat to biodiversity. Most of our worst invasive plant species were intentionally introduced across the Southeast to support the growing bioeconomy. Successful development of renewable power biomass crops. These cellulosic crops share many traits with invasive plants (e.g., drought tolerant, fast

  14. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  15. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  16. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  17. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

  19. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

  20. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

  1. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  2. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  3. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  4. The Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950: an analysis of the American response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murry, Ellen Theresa

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CHINESE "INVASION" OF TIBET IN 1950: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN RESPONSE A Thesis by ELLEN THERESA MURRY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS May 1982 Major Subject; History THE CHINESE "INVASION" OF TIBET IN 1950: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN RESPONSE A Thesis by ELLEN THERESA HURRY Approved as to style and content by: a rman o omm1t e) (Member) (Member) em er ea epartme May...

  5. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  6. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  7. Adaptation of eastern white pine provenances to planting sites. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demeritt, M.E.; Garrett, P.W.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eastern white pine provenances from the extreme limits of the natural range of this species are changing from above- and below-average stability to average stability for height growth with increasing age. The regression method is useful for evaluating the stability of provenance to planting sites. The same general conclusions are reached for the performance at different planting sites from the regression method as from the relative difference method.

  8. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Doethideomycetes Fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabien; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related species can have very diverse host plants. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  9. 3D computational study of non-invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    -invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer Earl Zastrow, Susan C Hagness and Barry Non-invasive microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer is investigated using three)). The goal of hyperthermia cancer treatment is to achieve a temperature of approximately 40­45 C in a region

  10. The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 825838, May 1999, www.plantcell.org 1999 American Society of Plant Physiologists CUT1, an Arabidopsis Gene Required for Cuticular Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada b National Research Council of Canada, Plant. Michael Giblin,b David C. Taylor,b and Ljerka Kunsta,2 a Department of Botany, University of British is species dependent, but typically they are 26 to 34 carbons long. VLCFAs, the precursors for wax

  11. COOPERATION WITH THE STATES THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT SECTION 6 PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endangered and threatened species, candidate species, and recently de-listed species. Under section 6, NMFS

  12. PET imaging to non-invasively study immune activation leading to antitumor responses with a 4-1BB agonistic antibody

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AS, Radu CG, Ribas A: PET imaging of the immune system:as: Escuin-Ordinas et al. : PET imaging to non-invasivelyRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access PET imaging to non-invasively

  13. LEAH GERBER The U.S.Endangered Species Act establishes categories for endangered and threatened species but provides no crite-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    and threatened species but provides no crite- ria for deciding when a species should be listed, delisted

  14. The effect of metals and soil pH on the growth of Rhododendron and other alpine plants in limestone soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaisheva, Maria V

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhododendrons are economically important plants in horticulture, and many species are threatened in the wild by habitat degradation. It is therefore doubly important that their nutritional needs should be understood....

  15. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  16. IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    i IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES.2.2 Multiple Neuropharmacological Measures from a single PET scan ................. 4 1.2.2.1 Dual ...................................................................................... 5 1.2.3 Reduction of inter-scanner PET image variability

  17. Differential radioactivity monitor for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  18. Control and User Interface Design for Compact Manipulators in Minimally-Invasive Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Control and User Interface Design for Compact Manipulators in Minimally-Invasive Surgery Peter, and robust controllers. The endoscope manipulator is controlled by a single-board computer and individual Berkelman, Eric Boidard, Philippe Cinquin, Jocelyne Troccaz Abstract-- This paper describes the control

  19. ACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE OF HYDRAULICS

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    Wu, Mingshen

    to validate the concept and the numerical models. NOMENCLATURE A0 The orifice area of the control valve inletACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE and controllability. As a proof-of-concept for this ap- proach, we are pursuing the design of a novel, dexterous

  20. Annual Logging Symposium, June 16-20, 2012 SATURATION-HEIGHT AND INVASION CONSISTENT HYDRAULIC

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    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    clastic and carbonate reservoirs in multi-well contexts. It overcomes the limitation of the bulk volume on pore geometry, which relates to saturation-height modeling at a later stage in reservoir characterization. Additionally, pore geometry affects mud-filtrate invasion under over-balanced drilling conditions