Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Invasive Plant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USDANISIC Rosa multiflora Multiflora rose Severe Invasive.org, USDANISIC Sorghum halepense Johnsongrass Severe Invasive.org, USDANISIC Vinca minor Common periwinkle...

2

INITIAL RESPONSE OF INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANT SPECIES TO TIMBER HARVESTING IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY FORESTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The responses of invasive exotic plant species (IES) to silvicultural treatments one growing season after timber harvesting were examined in the Cumberland Plateau region of (more)

Devine, Kevin Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Final Report Parris Island Depot Invasive Plant Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Recommendations for Control Page 37 a. Chinese tallow tree (Triadicasebifera) Page 37 b. Chinaberry non-native invasive species that have been prioritized for control are Chinese tallow

Bolding, M. Chad

4

Electric Transmission Right-of-Way Invasive Non-Native Woody Plant Species Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Invasive non-native woody plant species are a significant issue in the United States. Invasive woody plants are a particular concern for electric transmission right-of-way (ROW) managers. While invasive non-native woody plants have beneficial usesincluding erosion control, wildlife food and cover, and use as ornamentalsthey also have a notably negative impact on electric transmission ROWs. Negative impacts include reducing line clearance, reliability, and accessibility, and increasing vegetation manageme...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Patterns of Plant Invasions: A Case Example in Native Species Hotspots and Rare Habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land managers require landscape-scale information on where exotic plant species have successfully established, to better guide research, control, and restoration efforts. We evaluated the vulnerability of various habitats to invasion by exotic plant species in a 100,000 ha area in the southeast corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. For the 97 0.1-ha plots in 11 vegetation types, exotic species richness (log 10 ) was strongly negatively correlated to the cover of cryptobiotic soil crusts (r =-0.47, P<0.001), and positively correlated to native species richness (r = 0.22, P<0.03), native species cover (r = 0.23, P<0.05), and total nitrogen in the soil (r = 0.40, P<0.001). Exotic species cover was strongly positively correlated to exotic species richness (r = 0.68, P<0.001). Only 6 of 97 plots did not contain at least one exotic species. Exotic species richness was particularly high in locally rare, mesic vegetation types and nitrogen rich soils. Dry, upland plots (n = 51) had less than half of the exotic species richness and cover compared to plots (n = 45) in washes and lowland depressions that collect water intermittently. Plots dominated by trees had significantly greater native and exotic species richness compared to plots dominated by shrubs. For the 97 plots combined, 33% of the variance in exotic species richness could be explained by a positive relationship with total plant cover, and negative relationships with the cover of cryptobiotic crusts and bare ground. There are several reasons for concern: (1) Exotic plant species are invading hot spots of native plant diversity and rare/unique habitats. (2) The foliar cover of exotic species was greatest in habitats that had been invaded by several exotic species. (3) Continued distu...

Thomas J. Stohlgren; Yuka Otsuki; Cynthia A. Villa; Michelle Lee; Jayne Belnap

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EO 13112: Invasive Species  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

183 183 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 25 / Monday, February 8, 1999 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13112 of February 3, 1999 Invasive Species By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990, as amended (16 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.), Lacey Act, as amended (18 U.S.C. 42), Federal Plant Pest Act (7 U.S.C. 150aa et seq.), Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.), Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other pertinent statutes, to prevent the introduc- tion of invasive species and provide for their control and to minimize

8

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update All 33,000 acres of the ORR All 33,000 acres of the ORR ORR Invasive Plant Management Plan Surveys and Monitoring ...

9

Teller, Brittany Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels in Communities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teller, Brittany 374099 Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels the trophic structure of their invaded territories in terms of biomass. If invasive plant species reduce native plant biomass it is expected that the higher trophic levels that depend on native plants

Knight, Tiffany

10

Invasive Species -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Wildlife What's New Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Some of the links on this page are to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) that can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. Non-native plants and animals cause problems for many native species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Protected and relatively undisturbed for the past 60 years, the ORR has changed considerably since 1942 when it was acquired as part of the Manhattan project. At that time about half of the land was cleared and cultivated. Those cleared areas have gradually returned to forest through plantings and natural succession. Now about 70% of the reservation is in mature or maturing native habitats. However, invasive, non-native plants and animals often impact these areas.

11

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

12

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China, Nanjing, China 2 Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China 3 ISPRA ­ Institute for Environmental and Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, China 5 The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic

Kratochvíl, Lukas

13

A Dynamic Invasive Species Research Vision: Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President Curry Seed and Chile Co. Robert Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile

USDA, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

14

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

15

Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects  

SciTech Connect

Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Review: Plant species identification using digital morphometrics: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants are of fundamental importance to life on Earth. The shapes of leaves, petals and whole plants are of great significance to plant science, as they can help to distinguish between different species, to measure plant health, and even to model climate ... Keywords: Flower, Image processing, Leaf, Morphometrics, Plant science, Shape analysis, Taxonomy

James S. Cope; David Corney; Jonathan Y. Clark; Paolo Remagnino; Paul Wilkin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A geographic footprint of boaters entering & departing Lake Powell| Aquatic nuisance species management| Potential distribution of the invasive zebra/quagga mussel into south western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Currently, transoceanic and intercontinental dispersal of the Zebra/Quagga mussel (and many other Aquatic Invasive Species) has already occurred. While there may be countless vectors (more)

Wenzel, Jamie M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically dominant and economically important invasive species in the United States. This dissertation addresses aspects of the biology, behavior, management, and collection techniques for N. fulva. Specifically, topics investigated include a modified drip technique for extracting ants from their substrate, the effectiveness of a broadcast ant bait as a stand-alone treatment, the foraging preference and peak activity of workers, the reproductive potential of queens, and the ability of this species to translocate pathogenic microorganisms. The primary goal of these works was to better understand the biological idiosyncrasies of this species that may ultimately lead to the mitigation N. fulva populations. A modified drip technique was developed to quickly and efficiently extract N. fulva from their nesting substrates. Ants and their associated substrates were collected in 18.9 L buckets lined with talcum powder and transported to the laboratory. Substrates were weighted down and a cardboard tower was provided for the immigration of ants as they were forced out of substrates with a slow influx of water. Three applications of Advance Carpenter Ant Bait (ACAB) were applied to a N. fulva population in East Columbia, TX. A series of GIS interpolated maps depict achieved management and subsequent rebound of N. fulva populations. As great as 77% population reduction was achieved by 1 week post treatment, but N. fulva populations rebounded within 3-4 weeks. As a stand-alone treatment, this bait did not provide adequate ant management in treatment plots. Diet preference experiments were performed using artificial diets and food lures. These results of these trials indicated that N. fulva preferred the most carbohydrate rich diet offered through all seasons and that mint apple jelly or hot dog slices were the favored food lures. Diel foraging behavior was observed when temperatures were between 9.95 and 37.26 degrees C. Peak foraging activity occurred at 28.24 +/- 3.12 degrees C. A laboratory investigation of N. fulva suggested that as the number of queens increased, individual queen fecundity increased. This phenomenon is a novel observation among ants and suggests an alternative mechanism for intracolony dominance. Hexagyne colony fecundity of 0.25 +/- 0.12 eggs/queen/hr was the maximum fecundity observed. Results of laboratory experiments showed that N. fulva were capable of transferring E. coli up to 4.5 m in 6 hrs after acquisition from a contaminated source. Pyrosequencing of ectomicrobial assemblages revealed a suite of 518 bacteria and 135 fungi species associated with N. fulva, many of which are known pathogens of plants and animals, including humans. These results suggested that N. fulva should be regarded as both a medically and agriculturally important species.

McDonald, Danny 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake Vander Zanden , Gretchen J.A. Hansen, Scott N. Higgins 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with natural disasters, where disaster preparedness and emergency response plans are the norm, even in casesCommentary Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake. In a response to our article, Horns (2011-this issue) highlights difficulties associated with invasive species

Vander Zanden, Jake

20

Assessment of Non-Native Invasive Plant Species on the United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S.M. Almeida is a notorious invader of roadsides and power transmission line rights-of-way in the southeastern United States, but it is seldom found...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced shape context for plant species identification using leaf image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel method for leaf species identification combining local and shape-based features. Our approach extends the shape context model in two ways. First of all, two different sets of points are distinguished when computing the shape ... Keywords: image retrieval, plant species identification, shape context

Sofiene Mouine; Itheri Yahiaoui; Anne Verroust-Blondet

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spraying over the top of Ambrosia pumila, a federally listedtypical of the Larrea-Ambrosia microphyllous scrub that isthe highest of all species. Ambrosia dumosa, E. farinosa, K.

Steers, Robert Jeremy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuel called syngas. By installing the pictured device in front of a concentrating solar power dish, power plants can burn less fuel.

24

Elevated CO2 and plant species diversity interact to slow root decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in plant species diversity can result in synergistic increases in decomposition rates, while elevated atmospheric CO2 can slow the decomposition rates; yet it remains unclear how diversity and changes in atmospheric CO2 may interact to alter root decomposition. To investigate how elevated CO2 interacts with changes in root-litter diversity to alter decomposition rates, we conducted a 120-day laboratory incubation. Roots from three species (Trifolium repens, Lespedeza cuneata, and Festuca pratense) grown under ambient or elevated CO2 were incubated individually or in combination in soils that were exposed to ambient or elevated CO2 for five years. Our experiment resulted in two main findings: (1) Roots from T. repens and L. cuneata, both nitrogen (N) fixers, grown under elevated CO2 treatments had significantly slower decomposition rates than similar roots grown under ambient CO2 treatments; but the decomposition rate of F. pratense roots (a non-N-fixing species) was similar regardless of CO2 treatment. (2) Roots of the three species grown under ambient CO2 and decomposed in combination with each other had faster decomposition rates than when they were decomposed as single species. However, roots of the three species grown under elevated CO2 had similar decomposition rates when they were incubated alone or in combination with other species. These data suggest that if elevated CO2 reduces the root decomposition rate of even a few species in the community, it may slow root decomposition of the entire plant community.

De Graaff, Marie-Anne [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Rula, Kelly L [ORNL; Six, Johan W U A [University of California, Davis; Schweitzer, Jennifer A [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Abstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52820). Sequence analysis of ScNLE protein A BLAST search of the GenBank protein database revealed transcription factors, we searched the ScNLE promoter for different sequence motifs recog- nizedAbstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum

27

Ten-year growth of woody species planted in reclaimed mined banks with different slopes  

SciTech Connect

In landscape reconstruction in an opencast coal mine, a gradient of slopes can be obtained. The slope gradient can affect different processes, such as plant growth, especially in semi-arid conditions. On the other hand, to favor the heterogeneity of habitats and ensure long-term restoration, late successional woody species have been planted but with heterogeneous results. In this study, the effect of a slope gradient (from 11.4 to 15.5 degrees) on the growth and survival of five Mediterranean woody species 10 years after the reconstruction of mining banks was evaluated. Slope gradient reduced height growth significantly from 10 cm degree{sup -1} (lentish) to 25 cm degree{sup -1} (pine) in 10-year- old woody species. This gradient also reduced basal diameter growth from 0.22 mm degree{sup -1} (juniper) to 0.58 mm degree{sup -1} (pine). Survival and slope were not significantly correlated. Growth and survival of the 10-year- old woody species were equal to or higher than those of the same species in other afforestations in semi-arid conditions. This outcome demonstrates the adequacy of species and applied techniques of restoration that allow a long-term reliability of reclaimed mine slopes.

Badia, D.; Valero, R.; Gracia, A.; Marti, C.; Molina, F. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Huesca (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants  

SciTech Connect

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

Sackschewsky, M.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Distribution and conservation significance of endemic species of flowering plants in Peru  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Using the data published in the Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Gymnosperms of Peru, we analyzed the elevational distributions of 5323 species reported as endemics from that country as a whole, for 10 families with the highest number of endemic taxa in Peru, and the distribution patterns of these species according to life form. We calculated the density of endemism (number of endemic species divided by area 1000) and absolute number of endemic species among life forms and families, along an elevational gradient. Overall densities of endemics were 1015 times higher at mid-elevation (2000 3500 m) than in the Amazonian lowlands (0500 m). Absolute numbers of endemics peaked at 1500 3000 m for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes, while trees, vines, and lianas showed maxima in the lowlands (0500 m); yet densities of endemics for all life forms peaked at 15003000 m. Among the 10 families with the highest number of endemics, densities of endemics peaked at mid- to high elevation (1500 4500 m), but showed much disparity in the elevational distribution of absolute numbers of endemic species. Finally, the percentage of endemic species to total species is highest for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes. Given that less than 10 % of the land area for each of the montane zones (20004500 m) is protected compared to 13.529.9 % in the lower elevations (01000 m), we recommend that priority be given to increasing the size of protected areas at mid- to high altitude in the Andean slopes to grant further protection in zones with the highest density of endemics. We also recommend that more emphasis be given to collecting and studying non-trees, since most endemic species belong to that class.

Henk Van; Der Werff; Trisha Consiglio

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A comparison of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year-round sampling. This study compares the environmental {sup 137}Cs concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage {sup 137}Cs concentrations. The study`s objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation {sup 137}Cs concentrations are statistically the same.

Rangel, R.C.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books D9362F8F06B7CB16FD59D7C2F2FBABF2 AOCS Press Downloa

34

Negative plantsoil feedbacks may limit persistence of an invasive tree due to rapid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: biological invasions; Chinese tallow tree; pathogen accumulation; persistence; plant­soil feedbacks 1

Siemann, Evan

35

Niche-based modelling as a tool for predicting the risk of alien plant invasions at a global scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) succulent karoo, (3) Nama-karoo, (4) fynbos, (5) Albany thicket, (6) grassland and (7) savanna. Because, fynbos and succulent karoo. Temperate Europe and the south-eastern part of the USA now appear suitable (succulent karoo, Nama-karoo and dwarf savanna). Species' distribution models Native distribution of South

Schweik, Charles M.

36

A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology, have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year117CS round sampling. This study compares the environmental concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil 117CS concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage 137CS concentrations. The study's objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation 137CS concentrations are statistically the same. If the concentrations are statistically the same, then a recommendation could be made to the CPSES for substitution of leaf type sampled. Broadleaf tree leaf samples were collected on and off CPSES. Evergreen leaf samples were collected in close proximity to broadleaf samples. The leaf and soil samples were dried and homogenized for analysis. Gamma-ray spectrometry was performed to measure 137Cs radioactivity in each leaf and soil sample. The 137CS concentrations for each leaf and soil sample were calculated and statistically compared. The mean values of the 137CS concentrations in broadleaf and evergreen foliage samples were found to be statistically the same and therefore from the same population. The individual soil sample 137CS concentration means were also statistically the same and from its own population. The foliage and soil populations, although, were found to be statistically different. This study's conclusion is that evergreen leaves from juniper trees can be used to supplement and/or substitute for the broadleaf samples-currently collected. This study may be used by CPSES to petition the USNRC for a modification of the current environmental sampling program. A change in foliage collection would allow the CPSES to better satisfy its environmental sampling regulatory requirements.

Rangel, Ruben Canales

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

38

Sensitive Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitive Species Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on sensitive species, LANL can potentially reduce the possibility of these species being upgraded to federal protection. April 12, 2012 sensitive species The bald eagle is one of our sensitive species. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Sensitive species are plants and animals that are protected at the state or local level. Keeping sensitive species safe We strive to minimize the impact of Laboratory operations on sensitive species, which are plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels.

39

Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Interactive Effects of Geography and Host Plant Species on Genetic and Phenotypic Variation of Cotton Fleahopper Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) is a widely distributed insect across the United States. Although, it feeds on several native wild hosts, its agricultural importance lies as an economic pest of cotton in several states in the southern United States. No studies have addressed intraspecific genetic and phenotypic variation of this insect pest at a large geographic scale. I examined genetic variation among cotton fleahopper populations associated with cotton in different geographic locations across the southern United States (Chapter II). Using dominant, neutral, nuclear molecular markers (AFLP, amplified fragment length polymorphism) and mitochondrial DNA sequences, I found that overall genetic differentiation among different geographic populations, collected from cotton in eleven cotton growing states, was low but significant. AFLP revealed the presence of three regional groups representing western (Arizona), central (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama), and eastern (Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina) populations. I examined if there were distinct lineages of cotton fleahoppers associated with three of its host plant species: cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), horsemint (Monarda punctata) and woolly croton (Croton capitatus) in five different locations of Texas by using AFLP markers (Chapter III). I found two distinct host-associated lineages at three locations and local panmixia in the other two locations. I tested if host preference of cotton fleahoppers were affected by geographic variation and prior experience. Conducting choice tests with a Y-tube olfactometer, I found that host preference in cotton fleahoppers for horsemint (one of its native host plants) is conserved and unaffected by individual?s prior experience with cotton (Chapter IV). Finally, I explored the role of host-plant species in morphological differentiation of the cotton fleahopper in two locations that differ in presence of distinct host-associated lineages. Using a geometric-morphometric approach, I detected significant effect of host plant and geography on body morphology and wing shape of cotton fleahopper populations (Chapter V). Length of antenna and rostrum were two important traits associated with morphological divergence of cotton and horsemint associated insect populations. Cotton associated individuals had relatively longer antenna and rostrum compared to individuals associated with horsemint.

Barman, Apurba

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fly Invasion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasion Invasion Name: Mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Over the past week, out house has been infested with big houseflys! I am killing 10-15 in one swipe! It only tends to be during the day with the light coming through the windows, but it been going on for 3 days now and they just keep coming! Where are they coming from and why are they so huge? I feel like maybe I've been keeping a fithly house, but I know it's clean. Please help me to understand what is going on. This is the first time I have ever seen so many in my house. Replies: Mary Jo, The way to deal with any insect infestation is first to get rid of the adults and then remove the children and the place they will/can develop. Seeing that you are swatting 10-15 per swipe of the adults, you have step one in progress. Continue removing the adults as you find them and you lessen their opportunity for reproduction.

42

Cement invasion  

SciTech Connect

Damage from cement and cement filtrate has been a much discussed subject since set-through-and-perforate completions were first used. Historically, much of the discussion was similar to that for rotary drilling and drilling mud - it would be nice to prevent all damage, but in the real world, some damage must be tolerated to allow the operator to reap the benefits of cementing. The principal perceived formation damage due to cement invasion is seen by the operator as reducing production. The pure idealist requires full potential production under all alternatives, and would to complete all oil and gas wells free of any formation damage. The more practical idealist holds that damage would result in lower production with the completion method he prefers should be prevented. The pragmatic operator compares the cost of preventing damage to the cost of correcting the damage. Even an extremely high damage ratio is academic if the planned stimulation treatment eliminates the influence the cement invasion might have on production. Formations with permeability high enough to yield economical production without some sort of stimulation or cleanup treatment are unlikely to be subject to significant cement filtrate damage.

Sutton, D.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbaceous crops for bioenergy. Biomass Bioenerg 14:31724.Non-native species and bioenergy: Are we cultivating theniche estimates for bioenergy crops and invasive species of

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

The influence of annual species composition and density on perennial seedling density in four plant communities in the Northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

According to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for long-term underground storage of high-level nuclear waste. Part of the overall site characterization program is to monitor potential impacts on the biological resources at Yucca Mountain. A part of the biological monitoring program, assessed vegetation parameters included density of annual and perennial seedlings. This data was used to evaluate: (1) seed germination and seed survival; and (2) if annual plant species density and cover influence perennial seedling survival. Twelve permanent 200 {times} 200-m ,study plots were established in each of four vegetation associations present in the Yucca Mountain Project area. During the spring of 1992, 20 to 60, 1-m{sup 2} randomly-located quadrats per study plot were measured for perennial seedling density, annual species density, and annual species composition. Perennial seedlings found in 1992 were relocated in the spring of 1993, and survival determined. Cover was measure in the spring of 1992. Annual plant density and cover was greatest in the Larrea-Lycium-Grayia vegetation association, and lowest in the Larrea-Ambrosia vegetation association. Annual seedling density had a negative exponential relationship with perennial seedling density in 1992. However, non-linear regression analysis indicated that 1992 annual seedling density had a greater impact on survival of pernnial seedlings from 1992 to 1993.

Hall, P.F.; Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

Anderson, T.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Walton, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal-fired Plants .capture technologies to coal-fired plants is also likely togroups. Conventional Coal-fired Plants Sulfur During

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Control of Invasive Plants on the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy November 2006 (10) Japanese stilt grass spreads through the ORR (ORNL photo) Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy November 2006 (11)...

49

Invasive Plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be most problematic in disturbed areas such as clearings and openings along roads, under transmission lines, beside waterfronts, and in areas with dead pines. Some can, however,...

50

Impact of disturbance on arthropod community structure: Nutrient enrichment, fire and the invasive Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Invasive species, fire suppression and nutrient deposition, as distinct disturbance factors, have altered Texas prairie communities. Arthropod diversity, abundance, and community composition may be modified (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The politics of invasion : defining and defending the natural, native and legal in the Galpagos Islands of Ecuador.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation analyzes contemporary politics and practices designed to manage species invasions and human population impacts in the Galpagos Islands of Ecuador. Due to the (more)

Brewington, Laura.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation of an oxyfuel power plant using mixed conductingA Vision for Thermal Power-Plant Technology Development inon an Existing US Coal-Fired Power Plant . First National

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plantspower plants, petroleum refining, chemical processing industries, and natural gasnatural gas. If CO 2 capture and geologic sequestration from coal-fired power plants

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo ?.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

56

High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants

Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from combustion and gasification of coal an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Genetic differences in growth of an invasive tree Evan Siemann and William E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum) from its native range (Asia), place of introduction to North of increased competitive ability, Sapium sebiferum, Chinese Tallow Tree, trade- off, invasion, plant growth

Siemann, Evan

60

The war of the roses: demilitarizing invasion biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demilitarizing invasion biology BMH Larson new socialdemilitarizing invasion biology Brendon MH Larson Biologistsmetaphors within invasion biology. I argue that these

Larson, BMH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

62

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

honeysuckle, kudzu) By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree, privet, bamboo) #12;2 Photo

Gray, Matthew

63

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ­ By smothering (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu) ­ By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree

Gray, Matthew

64

The little fire ant Wasmannia auropunctata: a new invasive species ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

effect also on other ground arthropods, judging from the observed decline ... It is an agricultural pest in ...... tural importance as they reduce agricultural crop pest.

65

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture environmental pollutants in the gaseous state and co-inject them with the CO2, in order to mitigate problems associated with solid waste disposal in surface impoundments. Under such conditions, the injected pollutant concentrations could be roughly equivalent to their concentrations in the coal feed. The fate of the injected contaminants can only be determined through further testing and geochemical modeling. However, the concentrations of inadvertent contaminants in the injected CO2 would probably be comparable to their ambient concentrations in confining shales of the injection zone. In general, the aqueous concentrations of hazardous constituents in distal parts of the injection zone, regardless of source, are likely to be limited by equilibrium with respect to coexisting solid phases under the acid conditions induced by the dissolved high pressure CO2, rather than by the initial concentrations of injected contaminants. Therefore, even if a deliberate policy of contaminant recovery and injection were to be pursued, water quality in USDWs would more likely depend on thermodynamic controls governing aqueous contaminant concentrations in the presence of high pressure CO2 rather than in the injected CO2. The conclusions reached in this report are preliminary, and should be confirmed through more comprehensive data evaluation and supporting geochemical modeling.

Apps, J.A.

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 12 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. nature biotechnology advance online publication  A r t i c l e s Grasses of the genus Setaria occur in natural and agricultural eco- systems worldwide, from the tropical forage S. sphacelata (golden timothygrass) to the invasive S. viridis (green foxtail) and S. verticil- lata (hooked bristlegrass) populations that can be found in the farthest northern reaches of Canada. Five Setaria species, S. faberii (giant fox- tail), S. viridis, S. pumila (yellow foxtail), S. geniculata (knotroot foxtail) and S. verticillata, are problematic weeds 1 . S. viridis is among the most widespread plant species on the planet, and is problematic for crop production due to its repeated evolution of herbicide resistance 2 . In Northern China, around 6,000 BC, foxtail millet was domesticated

68

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States); Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bog Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

71

prairie restoration plant ident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Identification Plant Identification Once your restoration is started and plants begin to germinate, the next issue you are faced with is the identification of what is growing. From my experience, the seeds you planted should start germinating after about a week to ten days. Of course, this is dependent on the weather conditions and the amount of moisture in the soil. If you are watering regularly, you will get growth much more quickly than if you are just waiting for nature to take its course. Identifying prairie plants as they germinate is very difficult. If you are an experienced botanist or an expert on prairie plants, your identification will still be a little more than an educated guess. In other words identifying prairie species from non-native species will take some time.

72

Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE OR NERP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available eledronically from the following source. Available eledronically from the following source. Web s/te: www.doe.gov/bridge Reports are available in paper to the public from the following source. US. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 T-e: 1-800-553-6847 EM//: orders@ ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm 7DD: 703-487-4639 Fa: 703-605-6900 Reports are available in paper to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source. Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: 865-576-8401 €-ma//; reports0 adonis.osti .gov

73

Invasive Plant Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

preferable and recycled content products, including EPA-designated items such as compost and mulch, that contribute to environmentally and economically beneficial practices....

74

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANT CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torpedo Grass CogonGrass Chinese Tallow Japanese Climbing Fern #12;Wide Range of Habitats /Dispersal Mechanisms Barrier Island Sand Dune Flatwood Swamp CHINESE TALLOW CHINESE TALLOW #12;Application Equipment treatments Urban Interface Plantation Cut Stump #12;More Treatments COGON GRASS TALLOW TREES CLIMBING FERN

Watson, Craig A.

75

Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology. Battelle Number(s): ...

76

Non-Invasive Attack Testing Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Invasive Attack Testing Workshop. Purpose: To encourage development of test methods, metrics and tools for evaluating the effectiveness of ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

78

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

79

SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Why sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? These common marine microorganisms with the tongue-twisting name behave like fungi in the ocean ecosystem but are actually protists. Their abundance in the ocean varies with the changing seasons. They feed on non-living organic matter such as decaying algae, plants such as mangrove leaves and salt marsh grass or even animal tissues. Species that belong to the Labyrinthulomycete category all fall under a larger category of protists that also includes diatoms and brown algae. Labyrinthulomycetes help break down organic matter in the waters, and some species can also break down crude oil and tarballs. Researchers believe they also "upgrade" the quality of the debris that feed other marine organisms by adding nutrients. Long chain fatty acids produced by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Journal of Tropical Ecology (2002) 18:687705. Copyright 2002 Cambridge University Press The invasibility of tropical forests by exotic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forest location: the Hawaiian Islands. But the combination of Hawaii's extreme isolation and heavy human The invasibility of tropical forests by exotic plants PAUL V. A. FINE1 Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257S. 1400 East Rm. 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA (Accepted 20th September 2001) ABSTRACT

Fine, Paul V.A.

83

COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES  

SciTech Connect

While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or â??clearing houseâ? for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endangered Species Act Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Endangered Species Act Year 1973 Url Puerto-rican-parrott-TomMacKenzieUSFWS.jpg Description References The Endangered Species Act[1] Fish and Wildlife Service - ESA Overview[2] ESA Fact Sheet[3] When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of "esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people." It further expressed concern that many of our nation's native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct. The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. It is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries

85

Dynamics of water use and responses to herbivory in the invasive reed, Arundo donax (L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first objective of this study was to investigate the role of an invasive grass species, Arundo donax (L.), on the hydrologic cycle. At a site on the Rio Grande in South Texas, we measured the gas exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor at the leaf scale and structural characteristics, such as leaf area and shoot density, at the stand scale. In order to assess the effect of water availability, this study was conducted along transects perpendicular to the edge of the river along a potential moisture gradient. The second objective was to quantify the effect of two herbivores, an armored scale, Rhizaspidiotus donacis (Leonardi), and a stem-galling wasp, Tetramesa romana (Walker),on the photosynthetic and transpiration rates of A. donax. Leaf gas exchange measurements were made to determine the direction and magnitude of the effect on physiological processes and by what mechanisms any effects arose. Stands of A. donax used approximately 9.1 ? 1.1 mm of water per day. This rate of water use was at the high end of the spectrum for plants. The major controls on stand scale transpiration were evaporative demand, leaf area index, and water availability. During two summer seasons, stand scale transpiration varied greatly, following the pattern of variability in precipitation, suggesting that recent rainfall constituted a significant proportion of the water taken up by this species. Herbivory by a stem-galling wasp and a sap-feeding scale, both separately and together, reduced the rates of leaf scale physiological processes in A. donax. The efficacy of the wasp was density dependent, and this herbivore reduced the carboxylation rate of Rubisco. The effect of the scale took approximately five months to manifest, which coincided with generation time. Scale reduced photosynthesis by decreasing the maximum rate of electron transport. When the two insects were both present, the effect of their herbivory seemed to be additive. These results will assist the responsible management agencies in evaluating the propriety of using one or both of the insect herbivores as biological control agents.

Watts, David A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Foliar herbivory and its effects on plant growth in native and exotic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

species with a Chi-square independence test. Greenhouse experiments. To evaluate the effects of foliar herbivory on plant growth in exotic and native species...

87

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Operational Status Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal operations. All personnel are to report for duty according to...

88

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

89

Evolutionary and Ecological Drivers of Invasion in the Annual Thistle, Centaurea melitensis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) populations intrait among invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia populations intrait among invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia populations in

Moroney, Jolene Rene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

92

Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996 the growth, survivorship, and reproduction of nondomesticated plants (Friess and Maillet 1996, 1997; FunayamaChapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power

Flecker, Alex

93

The Ecological and Socio-Economic Impacts of Invasive Alien Species on Island Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 10,000 kg were harvested annually from the black coral beds off Maui and Kauai. During the late 70's from the Philippines and Tonga (Harper, 1988). These sources have filled the demand for low quality in the FMP (Grigg, 1988).For black coral, the combined MSY for beds off Maui and Kauai is 6,250 kg/yr (Grigg

Meyerson, Laura A.

94

Burmese Pythons in South Florida: Scientific Support for Invasive Species Management1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- such as the common boa (Boa constrictor), green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), yellow anaconda (Eunectes notaeus

Mazzotti, Frank

95

INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´n Biolo´gica de Don~ana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cienti´ficas, Avda Americo Vespucio, 41092, where M. floricola have fighting abilities superior to Anoplolepis gracilipes (which sprays formic acid

Courchamp, Franck

96

Biological invasion-inspired migration in distributed evolutionary algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration strategy plays an important role in designing effective distributed evolutionary algorithms. In this work, a novel migration model inspired to the phenomenon known as biological invasion is devised. The migration strategy is implemented through ... Keywords: Biological invasion, Distributed evolutionary algorithm, Massive migration

I. De Falco; A. Della Cioppa; D. Maisto; U. Scafuri; E. Tarantino

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Identification, Distribution and Control of an Invasive Pest Ant, Paratrechina sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invasive species are capable of causing considerable damage to natural ecosystems, agricultures and economies throughout the world. These invasive species must be identified and adequate control measures should be investigated to prevent and reduce the negative effects associated with exotic species. A recent introduction of an exotic ant, Paratrechina sp. nr. pubens, has caused tremendous economic and ecological damage to southern Texas. Morphometric and phylogenetic procedures were used to identify this pest ant, P. sp. nr. pubens, to Southern Texas. The populations in Texas were found to be slightly different but not discriminating from P. pubens populations described in previous literature. Analysis of the distribution and expansion of P. sp. nr. pubens found numerous geographically discrete populations and moderately expanding territories. These expansion rates were determined to be ~20 and ~30 m per mo for a neighborhood and industrial area, respectively. Several laboratory and field control strategies were implemented for control of this intensely pestiferous species. Dinotefuran exhibited high laboratory efficacy against P. sp. nr. pubens, while treatments using novaluron were inconclusive. The use of expanded-use Termidor? demonstrated trends in these data that suggest it as the treatment of choice. Other field treatments, such as Termidor and Top Choice?, Termidor and Advance Carpenter Ant BaitTM, and Transport? and Talstar? G, did not attain the success found in the expanded-use Termidor treatment. Most treatments examined were determined ineffective against high populations of P. sp. nr. pubens. Additional and more intensive population management regimes should be investigated. Abating further P. sp. nr. pubens population proliferation to other regions will only be realized from additional control research supplemented with state and federal interdiction policies.

Meyers, Jason

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Trace species emissions for IGFC  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this investigation are to study both the fate and distribution of at least five significant, coal-derived trace elements commonly present in coal-gas, in terms of their vaporization during gasification, their condensation and sorption during hot-gas cleanup, as well as their effects on fuel cells, gas turbines, and ultimately the environment. The definition here of trace does not include the major contaminants of sulfur and chlorine, etc., although the simultaneous presence of such major species is always considered in our thermochemical calculations. Of course, many other elements can vaporize in trace quantities from raw coal as either volatile, molecular compounds or as metallic vapors which, besides their deleterious action on the energy conversion systems, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when emitted into the atmosphere. Hence, an understanding is sought of how the type and quantity of significant trace species in coal-gas changes from the coal pile through cleanup subsystems and the electric generators to the exhaust stack of an integrated system.

Pigeaud, A.E.; Helble, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Snakes and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes and Plants Snakes and Plants Name: kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in the southern most tip of Illinois,on horseshoe lake. I would like to know what time of the year do snakes come out and when do they go back in? Also is there any plants to plant to keep them away? Replies: What kind of snakes, in what kind of habitat? All snakes in Illinois hibernate in winter, but their habits differ by species. I'm not sure of the range of dates for southern Illinois, but they start to come out of hibernation in northern Illinois around the end of March or in April, depending on the weather. Advance of spring is usually about 3 weeks earlier in southern Illinois than northern, so i guess snake emergence would be about that much advanced as well. They will come out when there are warm sunny days to get them warmed up, and nights are not so cold that they will be harmed. Fall entry into hibernation is roughly parallel, snakes will often bask in the sun on sunny fall days before going into hibernation, again in no. Ill usually in October but widely varying.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Endangered Species Listing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an Endangered Species Advisory Committee to guide a new research effort to address electric power sector technical issues connected to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listing decisions on hundreds of species over the next several years. EPRI has conducted initial research into the listing process and has reached out to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other stakeholder groups in an effort to establish collegial and cooperative ties and to better understand the research gaps ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species A document listing the tree species included in the 2011 Production Forecast Tom Jenkins Justin Gilbert Ewan Mackie Robert Matthews #12;PF2011 ­ List of tree species The following is the list of species used within the Forecast System. Species are ordered alphabetically

103

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

104

Prediction of species composition of plant communities in a rural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

traits in forest communities, but 3356% in the meadow and weed .... the exception of several areas where city governments ..... Hawaii and other Pacific islands.

105

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

106

Light management for landscape restoration| Suppression of a model weedy light-demanding pioneer shrub, Ulex europaeus on Mauna Kea Hawai`i.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The use of planted forests as a restoration tool has been shown to improve landscape health and may control invasive plant species by canopy (more)

Perry, Cheyenne Hiapo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Poisonous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants Plants Nature Bulletin No. 276 October 1, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation POISONOUS PLANTS In the autumn of 1818, Nancy Hanks Lincoln died of milk sickness and left her son, Abe, motherless before he was ten years old. Since colonial times, in most of the eastern half of the United States, that dreaded disease has been a hazard in summer and fall, wherever cattle graze in woodlands or along wooded stream banks. In the 1920s it was finally traced to white snakeroot -- an erect branched plant, usually about 3 feet tall, with a slender round stem, sharply-toothed nettle-like leaves and, in late summer, several small heads of tiny white flowers. Cows eating small amounts over a long period develop a disease called "trembles", and their milk may bring death to nursing calves or milk sickness to humans. When larger amounts are eaten the cow, herself, may die.

108

Plant succession on disturbed sites in four plant associations in the Northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is characterizing Yucca Mountain Nevada, as a potential site for long-term underground storage of high-level nuclear waste. DOE is committed to reclaim all lands disturbed by the project, and return them to a stable ecological state, with a composition and productivity similar to predisturbance conditions. A study was implemented to assess plant species which naturally invade disturbed sites in the Yucca Mountain Project Area. In 1991 and 1992 study plots were established on disturbed sites. Sites were characterized by disturbance type (i.e., road, drill pad, etc.), disturbance severity, vegetation association, time since abandonment, and topographic placement. Density of all perennial plant species was measured on disturbed and undisturbed plots. The species with the highest density in disturbed sites was Chrysothamnus teretifolia. This species was not a major contributor in undisturbed sites. In the undisturbed sites Ambrosia dumosa had the highest density of perennial plant species but was also high in density in the disturbance sites. Total species density was higher in undisturbed sites compared to disturbed sites. Plant species density analysis compared disturbed and undisturbed vegetation associations. Results will be used to design reclamation field trails and to finalize the Yucca Mountain Project Reclamation Implementation Plan.

Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.; Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Bagdad Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bagdad Plant Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon Drive Leechburg, P A 15656 * ATI Allegheny "'I Ludlum e-mail: Raymond.Polinski@ATImetals.com Mr. James Raba U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 205585-0121 Raymond J. Polinski General Manager Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel RE: Distribution Transformers Rulemaking Docket Number EE-2010-STD-0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Submitted 4-10-12 via email Mr. Raba, I was planning to make the following closing comments at the DOE Public Meeting on February 23, 2012, but since the extended building evacuation caused the meeting to run well past the scheduled completion time I decided to submit my comments directly to you for the record.

110

Why Sequence Methylotenera species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methylotenera species? Methylotenera species? electron micrograph Scanning electron micrograph of cells of Methylotenera mobilis strain JLW8 grown on methylamine. Photo: Dennis Kunkel, Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc. Metabolism of organic C1 compounds (compounds containing no carbon-carbon bonds) is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Methane has been recognized as one of the major C1 compounds in the environment and a major contributor to the greenhouse effect. While global emissions of other C1 compounds (methanol, methylated amines) have historically attracted less attention, recent models put their emissions on a scale similar to the scale of methane emissions. JGI plans to sequence three methylotrophs (degraders of C1 compounds) of the genus Methylotenera. Methylotrophic bacteria play a major role in maintaining the balance of C1

111

Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION  

SciTech Connect

Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

JOHN C WALKER

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens  

SciTech Connect

The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Plant Rosettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rosettes Rosettes Nature Bulletin No. 662 January 13, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLANT ROSETTES In winter our landscape is mostly leafless trees silhouetted against the sky, and the dead stalks of wildflowers, weeds and tall grasses -- with or without a blanket of snow. Some snows lie on the ground for only a few days. Others follow one after another and cover the ground with white for weeks at a time. Soon the eye begins to hunger for a glimpse of something green and growing. Then, in sunny spots where the snow has melted or where youngsters have cleared it away, there appear clusters of fresh green leaves pressed tight to the soil. Whether it is a dandelion in the lawn, a pansy in a flower border, or a thistle in a vacant lot, such a typical leaf cluster -- called a winter rosette -- is a ring of leaves around a short central stem. The leaves are narrow at the base, wider toward the tip, and spread flat on the ground with little or no overlap. This arrangement gives full exposure to sunlight and close contact with the warmer soil beneath. Such plants continue to grow, sometimes faster, sometimes slower, even under snow, throughout winter.

115

Patterns of plant invasions in China: Taxonomic, biogeographic, climatic approaches and anthropogenic effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mill. Amberboa moschata (L. ) DC. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.Ambrosia tri?da L. Anthemis arvensis L. Anthemis cotula L.moschata (L. ) DC. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. Conyza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assemblathon 2: evaluating de novo methods of genome assembly in three vertebrate species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly. Genome BiolJ: Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indianambitious multi-species genome sequencing projects such as

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Why sequence psychrotolerant Acidithiobacillus species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

techniques for such sites. Principal Investigators: Dopson, Mark Ume University Program: CSP 2010 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence psychrotolerant Acidithiobacillus species...

119

JGI - Why Sequence Polynucleobacter Species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Living and Endosymbiotic Polynucleobacter Species? The Polynucleobacter group (Betaproteobacteria, Burkholderiaceae) is of enormous environmental relevance in freshwater...

120

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

SciTech Connect

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Long-day plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-day plants Name: Ryan S Martin Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are long-day plants? Replies: Long-day plants are those that require a...

124

The effect of drought on four plant communities in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

Desert plant communities contain many perennial plant species that are well adapted to arid environments; therefore, one would intuitively believe that perennial desert species readily survive drought conditions. Abundant research on plant-soil-water relationships in North American deserts has shown that many species can maintain water uptake and growth when the soil-water potential is low. Little research, however, has focused on how prolonged drought conditions affect plant species in vegetation associations in desert ecosystems. A prolonged and widespread drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the Northern Mojave Desert, from 1987 through 1991. During this drought period vegetation characterization studies, initiated in 1990, by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG and G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both desert vegetation associations and desert plant species reacted to a prolonged drought. This paper presents the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States); Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Plant Databases Welcome to the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory's Gasification Plant Databases Within these...

126

Microsoft Word - Aquatic_Invasive_Mussels_Monitoring_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations - ST-3 Innovations - ST-3 Matt DeLong Contract Specialist for Technology Innovation Projects - NSSP-4 Proposed Action: Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Columbia River Basin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the expansion of ongoing research and monitoring efforts on the potential spread and impact of aquatic invasive mussels in the Columbia River Basin through BPA's Fiscal Year 2013 Technology Innovation Portfolio. Washington State University Vancouver would conduct the enhanced research and monitoring efforts with co-sponsorship from the U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research

127

Identification of Unknown Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. In a wet FGD system, circulating water must be periodically blown down and treated to remove solids and dissolved chemicals. Along with SO2, other substances in flue gas may dissolve in water, including selenium (Se). In addition to the common selenium species selenite and selenate, past research has identified selenium-containing species that...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

"Modern" Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Modern" Coal Plants "Modern" Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 331-A February 7, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation "MODERN" COAL PLANTS The Age of Cycads, when those strange tree-like plants predominated, began during the Triassic Period of the earth's geological history, reached its peak during the 60 million years of the Jurassic Period which followed, and ended during the first part of the Cretaceous Period that began about 95 million years ago. During the Jurassic, in addition to Cycades, there were also many species of ginkgos, and conifers which were the ancestors of our modern sequoias and pines. The ginkgo or "Maidenhair Tree", which we have imported from China and Japan, is the only one remaining of that tribe -- "a living fossil".

129

Abstract Invasive species, where successful, can devas-tate native communities. We studied the dynamics of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of ant communities in regenerating temperate conifer forests Jennifer D. Palladini a of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Tel.: +1 406 2434356; fax: +1 406 2434184. E-mail address: jennifer Formica lasiodes 4 (1) 17 (9) 10 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 (1) 0 Myrmica discontinua 6 (4) 33 (9) 4 (3) 0 1 (1) 0

Gordon, Deborah

130

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of 221 baseload power plant units currently in the planning stage. The list shows the plant owner, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, major equipment suppliers (steam generator, turbogenerator, and flue gas desulfurization system), partner, and date the plant is to be online. This data is a result of a survey by the journal of power plant owners.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. The trace element selenium is found in coal and can become concentrated in the wastewater from the FGD process. Some chemical forms, or species, of selenium are more resistant to removal by water treatment processes than others; thus, understanding the speciation of selenium is important to designing effective wastewater treatment systems. In additi...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

NETL: News Release - Environmentally Safe Control of Invasive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can block pipes that deliver water to power-plant cooling systems, shutting down electricity generation while the organisms are removed. Large colonies can also threaten water...

133

Why Sequence Three Acidovorax Species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Acidovorax Species? Three Acidovorax Species? Intimate interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes have influenced the course of organismal evolution and ecological distribution. While ubiquitous, there is generally little understanding of the physiological basis of such associations, particularly when they are nonpathogenic in nature (symbiotic). Earthworms of the family Lumbricidae harbor novel symbiotic betaproteobacteria within their nephridia (excretory organ). Few symbiotic betaprotebacteria have been reported, and no other beneficial bacteria are described that specifically colonize the excretory organs of animals. To better understand the physiological and evolutionary dimensions of this symbiosis, JGI will sequence the genome of the isolated Acidovorax symbiont, and the genomes of two additional species within the genus: the

134

Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Plant immune systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant immune systems Plant immune systems Name: stephanie Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Do plants have an immune system? How does it work? Are plants able to "fight off" infections such as Dutch Elm disease? Replies: In the broadest sense, an immune system is any method an organism has protect itself from succeeding to another organism's efforts to undermine its health and integrity. In this sense, yes, plants have immune systems. Plants do NOT have "active" immune systems, like humans, including macrophages, lymls, antibodies, complements, interferon, etc., which help us ward off infection. Rather, plants have "passive" mechanisms of protection. For instance, the waxy secretion of some plants (cuticle) functions to help hold in moisture and keep out microorganisms. Plants can also secrete irritating juices that prevent insects and animals from eating it. The thick bark of woody plants is another example of a defensive adaptation, that protects the more delicate tissues inside. The chemical secretions of some plants are downright poisonous to many organisms, which greatly enhance the chances of survival for the plant. Fruits of plants contain large amounts of vitamin C and bioflavonoids, compounds which have been shown in the lab to be anti-bacterial and antiviral. So in these ways, plants can improve their chances of survival. Hundreds of viruses and bacteria attack plants each year, and the cost to agriculture is enormous. I would venture to guess that once an organism establishes an infection in a plant, the plant will not be able to "fight" it. However, exposure to the sun's UV light may help control an infection, possibly even defeat it, but the plant does not have any inherent "active" way to fight the infection

136

Integrating complex ecological information to develop a management plan for Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum L. Roxb.) in south Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Managing pernicious invasive plant species is an essential component of maintaining biodiversity and restoring natural ecosystem structure and function. Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum L. Roxb.) (more)

McCormick, Cheryl Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Rapid ontogenetic niche expansions in invasive Chinese tallow tree permit establishment in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid ontogenetic niche expansions in invasive Chinese tallow tree permit establishment and poorly understood. Chinese tallow tree Triadica sebifera is a major invader demonstrating broad variation

Siemann, Evan

138

Chlorine and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine and Plants Name: Paul Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Is too Much chlorine going to kill or harm plants? I couldn't find information anywhere but I found...

139

Chlorine and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine and Plants Name: james Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am doing project on the effects of chlorine on plant growth and i cant find any info. If you could...

140

PLANT BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANT BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 University of Georgia Athens, GA 30602 Updated: 9/5/12 #12;Plant Biology Handbook Table of Contents General Information and Operating Procedures 1

Arnold, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Plants producing DHA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CSIRO researchers published results in November 2012 showing that the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can be produced in land plants in commercially valuable quantities. Plants producing DHA inform Magazine algae algal AOCS bi

142

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

143

Paste Plant Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... It now provides data extraction features that aggregate system ... DUBAL Carbon Plant management team defined and implemented a 3-year strategic ... how to best approach Paste Plant operating and maintenance activities.

144

Plants and Dirt Compaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dirt Compaction Name: Conor Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: When growing corn and soybean plants does the compaction of dirt effect the growth of the plant? Replies:...

145

Light Wavelength and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Wavelength and Plants Name: John Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I just was wandering whether plants grow better in artificial light or in sunlight. I am...

146

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Plant centromere compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

151

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process EngineeringOpen), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

155

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

156

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

157

Decisions decisions plant vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes concepts for a family of plant vessels that help users make decisions or reach goals. The concepts use plants to mark time or answer questions for the user, creating a connection between the user and the individual plant. These concepts ...

Jenny Liang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Plants on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Delicious Rank Advanced...

160

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Species Information System (SIS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Species Information System (SIS) Dataset Summary Description The Species Information System (SIS) consists of a web-enabled database (login required) and a public...

162

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

163

Exotic Species What's the Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are estimated to cost about $138 billion in environmental damage and losses each year. Non-native plants $100 million annually in damage to water pipes and filtration systems, and in control costs. · Brown-300 power outages/yr, numerous bites of children, etc. #12;What's the Problem? · Melaleuca tree --destroyed

Callender, Craig

164

vol. 179, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2012 Insects on Plants: Explaining the Paradox of Low Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species pools. Herbivore diversity increases as a power function of plant diversity, and the rate specialized herbivores or pathogens have density-dependent effects on plant growth and fitness, put- tingvol. 179, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2012 Insects on Plants: Explaining the Paradox of Low

165

Exploring similarities among many species distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. ... Keywords: HPC, parallel processing, species distribution modeling

Scott Simmerman; Jingyuan Wang; James Osborne; Kimberly Shook; Jian Huang; William Godsoe; Theodore Simons

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Yungang Wang 1 , Jiaoyan Huang 2,a , Philip K. Hopke 3,* , Oliver V. Rattigan 4 , David C....

168

Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage  

SciTech Connect

Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Crystals and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crystals and Plants Crystals and Plants Name: Diab Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What will the likely effects of crystallized filaments in plant cells be? I had noticed that moth balls (para dichlorbenzene) tends within a very short temperature range to transform from a solid to gas and back to solid in the form of crystal filaments. I been wondering about the likely effects of an experiment in which a plant is placed in a chamber saturated with the fumes of a substance that had the same transformation properties of its state but none of the toxic effects be on the plants and will such filaments form inside the cell and rearrange its DNA strands or kill it outright? Replies: The following might be helpful: http://biowww.clemson.edu/biolab/mitosis.html http://koning.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/Plant_Physiology/osmosis.html

171

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

High-throughput sequencing of cytosine methylation in plant DNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to that in flowering plants around repeat regions [15]. The green algae Chlorella sp. NC64A and Volvox carteri show very little methylation in non-CpG contexts in genes, and greatly reduced or absent non-CpG methylation at repetitive regions, with Volvox carteri... showing greatly reduced methylation in all contexts compared to other plant species [15]. Similarly, the distributions of methyla- tion in the green algae Chlamydomonas, while not wholly divergent from those in flowering plants [49], show much lower levels...

Hardcastle, Thomas J

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Name: Jack Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do plants have any other way of growing besides photosythesis? Plants do not use photosynthesis to grow!!! They use cellular respiration just like every other organism to process energy into work. Plants use oxygen just like we do. Photosynthesis is principally only a process to change sunlight into a chemical form for storage. Replies: Check out our archives for more information. www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Steve Sample Jack, Several kinds of flowering plants survive without the use of chlorophyll which is what makes plants green and able to produce sugar through photosynthesis. Dodder is a parasitic nongreen (without chlorophyll) plant that is commonly found growing on jewelweed and other plants in damp areas. Dodder twines around its host, (A host is an organism that has fallen victim to a parasite.), like a morning glory and attaches itself at certain points along the stem where it absorbs sugar and nutrients from the hosts sap.

175

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

176

Plant and Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicationshouseplantligh t.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach "Artificial" light comes from many kinds of bulbs that emit different wavelengths of light; Many plants...

177

Repurposing a Hydroelectric Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis project explores repurposing a hydroelectric plant along Richmond Virginia's Canal Walk. The building has been redesigned to create a community-oriented space programmed as (more)

Pritcher, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

& Immobilization Plant Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the current mixing, erosion, corrosion, instrumentation and monitoring challenges at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in Hanford. The "black cell" design concept and the use of...

179

Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Soil to plant transfer of 238 Th on a uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil to plant transfer of 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th on a uranium mining-impacted soil from species grown in soils from southeastern China contaminated with uranium mine tailings were analyzed The radioactive waste (e.g. tailings) produced by uranium mining activities contains a series of long

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

182

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Plants remember drought, adapt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research carried out at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL; USA) shows that plants subjected to a previous period of drought learn to deal with the stress owing to their memories of the experience. Plants remember drought, adapt Inform Magazine

185

Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among

186

Foliar response of ten tree species exposed to SO/sub 2/ air pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the relative susceptibility to SO/sub 2/ damage among 4 birch species - Scotch, Austrian, and eastern white pines, white ash, black cherry, and hybrid poplar - is reported. Controlled exposures were performed and the percentages of plants injured and the percentages of leaf areas damaged were recorded.

Biggs, A.R.; Davis, D.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

BNL | Plant Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sciences Plant Sciences The Plant Sciences group's goal is to understand the principles underlying carbon capture, conversion, and storage in living systems; and develop the capability to model, predict and optimize these processes in plants and microorganisms. Staff Members John Shanklin Jason Candreva Jilian Fan Hui Liu Qin Liu Edward Whittle Xiaohong Yu Dax Fu Jin Chai Chang-Jun Liu Yuanheng Cai Mingyue Gou Guoyin Kai Zhaoyang Wei Huijun Yang Kewei Zhang Xuebin Zhang Jörg Schwender Jordan Hay Inga Hebbelmann Hai Shi Zhijie Sun Changcheng Xu Chengshi Yan Zhiyang Zhai Plant Sciences Contact John Shanklin, (631)344-3414 In the News No stories available Funding Agencies DOE Basic Energy Sciences Bayer CropScience The Biosciences Department is part of the Environment and Life Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory

188

Granby Pumping Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Granby Pumping Plant Granby Pumping Plant Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Granby Pumping Plant-Windy Gap Transmission Line Rebuild Project Western owns and operates a 12-mile, 69-kV electric transmission line in Grand County, Colo., that originates at Windy Gap Substation and terminates at Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard. The proposed project would rebuild the single circuit line as a double circuit transmission line and add a second power transformer. One circuit would replace the existing 69-kV line; the other circuit would be a new 138-kV line. Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard would be expanded to accommodate the second line and power transformer. Windy Gap Substation would be modified to accommodate the second line.

189

Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of a New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many regions of the world, the extremes of winter cold are a major determinant of the geographic distribution of perennial plant species and of their successful cultivation. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant ...

Christopher Daly; Mark P. Widrlechner; Michael D. Halbleib; Joseph I. Smith; Wayne P. Gibson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Narrowing the estimates of species migration rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of species migration rates How fast can species migrate?estimate population growth rates for each population sinceon their data 1 show that the rate of population spread is

Blois, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Effects of nutrient loading and extreme rainfall events on coastal tallgrass prairies: invasion intensity, vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbivory on the ability of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) to invade coastal prairie to determine of extreme rainfall events. Keywords: biological invasions, carbon, Chinese tallow tree, climate change

Siemann, Evan

195

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist native  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist prairie vegetation and a seedling of either introduced Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) or native

Siemann, Evan

196

Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

McGee, Sasha Alanda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Experiences and challenges in deploying potentially invasive sensor systems for dynamic media applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a series of projects that explore a set of dynamic media applications built upon a potentially invasive sensor system - the Ubiquitous Media Portal, featuring high-resolution video and audio capture ...

Gong, Nan-Wei

198

A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

AVESTAR® - Smart Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Plant In the area of smart plant operations, AVESTAR's dynamic simulators enable researchers to analyze plant-wide performance over a wide range of operating scenarios, including plant startup (cold, warm, hot), shutdown, fuel switchovers, on-load cycling, high-load operations of 90-120% of rated capacity, and high frequency megawatt changes for automatic generation control. The dynamic simulators also let researchers analyze the plant's response to disturbances and malfunctions. The AVESTAR team is also using dynamic simulators to develop effective strategies for the operation and control of pre-combustion capture technology capable of removing at least 90% of the CO2 emissions. Achieving operational excellence can have significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. If deployment of new CO2 capture technologies is to be accelerated, power generators must be confident in ensuring efficient, flexible, reliable, environmentally-friendly, and profitable plant operations.

200

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

California Beach Health: Evaluation of Grunion as an Indicator Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible outcomes of desalination plants and ocean outletsabout possible impacts of desalination plants on grunion. An

Martin, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

203

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

204

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

205

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

206

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

207

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

208

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

209

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

210

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

211

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

212

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

213

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

214

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

215

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

216

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

217

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

218

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

219

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

220

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Major Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) The Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) was established in October 2000 to further the commercial-scale...

222

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

223

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

224

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

225

Artificial light and plant growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial light and plant growth Name: Lim Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What color of artificial light works the best in plant growth? Replies:...

226

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

227

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more …. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

228

prairie restoration planting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planting Planting The most common method of planting is to broadcast spread your seeds. This is usually done by hand, but you can also use a lawn-type spreader. After you have spread your seeds, rake the area over lightly. For seeds to germinate correctly they need to have good seed to soil contact, but you also don't want to bury the seeds too deeply. The general rule is to cover seeds to a depth no deeper than twice the seed's size. For example, if a seed is 4 mm in size, you would not want to bury it any deeper than 8 mm. The seeds commonly found in a prairie matrix are usually small enough, that raking over the spread seed to mix and cover them with a thin layer of soil, is adequate. If you are involving large numbers of people in the planting, a plastic cup

229

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

230

Fuel rod reprocessing plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plant for the reprocessing of fuel rods for a nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of rectangular compartments desirably arranged on a rectangular grid. Signal lines, power lines, pipes, conduits for instrumentation, and other communication lines leave a compartment just below its top edges. A vehicle access zone permits overhead and/or mobile cranes to remove covers from compartments. The number of compartments is at least 25% greater than the number of compartments used in the initial design and operation of the plant. Vacant compartments are available in which replacement apparatus can be constructed. At the time of the replacement of a unit, the piping and conduits are altered to utilize the substitute equipment in the formerly vacant compartment, and it is put on stream prior to dismantling old equipment from the previous compartment. Thus the downtime for the reprocessing plant for such a changeover is less than in a traditional reprocessing plant.

Szulinski, M.J.

1981-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Power Plant Closure Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that are planning to decommission an aged power plant face a host of issues that must be addressed and many tasks that must be properly executed in order to ensure a successful closure of the facility.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Plant Pathogen Resistance  

Crop plants are infected by numerous fungal and bacterial pathogens that reduce crop quality and yield. Common methods for addessing this problem include time consuming processes such as genetic engeneering, and possibly enviromentally risky ...

234

Proceedings of the SERI Biomass Program Principal Investigators' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program Reports; 23-25 June 1982, Washington, DC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) is concerned with how plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas is utilized. Processes are being developed in this program to make use of those aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as on their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Plant critical concept  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

How do plants grow?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do plants grow? How do plants grow? Name: Sally McCombs Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A 4th grade class at our school is doing plant research and would like to know if plants grow from the top up or from the bottom up? Thanks for your help! Replies: Plants grow from the top up (or from the bottom down, in the case of root growth). Right at the tip, more cells form by division, and just behind that is an area where cells get bigger). More amazing than all of this is where your question comes from. I went to 4th grade there!!! Amazing, Just after the school was built, I think, maybe around 1959 to about early 1960's. Then I moved on to St. Pete High School, then my parents got jobs in Alabama, where I did the last year of High School. Then onto college in New England, graduate school in California, a research job in England, and now finally as a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle. Brings back memories...

237

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NISTIR 6005 Plant Spatial Configuration Application Protocol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Part 12, Description method: The EXPRESS-I language reference manual; ... Decommission Plant ... Plant operating procedures; ...

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

240

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plant and Animal Immigrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Animal Immigrants and Animal Immigrants Nature Bulletin No. 43 December 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PLANT AND ANIMAL IMMIGRANTS When foreign plants and animals are brought to a new country they either become naturalized and thrive, or they cling to their old ways and die out. after they, too, find new freedoms because they leave their enemies, competitors, parasites, and some of their diseases behind them -- much as immigrant people do. The United States now supports about 300 times as many people as it did when Columbus discovered America. This is possible because the domesticated plants and animals that the early settlers brought with them give much higher yields of food and clothing than the Indians got from wild ones.

242

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

243

Plants making oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants making oxygen Plants making oxygen Name: Doug Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many plants are needed to make enough oxygen for one person for one hour? We are experimenting with Anacharis plants. Replies: The problem can be solved when broken down into smaller questions: 1. How much oxygen does a person need in an hour? 2. How much oxygen does a plant produce in an hour? 3. Based on the above, how many plants will provide the oxygen needs of the person for the hour? Here is the solution to the first question: A resting, healthy adult on an average, cool day breathes in about 53 liters of oxygen per hour. An average, resting, health adult breathes in about 500 mL of air per breath. This is called the normal tidal volume. Now, 150 mL of this air will go to non- functioning areas of the lung, called the "dead space." The average breath rate for this average person is 12 breaths per minute. So, the amount of air breathed in by the person which is available for use is 12 x (500 mL -150 mL) = 4,200 mL/minute. Multiply by 60 to get 252,000 mL/hour. That is, every hour, the person will breathe in 252 L of air. Now, on an average, cool, clear day, only 21% of that air is oxygen. So, 21% of 252 L is 53 L. So, in an hour, the person breathes in about 53 L of oxygen.

244

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

245

Pinellas Plant facts  

SciTech Connect

The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Troubleshooting power plant controls  

SciTech Connect

Using an example from an 80 MW cogeneration plant working at near capacity on a hot day, the paper illustrates the steps involved in troubleshooting a maintenance problem. It discusses identification of the problem, the planning involved in the identification of the problem, development of proof of an hypothesis, human factors, implementing effective solutions, and determination of the root cause.

Alley, S.D. [ANNA, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

249

Mechanisms in Plant Development  

SciTech Connect

This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Plantings that save energy  

SciTech Connect

In this 12th of a series on urban forestry, homeowners and community planners are offered practical guidance in selection of landscape plantings which will significantly reduce wind velocity and heat loss from homes in winter and reduce energy costs for air conditioning in summer.

Heisler, G.M.; DeWalle, D.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Connectance determines invasion success via trophic interactions in model food webs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

02881 USA 3 Harvard University, Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts 01366 USA 4 Department of Plant

Russell, Gareth

252

The Role of Temperature and Nutritional Status in Impingement of Clupeid Fish Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic impingement of high numbers of juvenile and adult clupeid fish species such as gizzard and threadfin shad, menhaden, and herring is a common occurrence, particularly during winter at many power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). In fact, annual impingement estimates are frequently dominated by the large numbers of clupeids associated with these episodes. Minimizing the number of fish impinged at CWIS is important for both environmental protection and operational reasons. This report p...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Abstract--Design aspects of a minimally invasive high-throughput automation system for radiation biodosimetry are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for radiation exposure. Only those showing both internal and external contamination were examined usingAbstract--Design aspects of a minimally invasive high- throughput automation system for radiation was supported by grant number U19 AI067773, the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation

254

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort...

255

Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear weapons in support of the NNSA stockpile stewardship program. Pantex also performs research and development in conventional high explosives and serves as an interim storage site for plutonium pits removed from dismantled weapons. Enforcement January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant November 21, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation, BWXT Pantex, LLC - EA-2006-04 Issued to BWXT Pantex, LLC, related to Quality Assurance and Safety Basis Requirements Violations at the Pantex Plant

256

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

258

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

259

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

262

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

T Plant Cell Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Project within Fluor Hanford performed an initial investigation of the current and historical contents of 221-T (T Plant Canyon) process cells. This Phase I report is intended to be followed by a final, more detailed, Phase II report. This information has been gathered in order to help reduce uncertainties and future surprises regarding cell contents during future work in and around T Plant process cells. The information was obtained from available documentation and was compiled into a database that is included in the report. Resolution of any apparently conflicting information was not a part of the Phase I effort. No information has been found to date that would indicate there could be a significant unexpected hazard in any of the process cells.

HLADEK, K.L.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Performance Summaries Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Performance Summaries Project Performance Summaries are written after project completion. These...

267

US prep plant census 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... new survey instrument to collect information from natural gas processing plants during non-emergency and supply-emergency conditions. ...

269

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Nature Bulletin No. 699 December 22, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor POINSETTIA -- THE CHRISTMAS PLANT Christmas is a day of family gatherings. In each home they have their own traditional customs. Some of us cherish those that are peculiar to the region where we were children, or the land from whence our forefathers came. Most of us have also adopted customs -- such as decorating with holly and mistletoe -- that stem from ancient pagan ceremonies or festivals but have lost their original significance. There are many myths and legends about the origin of our Yuletide customs. (See Bulletins No. 135, 173, 211, 326 and 475). In this country most families have a Christmas tree, a custom that was introduced from Germany by Hessian troops in the British army during the Revolutionary War. It prevails in Britain and most of northern Europe but is unusual in Italy, Spain and Latin America. There, the symbol of Christmas and heart of the celebration in a home is not an Evergreen tree but a miniature reproduction of the stable and manger where Christ was born.

273

Plants of the Bible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bible Bible Nature Bulletin No. 188-A April 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE BIBLE When Jesus suffered on the cross, we are told in the Gospel according to St. Matthew (27:48) that at the ninth hour he thirsted and a sponge, filled with vinegar and put upon a reed, was raised to His lips. It is so related in St. Mark (15:36) but according to St. John (19:29), "they filled a sponge with vinegar, and put it upon hyssop, and put it into his mouth. " What was hyssop. The plant is mentioned frequently in the Bible. The hyssop of our herb gardens is not native to Palestine, Syria or Egypt, but there is evidence that when Solomon "spoke of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall" (I Kings 4:23), he spoke of the herb we call marjoram. The hyssop dipped in the blood of a sacrificial lamb and used by the Israelites in Egypt to mark their doorways (Exodus 12:22), and the hyssop referred to by St. John but called a reed by St. Matthew and St. Mark, was probably sorghum, a tall cereal plant grown by the Jews for food and also used for brushes and brooms.

274

Delayed Planting Considerations for Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quite a bit of Indianas corn crop remains to be planted, especially in southern Indiana, due to the current rainy spell that put the brakes on what had been a very rapid planting pace. As of 11 May, 42 % of Indianas intended corn acreage was yet to be planted (USDA-NASS,

John Obermeyer; Entomology Dept; Tony Vyn; Agronomy Dept

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http:www.pantex.com Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in...

276

The Kansas City Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Kansas City Plant The Kansas City Plant The Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT...

277

Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Fish and Game

278

Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria for Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eolian dispersion of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments is an emerging global issue for which economical remediation alternatives are needed. Phytostabilization, the revegetation of these sites with native plants, is one such alternative. Revegetation often requires the addition of bulky amendments such as compost which greatly increases cost. We report the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) to enhance the revegetation of mine tailings and minimize the need for compost amendment. Twenty promising PGPB isolates were used as seed inoculants in a series of greenhouse studies to examine revegetation of an extremely acidic, high metal content tailings sample previously shown to require 15% compost amendment for normal plant growth. Several isolates significantly enhanced growth of two native species, quailbush and buffalo grass, in tailings. In this study, PGPB/compost outcomes were plant specific; for quailbush, PGPB were most effective in combination with 10% compost addition while for buffalo grass, PGPB enhanced growth in the complete absence of compost. Results indicate that selected PGPB can improve plant establishment and reduce the need for compost amendment. Further, PGPB activities necessary for aiding plant growth in mine tailings likely include tolerance to acidic pH and metals.

Grandlic, C.J.; Mendez, M.O.; Chorover, J.; Machado, B.; Maier, R.M.

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ground surface as snow- drift and the ice sheet during a growing phase, with a mixing ratio of the localGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

280

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart H. S. Soroff, MD and J. Rastegar The primary function of the ventricular chambers of the heart is to provide the proper volume, in the first part of the cardiac cycle, when the heart is relaxed, cardiac diastole, the device exerts

Webster III, Robert James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Monitoring the Development of Nurse Plant Species to Improve the Performances of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:289­295 Maremammani A, Bedini S, Matosevic I, Tomei PE, Giovannetti M (2003) Type of mycorrhizal associations in two

Thioulouse, Jean

282

Plant Species Distributions under Present Conditions and Forecasted for Warmer Climates in an Arid Mountain Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex environmental gradients in the White and Inyo Mountains in eastern California produce striking variations in vegetation assemblages over short distances. Vegetation composition is dominated by elevational gradients of temperature and ...

Christopher M. Van de Ven; S. B. Weiss; W. G. Ernst

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effects of prescribed burning on undesirable plant species and soil physical properties on tallgrass prairies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prescribed burning has been a common conservation practice on native prairie dating back to the days of pioneer settlement. Advantages include increased forage quality, reduction (more)

Ungerer, James L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

B plant mission analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report further develops the mission for B Plant originally defined in WHC-EP-0722, ``System Engineering Functions and Requirements for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First Issue.`` The B Plant mission analysis will be the basis for a functional analysis that breaks down the B Plant mission statement into the necessary activities to accomplish the mission. These activities are the product of the functional analysis and will then be used in subsequent steps of the systems engineering process, such as identifying requirements and allocating those requirements to B Plant functions. The information in this mission analysis and the functional and requirements analysis are a part of the B Plant technical baseline.

Lund, D.P.

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Aspergillus is not only one of the most important fungi for use in biotechnology it is also one of the most commonly found groups of fungi worldwide. This project seeks to sequence and annotate a series of additional Aspergillus species and Penicillium roqueforti to complement and strengthen the genomic data currently available for comparative studies. The data resulting from these species comparisonswill be of direct relevance to the DOE mission, particularly to howspecies have become adapted for utilization of specific carbon sources enabling efficientbiomass degradation. Principal Investigators: Ronald de Vries, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli

290

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

Jarvis, E. E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

292

Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

Not Available

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Plant Pathogen Resistance - Energy Innovation Portal  

Plant Pathogen Resistance Agent for Plant Protection from Common Virulent Pathogens Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ORNL About This Technology

296

Aquatic Nuisance Species: A multi-stage approach to understanding the invasion ecology of exotic crayfish in Northern and Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population (American River & Crystal Lake), along with a noRiver (Sacramento Co. , CA) and from the outflow of Crystal

Kats, Lee; Pintor, Lauren; Sih, Andrew; Kerby, Jake

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

A LUNAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A concept of a nuclear power plant to be assembled on earth and operated on the moon is presented. The two principal design objectives are reliability and high specific power. Wherever there is an incompatibility between these two objectives, the decision favors reliability. The design is based on the premise that the power plant must be designed on the basis of current technology and with a minimum amount of research and development. The principal components consist of a fast reactor in a direct cycle with a mercury-vapor turbine. The high- frequency generator, hydrogen compressor for the generator cooling system, mercury-recirculating pump, and condensate pump are on an extension of the turbine shaft. Ths mercury vapor is condensed and the hydrogen cooled in wing radiators. The reactor is of a construction quite similar to EBR-I Mark IlI for which there is a large amount of operating experience. The radiator is a vertical tube-and-fin type built in concentric cylindrical sections of increseing diameter. The curved headers are connected by swivel joints so that, upon arrival, the radiator can be quickly unfolded from the compact cylindrical package it formed during transportation. (auth)

Armstrong, R.H.; Carter, J.C.; Hummel, H.H.; Janicke, M.J.; Marchaterre, J.F.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Balance of Plant Corrosion Issues in Aging Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... number of times, can be used to forecast the most probable number of leaks. ... Conditions for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Sweden.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. In Global bio- diversity assessment, Section 6.complexity controls species diversity and nutrient effectsC. S. Thornber. 2006. Predator diversity strengthens trophic

Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The SONATRACH jumbo LPG plant  

SciTech Connect

The authors aim is to give to the 17 TH world gas conference a general idea on SONATRACH LPG PLANT which is located in the ARZEW area. They develop this communication as follows: general presentation of LPG plant: During the communication, the author's will give the assistance all the information concerning the contractions the erection's date and the LPG PLANT process, start-up of the plant: In this chapter, the authors's will describe the start-up condition, the performance test result, the flexibility test result and the total mechanical achievement of the plant; operation by SONATRACH: After the success that obtained during the mechanical achievement and performance test, the contractor handed over the plant to SONATRACH.

Ahmed Khodja, A.; Bennaceur, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

304

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

305

Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasive Early Detection & Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects Invasive Early Detection & Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens Lee Goldstein Boston University School of Medicine Abstract Purpose: The lens is a highly-ordered tissue with unique optical properties and exquisite radiosensitivity. The focus of this project is to evaluate radiation cataract dose response and mechanisms associated with low-linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays. We aim to investigate the natural history of Rayleigh light scattering changes in pre-cataractous lenses of mice exposed to radiations using a fully-validated, performance-tested quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) instrument developed by Dr. Goldstein and colleagues at Boston University. This innovative laser-based technology quantitatively assays pre-cataractous molecular pathology in the lenses of living mice

306

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

307

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

308

How plants grow toward light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How plants grow toward light How plants grow toward light Name: schwobtj Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: When a seed is planted below the surface of the ground, how does it "know" to grow toward the light? Replies: Plants don't know where the light is, they do respond to gravity. Since light is usually up, a plant seed grows up and finds light enough to keep things going. Psych One way that plants below ground can tell which way is up is with the use of STATOLITHS. Statoliths are dense pieces of material that settle to the bottom of a STATOCYST. In plants, pieces of starch or another material denser than water will settle to the bottom of the cell. Somehow the plant cell determines on what side the statolith has fallen, and then somehow relays a message (probably a chemical) that tells the bottom cells to grow faster than the top cells, therefore causing upward growth. There is still quite a lot of mystery in there to be discovered. I got this explanation from BIOLOGY by Neil Campbell. This is similar to the way in which plants use chemical signals to help them grow towards light.

309

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of Virtual Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virtual Power Plants We are working in the emerging intersection between information, computation, and complexity Applications * Design * Environmental modeling * Controls with...

311

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

312

MEASUREMENT OF POWER PLANT EXHAUST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by tracking propagation of acoustic plane waves in a ... of the robustness of plane wave propagation to ... for GHG monitoring in power plant stacks and ...

313

The northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants are important cultural resources to the state of Georgia and the communities immediately adjacent. If the early technology of these (more)

Kelly, Nancy Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

,"California Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

315

Plant energy auditing | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial...

316

ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk Reference Revision 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity October 18, 2011 DOENETL-20111516 Preliminary - Do Not Cite or Quote Fossil...

318

Asbury power plant, Asbury, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Asbury power plant in rural southwest Missouri is off the beaten path in more ways than one. Three years ago, Empire District Electric Co., the plant's owner/operator, began mixing pieces of discarded tires into its coal fuel supply. Each ensuing year, without compromising local air quality, the plant has rid the area of millions of tires that otherwise would have ended up in a landfill. For demonstrating that a blight can be made right, Asbury is one of Power's 2005 top plants. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Plant construction and community stress  

SciTech Connect

Reports on a study commissioned by EPRI's Energy Analysis and Environment Division to acquire a better understanding of the power plant construction process and the socioeconomic impacts it can bring about. Points out that because of a parallel study the NRC conducted involving nuclear plants, the EPRI study's emphasis was on coal-fired power plants, which represented 9 of the 12 case studies. Finds that the impacts on communities near the case study plants were considerably less than had been forecast. Emphasizes that improper socioeconomic assessment procedures and poor mitigation planning can contribute to costly construction delays and lower construction worker productivity.

Lihach, N.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MHD plant turn down considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Better Buildings, Better Plants Program Partners are demonstrating their commitment to energy savings by signing a voluntary pledge to reduce energy intensity by 25% over ten...

323

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 3 "Operator Company:" "PART 3. CONTACTS" "Section A: Contact information during an emergency (such as a hurricane):" "Processing Plant Operations Contact:",,,...

324

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......

325

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

During an Emergency. 12. Department of Energy Situation Reports During an Energy Emergency. 13. Why Survey Natural Gas Processing Plants? 14.

326

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' 1 . \." _ j. .I > * .A; .i ,' / / ,/ ' , ( , ( 1: 1 i I l-1 5 ' / ,,' :A' ' , THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT . and THE MARION ENGINEER DEPOT of Marion, Ohio A Profile AFTER FORTY YEARS BY Charles D. Mosher and Delpha Ruth Mosher . . . 111 THE AUTHORS Charles D. Mosher was born on a farm located in Morrow County on Mosher Road near Mt. Gilead. He received his TH.B. from Malone College, B.A. from Baldwin-Wallace College and his B.Div. and M.Div. at the Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. He did additional graduate work at Western Reserve University, Kent State University and Florida State University. He has taught in Cleveland and in Morrow County and has been an Occupational Work Adjustment teacher at Harding High School in Marion

328

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ATOMIC POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactor power plants and discloses a design of a reactor utilizing a mixture of discrete units of a fissionable material, such as uranium carbide, a neutron moderator material, such as graphite, to carry out the chain reaction. A liquid metal, such as bismuth, is used as the coolant and is placed in the reactor chamber with the fissionable and moderator material so that it is boiled by the heat of the reaction, the boiling liquid and vapors passing up through the interstices between the discrete units. The vapor and flue gases coming off the top of the chamber are passed through heat exchangers, to produce steam, for example, and thence through condensers, the condensed coolant being returned to the chamber by gravity and the non- condensible gases being carried off through a stack at the top of the structure.

Daniels, F.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two power plants operating on natural gas. The N ofindings in a natural fired power of gas plant consisting of

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recombinant stromelysin-1 (SL-1) on invasion and migration?2, ?6, or ?1 integrin subunits with (+ SL-1, black bars)or without (- SL-1, white bars) the addition of recombinant

Lochter, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fiebig, Anne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Power plants with topping gas turbines and coal gasification planning of new plants and upgrading of existing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on existing and new power plants improved environmentally and economically by integrating gas turbines in the plant process. The rate of additional firing has an influence on the overall plant efficiency. The influence of the additional firing of natural gas-fired power plants is compared to that of power plants with integrated coal gasification. The differences are explained. The result of the examination lead to recommendations for the design of new plants and for upgrading of existing plants. The advantages of topping gas turbines are shown by examples of new power plants and upgraded plants.

Schoedel, J.; Mertens, K. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

337

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion cycles. They are also useful benchmark systems for the comparison to current theoretical methods where they provide insight into the dynamics occurring beyond the Franck-Condon region. These systems are studied using velocity map ion imaging, a technique that measures velocity and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic and photolytic methods. The current work involves the measurement of fundamental physical constants of the XO species. The bond dissociation energy of IO is measured. Vibrational level dependent correlated final state branching ratios of the predissociation of the A(^2 II_3/2) state of ClO and BrO are reported, and comparison to theoretical methods is discussed.

Dooley, Kristin S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Monitoring, assessing and evaluating the pollinator species (Hymenoptera: apoidea) found on a native brush site, a revegetated site and an urban garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research presents the findings of a pollinator diversity study that took place at three study sites. Although variation in pollinator diversity occurred between the three sites, fewer pollinators than expected were recorded from the La Joya Tract (revegetated site). Numerous genera and species were recorded from the Havana Tract (native site) as well as the Valley Nature Center (urban garden). In contrast, the La Joya Tract had a comparatively depauperate pollinator fauna. The numbers of pollinator genera and species recorded from the three study sites were decreased in comparison to the total number of genera and species recorded from Hidalgo County. Hidalgo County has 35 known genera and 75 species of bees documented to date. About 40% of the genera and 23% of the species recorded from Hidalgo County were recorded from the Havana Tract in this study, while a mere 8.5% of the genera and 4% of the species were reported from the La Joya Tract and 34% of the genera and 16% of the species were reported from the Valley Nature Center. Although the vascular plant species identified from these study sites were diverse, the floral rewards they provided yielded an insight as to what was going on in terms of pollinator diversity. Plants may yield nectar or pollen floral rewards or both in some cases to pollinators. The current study provides evidence that revegetation of land with plants that primarily provide nectar rewards will result in fewer observed bee taxa than from land revegetated with plants that provide a mix of nectar and pollen floral rewards.

Cate, Carrie Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Managing Natural and Reintroduced Rare Plant Populations within a Large Government Reservation  

SciTech Connect

California is home to many large government reservations that have been in existence for decades. Many of these reservations were formed to support various Department of Defense and Department of Energy national defense activities. Often, only a very small percentage of the reservation is actively used for programmatic activities, resulting in large areas of intact habitat. In some cases, this has benefited rare plant populations, as surrounding lands have been developed for residential or industrial use. However, land management activities such as the suppression or active use of fire and other disturbance (such as fire trail grading) can also work to either the detriment or benefit of rare plant populations at these sites. A management regime that is beneficial to the rare plant populations of interest and is at best consistent with existing site programmatic activities, and at a minimum does not impact such activities, has the best potential for a positive outcome. As a result, some species may be 'difficult' while others may be 'easy' to manage in this context, depending on how closely the species biological requirements match the programmatic activities on the reservation. To illustrate, we compare and contrast two rare annual plant species found at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. Although several populations of Amsinckia grandiflora have been restored on the site, and all populations are intensively managed, this species continues to decline. In contrast, Blepharizonia plumosa appears to take advantage of the annual controlled burns conducted on the site, and is thriving.

Carlsen, T M; Paterson, L E; Alfaro, T M

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Uniform power plant identification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the seventies in the Federal Republic of Germany a uniform power plant identification system (Kraftwerks-Kennzeichen-System, KKS) was developed and introduced. It allows to keep the identification by all engineering disciplines from planning to waste management for any type of power plant. The paper explains the historical development, the structure and the application of this system.

Christiansen, W. (RWE Energie AG, Hauptverwaltung, Essen (DE)); Pannenbacker, K. (GABO mbH, Erlangen (DE)); Popp, H. (Siemens AG, Bereich Anlagentechnik, Erlangen (DE)); Seltmann, A. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hydrocarbons from plants and trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

Calvin, M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM TECHNICAL REPORT A-S3-1 AERIAL SURVEY TECHNIQUES TO MAP NUMBER rGOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. Technical Report A-83-l 4. TI T L E (""d Subtitle) 5. AERIAL SURVEY···..,." -.d Identity by block numb,,,) Aerial surveys Computer applications Aquatic plant control Mapping

US Army Corps of Engineers

347

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation provides information about the importance of information about natural gas processing plants, particularly during periods of natural gas supply disruption, such as hurricanes. It also provides information about a relatively new survey instrument to collect information from natural gas processing plants during non-emergency and supply-emergency conditions.

Information Center

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Plants and Night Oxygen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants and Night Oxygen Production Plants and Night Oxygen Production Name: Ashar Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I would like to know if there are any plants which produces oxygen at night (without photosynthesis). I was told by a friend that Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) produces oxygen even at night and I'm not convinced. I would like to get confirmation from experts. Replies: Some plants (particularly those of dry regions, e.g., deserts) only open their stomates at night to avoid drying out to intake CO2 (and output O2) (CAM photosynthesis) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulacean_acid_metabolism Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, PhD Missouri Botanical Garden Bringing oxygen producing plants into your home is a way to mimic the healthy lifestyle factors of longevity in humans from the longest lived cultures.

351

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

352

Amine plant troubleshooting and optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic method for troubleshooting and optimization of amine plants, if properly used, will result in fewer plant upsets, quick and correct responses to changing conditions and long-term profitable operations of any amine unit. It is important for amine plants to maintain safe, continuous and optimized operations for short- and long-term success. Effective and fast resolution of maine unit upsets plays a large part in this success. These considerations are as important in plants using generic amines such as monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and specialty amines based on MDEA. The key to troubleshooting and optimization is a systematic approach. Developing and using control charts can also be used to monitor amine plant operations. By using these techniques collectively, a formal method for troubleshooting and optimization can be established. This will ultimately result in a more trouble-free, continuous operation.

Abry, R.G.F. [Dow Chemical Co., Ft. Saskatchewan, Alberta (Canada); DuPart, M.S. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Aquatic plant control research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

355

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal or coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Test Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to conduct RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of Coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Lalit S. Shah; William K. Davis

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Utilization of emergent aquatic plants for biomass-energy-systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review was conducted of the available literature pertaining to the following aspects of emergent aquatic biomass: identification of prospective emergent plant species for management; evaluation of prospects for genetic manipulation; evaluation of biological and environmental tolerances; examination of current production technologies; determination of availability of seeds and/or other propagules, and projections for probable end-uses and products. Species identified as potential candidates for production in biomass systems include Arundo donax, Cyperus papyrus, Phragmites communis, Saccharum spontaneum, Spartina alterniflora, and Typha latifolia. If these species are to be viable candidates in biomass systems, a number of research areas must be further investigated. Points such as development of baseline yield data for managed systems, harvesting conceptualization, genetic (crop) improvement, and identification of secondary plant products require refinement. However, the potential pay-off for developing emergent aquatic systems will be significant if development is successful.

Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Scantland, D.A.; Groet, S.S.; Lawhon, W.T.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Bidding for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a 'Million Dollar Plant' Increase Welfare?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a Million Dollar Plantfor Industrial Plants: Does Winning a Million Dollar Plantfundamentally, this approach does not offer a framework for

Moretti, Enrico

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aquatic Species Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned AFOSR Workshop Washington, D.C. February 19-21, 2008 Sponsored by Air Force Office of Science Eric E. Jarvis, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center eric_jarvis@nrel.gov NREL/PR-510-43232 The ASP Didn't Invent the Concept of Fuels from Algae...  Algae for methane (via anaerobic digestion) * Meier (1955); UC Berkeley 1957-59 (Oswald and Golueke) * Wastewater use, recycling of CO 2 and nutrients  Revival during Energy Crisis of 1970's * Uziel et al. (1975); Benemann et al. (1976-80) * Still focused on methane and hydrogen * Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) * Later DOE (SERI founded in 1977) ...But the ASP Took the Concept to the Next Level  Supported work at SERI/NREL and through

362

endangered species | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

429 Throttled (bot load) 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234558 Varnish cache server endangered species Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting #2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today in Boise. Though the intent of the meeting was to focus on identifying permitting concerns, agencies and developers alike had few concerns with the current process. There were agency personnel in attendance who had not attended the first Idaho meeting, so the workshop was a great opportunity to work through the flowcharts relevant to those agencies. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

363

Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

366

Melvin Calvin: Fuels from Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A logical extension of his early work on the path of carbon during photosynthesis, Calvin's studies on the production of hydrocarbons by plants introduced many in the scientific and agricultural worlds to the potential of renewable fuel and chemical feedstocks. He and his co-workers identified numerous candidate compounds from plants found in tropical and temperate climates from around the world. His travels and lectures concerning the development of alternative fuel supplies inspired laboratories worldwide to take up the investigation of plant-derived energy sources as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Taylor, S.E.; Otvos, J.W.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

Plant Support Engineering: Elastomer Handbook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On a daily basis, engineers and maintenance personnel make judgments regarding the capabilities, degradation, and longevity of elastomeric material and its compatibility with other materials. Although most applications of elastomers in nuclear power plants are not unique to the industry, there is an extra emphasis in certain applications with regard to reliability, quality, and resistance to nuclear-plant-specific environments. Existing resources on elastomers are extensive, but they are not tailored to ...

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been using the green plants' stored energy in the form ofannually renewable energy resources using green plants. 7 the green plant to capture and store solar energy, is Brazil

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant December 31, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Pantex Plant, December 2013 Targeted Review of the Safety Significant Blast Door and Personnel Door Interlock Systems and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Pantex Plant June 6, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - May 2013 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Pantex Plant [HIAR PTX-2013-05-20] December 11, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Site Visit [HIAR PTX-2012-11-08] November 28, 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - July 2012

370

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

372

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

373

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

374

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A REVIEW OF NON-INVASIVE IMAGING METHODS AND APPLICATIONS IN CONTAMINANT HYDROGEOLOGY RESEARCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminant hydrogeological processes occurring in porous media are typically not amenable to direct observation. As a result, indirect measurements (e.g., contaminant breakthrough at a fixed location) are often used to infer processes occurring at different scales, locations, or times. To overcome this limitation, non-invasive imaging methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology research. The most common methods, and the subjects of this review, are optical imaging using UV or visible light, dual-energy gamma-radiation, X-ray microtomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Non-invasive imaging techniques have provided valuable insights into a variety of complex systems and processes, including porous media characterization, multiphase fluid distribution, fluid flow, solute transport and mixing, colloidal transport and deposition, and reactions. In this paper we review the theory underlying these methods, applications of these methods to contaminant hydrogeology research, and methods advantages and disadvantages. As expected, there is no perfect method or tool for non-invasive imaging. However, optical methods generally present the least expensive and easiest options for imaging fluid distribution, solute and fluid flow, colloid transport, and reactions in artificial two-dimensional (2D) porous media. Gamma radiation methods present the best opportunity for characterization of fluid distributions in 2D at the Darcy scale. X-ray methods present the highest resolution and flexibility for three-dimensional (3D) natural porous media characterization, and 3D characterization of fluid distributions in natural porous media. And MRI presents the best option for 3D characterization of fluid distribution, fluid flow, colloid transport, and reaction in artificial porous media. Obvious deficiencies ripe for method development are the ability to image transient processes such as fluid flow and colloid transport in natural porous media in three-dimensions, the ability to image many reactions of environmental interest in artificial and natural porous media, and the ability to image selected processes over a range of scales in artificial and natural porous media.

Werth, Charles J.; Zhang, Changyong; Brusseau, M. L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Baumann, T.

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: > PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. > Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. > Black Sea data were used for parameterization. > North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). > PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

Weijs, Liesbeth, E-mail: liesbeth.weijs@ua.ac.be [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Yang, Raymond S.H. [Quantitative and Computational Toxicology Group, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1680 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Das, Krishna [Laboratory for Oceanology-MARE Center, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

379

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program...

380

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

382

NETL: Emissions Characterization - TVA Cumberland Plant Plume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumberland Power Plant Plume Study Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Cumberland fossil plant (CUF) at Cumberland City, Tennessee will...

383

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

384

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review ARPT-WTP-2011-002...

385

Qing an Cogeneration Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qing an Cogeneration Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Qing'an Cogeneration Plant Place Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 152400 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass...

386

Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

387

Rare Plants of the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or applying herbicides to maintain rights-of-way can kill plants, and changes in adjacent land use can impact a population. Other threats include illegal harvesting of some...

388

Better Tools for Better Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Tools for Better Plants Better Tools for Better Plants Andre de Fontaine Bill Orthwein, CEM Advanced Manufacturing Office, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy November 15, 2011 2 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov Today * New opportunities - AMO Overview - Better Buildings, Better Plants Program - Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge * New and revised tool suite - Energy Management Toolkit - Updated system assessment tools - Tool-related training 3 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov Manufacturing Matters * 11% of U.S. GDP * 12 million U.S. jobs * 60% of U.S. engineering and science jobs % Manufacturing Job Growth or Loss 31.8% of all manufacturing jobs lost from 2000-2011 Jobs 31% of all 2010 U.S. total energy consumption

389

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mo Callaway Unit 1 1,190 8,996 100.0 Union Electric Co 1 Plant 1 Reactor Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

390

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ct Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3 2,103 16,750 100.0 Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

391

ALMR plant design and performance  

SciTech Connect

The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) plant, sponsored by the US Department of Energy and being developed by a General Electric Company lead industrial team, features simple and reliable safety systems, seismic isolation, passive decay heat removal, passive reactivity control, and substantial margins to structural and fuel damage limits during potential accident situations. These features will result in significant gains for public safety and protection of the owner's investment. Standardized modular construction and extensive factory fabrication will result in a plant design that is economically competitive. The reference commercial ALMR plant utilizes nine reactor modules arranged in three identical 480-MW(electric) power blocks for an overall plant net electrical rating of 1440 MW(electric). Each power block features three identical reactor modules, each with its own steam generator, that jointly supply power to a single turbine generator.

Kwant, W.; Boardman, C.E.; Dayal, Y.; Magee, P.M. (GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plants of the Coal Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Age Nature Bulletin No. 330-A February 1, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE COAL...

393

Materials Guidelines for Gasification Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report distills and condenses EPRI's knowledge of materials performance in numerous pilot and commercial-scale gasifiers into guidelines for the application and expected performance of materials in key parts of gasification-combined-cycle power plants.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optimal Scheduling of Cogeneration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cogeneration plant, feeding its output water into a district-heating grid, may include several types of energy producing units. The most important being the cogeneration unit, which produces both heat and electricity. Most plants also have a heat water storage. Finding the optimal production of both heat and electricity and the optimal use of the storage is a difficult optimization problem. This paper formulates a general approach for the mathematical modeling of a cogeneration plant. The model objective function is nonlinear, with nonlinear constraints. Internal plant temperatures, mass flows, storage losses, minimal up and down times and time depending start-up costs are considered. The unit commitment, i.e. the units on and off modes, is found with an algorithm based on Lagrangian relaxation. The dual search direction is given by the subgradient method and the step length by the Polyak rule II. The economic dispatch problem, i.e. the problem of determining the units production giv...

Erik Dotzauer; Kenneth Holmstrm

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A neighborhood alternative energy plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

Brooks, Douglas James

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Upgrading coal plant damper drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ar Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2 1,835 15,023 100.0 Entergy Arkansas Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of ...

398

Deoxygenation in Cycling Fossil Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimizing shutdown oxygen levels at a cycling fossil plant can reduce corrosion product transport to the boilers. In this study two forms of activated carbon were used to catalyze the oxygen/hydrazine reaction and minimize oxygen levels.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Balancing people, plants, and practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two of the biggest challenges facing the US power industry today are retaining an experienced, capable workforce and operating and maintaining a reliable, diversified fleet of generating plants. Success in the marketplace requires a proper balancing of staff and new technology, something few gencos do well. Following this introductory paper in this issue are several technical articles representing a small sample of the steps that gencos nationwide are taking to prolong plant life. Unlike the false promise of Ponce de Leon's fountain of youth in Florida, the promise of longer life for aging plants is real wherever experienced engineers and technicians are on the job. The article looks at problems across America, from the East Coast to the West Coast. It is supported by diagrams projecting US new capacity and plant type additions up to 2014. 5 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competing in an increasingly global industry, U.S. chemical facilities have intensified their efforts to improve energy utilization. Increases in energy efficiency can offset age, scale, or other disadvantages of a chemical plant when compared with its in

Betczynski, M. T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fiberglass plastics in power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

Pratt, L.H.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sedoheptulose in Photosynthesis by Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 SEDOHEPT[JLOSE IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BY PLANTS A. A. Benson,a v i t a l function during a photosynthesis. W h a wmonopho sphate i n e cl% 2 photosynthesis products o f a l l

Benson, A.A.; Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, M.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

Thomas, Andrew

405

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

Turbine power plant system  

SciTech Connect

A turbine power plant system consisting of three sub-systems; a gas turbine sub-system, an exhaust turbine sub-system, and a steam turbine sub-system. The three turbine sub-systems use one external fuel source which is used to drive the turbine of the gas turbine sub-system. Hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbines of the exhaust turbine sub-system and heat energy from the combustion chamber of the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbine of the steam turbine sub-system. Each sub-system has a generator. In the gas turbine sub-system, air flows through several compressors and a combustion chamber and drives the gas turbine. In the exhaust turbine sub-system, hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system flows into the second passageway arrangement of first and fourth heat exchangers and thus transfering the heat energy to the first passageway arrangement of the first and fourth heat exchangers which are connected to the inlets of first and second turbines, thus driving them. Each turbine has its own closed loop fluid cycle which consists of the turbine and three heat exchangers and which uses a fluid which boils at low temperatures. A cooler is connected to a corresponding compressor which forms another closed loop system and is used to cool the exhaust fluid from each of the two above mentioned turbines. In the steam turbine sub-system, hot fluid is used to drive the steam turbine and then it flows through a fluid duct, to a first compressor, the first fluid passageway arrangement of first and second heat exchangers, the second passageway of the first heat exchanger, the combustion chamber of the gas turbine where it receives heat energy, and then finally to the inlet of the steam turbine, all in one closed loop fluid cycle. A cooler is connected to the second passageway of the second heat exchanger in a closed loop fluid cycle, which is used to cool the turbine exhaust.

Papastavros, D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Validation that a 1-year fellowship in minimally invasive and bariatric surgery can eliminate the learning curve for laparoscopic gastric bypass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a six-week focused training program for minimally invasivesurgery fellowship training program in?uence operativeof a fellowship training program in minimally invasive and

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded to demonstrate the ability to affect and optimize mercury speciation and multi-pollutant control using non-intrusive advanced sensor and optimization technologies. The intent was to demonstrate plant-wide optimization systems on a large coal fired steam electric power plant in order to minimize emissions, including mercury (Hg), while maximizing efficiency and maintaining saleable byproducts. Advanced solutions utilizing state-of-the-art sensors and neural network-based optimization and control technologies were proposed to maximize the removal of mercury vapor from the boiler flue gas thereby resulting in lower uncontrolled releases of mercury into the atmosphere. Budget Period 1 (Phase I) - Included the installation of sensors, software system design and establishment of the as-found baseline operating metrics for pre-project and post-project data comparison. Budget Period 2 (Phase II) - Software was installed, data communications links from the sensors were verified, and modifications required to integrate the software system to the DCS were performed. Budget Period 3 (Phase III) - Included the validation and demonstration of all control systems and software, and the comparison of the optimized test results with the targets established for the project site. This report represents the final technical report for the project, covering the entire award period and representing the final results compared to project goals. NeuCo shouldered 61% of the total project cost; while DOE shouldered the remaining 39%. The DOE requires repayment of its investment. This repayment will result from commercial sales of the products developed under the project. NRG's Limestone power plant (formerly owned by Texas Genco) contributed the host site, human resources, and engineering support to ensure the project's success.

Rob James; Virgil Joffrion; John McDermott; Steve Piche

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Aquatic species project report: FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

Strand, Stuart E.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Emissions, Monitoring, and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), has teamed with Clean Air Engineering of Pittsburgh PA to conduct a mercury monitoring program at the WEFC Hugo plant in Oklahoma. Sponsored by US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-26-98FT40323, the program included the following members of the Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) as co-sponsors: Missouri Basin Power Project; DTE Energy; Entergy; Grand River Dam Authority; and Nebraska Public Power District. This research effort had five objectives: (1) determine the mass balance of mercury for subbituminous coal-fired power plant; (2) assess the distribution of mercury species in the flue gas (3) perform a comparison of three different Hg test methods; (4) investigate the long-term (six months) mercury variability at a subbituminous coal-fired power plant; and (5) assess operation and maintenance of the Method 324 and Horiba CEMS utilizing plant personnel.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Allen Kephart; Volker Schmidt; Gerald Butcher

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Vascular plants of waste storage sites in the 200 areas of the Hanford reservation  

SciTech Connect

A brief accounting of terrestrial, riparian and semi-aquatic plants known to be associated with radioactive waste storage sites in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Reservation is given. In most cases the species are characteristic of those which generally inhabit the reservation, but some plants are restricted to specialized habitats provided by particular waste storage sites. It is impractical to list all species growing at each waste storage site because of seasonal variation and changes brought about by environmental management practices. An alpbabetical listing has been prepared with an example of where each species is known to occur. The list will be updated as needed and expanded to include other waste storage areas. Plant specimens were collected during spring and fall when flowering material was available. Herbarium mounts were prepared of many specimens and have been retained as part of the Hanford Reservation herbarium collection. Identification to species level was made whenever possible. Color photographs of the specimen mounts are used as training aids and demonstration material by ARHCO Radiation Monitoring personnel. (auth)

Price, K.R.; Rickard, W.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Water Circuit of the Plants - Do Plants have Hearts ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a correspondence between the circulation of blood in all higher animals and the circulation of sap in all higher plants - up to heights h of 140 m - through the xylem and phloem vessels. Plants suck in water from the soil, osmotically through the roothair zone, and subsequently lift it osmotically again, and by capillary suction (via their buds, leaves, and fruits) into their crowns. In between happens a reverse osmosis - the endodermis jump - realized by two layers of subcellular mechanical pumps in the endodermis walls which are powered by ATP, or in addition by two analogous layers of such pumps in the exodermis. The thus established root pressure helps forcing the absorbed ground water upward, through the whole plant, and often out again, in the form of guttation, or exudation.

Wolfgang Kundt; Eva Gruber

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties  

SciTech Connect

Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite increasing knowledge about its enzymatic properties and the regulation of its expression, little is known about its function. We have generated transgenic animals that express an autoactivating mutant of rat SL1 targeted to the epithelial compartment of the mammary gland. Phenotypically, SL1 transgenic mice display increased branching morphogenesis and lactogenic differentiation at prepubertal stages and premature involution during late pregnancy. Branching morphogenesis requires the invasion of epithelial cells into the adipose tissue, a process reminiscent of invasion of stromal compartments by tumor cells. Strikingly, a large number of SL1 transgenic animals also develop mammary tumors of various histotypes, including invasive adenocarcinomas. Because tumor development is a late response of SL1 transgenic mice to overexpression of the transgene, it remains unclear whether SL1 plays a direct role in tumor growth and/or invasion or whether the observed tumors are a consequence of other molecular alterations in the microenvironment of the mammary gland before the onset of tumor growth. Studies performed with synthetic inhibitors of MMP activity and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) have shown that suppression of MMP activity also suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. In many cases, the level of SL1 expression in tumors of the mammary gland and other tissues is positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. However, the only direct evidence for the nature of the MMPs involved was provided by the demonstration that function-blocking antibodies against gelatinase A and antisense inhibition of matrilysin expression decreased the invasiveness of tumor cells in a reconstituted basement membrane assay. These studies encouraged us to investigate whether SL1 plays a direct role in invasion of ECM. We used two carcinoma cell lines, TCL1 and SCg6 that formed rapidly growing, invasive tumors in vivo and migrated through Matrigel and collagen gels in culture. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against SL1 inhibited Matrigel invasion by TCL1 and SCg

Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pilot plant environmental conditions (OPDD Appendix C)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is Appendix C to the Pilot Plant Overall Plant design description document for the 10-MW pilot central receiver plant to be located at Barstow, California. The environmental design criteria to be used for plant design day performance, operational limits, and survival environmental limits are specified. Data are presented on insolation, wind, temperature, and other meteorological conditions. (WHK)

Randall, C.M.; Whitson, M.E.; Coggi, J.V.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

427

ENERGY STAR plant certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» ENERGY STAR plant certification » ENERGY STAR plant certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award

428

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

429

Juice Processing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Juice Processing Plant EPI Juice Processing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

430

Automobile Assembly Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automobile Assembly Plant EPI Automobile Assembly Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

431

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Plant Level Energy Performance Benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 1990's, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked with U.S. corporations to reduce their energy requirements in buildings and office space through voluntary programs such as ENERGY STAR. Corporate partners within ENERGY STAR have enjoyed success by applying the principles fundamental to this program. However, a common view was held that ENERGY STAR did not fully address energy use and performance of manufacturing plants. While there are many partners primarily working in manufacturing industries within ENERGY STAR, the program to date has focused primarily on the energy use and performance of commercial buildings rather than manufacturing plants. In the upcoming year, the EPA is poised to deliver new program components to facilitate broader corporate participation in ENERGY STAR. The business-oriented approach for building owners central to ENERGY STAR will be expanded to accommodate the energy use of manufacturing businesses. With introduction of the enhanced industrial manufacturing offering, ENERGY STAR will have a complete group of tools that will appeal to all corporate partners. Through understanding of their performance relative to their peers, EPA hopes to make available to the public tools to assess the performance of their plants relative to their peers. The objective of these tools is to provide plant managers and corporate executives with actionable information that can make their plants more competitive, more profitable, and more environmentally benign.

Hicks, T. W.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Plant Genomics Vol 3.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Populus Populus Genome Initiative Stephen DiFazio Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26508-6057 USA Email: spdifazio@mail.wvu.edu 8 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background on Populus Biology The genus Populus consists of about 29 species organized into six major sections that occur primarily in the Northern Hemisphere (Eckenwalder 1996). Species from the different sections of the genus have diverse ecological characteristics. Two of the most economically important sections (Aigeiros and Tacamahaca) contain species collectively known as cottonwoods. These occur mostly in riparian zones and are characterized by primarily ruderal life history, dominating early successional stages and thriving on flood-mediated disturbance (Braatne et al. 1996; Karrenberg et al. 2002). The other major section of the genus (section Populus,

436

Linking fisheries management and conservation in bioengineering species: the case of South American mussels (Mytilidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the cultured in Venezuela. Farmed invasive bivalvefor exploitation (Venezuela). Extraction from natural banksin the Gulf of Paria (Venezuela) in 1993, causing large

Carranza, Alvar; Defeo, Omar; Beck, Mike; Castilla, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

438

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Systems Annual Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Progress Report Presented by Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort of municipal utilities in Iowa, Minnesota, and the Dakotas for development of 200 (now 268) MW of compressed air energy storage (CAES) and 75 MW of wind capacity. THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is the ISEP Agency? The ISEP Agency is an intergovernmental entity formed under Iowa law in 2005 and governed by a board of directors composed of representatives of participating local governments. Board of Directors: * Dennis Fannin, Osage * John Bilsten, Algona * Sheila Boeckman, Waverly * Scott Tonderum, Graettinger * Niel Ruddy, Carlisle

439

Why sequence Dothideomycetes plant pathogens?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dothideomycetes plant pathogens? Dothideomycetes plant pathogens? The largest and most diverse group of fungi, Dothideomycetes are found on every continent and play key roles in maintaining the local ecosystems by degrading biomass and contributing to regulating the carbon cycle. Many of these fungi are also tolerant of environmental extremes such as heat, humidity and cold. Among the members of this group are pathogens that infect nearly every major crop used for food, fiber or fuel. As crop rotations are being reduced, fewer crops are being grown on larger acreages, making them more susceptible to severe crop losses due to disease. Understanding the plant pathogens of these crops could reduce fertilizer use, which could in turn help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To better understand the members of this group, the project calls for

440

NETL: Innovations for Existing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for Existing Plants Innovations for Existing Plants Coal and Power Systems Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Previous Next Chemical Looping Summary Chemical Looping Summary (July 2013) This summary provides a technical description of this advanced technology, describes its advantages, examines the R&D areas of need, and summarizes DOE's R&D efforts. DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (June 2013) This comprehensive handbook provides an update on DOE/NETL R&D efforts on advanced CO2 capture technologies for coal-based power systems. CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations (July 2013) This meeting highlighted DOE/NETL RD&D efforts to develop advanced pre-, post-, and oxy-combustion CO2 capture technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Power plant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power plant Power plant Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Date Released January 26th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated June 07th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords eGrid eGRID2007 EIA Electricity emissions epa Power plant Data application/zip icon eGRID2007_Version1-1.zip (zip, 18.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

442

Performance of nuclear plant RTDs  

SciTech Connect

Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are used for safety-related measurements in nuclear power plants and must therefore be accurate and respond to temperature changes in a timely fashion. Experience has shown that RTD calibration shift and response-time degradation can occur with aging. Therefore, periodic testing is performed to ensure that acceptable performance limits are not exceeded. A new method called the loop current step response (LCSR) test is used for periodic response-time testing of nuclear plant RTDs. This method permits testing the RTD as installed in an operating plant (in situ testing). The LCSR test is based on heating the RTD sensing element with a small electric current applied remotely through the sensor lead wires.

Hashemian, H.M.; Petersen, K.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences Joshua Paul Baker, Old Dale Wallace, Centerville Master of Science Reginald Jason Millwood, Plant Sciences Kara Lee Warwick, Plant Sciences Undergraduate Degrees, Summer Term 2011 Henry Joseph Cope, III, Plant Sciences David

Tennessee, University of

445

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Role of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip) IV Transcription Factors in Plant Development and Plant Protection from Deleterious Environmental Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Homeobox genes comprise an important group of genes that are responsible for regulation of developmental processes. These genes determine cell differentiation and cell fate in all eukaryotic organisms, starting from the early stages of embryo development. Homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors are unique to the plant kingdom. Members of the HD-Zip IV subfamily have a complex domain topology and can bind several cis-elements with overlapping sequences. Many of the reported HD-Zip IV genes were shown to be specifically or preferentially expressed in plant epidermal or sub-epidermal cells. HD-Zip IV TFs were found to be associated with differentiation and maintenance of outer cell layers, and regulation of lipid biosynthesis and transport. Insights about the role of these proteins in plant cuticle formation, and hence their possible involvement in plant protection from pathogens and abiotic stresses has just started to emerge. These roles make HD-Zip IV proteins an attractive tool for genetic engineering of crop plants. To this end, there is a need for in-depth studies to further clarify the function of each HD-Zip IV subfamily member in commercially important plant species.

William Chew; Maria Hrmova; Sergiy Lopato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Environmental quandary shuts Mohave plants  

SciTech Connect

The 1,580 MW coal-fired Mohave Generating Station in Laughlin, NV was closed on 31 December 2005 and is expected to be closed for four years whilst the owners Southern California Edison sort out battles over the plant's pollutant emissions and negotiate with two native tribes over rights to the water needed to deliver fuel to Mohave as a slurry. The plant was forced to close because it was unable to comply with a 1999 court order to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

T Plant overpack tiedown analysis  

SciTech Connect

This tiedown evaluation meets the requirement imposed by HNF-6550, Safety Evaluation for Packaging (Onsite) T Plant Canyon Items, (O'Brien 2000). O'Brien (2000) requires that any items prepared for shipment from T Plant to the burial grounds that are not bounded by the analysis in O'Brien (2000) must have a separate, approved, engineered tiedown analysis. The width of the overpack box is 9 ft. 7 in. This width is wider than the maximum width authorized in O'Brien (2000), which is 8 ft.

Riley, D.L.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM A Global Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standardized linear contrasts to show that this positive relationship persists when all bird species for which distribution maps published in standard ornithological handbooks (e.g., Cramp, 1977­1994; Marchant and Higgins standardized, may be entered into conventional statistical analyses. Standardization of contrasts is dependent

Reynolds, John D.

450

In Silico Modeling of Geobacter Species.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project employed a combination of in silico modeling and physiological studies to begin the construction of models that could predict the activity of Geobacter species under different environmental conditions. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of the first genome-based models of organisms known environmental relevance. This included the modeling of two Geobacter species and two species of Pelobacter. Construction of these models required increased sophistication in the annotation of the original draft genomes as well as collection of physiological data on growth yields, cell composition, and metabolic reactions. Biochemical studies were conducted to determine whether proposed enzymatic reactions were in fact expressed. During this process we developed an Automodel Pipeline process to accelerate future model development of other environmentally relevant organisms by using bioinformatics techniques to leverage predicted protein sequences and the Genomatica database containing a collection of well-curated metabolic models. The Automodel Pipeline was also used for iterative updating of the primary Geobacter model of G. sulfurreducens to expand metabolic functions or to add alternative pathways. Although each iteration of the model does not lead to another publication, it is an invaluable resource for hypothesis development and evaluation of experimental data. In order to develop a more accurate G. sulfurreducens model, a series of physiological studies that could be analyzed in the context of the model were carried out. For example, previous field trials of in situ uranium bioremediation demonstrated that Geobacter species face an excess of electron donor and a limitation of electron acceptor near the point of acetate injection into the groundwater. Therefore, a model-based analysis of electron acceptor limitation physiology was conducted and model predictions were compared with growth observed in chemostats. Iterative studies resulted in the model accurately predicting acetate oxidation and electron acceptor reduction. The model also predicted that G. sulfurreducens must release hydrogen under electron-accepting conditions in order to maintain charge and electron balance. This prediction was borne out by subsequent hydrogen measurements. Furthermore, changes in gene expression were consistent with model predictions of flux changes around central metabolism. The model revealed multiple redundant pathways in central metabolism suggesting an apparent versatility unusual in microbial metabolism. The computational analysis led to the identification of 32 reactions that participated in eight sets of redundant pathways. The computational results guided the design of strains with mutations in key reactions to elucidate the role of the alternate pathways and obtain information on their physiological function. A total of seven strains with mutations in genes encoding five metabolic reactions were constructed and their phenotypes analyzed in 12 different environments. This analysis revealed several interesting insights on the role of the apparent redundant pathways. 13C labeling approaches were developed for further elucidation of metabolic pathways with model-driven interpretation. For example, the model was used to calculate the optimal acetate 13C labeling ratio for distinguishing flux through various pathways based on amino acid isotopomer distributions. With this method it was possible to elucidate the pathways for amino acid biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the labeling pattern of isoleucine deviated significantly from what was predicted by the metabolic reconstruction. Detailed analysis of the labeling patterns with the model led to the discovery that there are two pathways for leucine biosynthesis, including a novel citramalate pathway that was subsequently confirmed with biochemical analysis. In summary, the combined computational and experimental studies have been instrumental in further characterizing the central metabolism of members of the Geobacteraceae. Furthermore, the methods developed in these

Lovley, Derek, R.

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Giralang, AU)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Kaleen, AU)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Factors Affecting the Feasibility of a Warsaw Pact Invasion of Western Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War and the opening of selected archives in both Eastern and Western Europe provides scholars the opportunity to study this period with greater accuracy and detail than was previously possible. This study seeks to determine the feasibility of a Warsaw Pact invasion of Western Europe in 1987 through the examination of the factors that would have affected such an operation. After each of these factors have been analyzed then conclusions will be drawn about the probable course and termination of such a conflict in Central Europe. The argument will be made that NATO would have been able to hold onto most of West Germany in the event of such an attack.

Williamson, Corbin

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

455

Oligohaline benthic invertebrate communities at two Chesapeake Bay power plants  

SciTech Connect

Benthic invertebrate populations at the Surry Power Plant on James River, Virginia and the C.P. Crane Power Plant on Saltpeter Creek, Maryland exhibited large spatial and temporal variations. At C.P. Crane, where the cooling water is pumped between two tidal creeks, populations in the receiving creek exhibited five response patterns: 1) mitigation of a winter die off (Rangia cuneata, a brackish water clam), 2) acceleration of growth or development (R. cuneata; Scolecolepides viridis, a polychaete; Leptocheirus plumulosus, an amphipod; Tubificidae; and Coelotanypus sp., a dipteran), 3) importation of larvae from the source water creek (S. viridis and Coelotanypus sp.), 4) extension of creek-dwelling species into the adjacent river (Coelotanypus sp. and other dipterans), and 5) increased severity of late summer population depression (S. viridis and L. plumulosus). At Surry, where the cooling water is taken from the downriver side of a peninsula and discharged on the upriver side, there was no confined creek system at the discharge, and effects were less pronounced. No major ecological damage was attributed to either power plant, due in part to the resilience of estuarine endemic populations, but the unique features exhibited by each of the two sites support the argument that oligohaline estuarine zones should not be designated a priori for unregulated industrial development. 39 references, 20 figures, 9 tables.

Jordan, R.A.; Sutton, C.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compiles data on power plant operations and characteristicscharacteristics (e.g. power plant unit, state, grid controlBaseCase contains hourly power-plant unit-level information

Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

2012 STRATEGY 2012 PHYSICAL PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Install wet-bulb control on cooling towers Event Feb Ops. Supt. 8 Identify and repair steam leaks cooling towers to increase efficiency New economizer #3 boiler Upgraded plant light fixtures 2012 STRATEGY cooling towers off-line all month. (Dec) WSE online combined 907hrs (760,642 tons = 41.57% of the load

Rock, Chris

458

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Positive Program Attributes ............................................................... 4 2.2 Weaknesses and Items Requiring Attention ..................................... 5 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................ 9 4.0 RATING .................................................................................................... 10

459

Shell structures for biogas plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shell structures designed for biogas plants of the fixed-dome type by the Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association are described. Biogas digesters of the design described have been successfully tested in Rwanda and India without structural or contractural problems.

Sasse, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Pantex Plant meteorological monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

The current meteorological monitoring program of the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas, is described in detail. Instrumentation, meteorological data collection and management, and program management are reviewed. In addition, primary contacts are noted for instrumentation, calibration, data processing, and alternative databases. The quality assurance steps implemented during each portion of the meteorological monitoring program are also indicated.

Snyder, S.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Gatewaycompatible vectors for highthroughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gateway-compatible Gateway-compatible vectors for high-throughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species David G.J. Mann 1,5,†* , Peter R. LaFayette 2,3,5 , Laura L. Abercrombie 1,5 , Zachary R. King 3,5 , Mitra Mazarei 1,5 , Mathew C. Halter 1 , Charleson R. Poovaiah 1,5 , Holly Baxter 1,5 , Hui Shen 4,5 , Richard A. Dixon 4,5 , Wayne A. Parrott 2,3,5 and C. Neal Stewart Jr 1,5 1 Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA 2 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA 3 Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics & Genomics, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA 4 Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, USA 5 The BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA Received 31 May 2011; revised 12 June 2011; accepted 10 August 2011.

463

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fuzzy inference systems for efficient non-invasive on-line two-phase flow regime identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of two-phase flow regimes that occur in heated pipes is of paramount importance for monitoring nuclear installations such as boiling water reactors. A Sugeno-type fuzzy inference system is put forward for non-invasive, on-line flow ...

Tatiana Tambouratzis; Imre Pzsit

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

NMR relaxometry as a potential non-invasive routine sensor for1 characterization of phenotype in Crassostrea gigas2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NMR relaxometry as a potential non-invasive routine sensor for1 characterization of phenotype parameters that can be used to monitor the physiological state of oysters. NMR measurements18 were carried cavity volume and dry flesh weight and to determine sex and gonad21 development. The NMR results showed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

466

Design and simulation of a plant control system for a GCFR demonstration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plant control system is being designed for a 300 MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. Plant models and simulations are being developed to generate information necessary to further define control system requirements for subsequent plant design iterations.

Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Measuring wind plant capacity value  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility planners and wind energy researchers pose a common question: What is the capacity value of a wind plant? Tentative answers, which can be phrased in a variety of ways, are based on widely varying definitions and methods of calculation. From the utility`s point of view, a resource that has no capacity value also has a reduced economic value. Utility planners must be able to quantify the capacity value of a wind plant so that investment in conventional generating capacity can be potentially offset by the capacity value of the wind plant. Utility operations personnel must schedule its conventional resources to ensure adequate generation to meet load. Given a choice between two resources, one that can be counted on and the other that can`t, the utility will avoid the risky resource. This choice will be reflected in the price that the utility will pay for the capacity: higher capacity credits result in higher payments. This issue is therefore also important to the other side of the power purchase transaction -- the wind plant developer. Both the utility and the developer must accurately assess the capacity value of wind. This article summarizes and evaluates some common methods of evaluating capacity credit. During the new era of utility deregulation in the United States, it is clear that many changes will occur in both utility planning and operations. However, it is my judgement that the evaluation of capacity credit for wind plants will continue to play an important part in renewable energy development in the future.

Milligan, M.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ecology, 84(6), 2003, pp. 14891505 2003 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings of the invasive alien tree, Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) and an ecologically similar words: biological invasions; Celtis laevigata; Chinese tallow tree; Enemies Hypothesis; herbivory; plant that are already underway. Focal species The alien Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb., Euphorbiaceae

Siemann, Evan

469

Audit of Mound Plant`s reduction in force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective of this audit was to determine whether the Mound Plant`s Fiscal Year 1992 reduction in force (RIF) was effectively managed and implemented properly by DOE. DOE established policy to encourage contractors to reduce staffing by voluntary separations without unreasonable separation costs. EG&G Mound`s FY 1992 RIF was accomplished by voluntary separations; however, its implementation unreasonably increased costs because DOE did not have adequate criteria or guidelines for evaluating contractors` RIF proposals, and because EG&G Mound furnished inaccurate cost data to DOE evaluators. The unreasonable costs amounted to at least $21 million. Recommendations are made that DOE develop and implement guidelines to impose limitations on voluntary separation allowances, early retirement incentive payments, and inclusion of crucial employee classifications in voluntary RIFs.

Not Available

1993-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

470

Striving Toward Energy Sustainability: How Plants Will Play a Role in Our Future (453rd Brookhaven Lecture)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Edible biomass includes sugars from sugar cane or sugar beets, starches from corn kernels or other grains, and vegetable oils. The fibrous, woody and generally inedible portions of plants contain cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, three key cell-wall components that make up roughly 70 percent of total plant biomass. At present, starch can readily be degraded from corn grain into glucose sugar, which is then fermented into ethanol, and an acre of corn can yield roughly 400 gallons of ethanol. In tapping into the food supply to solve the energy crisis, however, corn and other crops have become more expensive as food. One solution lies in breaking down other structural tissues of plants, including the stalks and leaves of corn, grasses and trees. However, the complex carbohydrates in cellulose-containing biomass are more difficult to break down and convert to ethanol. So researchers are trying to engineer plants having optimal sugars for maximizing fuel yield. This is a challenge because only a handful of enzymes associated with the more than 1,000 genes responsible for cell-wall synthesis have had their roles in controlling plant metabolism defined. As Richard Ferrieri, Ph.D., a leader of a biofuel research initiative within the Medical Department, will discuss during the 453rd Brookhaven Lecture, he and his colleagues use short-lived radioisotopes, positron emission tomography and biomarkers that they have developed to perform non-invasive, real time imaging of whole plants. He will explain how the resulting metabolic flux analysis gives insight into engineering plant metabolism further.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Ph.D., Medical Department)

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Multimedia Mercury Fate at Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped With SCR and Wet FGD Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the current regulatory climate in the United States, a number of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems will be installed at new and existing coal-fired power plants to remove nitrogen oxide (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mercury. The multimedia fate of trace metal species, especially mercury, in SCR/wet FGD systems is not well understood. Understanding and quantifying the amount of mercury removed from the flue gas and distributed to the solid and aqueous ...

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Title Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6097E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wang, Yungang, Jiaoyan Huang, Philip K. Hopke, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, Mark J. Utell, and Thomas M. Holsen Journal Chemosphere Volume 92 Issue 4 Pagination 360-367 Date Published 07/2013 Abstract In the spring of 2008, a 260MWe coal-fired power plant (CFPP) located in Rochester, New York was closed over a 4 month period. Using a 2-years data record, the impacts of the shutdown of the CFPP on nearby ambient concentrations of three Hg species were quantified. The arithmetic average ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate mercury (PBM) during December 2007-November 2009 were 1.6ng/m3, 5.1pg/m3, and 8.9pg/m3, respectively. The median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM significantly decreased by 12%, 73%, and 50% after the CFPP closed (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v4.1) identified six factors including O3-rich, traffic, gas phase oxidation, wood combustion, nucleation, and CFPP. When the CFPP was closed, median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM apportioned to the CFPP factor significantly decreased by 25%, 74%, and 67%, respectively, compared to those measured when the CFPP was still in operation (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis showed the greatest reduction in all three Hg species was associated with northwesterly winds pointing toward the CFPP. These changes were clearly attributable to the closure of the CFPP.

473

Methodology and application of surrogate plant PRA analysis to the Rancho Seco Power Plant: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the development and the first application of generic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) information for identifying systems and components important to public risk at nuclear power plants lacking plant-specific PRAs. A methodology is presented for using the results of PRAs for similar (surrogate) plants, along with plant-specific information about the plant of interest and the surrogate plants, to infer important failure modes for systems of the plant of interest. This methodology, and the rationale on which it is based, is presented in the context of its application to the Rancho Seco plant. The Rancho Seco plant has been analyzed using PRA information from two surrogate plants. This analysis has been used to guide development of considerable plant-specific information about Rancho Seco systems and components important to minimizing public risk, which is also presented herein.

Gore, B.F.; Huenefeld, J.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

475

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

476

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

477

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

478

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

479

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

480

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive plant species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481
<